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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Re: Improvements on wet cleaning your quilt - long From: Sally Ward

I took a one-day course with a UK textile expert who described washing quilts in exactly this way (boards and plastic sheeting). Her added advantage was a lawn on a very slight slope, which made drainage easy. A disadvantage was waiting for English weather to be amenable. She wouldn't wash during rain because of not knowing what might be in the rainwater. She also checked with the local water board before starting in case the local water had particularly high levels of chlorine or other undesirables that day.

Her triumph was her draining method. She had acquired a huge sheet of a plastic material which is used on motorway verges to give stability but allow grass to grow through - a kind of very open honeycomb about 4-5" deep. Usually sold by the mile, the manufacturers were intrigued to know why she wanted a few yards. With a sheet under the item being washed, and willing helpers, she was able to move the wet item onto its 'draining rack', also spread on the lawn, and accelerate the drying process.

Sally W

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Subject: Advice given in book - long winded From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2005 04:07:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Good morning!

I am always amazed at some of the information I find on qhl, in this case, at 3:17 a.m. So much for a middle-aged insomniac's entertainment at this ungodly hour of the morning.

Since my comprehensive book on quilt and textile care has been given a mention, let me clarify the fact that the overview I provide there lists "wet washing" as only one alternative, and one to be avoided, if at all possible. In reality, situations arise whereby the choice is to either immediate wash a quilt or simply throw it away. Accidents happen. One case in point was when my little dog, as she became older, got a little bit demented. She jumped on the bed and "let loose". This was at 7 a.m. on a cold winter's morning when Jim was just coming home from work, having worked all night, at that time. Not fun to grab two quilts and race to the laundromat to find some triple loader washers. Neither of the quilts remain in my possession.

Detailed information is provided about pre-testing fabrics, spot washing, and vacuuming. Moreover, the idea is set forth that cleaning should be done by a professional if the quilt has any significant value whatsoever. By professional, I mean a trained and certified professional conservator in private practice or one who works for a museum or a university, and under that category, also include the option of university students who are working directly under supervision. I also mention professional restorers and how their work differs from conservators.

Yes, with Xenia's permission and aforeknowledge, I did include her quote in my book. To me, it says it all, but in a non-didactic, humorous way. Thank you, Xenia.

There is a company named "Orvis". They sell clothing. The cleaning product that is used for sheep, horses, and quilts is called "Orvus WA Paste", just so we are all on the same page. I discuss the properties of Orvus at length.

The steps outlined by Linda in her cleaning plan are her words. If anyone would like to read what I actually said, including information about drying quilts too quickly and the water marks that can result, I guess the book would have to be read. I would not want someone pre-judging my book and developing a closed mind about it, based on misleading or incomplete information or inferences.

I have also talked about the use of washing machines and the ideas that some people have about that subject, specifically the use of the machine to wring out excess water, and my own opinions on the matter.

Xenia does not like to be misquoted, and I feel the same way. I believe that I covered all bases. I hope that my book will be an excellent point of reference for those who have acquired it. Positive feedback has been sent our way by many who have seen the book, so far.

Any damage on a quilt should definitely be stabilized before attempting to do any cleaning, particularly wet washing. Washing any textile that is in need of repair is a dangerous proposition as the damage already sustained will be magnified. That stands to reason.

I took the time to write /Straight Talk About Quilt Care: Display, Cleaning, and Storage of New and Antique Quilts and Needlework/ because I care. It is a beautiful book, lovingly put together, not common and mass-produced, not a million copies made. A special book because of all the personal anecdotes and experience gained from many different sources and over many years, it is an attempt "to make sense of it all" and to give credit to all who have weighed in on the subject previously.

While I enjoyed collecting my thoughts and placing them in print, and loved working with my husband to provide quality photos, more than fifty of them for the book, and also helped in doing book layout, actually I would not care if I sold another copy. In a world that seems to seek only money, I would have to state that the book was written as a service, not as an expectation that I would become rich. That said, it will be a long time before I catch up with paying for the production of the book, having remortgaged the house, in the meantime, to pay for all of the special equipment needed to print the book ourselves and have it look very professional and as nice as any other book on the market today. Yes, the book is there as a resource for those who want to access the information it contains, information that, until now, has not been presented altogether and in a logical sequence. I hope that my book will not be pre-judged on the basis of a few remarks that, in their incompleteness, inaccurately portray my advice. Since the topic was brought up, I felt the need to say a few words to clear the air.

On a completely different subject, thanks for mentioning the Wisconsin book, Xenia. I have ordered a copy. I will measure the casket cover today and get back to you on that. I did not commit the odd measurement to memory, just kept in mind that it is approximately 36" and almost square.

Best,

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Re: Improvements on wet cleaning your quilt - long From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2005 07:58:31 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Dear QHL, I have posted a picture of the quilt washing set up in use at Grove Farm on Kauai, which I visited in June 2003. www.vintagepictures.eboard.com

I was fortunate enough to enjoy a private tour of the quilts by the collections manager and we discussed the climate issues on Kauai. Humidity is a big problem and because the farm "house" where the quilts are located is not air conditioned.

The collection is documented in:

Schleck, Robert J 1986. The Wilcox Quilts in Hawaii. Grove Farm Homestead and Waioli Mission House. Kauai, HI

Regards, Juia Zgliniec, Poway, CA - where we have ideal quilt washing conditions and a wet quilt dries in a coupe of hours on a hot day.

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Subject: Re: Lace curtain method of washing a quilt. From: Charles Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2005 07:03:10 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Here is my humble addition to the experts' good advice.

Before washing a very dirty inscribed 1820 (yes, 1820) Trapunto, I basted old lace curtain material to fabric rips, tears, weaknesses, etc. Then I put IT in the washing machine with no agitation! (yes, I did). I used cold water first to get the hundred years of grime out of IT, then warm water and liquid detergent or Orvus, I forget which. Rinsed a zillion times. Dried IT on the basement floor on old mattress pads, with fans. Removed basted material.

IT came out good. (Was I lucky, or what.)

Anyway, I haven't tried, but old lace curtains might do well instead of sheets with the bathtub method. They are strong, but allow for more circulation.

Barbara Woodford

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Subject: "pricking" patterns From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2005 11:00:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

My goodness, this latest digest was interesting!! I have to work long and hard to "earn" my time to sit at the computer, so it is rewarding when the conversation is so varied and stimulating.

Polly mentioned the 'pricked" paper patterns and that it was difficult to see that they were actually patterns until being held to the light. I had a similar experience when cleaning out my MIL's boxes under the bed. I came across a stack of old waxed paper sheets and wondered if perhaps something had been wrapped in them at some date. As I went to dispose of them, the light revealed an outline - and I discovered that the waxed paper sheets were each and every one an applique quilt pattern. She had placed the waxed paper over the original pattern and drawn with a pencil. The pencil did not show up, but the lines were clearly evident when the paper was placed over another surface. MY 11 year old granddaughter made a full size bed quilt from one of those patterns - an adorable high top shoe repeat block.

A few weeks ago, I attended a seminar on civil war women in VA. There were a few vendors, and of course there were a few post mortem photographs of small children and babies. It matters not that the deaths occured over a hundred years ago, and it matters not that I did not know the families - but the sight of the dead children still puts a baseball sized knot in my throat, and an ache in my heart. Teddy Pruett in the steambath that is north Fl. DO NOT make me go outside!!!!

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Subject: For those interested in the history of slavery... From: "Candace Perry"

I received this info today...I know some of you like any new info that you can get your hands on!

From: J.B. Bird <jb.birdmail.utexas.edu> Date: Wednesday, July 13 2005 02:48 pm

For scholars working on U.S. slavery and the 19th century, I would enjoy your thoughts on a new historical Web site (which, full disclosure, I worked on), "Rebellion: John Horse and the Black Seminoles, the first black rebels to beat American slavery," at http://www.johnhorse.com <http://www.johnhorse.com/> . The site has a lot of food for thought. Two items may be of particular interest to this group --

1) The site documents the participation of plantation slaves in the uprising that took place at the outset of the Second Seminole War (these were slaves, distinct from the Black Seminole maroons), showing that this was the largest slave rebellion in U.S. history. Scholars have missed and misinterpreted the facts of the rebellion for more than 150 years. There is documentation posted on the site on a "toolkit for the rebellion" page at http://www.johnhorse.com/toolkit and in a essay linked to that page. Both offer detailed sources.

2) The site shows the little known but significant influence of the Black Seminoles on the U.S. antislavery movement, particularly in setting a legal precedent that JQ Adams, Joshua Giddings, and others invoked to persuade Lincoln to emancipate the Southern slaves. A narrative detailing this aspect of the Black Seminole story starts within the site under "Liberty Foretold": http://www.johnhorse.com/trail/04/b/01.htm.

I'd be interested in reactions, and quite willing to post counter-arguments to the site.

