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Quilters Find a way to care

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Subject: Quilt History website From: Kris Driessen <

Well, the answer to this is right on the Quilt History website! There is both a bibliography and a link to purchase quilt history books as well as a TON of articles on a variety of subjects. This is the website YOU ALL contribute to with your paid dues, please take advantage of it! http://www.quilthistory.com

Kris

--- JLHfwaol.com wrote:

> Good afternoon, > Can anyone direct me to a site that has a complete list of > the State > Quilt Study Project Books? Please answer me off list at JLHfw > aol.com. > Thanks, Janet >

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Subject: re: Shelburne Museum From: Sandi or Mike Hardy <shardytogether.net>

I have their book of the quilt exhibit for the last two years, "The Art of the Needle" and some other info about their quilts. Let me know which quilt you are interested in and I can send you what I find in the books. If I don't have any I'll see what I can find out. Last year I was a volunteer quilting demonstrator in the exhibit but other than that I am not affiliated with the museum. I don't know why they would not have answered your questions other than they are probably understaffed.

Sandi in Vermont

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Subject: Speakers for lectures and/or classes From: Barbara Burnham

QHL, I am writing today on behalf of The Baltimore Appliqué Society (BAS). Our new and enthusiastic Programs Chairperson is seeking future speakers for lectures and/or classes. QHL seems an appropriate group to query, as BAS (not a typical quilt group) "supports the preservation of quilts, textiles, and related documents in museum and historical society collections" and "promotes the art of appliqué and quilting". BAS members include collectors and historians, as well as quiltmakers. For more info on BAS please visit: http://www.baltimoreapplique.com If you (or someone you can recommend) will be in the Baltimore area, or are willing to travel here, and you might suggest a program or activity of interest to BAS members, please contact me off-list. Many BAS members are in other states and other countries, and our activities and contributions often extend beyond Baltimore. Thank you, Barbara Burnham

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Subject: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: Karen Alexander

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category63634&item7319496720 &tcphoto

Does this strike you all as reminiscent of Hmong work or a design from India? Would you peg this as an import?

No affiliation.

Karen Alexander in the cloudy, cool San Juans hoping for a sunny 4th

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Subject: Re: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>

The Hmong handwork I've seen is finer and much more precise than this clumsy attempt. Clearly the seller can't spell, and seems to be vague about the age of the piece as well. Can he/she spell i-m-p-o-r-t?

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: Dana Balsamo

Photography leaves something to be desired, or is it just me? Poor lighting, poor clarity, not just on this piece but on others, too.

My best, Dana

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Subject: Re: Age of Chintz? From: ARabara15aol.com Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2005

Hello All, I haven't posted in quite a while but still enjoy all of my QHL friends' info. Today I obtained two wonderful items from an auction. One is a folky carolina lilly quilt signed and dated in cross stitch "C. Yost" March 1847. The quilt is in excellent condition considering it's age with only some staining and a few appliques coming loose. It appears to have been done by a young woman/girl as the applique is not very refined. The other item is wonderful. It is a 36"x36" square that was to be the center of a quilt that never was completed. It is appliqued with Chintz Hybiscus in a circle. The chintz is perfect without deterioration. The muslin backing has considerable staining but the piece is wonderful. There was a birth certificate in the lot that indicated that the individual on it was born in York Co Pa. How do I date it? I've become very rusty. I've been so immersed in my redevelopment work that my quilt studies have fallen by the wayside. Please help?

Donald Brokate "The Crazy Quilt Collector" Trenton NJ

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Subject: Re: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net> 

Hi Karen . . . I think it's an example of a "Ralli Quilt" from Pakistan or Western India - Schiffer published a book about these in 2003 written by Patricia Ormsby Stoddard. They do remind you of Hmong work. Most of these are of fairly recent vintage. The book is quite interesting - I picked it up after I bought a piece on eBay that is similar to this (cutwork designs), but not quilted, and red and green on white (great for Christmas!). (And I paid a lot less than $125 for it!) I knew it wasn't American, wasn't sure it was Hmong, and then when I saw the book on Ralli quilts, realized what I had. The workmanship on mine is also on the crude side, but I love it.