-- J.B. Bird, Writer-Producer, "Rebellion" <jb.birdmail.utexas.edu>

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Subject: Home made de-ionized water From: "Newbie Richardson" 

I forgot to mention about how you can give any quilt you wash outdoors, or in, a final rinse in de-ionized (pure) water. In the last year there have appeared car washing kits which include a canister which attaches to your garden hose. It is probably a big "Britta" water filter - just designed for the hose. The water pases through the filter before going on the car ( or in your outdoor wash tank). it is supposed to prevent spots on your new car ! Although I have not had it tested yet, it sounds right for a one/two time use to wash a large textile. I actually saw it advertised in one of thse Sky Mall catalogs you find on the airplane. The water in my town is surprisingly free of too many additives, but I do have well water in New Hampshire - which is full of iron. I frequently get in projects which I know will not see another conservator for at least 2 generations - so I do try very hard to be extra diligent. But the cost of a de-ionized water system is just too expensive for a self employed conservator. So file this in your useful information file. Newbie Richardson

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Subject: washing quilts From: "Jean Carlton" 

Linda You've done your homework - the quilt is not being enjoyed or preserved now so your decision to proceed with washing makes sense to me. It is a risk but you've considered that ---and it may turn out great. At the worst, you'll learn a bit more about what works and what doesn't for future decisions. I have one - older than that - which I have been contemplating for a year and a half! ( I do avoid hasty decisions in this area) My good friend doesn't even want to hear me talk about it - she said, "If you decide to wash it, don't even tell me when you're doing it." :) I like the idea of the big swimming pool or tarp contraption outdoors for more roomy conditions from Newbie - and the helping friend and ibuprofen are great suggestions, too. I'll be eager to hear the outcome. Post or let me know privately, PLEASE..... Jean Carlton

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Subject: Whole cloth quilts From: "Lori Kelly" 

Good morning!

I hope you can help me, I am searching for any and all information on whole cloth or white work quilts, Any books, websites, Other then just a few comments here and there and the odd book I cann't get enough information. I love the quilting on these quilts actually I'm overwhelmed my the beauty of these quilts. Please any information you can offer is greatly appreciated!! Also any of you with Whole cloth quilts in your collections that you could share pictures of would be..........awesome! thanks lori

Happiness does not depend on how much you have to enjoy...But how much you enjoy what you have ------=

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Subject: Re: "pricking" patterns From: Blackeyesandysueaol.com 

Teddy, I am probably not using the proper terminology. The red work patterns were apparently pierced by the manufacturer. The holes are so tiny that you do not see them easily, they are not visible unless you holed them up to a light source.. The closest thing I could think of to describe them are prickings like you might see for bobbin lace. Polly

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 13, 2005 wet wasing From: 

Hi, as my first note to this list, as a quilt dealer, collector, I have wet washed many, yes very many antique quilts with great success. As a seller of antique quilts, there are so many customers that want them "clean" and to look "nice", so the process of washing must be in the agenda. But my success is my old,, 25 year old, machines, totally slow and I can be in control of the machines, like not letting them spin or agitate with the lid up. The machine is just a place to rinse and rinse, as often I don't use any detergent at all. I've spent a lot keeping the machines in repair! Lots of old age dirt comes out in the rinse. And for drying,, my back yard is a pachwork of quilts in the summer. We get some great dry weather here. Also it's amazing to put a coffee filter on the end of a vacuum hose and see all the dirt, dust that comes off the quilt. AND on the other hand there are those I took a nap on, well kinda,, and decided the quilt will just need to be enjoyed as it is. I have taken Xenias advice also, and the quilt sold the way I acquired it. The collector that doesn't care if there are some age spots, stains, will overlook the quilt for the other qualities it possesses. There's lots to determine, and often it is the quilt in question...... Cindy Rennels in Ok

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Subject: Re: Whole cloth quilts From: "Karen Evans" <charter.net> 

I'll have some information for you later...what era are you interested in? Lynne Bassett has some marvelous information on 18th century wholecloth wool quilts, while I've done silk and linen quilts in the style of the Middle Ages and Renaissance....

Karen Evans

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Subject: Re: Whole cloth quilts From: "Lynne Z. Bassett"

Dear Lori,

I'm delighted to find another fan of whole cloth quilts! They are my particular passion. I have an article on New England whole cloth quilts coming up in the September issue of The Magazine Antiques (more commonly known as "Antiques"). I have also written about whole cloth quilts in PieceWork magazine (Sept./ Oct. 1999), Textiles in New England II: Four Centuries of Material Life, The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife Annual Proceedings 1999 (Boston University Press, 2001) , and in the little catalogue I did for Telltale Textiles: Quilts at Historic Deerfield (2003, available from the Historic Deerfield gift shop, can be ordered online).

Currently, I'm working on writing about whole cloth quilts in Massachusetts for the Massachusetts Quilt Documentation Project book. Unfortunately, that probably won't be available until 2009. And someday, I'll get all my information out for an exhibition and book--I hope!

Hope you find this helpful.

Best, Lynne

> Good morning! > > I hope you can help me, I am searching for any and all information on > whole cloth or white work quilts, Any books, websites, Other then just a > few comments here and there and the odd book I cann't get enough > information. I love the quilting on these quilts actually I'm overwhelmed > my the beauty of these quilts. Please any information you can offer is > greatly appreciated!! Also any of you with Whole cloth quilts in your > collections that you could share pictures of would be..........awesome! > thanks > lori >

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Subject: Re: Whole cloth quilts From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassettcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2005 09:10:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Hi again,

I forgot to add a couple more references: Pat Keller did a great catalogue for the Brandywine River Museum about Quaker quilts, and there are several wonderful whole-cloth quilts in there (very different from what we find in New England)--that's called "Of the best Sort but Plain" and it came out in 1997--available from the Brandywine River Museum gift shop. The American Folk Art Museum in New York City will be having an exhibit on whitework soon, and there will be whole cloth quilts in it.

I forgot the first essay I wrote about whole cloth quilts--it's in the proceedings of the "What's New England About New England Quilts?" symposium at Old Sturbridge Village, which was published by OSV in 1999, and is available from the gift shop there. The article I have coming out in Antiques in September expands greatly on the little bit I wrote in the Dublin Seminar Proceedings, which I mentioned in my last post, so I wouldn't bother looking up that reference at this point, though there are LOTS of great articles about New England textiles by various authors in the book.

Best, Lynne

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Subject: Wholecloth Quilts From: adi hirsh <adamroninetvision.net.il> 

>> >> > Good morning! > > I hope you can help me, I am searching for any and all information > on whole cloth or white work quilts, Any books, websites, Other > then just a few comments here and there and the odd book I cann't > get enough information. I love the quilting on these quilts > actually I'm overwhelmed my the beauty of these quilts. Please > any information you can offer is greatly appreciated!! Also any of > you with Whole cloth quilts in your collections that you could > share pictures of would be..........awesome! > thanks > lori > Hi Lori There are quite a few books dealing with wholecloth quilts, although not exclusively but rather as part of the general discussion. Here are a few, maily English and french:

British and Welsh quilts Allan, Rosemary E, North Country Quilts and Coverlets from Beamish Museum (1987) Chainey, Barbara, The Essential Quiter (background + how-to Colby, Averil, Quilting, 1972 (excellent) Dawson, Pam (ed), Amy Emms Story of Durham Quilting (1991) Jones, Jen, Welsh Quilts (1997) Lodge, Diana, Quilting (1995) (how-to) Marchbank, Brenda, Durham Quilting, 1988 Martin, Muriel, A Collection of Durham Quilts, 2000 (how-to) Osler, Dorothy, British Quilts (1987) Osler, Dorothy, North Country Quilts, Legend and Living Tradition (2000) Rae, Janer, Quilts of the British Isles, (1987) Stevens, Christine, Quilts (1993) - quilts from the Welsh folk museum

French quilts and Boutis: Pique de Provence, couvertures et jupons de la collection andre-jean cabanel, XVIII-XIX siecles, Edisud, 2000 Nicole, Francone, Boutis des villes boutis des champs, Edisud 1999 Nicole, Francine, Piques de soie (patterns) Nicolle, Francine, L'Art du Piquage en Provence (history and how-to instructions) Nicolle, Francine, Le Boutis dans le trousseau (patterns)

Quaker quilts: Keller, Patricia J., Of the Best Sort but Plain, Quaker Quilts from the Delaware Valley, 1760-1890

Hope this helps Ady in Israel

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Subject: Re: Wholecloth Quilts From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2005 08:51:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Wow1 In case anyone ever doubted the knowledge, depth of expertise, and the level of friendliness and willingess to help...I am so impressed with how generous our group is in sharing what they know! Way to go, ladies and gnetlemen!! That's just one of the reasons I love being part of this list!!! Marcia Kaylakie (who will never run out of exclamation points)

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Subject: Cleaning/conservation question... From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2005 11:29:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

One of my volunteers was asking how one can the acid stains that cause holes in white linens/cottons (specifically). I think there's no hope, but I said I would throw it out to this list...maybe someone's asked recently, and I apologize! She is looking to clean her personal collection -- which does include some museum quality things -- she and her husband are extraordinary poker-arounders, as I call them, and they find really great, overlooked stuff. They are currently on a homemade linen/cotton stocking kick. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Subject: Newbie's comment on H2O From: kathymooreneb.rr.com Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2005 10:17:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Newbie, I'm so glad you mentioned the water conditions. I've been reading the posts on washing quilts and was about to comment on this aspect myself. I've heard a story of an antique white cotton christening gown and other vintage clothing items that were ruined by being washed in hard water, pressed and put away for safe keeping, only to discover a couple of years later that they were dotted with little brown specks. Seems the hard water deposited minute particles of iron in the interweavings of the fabric and these minute specks eventually rusted!

I'm not really sure that rinsing with the deionized water would remove hard water deposits like this, but it seems a better possibility than not doing it.

Hard decision, but one we all have to wrestle with. Good luck.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: RE: Post mortem viewing From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2005 13:06:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Just wanted to quickly comment on this note from Sally...this occured in Pittsburgh, and the fellow was "enjoying" a continous loop of Steelers' highlights. We do LOVE our sports teams in PA... Candace Perry

-----Original Message----- From: Sally Ward [mailto:sallytattersntlworld.com] Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2005 4:23 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Post mortem viewing

Jccullencrewaol.com wrote: > In that movie there was a book of photographs of dead people, posed as they > would have been in life. In the movie, they say this was common in many > years ago.

It must only be about a week since my newspaper picked up a report of a deceased gentleman (one of your countrymen) whose 'viewing' was arranged thus:

He was seated on his favourite reclining chair, with a glass of beer by his side, paper on his lap, and TV remote in his hand. In front of him a television was playing a continuous loop of his favourite baseball team. Relatives said 'the undertakers did a fantastic job, it was just like he was at home'.

I kid you not.

Sally W

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Subject: whole cloths, pinpricks From: Laura Fisher <

Re whole cloth quilts, look at Katherine Berenson's book on the quilts of Provence, and various books on English and Welsh quilts. I don't think anyone has yet covered the subject vis-a-vis American quilts. Lynne Bassett is researching the quilting patterns on linsey-woolseys; consult her articles/lecture notes.

Re pinpricking, not on quilts but on paper, can anyone refer me to information about pinprick pictures? I have two in my tiny collection at home--fabulous floral bouquets that are three dimensional, all densely pierced from behind to produce a raised effect on the paper surface. A pretty remarkable artform that I would love to learn more about.

thanks

Laura Fisher

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Subject: WASHING From: Laura Fisher 

Oy, now this apartment dwelling New Yorker has not only space envy but LAWN ENVY. I'm sitting in my shop alone at the end of a restless week, awaiting anyone, and taking the time to read the helpful instructions you all have shared on QHL My mind is wandering to an image of quilts laid out to dry on the grass in Central Park, down the block from my apartment. Now that would be a sight.....Laura

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Subject: Re: WASHING From: Kathie Holland 

Laura, make sure you let us know if you ever do this :) it would be an amazing sight! Kathie in NJ ----- 

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Subject: quilt judging From: "Molly" 

Does anyone out there know about the history of quilt judging? When did = people begin to have quilts judged? I would be very interested in = learning more about this. Thanks. MW

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Subject: RE: Newbie's comment on H2O From: "Newbie Richardson"

Hard water is a separate issue. Usually folks already know about the problems of hard water because of the difficulties it presents in everyday life: shampooing hair, cleaning bathroom fixtures, regular laundry, etc. I know that in the rual areas I have lived in - or consulted to - folks have already had a filter put on the tap - or they regularly used Calgon as an additive. Adding Calogon water softener is perfectly fine, it does no harm to the textile. All it does is cause the extra minerals to bind with it and "float around" harmlessly - Don't you love the technical terms here? Bst Newbie

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Subject: RE: Cleaning/conservation question... From: "Newbie Richardson"

Candace, et all, The "age spots" are caused by any number of sustances, as well as the natural oxidation of cellulosic fibers when exposed to the air. These substances, depending on their chemical composition ( icing from a wedding cake, champagne from the reception, blood, food stains, automibile exhaust, cat pee, baby 'liquids' etc, etc.), change over time and become even more acidic as they age. So it will depend on the original composition of the substance that created the stain. A gentle wet cleaning with water, Orvus, and maybe sodium perborate as a non invasive bleaching agent should do no harm. The stains will lighten. I tell all my workshop participants that we do not judge an 80 year old woman based on her wrinkles and crows feet, we know that these are the inevitable result of natural aging. However, if this same lady has not washed and is in filthy clothes - then we avoid her. The same with textiles: if they are clean and well presented, then no one condemns them for a few spots borne of age. Years ago, in 1950's Paris, my parents had a cook (my father had a very official job that required a lot of entertaining) who used to say: "It is all in the presentation, Madame!" Best Newbie

-----Original Message----- From: Candace Perry [mailto:candaceschwenkfelder.com] Sent: Friday, July 15, 2005 11:29 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Cleaning/conservation question...

One of my volunteers was asking how one can the acid stains that cause holes in white linens/cottons (specifically). I think there's no hope, but I said I would throw it out to this list...maybe someone's asked recently, and I apologize! She is looking to clean her personal collection -- which does include some museum quality things -- she and her husband are extraordinary poker-arounders, as I call them, and they find really great, overlooked stuff. They are currently on a homemade linen/cotton stocking kick. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

--- 

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Subject: Whole cloth quilts From: 

Lori,

I posted an old whole cloth quilt on the eboard a few weeks ago. My favorite book which includes mostly whole cloth quilts is "Quilts of Provence, The Art and Craft of French Quiltmaking" by Kathryn Berenson. I have quite a few in my collection, but it is nearly impossible to take a good picture where you can appreciate the quilting designs. Many of the older French quilts don't have batting, (only cording) so you can hold them up to the light and see the designs, but that doesn't give you the same impression as looking at the quilt itself.

Kay Triplett

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Subject: quilting magazines free to a good N. Texas home From: 

I'm on a BIG BIG cleaning binge,which for me is a major deal...Before I get too cold hearted and toss them.....I have a rather substantial collection of older quilt magazines not necessarily complete sequences, QNM starting in 1976 April, I think, is the first one I have. Quite a few Quilt World, Quilt and who knows what all else. If there is anyone in the Dallas / Richardson/ Plano area that would like to come take them off my hands.......Please email me privately. I would like for someone to just come pick them up. I really don't have time to ship them out (plus I keep finding more in the oddest places <G>) Please contact me privately if you are interested in adding to your stash or quilting magazines. (needless to say the fabric is staying - as of now!)

Laura Hobby Syler texas_quilt.coairmail.net

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Subject: Magnificent crazy quilt in Easthampton, Massachusetts From: "Karen Evans"

There is a simply amazing crazy quilt in a small antiques store called = Curiosities. It's on Cottage Street in Easthampton, Massachusetts, and = belongs to the owner (it was made by his mother's great-aunt).

The crazy is actually an unbacked parlor throw of silk on muslin (I've = seen the back - one piece of the muslin appears to have been a feed = sack!), 16 blocks with embroidery, pen and ink drawings, paintings, and = the occasional bit of applique. It's all silk, in bright fresh colors, = with two shattered pieces but otherwise very few signs of deterioration.

It is simply one of the finest crazies I've ever seen. The paintings = include animals, insects, a vase, a woman sitting on a bench, and so on. = The fabrics appear to be primarily dress silks, many in blues and = purples, with a couple of brocades and a cigar silk ribbon of a young = woman. ALL the pieces are embellished with fly stitch, blanket stitch, = and the occasional bit of what looks like very densely woven = blanket/buttonhole stitching. One or two of the blocks have some = basting stitches still in place, which leads me to believe that it was = never finished (confirmed by the lack of backing, or any evidence that = there *was* a back).

The colors are very bright and clean, with the embroidery threads on the = front being just about as bright as the knots/strings on the back - = clearly this wasn't used or displayed very much. The outside edges have = been sewn to black cotton, which is turn stitched firmly but not tightly = onto a wooden frame. Employees and visitors have firm instructions not = to touch the piece with their bare hands. I saw no stains either on the = front or the back.

The clerk told me that the owner is arranging to have an appraiser = (allegedly someone "from Kentucky" who appears on Antiques Roadshow - = anyone know who this might be?) examine the piece this fall. It is NOT = for sale, but anyone who wishes may look at it for as long as they = please.

This is DEFINTELY worth seeing - I don't think I've ever seen a crazy = like this before. This is a splendid find, and I hope the owner has the = sense to have it properly photographed and mounted for display at a = museum or historical society that can properly conserve it.

Karen Evans Easthampton, MA ------=

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Subject: Re: quilting magazines free to a good N. Texas home 

Hey Laura, How about donating them to the New England Quilt Museum. They resell them so they can earn a little money for the library. Viv

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Subject: Re: quilting magazines free to a good N. Texas home From: "Laura Syler"

If I dont get a local taker I just may do that. The Dallas Guild doesn't want them (go figure) ----- Original Message ----- 

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Subject: Kalona Quilt Museum From: Barb Garrett 

While I greatly appreciate (and enjoy) all the quilt benefits of living in southeastern PA, I was very pleased last week to visit a wonderful quilt venue in Iowa. The Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum was grand. Their current exhibit is midwest Amish crib quilts from a private collection, and they are just as interesting to study as our Lancaster Amish quilts -- more varied designs and a different color palatte -- graphically gorgeous in a different way than the Lancaster Amish ones. Displayed with the crib quilts was a marvelous collection of old store spool cabinets -- beautiful.