Here's Schiffer's description of the book:

This book tells the story of a fascinating quilting tradition found in southern Pakistan and neighboring western India. These quilts, called ralli, are stunning in their designs, brilliant in their colors, and intriguing in their history. The designs, which include patchwork, applique, and embroidered styles, are reminiscent of motifs found on painted pottery from the ancient civilizations of the area. Showcased here are more than 130 stunning ralli quilts, all shown in full color. They date primarily from the mid- to late twentieth century and feature a wondrous array of designs and patterns that have been passed from mother to daughter and woman to woman for hundreds of years. Quilt descriptions identify where each quilt was made, design or pattern characteristics, type of fabric, and dimensions. The carefully researched text provides intriguing information on quilt construction, colors, patterns, and regional variations. A valuable reference for textile historians, designers, and quilt lovers everywhere, this book is a tribute to the skill and creativity of the "ralli region" people who continue to make and use these beautiful textiles.

http://www.schifferbooks.com/newschiffer/book_template.php?isbn0764316974

--_1499015.ALT--

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Subject: Not Hmong From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net>

Re: Karen's question

Ebay auction:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category63634&item7319496720

This is definitely not Hmong work. The seller says that it is Ralli work. This appears to be the case from looking at the book: Ralli Quilts: Traditional Textiles from Pakistan and India by Patricia Ormsby Stoddard.

Best,

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Re: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: "Laurette Carroll"

To add to what Judy said; Ralli quilts are often confused with American quilts by non-specialized dealers who find them in the field or at flea markets. Other applique work that confuses many are the intricately done Hmong pieces and the Molas of the Cuna Indians of the San Blas Islands/Panama area.

These last two are "usually" small pieces, while the Ralli quilts can be full size. Molas were originally made to be incorporated into a woman's dress, for the bodice area, and these older ones can be valuable to collectors, if they can be distinguished from the newer, made for tourists pieces.

Here's 3 sites to check out for Hmong and Cuna works, but a Google search brings up a lot of information for anyone interested in seeing photos of all three.

http://www.craftlink-vietnam.com/page3.htm

http://www.lib.uci.edu/libraries/collections/sea/hmong.html

http://thorup.com/mola.html

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: Gail Ingram

> Hi Karen . . . I think it's an example of a "Ralli Quilt" from Pakistan o r > Western India - Schiffer published a book about these in 2003 written by > Patricia Ormsby Stoddard. They do remind you of Hmong work. Most of these > are of fairly recent vintage. The book is quite interesting - I picked it > up after I bought a piece on eBay that is similar to this (cutwork > designs), but not quilted, and red and green on white (great for > Christmas!). (And I paid a lot less than $125 for it!) I knew it wasn't > American, wasn't sure it was Hmong, and then when I saw the book on Ralli > quilts, realized what I had. The workmanship on mine is also on the crude > side, but I love it.

Judy Sue, that was my first thought when I saw this. I pulled out several pieces of Ralli work, just to make sure I was right about the appliquE9. One sees similar quilts in the Kashmir, though they often tend to use as embellishments the "mirrors" and beads characteristic of much Indian embroidery .

Friends who are Indian tell me the typical crudeness of the work is not owing to the pieces being created hurriedly for export, but to the skill of the makers, who often are villagers working in an old tradition, with fabrics that are not the best. I have one small piece from the Kashmiri province that is superbly done, but most I've seen lack sophistication in execution.

When a South Indian friend learned I collected and made quilts, she told me emphatically, "I don't like quilts." I wondered how she could have formed such a distaste from her experience in America, since she had lived in NYC and Boston metropolitan areas and rarely come into contact with anything bu t "high art." Yet, she was emphatic about the matter. Later, when she was in my home and saw a quilt on my bed, she was surprised, both by the workmanship, the "unbusyness" of the straight-line design, and the fabrics. To her, quilts had been what this photograph shows.

I am like you, Judy: I find a charm in the pieces I have. I've gotten to point I can tell hallmarks of different regional work. It's folk art. Like the Gee's Bend quilts in many ways.

Gail

 

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Subject: Re: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: "Sharon in NC"

UNC TV's Our State will contain information on North Carolina quilts, patterns and colors.

Wednesday night at 10:30 PM

Sharon in NC

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Subject: The Vietnamese page! From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com>

Laurette, I was enthralled by the Craft Shop site showing work by Nung, Hmong. Etc! Just blown away. Those pillows and the textile hangers especially.

Do you know of any shop in U.S. That sells these items?