In the same complex is the Mennonite archives museum -- were there are several additional quilts, plus clothing and a great deal of family memorabilia -- a very interesting part of the visit. The website for the entire village is -- http://www.kalonaiowa.org/village/

It was great fun to meet and visit with fellow QHL member Marilyn Woodin, curator of the Kalona Quilt Museum -- she has done a wonderful job with the Quilt Museum. She tells me that she likes to change the exhibit every 3 to 4 months, and in August she will be mounting a redwork exhibit. I think she might also be including some red and white pieced quilts and some redwork done in blue, or yellow, or black, or pink, or green. She didn't give me details, but it will be a great exhibit, I'm sure, so if you are "in the area", I recommend stopping by. The town even offers a golf course just outside town -- where Bill spent his time while I had a quilt adventure. What more could I ask for -- only 3 hours from our conference (a short detour on the way home), and something to keep my driver happy while I emersed myself in quilts. The local motel -- The Pull-r Inn -- is great also (refers to the old fashioned tractor pulls that the owner used to participate in) and the local restaurant reminded me of home -- good PA German cooking, only I guess this would be Iowa German cooking.

The Midwest Amish Crib Quilts exhibit has a catalog, that unfortunately wasn't back from the printer yet, so hopefully Marilyn will post to the list details about it when it becomes available.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: QHL: Kalona Quilt Museum From: "Susan Wildemuth" 

I have to second what Barb wrote about the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum in Kalona, Iowa.

We at the Iowa-Illinois Quilt Study Group are lucky to be an educational auxiliary of this wonderful museum. IIQSG meets in April and August at the museum and we would love to have you join us -- we have show and share in the morning, a tour of the museum, lunch, and then a theme-based study in the afternoon. Our next meeting is August 6, 2005 at 9:30 a.m. with the doors of the museum opening at 9:00 a.m. for sign-in. The theme for our August afternoon study is Redwork.

Sue in Illinois

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Subject: Stephen Reich Memorial Fund From: "J. G. Row" 

Members of the QHL have really come through! You are the best! Absolutely! Many of you have thanked me for being the conduit of the QHL's donation to the Stephen Reich Memorial Fund. It is my great honor to be able to do this to show our friendship for Sue Reich, and to let her know that although there can be no real consolation for having lost her son, she can take some comfort knowing that now many people who would never have known him or anything about him will remember his bravery and patriotism and have honored his memory.

When I asked for a few contributions to help me pay for a wreath for Stephen Reich's funeral service given in the name of the QHL, I had no idea that so many of you would want to participate in honoring our friend Sue Reich's brave son. My small project soon turned "global" and has morphed into our donation to the Stephen Reich Memorial Fund, which the family has established. Money coming into this fund will be distributed to the Steep Rock Association - Major Reich spent many happy hours hiking on the association's preserves - and also to the Family Welfare Fund: 160th Regiment Nightstalkers Association.

My personal feeling is to direct 70% of our donation to the Family Welfare Fund of the Nightstalkers, and 30% to the Steep Rock Association, a nature preserve. If anyone disagrees with this distribution, get in touch with me personally -- don't take it to the list -- and I will withdraw your amount from the total and direct your donation to where you want.

With today's mail counted, 76 of you have contributed a total of $930.00!! I know because tonight I stamped all the checks "For Deposit Only." Contributions have come from 29 states, Canada and the UK. I must say, I have been intrigued by the notecard styles you chose (or didn't choose) and by the designs on your checks. Only one or two of you use quilty checks. If I had been asked to put money on how many of you use checks with quilt designs my number would have been much higher, and I would have lost big time.

If any of you have thought about donating and then forgot, there is still time. I will accept your donations to be given to the Fund in the name of the Quilt History List (with a list of all who contributed accompanying our check) until Thursday, July 28th. E-mail to me for my mailing address.

If you would prefer donating on your own, you may write a check to:

The Stephen Reich Memorial Fund

First National Bank of Litchfield

Po Box 391

Washington Depot CT 06794

If you have any questions about the fund, contact Debbie Swift at the bank:

860-868-7386

Judy in Ringoes, NJ soon to be Judy in Raritan, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Studio Quilt Study Group From: "J. G. Row" <

We will be meeting this coming Tuesday, July 19th. Our mission is to see the glorious quilts of the Gloucester County Historical Society collection, and there is room for just a couple more participants. I've seen one or two quilts from the collection, brought to a different study group meeting, and I know we will be treated to some early Quaker quilts, and more.

Please RSVP ASAP if you will be coming - by tomorrow, Sunday the 17th. Make your plans quickly!!!

One of our hostesses, the incomparable Judy Thompson, promises to bring her spectacular basket quilt that won just about every first prize possible at the Vermont Quilt Festival. I've heard that the judges awarded her quilt 99 points out of a possible 100. If old quilts won't get you to come to the meeting, perhaps a glorious contemporary quilt will. Polka dot enthusiasts won't be disappointed!

SQSG meeting; Tues. 7/19 Place: Kemble Memorial Methodist Church 19 S. Broad St. Woodbury, NJ Time: 10:00 am We will be viewing many of the quilts from the Gloucester County Historical Society collection. Their facility will not accommodate a large group so we will be meeting at Kemble Church, a few blocks down Broad St. We have been promised samplers by some of the quilters and photographs of them as well. We are trying to arrange a showing of some spectacular quilts from local private collections. The society does not allow photographs. Private collections may be photographed. Please bring your white gloves.

Suggested donation to GCHS $10.00 Lunch by Cooper Express $5.00 Gratuity for church custodian $1.00

Hosted by Nancy Stewart(nstewart504comcast.net) and Judy Thompson (jilt26comcast.net)

Please RSVP ASAP Directions:

Kemble Memorial Methodist Church 19 S. Broad St. Woodbury, NJ Judy T's Cell phone 609 617-9856

From the North: Rte. I-295 S to Exit 21 (Paulsboro/Woodbury). Right at the light end of exit (Wendy's will be across the road). Right onto #534/Delaware St. (Geisler's Liquor Store on the right). Delaware St. continue for aprox. 1.4 miles to Russell Alley (no street sign); landmarks on the right are Woodbury Public Library, then Friendship Fire Co. Right into alley along side of the fire house. Parking behind the church. or Park on street in front of church (busy street, limited parking). Continue to traffic light at Broad St. (Rte. 45) and make a right turn. The front of the church is about 100 yds. on the right.

From the South: Rte. I-295 N to Exit 21 (Paulsboro/Woodbury). Landmark is large West Deptford water tower. Right at the end of the ramp onto #534/Delaware St. Continue as per above directions.

Watch for balloons and SQSG sign at fire house alley.

Judy Thompson and Nancy Stewart

Judy in Ringoes, NJ judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: whole cloth quilts From: Paulette Bergman 

Hello! Just one more author/title to add to the list:

Horton, Marjorie, Welsh Quilting Pattern & Design Handbook, 1999.

This is primarily pattern/design with only a tiny bit on history. I believe that Marjorie lives in the Portland, Oregon, area.

As ever, in stitches, Paulette Paulette J. Bergman 

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Subject: Re: quilting magazines free to a good N. Texas home From: "Molly"

Hi Laura,

I am interested in any magazines that has quilt judging info in them. I understand that Pat Morris (now deceased) did a series many years ago. If you have these I would very much like to at least have those articles... Could you let me know... I will let you know my address, etc... Thanks... Molly

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Subject: quilting checks and other ways to show you are a quilting/Judy/Sue From: "Linda Heminway" 

Just wanted to make a comment to you all after Judy mentioned that she was surprised at how many of us didn't have quilting designs on our checks. My current supplier of checks does not offer a quilting design, otherwise I'd have them! I look carefully each time I order new checks to see if they have come up with something. By the way, Judy, I think your ideas for dispersement of the funds in honor of Sue's wonderful son are marvelous and I so proud of this group that we have all shown such support. I don't know Sue, personally, but to you, Sue, I feel as if you are a "sister" that I have, given your interests, and that the loss of your son has hit me very hard in that I am one of those who have stepped forward to be NH coordinator for the Home of the Brave quilt project. I wish there was even more than I, and those in this group, could do to show how much we really do care and want to help you during this time. If there are things I can do, or our group can do, I know we all share this, so do let us know. Getting back to why I started writing this, I was wondering after reading Judy's remarks exactly what you all have in your respective lives that you use to remind you of quilting. It would be very interesting to read what you all have surrounding you in your day to day lives. My vanity license plate for my car here in NH is -QUILT- though! I try to surround myself with quilting patterns wherever I can. In our last house my bathroom floor linoleum was selected specifically as it formed an Ohio Star block design. I was so excited to have found it and that my own husband actually liked it enough to agree with us having it! I even saw a "quilted" corn bread recipe that I am dying to try now. You make the cornbread and then make a "pattern" on the top of it using triangle and square shaped pieces of peppers and laying them in a pattern over top of the bread before it's baked - it's kind of cute! I have actually gone as far as to thinking of using some of my Jane Stickle quilt blocks that I have from an exchange on making kind of like a wallpaper border and using them end to end with a small "sashing" as a lovely reminder of my favorite things in life (other than all the usual things like God, family, pets, etc). I am such a visual person and quilting is such a part of my life that surrounding myself in whatever reminders I can find of my "love" is very important. By the way, I was actually going to write a book an call it "quilted wall borders" and come up with a way to make wall borders of quilt blocks and affix them to walls using two sided tape so that they could easily be removed if one wanted to clean or move and/or use them for quilts. I just got lazy and abandoned the project and never followed through. What other ways are you all (aside from quilts themselves, which we ALL have I am sure) are you all finding to bring your love of quilting "out there" into public view? I'd love to know. Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: Stephen Reich Memorial Fund From: 

> I am humbled by the goodness in the hearts of all of you who have taken time to remember my son with your beautiful memorial wreath and your donations to the "Night Stalkers Family Fund" and the Steep Rock Preservation. He was passionate and totally dedicated to both of these entities. Our collective family is somewhere between exquisitely sad and numb. Our hearts truly know the meaning of the word "anguish." The absolute worst thing in life has happened to us. At least now, we are living day-to-day and not hour-to-hour. This seems like an endless deployment. I wake up each morning and ask Stephen for help to get through the day. I am certain that he is somehow responsible for providing me with any strength I can muster. To add insult to injury, his wife's family traveled back to Panama City to find their childhood beach home con-demned due to a massive amount of beach erosion from the last hurricane. Ugh! Life does go for us with a very steep learning curve; but we have grandchildren to cheer us, and pets who give that unconditional love. There are quilt history projects that were promised and planned, that must proceed. Gardens to be weeded. Mortgage payments due. That last thing my son would want is for us to become paralyzed. Thanks again to all of you who been there in so many ways. I always will be eternally grateful. sue reich

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Subject: RE: quilting magazines From: "Maribeth Schmit" 

Laura and others, I am on the board of the Wisconsin Quilt History Project and the = Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Textiles. We are a non profit 501c(3) organization = and were formed in 1988. We published the book, "Wisconsin Quilts: Stories = in the Stitches" in 2001. One of the other hats I wear is librarian for = the research library at the interim museum. We accept donations of books, magazines, pamphlets, photos, etc. Anything having to do with textile = arts we would gladly accept. We would also be able to give you a receipt for = tax purposes. Please consider this worthwhile organization for care of your textile related treasures. See our website at: http://www.wiquiltmuseum.com/ Please E-mail me privately for further information or questions at: materialgirlwi.rr.com

Maribeth Schmit in historic Cedarburg, WI

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Subject: more re: washing the quilts From: "Mary Voss" <

I have had great success washing antique quilts in the washing machine - not using the agitator but just soaking the quilt in the tub, swooshing it around with my hands, letting it soak, and spinning the water out. Rinse several times by re-filling, soaking and spinning it. I then stretch out the quilt on a sheet on my living room carpet. I have used various soaps with no ill effect. Most of my quilts have a white background and much of the yellow stains were removed. I must say that none of these quilts have any historical significance which would make a big difference in how they are treated, they are just wonderful old quilts that came across my path and begged me to buy them, so I could appreciate the wonderful workmanship that was put into them. - Mary Voss - Holland MI

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Subject: nested levels? From: "Jean Carlton" 

Hi all I've had two digests this past week that come to me with the message that there were too many nested files to scan for viruses....anyone else had this? All others come as usual - I haven't opened these as getting a virus is NOT worth it....anyone else? j

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Subject: Re: nested levels? From: "J. G. Row" 

Jean,

I get single messages, not digest and a couple have come through lately with attachments -- which I haven't opened. I still have Barb Garret's last post about the Kalona Quilt Museum and it came with an attachment -- very strange.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: nested levels? From: Kris Driessen <

I think the attachments are just verifications - some E-mail clients attach those routinely so you can trust the sender. The list is set up to block those.

I think another problem might be that people are including too much stuff from the previous post in their reply. When I read the digest, I read the same message over and over after people include it in their reply. A couple of sentances would work just as well.

AND... people need to send in plain text, not HTML. Those on digest get pretty sick of reading all the =0D and other HTML markups. That might be part of the problem as well.

Kris

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Subject: Re:quilting checks and other ways to show you are a quilting 

Linda, I have the usual quilters "stuff"...quilts hanging all over my house (my DH tells people we live in a padded house!), quilty checks, and I always have a small quilt hanging on my front door. It changes according to the season or my mood (g).

Fun topic, thanks for asking the question.

Andrea, near Dayton

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 16, 2005 From: Laura Robins-Morris 

>Judy in Ringoes, NJ >soon to be >Judy in Raritan, NJ

Is there a Raritan Kid?? We'll miss the alter ego :-)

Laura in Seattle

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Subject: Re: quilting checks and other ways to show you are a quilting/Judy/Sue From:

What other ways are you all (aside from quilts themselves, which we ALL = have I am sure) are you all finding to bring your love of quilting "out = there" into public view?

Other than having quilts all over the house and on every bed, I have = quilted wall paper, quilted notecards, quilt calendars in every room. = I'd love to find the tiles to do a quilted floor, that sounds wonderful. = I would also like to find quilted checks so if anyone has a source for = them, other than your bank, please let me know.

Jessica M. Vaughn Aurora, CO vaughn8047msn.com<mailto:vaughn8047msn.com>

Make yourself familiar with the angels, and behold them frequently in = spirit; for without being seen, they are present with you. 

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Subject: Needlework in Sicily From: Karen Portwood 

Hello all,

I am hoping someone on the list might be able to give some suggestions. A friend of mine is leaving next week for a trip to Sicily. She wanted me to ask the list if anyone knows of places there to see needlework (not necessarily just quilts). She is thinking museums, shops, etc. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Please email me off list. Thank you.

Karen

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 16, 2005 From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2005 12:02:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I suspect she'll always be The Ringoes Kid, no matter where she lives, don't you? Marcia

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Subject: Re: Needlework in Sicily From: Becky Gockel <

No, please don't email off list. I am going to Italy in October, so I would love to see the responses.

Thank you, Becky

Karen Portwood <acornqltsyahoo.com> wrote: Hello all,

I am hoping someone on the list might be able to give some suggestions. A friend of mine is leaving next week for a trip to Sicily. She wanted me to ask the list if anyone knows of places there to see needlework (not necessarily just quilts). She is thinking museums, shops, etc. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Please email me off list. Thank you.

Karen

--0-1530969606-1121716324=:8983--

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Subject: washing quilts From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2005 16:08:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

When I began appraising quilts many years ago, I often told my husband that I was going to write down the wild stories I heard and keep note of the hysterically funny or downright bizarre things/stories that came across my table. I was well intentioned, but I fear I did not keep my promise, and a good boks' worth of great stories have left my feeble brain. One story has not escaped me, however, and it has to do with washing.

I was doing my measurements, notes, etc., on this particular quilt and asking the client about the origin/provenance, etc. She said, "Well, I don't really know a lot - I bought it at an auction in _____ (somewhere in the midwest.) It was stored in a 55 gallon drum in a warehouse by a river - the river flooded, and the barrel took on water, and this quilt was in it. It was completely brown when I bought it, so I took it home and threw it in the bathtub with Stanley Degreaser and left it for a week or so." I remember that I nearly went into shock!!!! Before me, on the table, lay a magnificent early indigo and white feathered star - a remarkable beauty. I am certain that I would have told her never, ever to attempt to wash it!

On the other hand, many are the times that someone has said "I was going to bring a quilt for you to appraise, but I didn't want you to see it dirty, so I washed it and completely ruined it." So sad.

DISCLAIMER: I do not and am not endorsing the use of Stanley - or any other product here - just relating a tale. The stuff may have been ancient - I think my Mom still has a bottle she purchased in 1954 just before we moved to Okinawa. Teddy P

_________________________________________________________________ Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE! http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/

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Subject: thread color fastness question From: "Andi" <andi0613iowatelecom.net> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2005 17:44:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I'm working with the Wilson Memorial Library director here in Keota, Iowa, studying an 1890 Redwork album fundraising quilt. We are certain of the date because one newspaper article dated August 1, 1890 mentions that the quilt has been begun, and another in December 1890 refers to the funds raised (and the center block is embroidered with "1890"). Merchants from Keota and nearby Harper purchased individual blocks for $3; individuals had their names embroidered for 10 cents (according to a newspaper account of Keota's centennial celebration). The artist for the commercial blocks was A.H. Richardson, a 13-year-old young man from Harper who became editor of the Keota Eagle (newspaper) when he was 17. Tremendous history, lots of area names, etc.

 

My question: the Turkey Red thread in 41 of the 42 blocks is surely colorfast. But what about the brown and black threads used in one central block that is a memorial to people who died? See some of the blocks at http://www.iowa-history.com/quiltindex.html . Does anyone have expertise with embroidery threads other than Turkey Red from the 1890 period? With what would brown and black threads have been dyed at that time? Can these two colors be safely, i.e., non-bleeding, treated with sodium percarbonate? Or some other cleaning agent? The quilt has significant yellowing and mildew spots all over. In fact, Pat Cummings asked to use a photo of a block of the Keota Quilt to show discoloration (not sure of the term you used, Pat) in her new book on quilt care. Oh yes - top and back are linen with a cotton flannel (very thin) batt. (Thanks to AQS appraiser Chris Moline for her help with this information.)