Gail

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Subject: Threads of Faith Exhibition From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2005 16:47:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Mark your calendars for this wonderful exhibition...running during the last month of our Cotton and Pennsylvania German Life exhibit, so you could do both! Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

Threads of Faith: Recent Works by the Women of Color Quilters Network

From August 7, 2005 to September 29, 2005, the Mennonite Heritage Center, 565 Yoder Road, Harleysville, Pennsylvania will present: Threads of Faith: Recent Works by the Women of Color Quilters Network. This dynamic quilt exhibit features 31 quilted wall hangings created by members of the Women of Color Quilters network. The public is invited to the opening reception for the exhibit scheduled for Sunday, August 7, 2005 from 2 to 5 p.m. A number of the artists who created quilts for this exhibit will be attending the reception. Refreshments, special music, and children’s’ activities will take place on the Heritage Center grounds as part of the opening celebration.

The exhibit quilts are not composed of familiar patch work patterns. Instead, the Threads of Faith quilt artists use a variety of interpretations, styles, and techniques and many of the artists experiment with non-traditional quilting materials, such as shell beads, metal, glass and bone. The quilts represent the blending of artistic expression with spirituality, African American history, and the diversity of the artists themselves. The quilt artists are from a wide range of backgrounds - rural and urban, young and old, and varied professions.

Threads of Faith was organized by the Women of Color Quilters Network founder and director Dr. Carolyn Mazloomli. The exhibit is divided into five themes: Sacred Moments (Biblical Narratives), Bearing Witness (women and family), Hope: The Anchor of Our Souls (Prayers and Spiritual Meditations), Blessed are the Piece Makers (Worship through Arts) and We Have Come this Far by Faith (African American Experiences).

The Women of Color Quilters Network was started in 1985 and includes over 1,700 members who share information, conduct quilting workshops, and who have been represented in numerous quilt exhibits. The WCQ Network has been recognized by the International Labour Department in Geneva and the United Nations for its developmental programs to aid women. Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi is a quilt artist, author, historian, and curator. Her quilts are in the collections of the American Museum of Design, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Wadsworth Museum along with corporate collections. Dr. Mazloomi, a former aerospace engineer, has appeared on numerous television shows and documentaries and was the curator for an international quilt exhibit that was part of the Unite Nations Conference for Women in 1995.

Threads of Faith was first exhibited at the American Bible Society Gallery in NYC and is traveling throughout the United States in 2005. This is the first exhibit by the Women of Color Quilters Network to be shown at the Mennonite Heritage Center which is pleased to host the exhibit. The Mennonite Heritage Center is located at 565 Yoder Road, Harleysville, Pa. Exhibit hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10 am to 5 pm, Saturday 10 am to 2 pm, and Sunday 2 to 5 pm. Admission to the exhibit is by donation with a suggested donation of $5. For information on this exhibit and other events, the public may check the Mennonite Heritage Center web site: www.mhep.org, email: infomhep.org, or call 215-256-3020.

The two attached quilt images are from the Threads of Faith: “Christ Bearing the Cross” By Michael Cummings, 2003 91 X 71 inches Cotton, linen, machine appliqué and quilted

“Palm Tree of Deborah” By Adriene Cruz, 1995 36 X 38 inches Cotton, acrylic paint, beads, shells

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Subject: Vermont From: "Julie" <quiltappraiseradelphia.net> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 08:14:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Last weekend was the Vermont Quilt Festival. Judy Roche's exhibit was the best! I also got to meet Judy and see all of the quilts that were chosen for the day. My favorite was the appliquE9 block quilt with the birds that had their beaks all pointed in toward a pomegranate. There was also an appliquE9 of a man thumbing his nose. Lynne Bassett gave a gallery talk that was so educational. I had to leave before it was over as my husband was in the car and we had set a time to meet. In my opinion, the exhibit was the best one they've had so far. Julie Crossland Hudson, NH

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Subject: Re: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: Sandra Millett <smillettsbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 17:07:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

--0-903771068-1120090072:434 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

I agree with the comments about the quilt on e-bay. This is not a H mong quilt. Here are some facts about their pa ndau (stitchery). Each tribe within the H mong will do a different type of stitchery, similar, but different. There are Red, White, Blue, Black and Flower H mong in northern Vietnam. Handwork from the Lao H mong is different from those from Vietnam. Lao and Thailand H mong are Green, Armband and White (I believe this last is true). The handwork from H mong available in the US is from both Lao and Thai tribes.