 

I am not in favor of cleaning the quilt, but perhaps I am too cautious; we need to halt the mildew somehow. I know about using a wet q-tip to test for colorfastness on fabrics, but I have to say that the thought of making a mistake with as much as a q-tip is daunting on such thin lines as this embroidery. The library now has acid free boxes and tissue paper for storage but no humidity control in the air conditioned basement where this (and two other quilts) live as property of the library, so the mildew question is big. In the months this quilt has lived in my house, it has noticeably stopped "growing" mildew - but keeping it with me is not a permanent option (drat).

 

For those who track Redwork, a similar quilt is in the IQSC collection from Beatrice, Nebraska.

 

 

Thanks in advance -

 

Andi in Keota, Iowa

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Subject: Quilt stuff in our lives From: "Amerine, Anne" <anne.amerinengc.com> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2005 14:37:50 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9

I copied the picture from The Quilt Detective that covered hand quilting and use it as wall paper on my computer at home. No quilt checks, but I had a quilt checkbook cover for years.  Anne Amerine

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Subject: Keota Quilt From: Patricia L Cummings <quiltersmusecomcast.net> Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2005 12:11:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Andi:

My book, Straight Talk about Quilt Care, describes the Keota quilt as having "mold/mildew". Mold and mildew have the same causal agent, and can produce a variety of colors on cloth. More is explained in the book.

Pat www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: quilty checks From: JKusnitzaol.com Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2005 13:10:58 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

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For all of you who want quilty checks, check out _www.checksinthemail.com_ (http://www.checksinthemail.com) click on the hobbies link and you'll see some.

My license plate says QUILTNOW. (QUILTMOM was already taken) My husband frequently travels with my car on photo trips and was once asked if he is a quilter.

Helene Kusnitz on Long Island where it really is hazy, hot and humid.

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Subject: Search for Elizabeth Saville Lewis Quilt Collection From: Ann-Louise Beaumont <albeaumontcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2005 13:08:01 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

Jane Crutchfield in Massachusetts asked me to pass along this request for information on the whereabouts of half of the Elizabeth Saville Lewis collection. If this request has been previously posted, please forgive the duplication. Jane received an email from Irene Zenev, Exhibits Curator at the Benton County Historical Museum in Philomath, OR 97370, www.bentoncountymuseum.org with the following request: " I work at the Benton County Historical Museum in Philomath, Oregon. We are trying to find about 20 quilts that belonged to Eliazbeth Saville Lewis that she dispersed to a museum in the East in 1956. Mrs. Lewis was a quilt collector and historian, and bestowed half her collection to Oregon State University's former Horner Museum and the other half to a museum unknown to us. I am contacting any organization who may know the whereabouts of this quilt collection. It dates from the Revolutionary war to the Civil War, and is quite important 2006 is the 50th anniversary of her gift to the Horner Collection, and if we can find them, we'd like to virtually reunite the quilts on the web to celebrate Mrs. Lewis' gift to the public."

A second email to Jane contains this: " We do have a description and black and white photos of some of the quilts that we're looking for. Most of Mrs. Lewis' collection ( her nickname was Bessie, she was married to a judge and lived in the Washington, DC area) dated from the late 18th century to the mid 19th century. There are a couple of bridal quilts, a Triple Irish Chain, an album quilt, but I'm not sure of the exact number or patterns of all the quilts. We're also trying to find the donor, Mrs. Lewis' daughter, Susan Lewis Cockrell, but am not having much luck."

I hope this rings a bell with someone out there. Please contact Irene Zenev with any information that you may have. Again, apologies if this has been posted before and I missed it. Best Wishes, Ann-Louise Beaumont, in Greeley, CO

-- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.9.2/52 - Release Date: 7/19/05

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Subject: Thanks re Fabric Covered Bottle Cap Info From: Ann-Louise Beaumont <albeaumontcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2005 13:12:31 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

Thank you all for your information on trivets, often in fruit shapes, that you posted. Since the bag of red and green fabric circles also had some prints with a white background, I'm assuming that it was intended to be a watermelon trivet. Believe me, I would never have guessed that! Best Wishes, Ann-Louise Beaumont in Greeley, CO

-- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.9.2/52 - Release Date: 7/19/05

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Subject: Re: Thanks re Fabric Covered Bottle Cap Info From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2005 14:17:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Watermelon motifs (and watermelons themselves!) were hot items, esp in South. Marjorie Kinnen Rawlings, author of "The Yearling" and the Cross Creek books lists in her "Cross Creek Cookery" a recipe for a cake her Ky. Mother made to resemble watermelon. Roaches had nibbled edges, but one could make sense of it anyway. A time-intensive recipe. A cousin had a kiddy watermelon swim suit. And to this day, hollowed out melons remain a hot item at buffets and garden parties---containers for fruit salad. Were there watermelon quilts?

Gail

> trivets, often in fruit shapes, > that you posted. Since the bag of red and green fabric circles also had > some prints with a white background, I'm assuming that it was intended > to be a watermelon trivet.

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Subject: Medieval demo in Ludlow, Massachusetts From: "Karen Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2005 21:45:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

The local branch of the Society for Creative Anachronism held a medieval history/fighting demo at the Hubbard Memorial Library in Ludlow, Massachusetts, this evening. I brought along a quilted tunic and my current project, a backstitched pouch, as part of the needlework exhibit.

As it turned out, I was one of the people interviewed by a reporter for the local weekly! The reporter asked intelligent questions about the origins of quilting, how it was used in medieval Europe, and what techniques were used. He even took my picture as I worked on my pouch!

The article should come out in the next week or two (more likely two weeks from now, since this week will probably be devoted to the Harry Potter release party at the library last week). I'll definitely post the text to the list.

It was definitely fun, even if the hideously sticky and hot weather is driving me nuts....

Karen Evans

 

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Subject: quilt checks From: PatKoerneraol.com Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 00:13:38 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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Jessica and others interested in quilt checks I finally found them at Checks in the Mail and the number on the box is 800-733-4443 / www.citm.com I don't find the name of the design but there are four different quilt designs that are repeated. Double Wedding Ring, Nine Patch, Star and Rolling Stone. Hope they are still available. I have had these for a couple of years. Dont write very many checks so they have lasted a long time. Pat Moore

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Subject: Quilting checks and other ways to show you are a quilting From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 08:16:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Here are some ways I like to "surround" myself with quilts. I have address labels with quilt images: http://www.colorfulimages.com/ Type in Quilt in the search box. I have the BlockBase software by Electric Quilt, and have downloaded the BlockBase screensaver for both my home & work computers. I love watching those blocks spin by :) I have a 'quilt block a day' perpetual calendar on my desk at work, always fun to flip it over & see what the new block of the day is :) (A friend gave me another perpetual calendar that features a saying about chocolate for each day of the year, that usually brings a chuckle!!) Since I spend too much time at work, I try to have as much "quilty" stuff around me there as possible. My mouse pad has a Diane Phalen motif. I have 3 quilts that are on the walls all the time, and a small quilt that changes for each holiday/season. I tell my boss he should be paying me "rent" for the art work :) He particularily likes the Amish Chinese Coins quilt I made, that hangs behind my desk. The large calendar on the wall is the Lang American Quilt calendar, in a frame http://www.lang.com/jump.jsp?itemID=5758&itemType=PRODUCT&path=1%2C2%2C4%2C4 66&iProductID=5758 I have notepads with quilt motifs (but tend to 'save' them, just like that fabric that is too good to cut in to :) I have coffee cups, greeting cards and postcards, jewelry, sweaters & t-shirts - even pocket tissue packs (Kleenex) with quilt motifs. I love the "Heartwood Creek" figurines, by Jim Shore, with quilty motifs. It isn't hard to find decorative and functional items to keep you thinking quilts, even when you are at work :) Now if some Quilt Angels would just come along & stitch while I slept :) Happy Quilting!! Karan from hot & humid Iowa

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Subject: RE: Quilting checks and other ways to show you are a quilti ng From: Margareta.Faustcec.eu.int Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 16:35:16 +0200 X-Message-Number: 3

Thanks for the website, Karan! I remembered I have been looking for a place to order business cards, and qhl may be the very people to ask! Although I quite liked what was on this site, I would really like cards with a single colour and motive. I know I have some from dealres and collectors (maybe some of you who are reading this) with say, a basket or Sunbonnet Sue in one corner, slightly raised - I think you get my idea. Any ideas where I could order this - from Europe? Margareta

-----Original Message----- From: Karan Flanscha [mailto:SadieRosecfu.net] Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2005 3:17 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Quilting checks and other ways to show you are a quilting

Here are some ways I like to "surround" myself with quilts. I have address labels with quilt images: http://www.colorfulimages.com/ Type in Quilt in the search box.

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Subject: quilt design checks From: stephanie drake <gsadrakeyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 08:20:51 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Checks in the Mail has a quilt design available.

>

__________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: 7/19/05 Watermelon quilts From: Sandra G Munsey <munseyjuno.com> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 12:09:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Yes, Gail, there definitely are watermelon quilts. Somewhere in my quilt "stuff" I have a contemporary pattern, probably 1980s or 90s, that makes half-square triangle watermelon slices. The blocks were fairly large, 10 or 12 inches maybe, and suggested for a picnic tablecloth or quilt.