During the Houston Quilt Festival over the last five years have been two H mong booths. If you're lucky, you may find some old work--frequently used and removed to be applied to another fabric--this is common among the H mong.

Having visited the CraftLink store in Hanoi, be assured that they feature the best handiwork from the various Vietnamese tribes--there are 53 in all. I purchased some things there.

I also have a large quilt, unbatted made in the late 70s by a H mong waiting in Thailand for entry into the US and purchased in Fresno, CA. All their work is free-hand without any paper patterns--handed down from mother to daughters.

Anyone in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area -- or just passing through -- and who wants to see garments and stitchery of both Lao and Vietnam H mong, let me know. I have a bunch.

Sandra Millett First Peoples: The H mong of Southeast Asia, Lerner Publications (US) ISBN 0-8225-4852-6 and Times Ltd. (international)

 

 

Laurette Carroll <rl.carrollverizon.net> wrote: To add to what Judy said; Ralli quilts are often confused with American quilts by non-specialized dealers who find them in the field or at flea markets. Other applique work that confuses many are the intricately done Hmong pieces and the Molas of the Cuna Indians of the San Blas Islands/Panama area.

These last two are "usually" small pieces, while the Ralli quilts can be full size. Molas were originally made to be incorporated into a woman's dress, for the bodice area, and these older ones can be valuable to collectors, if they can be distinguished from the newer, made for tourists pieces.

Here's 3 sites to check out for Hmong and Cuna works, but a Google search brings up a lot of information for anyone interested in seeing photos of all three.

http://www.craftlink-vietnam.com/page3.htm

http://www.lib.uci.edu/libraries/collections/sea/hmong.html

http://thorup.com/mola.html

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

From: "Judy Kelius" > Hi Karen . . . I think it's an example of a "Ralli Quilt" from Pakistan or > Western India - Schiffer published a book about these in 2003 written by > Patricia Ormsby Stoddard. They do remind you of Hmong work. Most of these > are of fairly recent vintage. > > http://www.schifferbooks.com/newschiffer/book_template.php?isbn0764316974

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: smillettsbcglobal.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1565764Rlyris.quiltropolis.com

--0-903771068-1120090072:434--

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Subject: Coverlet set From: "Nancy Smith" <stptquiltnutcharter.net> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 06:35:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I have posted pictures of a coverlet set I recently came upon. (It is  on the "Vintage Pictures" eboard under the "General" tab as "Coverlet  1-3".) Does anyone have any idea on when this could have been made and what the pieces were used for. The set was purchased at an estate sale in WI.  The applique pattern appears to have been made by "mirror" imaging  (reminiscent of a variation of how Hawaiian applique is done).

I'm just getting starting in quilt history research/appraising and would appreciate any comments you would have for me. Thanks! :)

Nancy Smith Stevens Point, WIA0 stptquiltnutcharter.net

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Subject: Re: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2005 23:34:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Sandra,

I noticed that every time you spelled the word you put a space between the H and the rest of the word. You spelled it H mong. I don't know that I've ever seen it spelled that way, but since you wrote the book and are the expert, please explain.

Have I always seen it that way, and just never noticed?

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

----- Original Message ----- From: "Sandra Millett" <smillettsbcglobal.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2005 8:07 PM Subject: [qhl] Re: Reminiscent of Hmong?

I agree with the comments about the quilt on e-bay. This is not a H mong quilt. Here are some facts about their pa ndau (stitchery). Each tribe within the H mong will do a different type of stitchery, similar, but different. There are Red, White, Blue, Black and Flower H mong in northern Vietnam. Handwork from the Lao H mong is different from those from Vietnam. Lao and Thailand H mong are Green, Armband and White (I believe this last is true). The handwork from H mong available in the US is from both Lao and Thai tribes.

During the Houston Quilt Festival over the last five years have been two H mong booths. If you're lucky, you may find some old work--frequently used and removed to be applied to another fabric--this is common among the H mong.

Having visited the CraftLink store in Hanoi, be assured that they feature the best handiwork from the various Vietnamese tribes--there are 53 in all. I purchased some things there.

I also have a large quilt, unbatted made in the late 70s by a H mong waiting in Thailand for entry into the US and purchased in Fresno, CA. All their work is free-hand without any paper patterns--handed down from mother to daughters.

Anyone in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area -- or just passing through -- and who wants to see garments and stitchery of both Lao and Vietnam H mong, let me know. I have a bunch.

Sandra Millett First Peoples: The H mong of Southeast Asia, Lerner Publications (US) ISBN 0-8225-4852-6 and Times Ltd. (international)

Laurette Carroll <rl.carrollverizon.net> wrote: To add to what Judy said; Ralli quilts are often confused with American quilts by non-specialized dealers who find them in the field or at flea markets. Other applique work that confuses many are the intricately done Hmong pieces and the Molas of the Cuna Indians of the San Blas Islands/Panama area.

These last two are "usually" small pieces, while the Ralli quilts can be full size. Molas were originally made to be incorporated into a woman's dress, for the bodice area, and these older ones can be valuable to collectors, if they can be distinguished from the newer, made for tourists pieces.

Here's 3 sites to check out for Hmong and Cuna works, but a Google search brings up a lot of information for anyone interested in seeing photos of all three.

http://www.craftlink-vietnam.com/page3.htm

http://www.lib.uci.edu/libraries/collections/sea/hmong.html

http://thorup.com/mola.html

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

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Subject: Promise Stitch From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 08:26:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Good morning, everyone! I am hoping someone will have information on the "Promise Stitch"... a style of quilting "handed down from Appalachian Mountain Craftspeople". I visited a quilt shop yesterday and they had a sample which was 4 small Log Cabin blocks, surrounded by a border with a delicate embroidered vine. She said it was a pattern from Mountain Patchwork www.mountainpatchwork.com The log cabin 'logs' were hand pieced, then when you flip them open, a line of running stitch is used to reinforce the sewing line. The website describes this as a "primitive stitch" and not fine hand quilting. The 2 owners/designers had taken a workshop to learn the "promise stitch". The shopowner would love any additional historical information on this technique, so I offered to see if any QHL members could help out. TIA, Karan from very soggy Iowa

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Subject: Re: Promise Stitch From: Chris Flynn <lovechrisearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 06:41:56 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Karan.... Billie Lauder brought some sweet samples of the promise stitch to our guild last year. I don't remember her saying they came from Appalachia though. Billie's examples were tiny, 1" squares sewn into a bigger block. Great take along work. I wish the Mountain Patchwork people showed a close up sample. Thanks, Chris in Sunny North California

On Jun 30, 2005, at 6:26 AM, Karan Flanscha wrote:

> Good morning, everyone! > I am hoping someone will have information on the "Promise > Stitch"... a style of quilting "handed down from Appalachian > Mountain Craftspeople". I visited a quilt shop yesterday > and they had a sample which was 4 small Log Cabin blocks, > surrounded by a border with a delicate embroidered vine. > She said it was a pattern from Mountain Patchwork > www.mountainpatchwork.com The log cabin 'logs' were hand > pieced, then when you flip them open, a line of running > stitch is used to reinforce the sewing line. The website > describes this as a "primitive stitch" and not fine hand > quilting. The 2 owners/designers had taken a workshop to > learn the "promise stitch". The shopowner would love any > additional historical information on this technique, so I > offered to see if any QHL members could help out. > TIA, Karan from very soggy Iowa > > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: lovechrisearthlink.net. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to > leave-qhl-1442664Rlyris.quiltropolis.com >

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Subject: Re: Reminiscent of Hmong? From: Sandra Millett <smillettsbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2005 16:38:59 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

--0-154906941-1120174739:93391 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Judy:

I wondered if someone would pick up on that. If you read books--and there are precious few--from Vietnam, the spelling frequently has a space between the H and the mong. Also there is an upside down accent V over the "o," but it won't do it in e-mail. The space has been done away with in the US. I assume as too cumbersome. Same space thing with the word for stitchery, pa ndau. I was coached by a H mong college professor from California on how to pronounce the word. The "au" goes up in tone, if it drops, the meaning is different. Language is very tonal and similar to Chinese as this is where they lived (and 5 million still do) before crossing the southern border of China to flee persecution.

Hope this clears up any confusion. Sandra

J. G. Row <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> wrote: Sandra,

I noticed that every time you spelled the word you put a space between the H and the rest of the word. You spelled it H mong. I don't know that I've ever seen it spelled that way, but since you wrote the book and are the expert, please explain.

Have I always seen it that way, and just never noticed?

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

----- Original Message ----- From: "Sandra Millett" To: "Quilt History List" Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2005 8:07 PM Subject: [qhl] Re: Reminiscent of Hmong?