Then, there is Rachel Clark's watermelon outfit - skirt, jacket and accessories, as I recall.

Finally, I had the privilege of borrowing a Pre-Civil War "watermelon" quilt for display at an exhibit I organized in April for an historical society fund raiser. The provenance of the quilt is quite thorough as it is still in the hands of direct descendants. A wedding ambrotype of the maker and her husband exists. She was the daughter of a well-to-do plantation owner in Twiggs County, GA. The quilt was made in 1860-61 and was one of a handful of possessions taken from the plantation in advance of Union armies in 1894. When the family returned to the plantation later, it had been pillaged and burned. The quilt is known in the family as "the watermelon quilt". It may have been made in conjunction with the birth of the maker's first child, but most certainly it was made soon after her wedding. Those of us up here in the cradle of Yankee-land felt privileged, indeed, to be able to display this unique quilt. Although, the current caretaker was afraid his ever-so-great Gran might be spinning in her grave! <G>

Unfortunately, DH and I are not into the digital camera world yet, so I cannot post a photo. But I will describe it the best I can. The applique quilt has 6 large blocks separated by sashing . The design is a quatrefoil reminiscent of the Oakleaf block. The center "hub" is yellow. There are 4 watermelons, positioned north, east, south and west. Each is a plump oval - like a watermelon. A smaller oval in the center, looking like a melon with a large slice removed from end to end, appears to be a dark reddish brown and shows effects of a change in color due to aging. Two green crescents surround each brown oval like the outer skin on a watermelon. The condition of the quilt is superb. There is little in the way of foxing on the creamy muslin background of the blocks or on the back. The border and sashing is red (probably madder) calico with a tiny white figure. The size is 56 x 79 inches.

The family contacted Smithsonian at some point for advice about the quilt and ambrotype. However, I do not know if the quilt was seen by the Georgia Quilt Project. If someone from that project would like to know more about the watermelon quilt, please contact me privately.

So, there you have it, Gail, there are watermelon quilts.

Sandra on Cape Cod -- where we are having a good dose of watermelon weather right now!

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Subject: Re: Watermelon quilts From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 17:24:22 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

Watermelons are amply represented in Baltimore-style applique quilts, usually shown in footed epergnes or on tables, sometimes sliced and with a knife inserted. See for instance:

Oliver, Enduring Grace. Quilts from the Shelburne Museum Collection, p 29.

Katzenberg, Baltimore Album Quilts, pp. 79 (2 watermelons), 83, 85 (2 watermelons), 87, 89, 93, 105

O'Brien, Home and Country, Early Nineteenth Century Quilts in the DAR Museum, p.45

Xenia

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Subject: Baltimore? From: Kathie Holland <kathiehollandoptonline.net> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 19:23:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

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I will be in Baltimore for a few days in mid August can anyone recommend musuems that I will be able to see antique Baltimore Album Quilts ? Any other interesting things to see and do in the area? Then we are off to Gettysburg for a couple of days and down to Williamsburg.....If you have any recommendations of must see museums and quilt shops in any of these areas I would really appreciate it. thanks, Kathie in NJ Kathie Holland kathiehollandoptonline.net

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Subject: Re: quilt checks From: "JESSICA VAUGHN" <vaughn8047msn.com> Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2005 22:39:06 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

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Thank you Pat. I found them, and am ordering them......DH probably = won't like them but he never writes checks anyway....

Jessica M. Vaughn Aurora, CO

 

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Subject: Red/Green quilts From: "avalon" <malthausidcnet.com> Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2005 09:35:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

When the quilting went across the appliqué shapes on the 1800's red/green quilts, was it the white thread of the background quilting or did the thread color change to match the appliqué color?

Mary

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Subject: a visit to the Garden State (long) From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2005 15:42:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

The Studio Quilt Study Group does great field trips. On Tuesday Judy Thompson and Nancy Stewart arranged for us to see the quilts in the collection of the Gloucester County Historical Society in Woodbury, NJ, a town with Quaker roots founded in 1683. The Society owns 88 quilts; we saw 55 of them plus 6 from private collections. It's amazing we were able to drive home after such sensory overload. There was a real Marseilles coverlet circa 1800 We saw a number of Quaker quilts. One made by Harriet Jones about 1850 had alternating strips of pale green and dark green silk (said to be from wedding dresses) quilted in fans, curved chevrons and cables. It had a back of glazed tan cotton (seen on several other quilts). This was not the same as the fabric used to line garments which we also saw used as quilt backing. Another Quaker example was a silk Lone Star on a green background with clam shell quilting (mid-19th century). It had a pale blue glazed back and is known as the Rebecca Clark quilt. You can see a picture of a third Quaker silk quilt brought by one of our members (1750-1775) on p. 10 of the Best Sort but Plain," the catalogue of the Brandywine River Museum exhibit curated by Patricia Keller. It has a pale green top and a dark blue wool back. A second, very similar, quilt is in the collection of the Independence National Historical Park. A Quaker quilt from the 1860s was made of silk scraps in the Double X pattern with beautiful running feather quilting. The back of this one is the brown lining fabric. An 1840s 9-Patch variation was accompanied by the 1828 sampler of the maker M.W. Brown. The sampler had many Quaker characteristic. The quilt has an elaborate manufactured fringe. One of the most interesting fabrics was a commemorative with an eagle and the portrait of a military man. J. G. Row thinks it's Zachary Taylor; I'm not sure about the uniform. I think we should send the picture to Lynne Gorges to see if she can tell us anything about the uniform. I was in signature quilt heaven. There were many from the early 1840s, lots of turkey red fabrics, names stamped and inscribed, some wonderful inking (our favorite was a raccoon commemorating the 1840 election of William Henry Harrison on a Chimney Sweep made by Elma Souder in 1844 ). On p. 75 of "New Jersey Quilts: 1777 to 1950" by the Heritage Quilt Project on New Jersey you can see the 1845 Double X signature quilt we raved about. The strangest thing about this quilt is that its sashing is a pink paisley that if you found a chunk of it at a yard sale would make you think 1940 (The more I learn the less I'm sure of.) On the next page is another quilt which has a back made of the same fabric as the Double X (the back is pictured), an incredible chintz. A second Double X signature quilt dated 1843-44 uses that strange paisley in some of the blocks. The 1845 Prickett Family quilt had sashing and borders of a blue and beige chintz. The blocks were turkey red, yellow, our favorite pistachio green and brown with stamped and inked signatures including some great drawings. An 1843 Chimney Sweep variation (I love that block) used four patches for the squares that surround the center square something none of us had seen before. It looks great. The early blocks were sashed and borders with triple rows of double pink and "poison" green, probably added in the 1870s. The most magnificent quilt of the day was a huge Lone Star (circa 1840) with smaller stars between the blades and various large scale chintzes used as the setting fabrics. Some of us would have been content to spend the rest of the day studying the fabrics in that quilt and imagining women wearing dresses made from them. It had a tape binding (as did many of the quilts we saw) and the back was pieced from a variety of brown prints. I liked an Oak Leaf and Reel in various turkey reds and greens set 6x6 with no sashing or borders. I loved a quilt made by Abigail Ann Leonard Chew, dated August 14, 1854 in which a Carpenters Square alternates with peony blocks and turkey red Diagonal Crosses form the sashing. That's not a very good description, but it's an amazing quilt. A large scale President's Wreath (22" square) has no sashes or borders. The name A. L. Horner is stamped in all four corners (better safe than sorry); it has a double pink back. A Mexican Rose 9 block has a vine and flower border but no sashing. An exquisite Modified 9-Patch with a wide drab chintz border with a shell motif, circa 1840, was donated by a woman who thought it was ugly! There was a Postage Stamp of 3/4" squares "made by a small boy who was sick." Wonder how he felt when he got finished. In 1865 one Rev. Zane was presented with, not one, but two signature quilts: one a Maple Leaf and Reel in red, white and green is inscribed "from the people of the Fourth Ward; the second is a flag (red, white and blue, of course) from the members of his church. This is nowhere near a complete account of the day, but it's all you're getting from me. I'm exhausted. If you don't belong to a study group join one. If you can't find one start your own. There really are lots of people out there like us and it's such fun when we get together. Cinda on the Eastern shore where like most of the eastern US it's too hot to go out. .

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Subject: Re: Red/Green quilts From: "Laura Syler" <texas_quilt.coairmail.net> Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2005 19:18:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

My experience has been that the majority of the quilting thread changed colors. Not always, but most times. And particularly in the green areas. Flipping the quilt over reveals the color change, and not always to red or green....I've seen a lot of brown colors. Some of those may have been home dyed and fugitive.