I agree with the comments about the quilt on e-bay. This is not a H mong quilt. Here are some facts about their pa ndau (stitchery). Each tribe within the H mong will do a different type of stitchery, similar, but different. There are Red, White, Blue, Black and Flower H mong in northern Vietnam. Handwork from the Lao H mong is different from those from Vietnam. Lao and Thailand H mong are Green, Armband and White (I believe this last is true). The handwork from H mong available in the US is from both Lao and Thai tribes.

During the Houston Quilt Festival over the last five years have been two H mong booths. If you're lucky, you may find some old work--frequently used and removed to be applied to another fabric--this is common among the H mong.

Having visited the CraftLink store in Hanoi, be assured that they feature the best handiwork from the various Vietnamese tribes--there are 53 in all. I purchased some things there.

I also have a large quilt, unbatted made in the late 70s by a H mong waiting in Thailand for entry into the US and purchased in Fresno, CA. All their work is free-hand without any paper patterns--handed down from mother to daughters.

Anyone in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area -- or just passing through -- and who wants to see garments and stitchery of both Lao and Vietnam H mong, let me know. I have a bunch.

Sandra Millett First Peoples: The H mong of Southeast Asia, Lerner Publications (US) ISBN 0-8225-4852-6 and Times Ltd. (international)

Laurette Carroll wrote: To add to what Judy said; Ralli quilts are often confused with American quilts by non-specialized dealers who find them in the field or at flea markets. Other applique work that confuses many are the intricately done Hmong pieces and the Molas of the Cuna Indians of the San Blas Islands/Panama area.

These last two are "usually" small pieces, while the Ralli quilts can be full size. Molas were originally made to be incorporated into a woman's dress, for the bodice area, and these older ones can be valuable to collectors, if they can be distinguished from the newer, made for tourists pieces.

Here's 3 sites to check out for Hmong and Cuna works, but a Google search brings up a lot of information for anyone interested in seeing photos of all three.

http://www.craftlink-vietnam.com/page3.htm

http://www.lib.uci.edu/libraries/collections/sea/hmong.html

http://thorup.com/mola.html

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future With Hope

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Current Exhibit at New England Quilt Museum From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2005 04:57:27 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

MAVERICKS: ECCENTRIC TWISTS ON ANTIQUE QUILTS June 23rd ­ August 14th, New England Quilt Museum, Lowell

“Mavericks" is a bold and vivacious collection of traditional antique quilts with unique twists organized by Julie Silber and Jean Demeter for The Quilt Complex, Albion, California. These quilts stretch the boundaries of expected patterns and color combinations to challenge the norm and delight the eye. Every quilt is an original departure from the ordinary.

Hours: Tue-Sat 10-4; Sun 12-4. 978-452-4207. www.nequiltmuseum.org

I hope to see some of you this summer!

Anita

Anita B. Loscalzo, Curator New England Quilt Museum 18 Shattuck Street Lowell, MA 01852 -------- email: CuratorNEQuiltMuseum.org telephone: 978-452-4207 Ext. 11

__________________________________ Yahoo! Mail Mobile Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Check email on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/learn/mail

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Subject: Hmong in Thailand From: ctquiltingverizon.net Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2005 14:09:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

This thread on the Hmong has interested me. In Chaingmai, Thailand, my DH purchased a piece of Hmong reverse needle applique for my birthday. The women were selling these pieces in the street; they didn't need a booth as they wore their traditional dresses, covered with their applique. It was a real treat to purchase it from the woman herself, who made it. We conversed slightly and found that they had indeed come from Tibet into Thailand to excape persecution from the Chinese people. The price of my B'day present? It was equal to US $3.00. I've been glad to see so many Hmong now residing in our country and sharing their talents. Susan Webb Titusville

Language is very tonal and similar to Chinese as this is where they lived (and 5 million still do) before crossing the southern border of China to flee persecution.

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Subject: More Hmong sites From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2005 08:30:07 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

My article "Hmong Needlework: Traditions Both Ancient and New" is a just brief introduction to Hmong needlework but does have links to several sites on the topic. http://www.womenfolk.com/quilting_history/hmong.htm

Judy Anne

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Subject: Hmong textile publication available From: Marsha MacDowell 

Regarding Hmong textiles, the Michigan State University Museum does have one publication on Hmong textiles still available. Information on it and other textile-related publications, can be found by going to www.museum.msu.edu, then clicking on the "MTAP STORE" icon at top.

Marsha MacDowell



 



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