Laura Hobby Syler Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles Quilt restoration specialist Richardson, Texas

 

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Subject: Fwd: Re: washing quilts From: Vivien Sayre <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2005 17:51:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

>Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2005 17:12:51 -0400 >To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> >From: Vivien Sayre <vsayrenesa.com> >Subject: Re: [qhl] washing quilts > > >Teddy and All, >Here's one for the books. I was brought a quilt by a client who said she >had put the thing into a bucket with soap and warm water and used a >plunger to agitate it. The quilt however was beautiful. >Vivien > >P.S. Same "DISCLAIMER" as Teddy > > > >At 04:08 PM 7/18/2005 -0400, you wrote: >>When I began appraising quilts many years ago, I often told my husband >>that I was going to write down the wild stories I heard and keep note of >>the hysterically funny or downright bizarre things/stories that came >>across my table. I was well intentioned, but I fear I did not keep my >>promise, and a good boks' worth of great stories have left my feeble >>brain. One story has not escaped me, however, and it has to do with washing. >> >>DISCLAIMER: I do not and am not endorsing the use of Stanley - or any >>other product here - just relating a tale. The stuff may have been >>ancient - I think my Mom still has a bottle she purchased in >>1954 just before we moved to Okinawa. Teddy P >> >>_________________________________________________________________

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Subject: indigo prints reproduction From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2005 15:13:27 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi all--A client wants indigo and white quilts for her yacht (can you imagine!) and is reluctant to use antiques because these will likely need frequent washing. If I choose to get involved in such a project, who or where would be the best resource to create new pieced quilts for her, copying old pattern(s). And, which fabric line or quilt shop might have reproduction 1880s indigo blue printed fabric to use for this purpose? Any leads would be appreciated.

And, re quilty stuff all around us---I am amused to notice that nearly every day there's an article in the New York Times that uses a quilt reference to comment on some social issue crisis--i.e., a crazy quilt of regulations", "a patchwork of run-down buildings..."etc. For a while I clipped them out in case they would find re-use in a lecture or article, but now that they appear so often, my interest seems to be waning. Does this occur in your local papers?

I remember way back when I first started handling quilts part-time, my boss at the NYC Human Rights Commision had significant input on Jesse Jackson's Presidential campaign; he made an eloquent speech using patchwork quilt references to describe the multi-ethnic multi-racial nature of the people of the U.S.

Laura FIsher

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Subject: visit to the Garden State/Thanks Cinda From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2005 21:07:21 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi Cinda, Thank you for describing the wonderful quilts you saw recently. We hate to miss them, but love to read about what treasurers you saw. I appreciate your posting so those of us who can't go can enjoy hearing about your delightful day. Carol Grace

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Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: washing quilts From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 12:29:11 +0100 X-Message-Number: 4

>> Here's one for the books. I was brought a quilt by a client who said >> she had put the thing into a bucket with soap and warm water and used >> a plunger to agitate it. The quilt however was beautiful.

Would that plunger be what we would call a 'posser', as opposed to a 'dolly'? If so, the washing process would have been efficient but quite gentle. The posser doesn't actually agitate the item, but rather it presses down as gently as if it was the flat of your hand pressing down, but because of the domed design and holes for water flow it in fact forces the water through it quite strongly. No agitation, no fist-like squeezing. DD and I both use modern possers regularly for small or delicate hand washes, and just a few plunges with the posser thoroughly wash without friction or stress on the garment.

A dolly on the other hand, with rods sticking out at an angle and a top handle for vigorous twisting, is quite a brutal implement of agitation.

Halfway down this page, on the right, is a picture of a posser with a many-legged dolly standing next to it. In best English tradition the pictures feature small children being made to do the work <GGG>

http://tinyurl.com/8568y

Sally W in the UK

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Subject: Red Green quilting From: stephanie drake <gsadrakeyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 04:49:56 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

I have such an applique quilt and the quilting stitches went right across the appliques and were done in white thread, allover diagonal parallel lines. The applique wasn't too finely done and the stitching was also done in white thread.

> > > When the quilting went across the appliqué shapes > on the 1800's red/green > quilts, was it the white thread of the background > quilting or did the thread > color change to match the appliqué color? > > Mary > > > > > > i

____________________________________________________ Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs

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Subject: washing quilts From: joan kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 07:52:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Sally -- Thanx for the demos. I noticed your term mangle is what the colonies call a wringer; and our mangle is a large electric ironer with a lidded top; great for pressing sheets and other flat items. Not sure if the term mangle is in use today; it generally went off mass market around the late 1950s when no-iron sheets and later poly fabrics became standard. However, the machine hung in there and enjoyed a revival in the 1980s to now. Not sure what the various names are for this machine today. Someone may know who has one????

Sally Ward wrote:

> > Halfway down this page, on the right, is a picture of a posser with a > many-legged dolly standing next to it. In best English tradition the > pictures feature small children being made to do the work <GGG> > > http://tinyurl.com/8568y > > > > >

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Subject: Re: washing quilts From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 13:57:09 +0100 X-Message-Number: 7

> Sally -- Thanx for the demos. I noticed your term mangle is > what the colonies call a wringer;

Hmm......'wringing' is what you do with your hands <G>...I was taught in school to make a rope-like twist to wring items out, and always to position the hands so that you increased the twist with the left hand facing upwards, twisting clockwise and the right hand facing upwards twisting anti-clockwise. Very hard to describe, but it means the wrists and arms are working towards each other. This was supposed to be least strenuous position.

I notice that wringing and mangling seem to have interchangeable meanings on the adverts on that site. I think 'mangle' was seen as an old-fashioned term, because when my Mother got a Hoover washing machine in the early 60s it definitely had a 'wringer' on the top, not a 'mangle', whereas Grandmother still had a 'mangle' in her outhouse <G>

Sally W

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Subject: Re: washing quilts From: "Nancy Gibbs" <izannah1msn.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 09:07:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

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Back when I was a child my dad and grandfather had a laundry and = drycleaning plant, and several of the older employees called the big = flatwork ironers "mangles," while my other grandmother called a wringer = a "mangle." So for me growing up in Iowa in the 50's the term had both = uses, but only by older people. For people of my parents' generation, = neither term was used.

Nancy G. in PA ----- Original Message ----- From: Sally Ward<mailto:sallytattersntlworld.com> To: Quilt History List<mailto:qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 8:57 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: washing quilts

> Sally -- Thanx for the demos. I noticed your term mangle is =

> what the colonies call a wringer;

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Subject: Quilts/patchwork in other countries From: Margareta.Faustcec.eu.int Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 16:13:53 +0200 X-Message-Number: 9

Hello all, I have just returned from a holiday on the island of La R=E9union - a French territory in the Indian Ocean, east of Madagascar. There I saw a couple of yo-yo/puff pieces at flea markets, they did not = look very spectacular so I didn't bother. I then found out that they are a = local tradition, called tapis mendiant - i.e. 'beggar's rug'. A Google search did not yield a lot, a glossary of local terms http://www.bibliotheque.refer.org/html/reunion/lexique/tapismen.htm

says (for those who don't read French) 'a patchwork made of pieces of = fabric in different colours, used as bedspreads, tablecloths or = wall-hangings'. It says it's made up of 'rosaces' and when looking under that word, I = found the description of the yo-yos/puffs. Wish I could return to this lovely island to do some more investigation = and maybe bring back a piece for study!! Most of all, I would like to know HOW this particular technique emerged = /got there. Influence or independent invention?? The word is also used metaphorically, especially when the population of multi-ethnic origin describe themselves (with reference to Laura = Fisher's contribution the other day).

Margareta - back in not-so-exotic Luxembourg.

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Subject: Re: indigo prints reproduction From: Carol Elmore <celmorek-state.edu> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 09:14:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Quoting Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>:

> > And, re quilty stuff all around us---I am amused to notice that > nearly every day there's an article in the New York Times that uses a > quilt reference to comment on some social issue crisis--i.e., a crazy > quilt of regulations", "a patchwork of run-down buildings..."etc. For > a while I clipped them out in case they would find re-use in a > lecture or article, but now that they appear so often, my interest > seems to be waning. Does this occur in your local papers?

Laura and others, I remember doing a search on an online legal database not long ago to locate the word "quilt" and "patchwork" in law cases. I pulled up various uses of quilting terms such as "a patchwork of regulations," "a crazy quilt of redistricting," etc. I have also seen books that have nothing to do with quilts use a quilt on the cover--novels, textbooks, and other non-fiction. I guess those of us interested in quilts should be flattered. Isn't there some saying about imitation being the highest form of flattery? Personally, I'm a bit irritated by all of this use (misuse?).

Carol Elmore Manhattan, Kansas

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Subject: A "must" stop on your trip From: "Roberta (Bobbe) Benvin" <quiltsndogsaol.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 11:27:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

In reply to Kathy Holland's post of 7/20, requesting museum exhibits to tour during her August road trip: I very highly recommend the current exhibit at the York Heritage Trust (250 E. Market St., York, Pa), entitled "Quilts: A Testimony to Friendship." At least 25 early quilts are displayed, including an extremely rare Hewson in the Trust's collection. Several of these quilts were featured in the recent issue of McCall's Vintage Quilts magazine. The exhibit will be rotated sometime in August, with additional spectacular quilts on view. By the way, on July 31, at 2 pm, Merikay Waldvogel will be presenting a FREE lecture! Kathy, and other qhl members may want to make a special trip. For additional information, call the Trust at 717-848-1587. From someone who thinks/knows York County(Pa) quilts are the BEST! Roberta Benvin ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: washing quilts From: joan kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 11:20:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

I'm sure a book could be written about regional differences, and probably has been. From the 30s-50s ads called them the electric and non-electric wringer washer and mangle or iron press depending on manufacturer. I grew up with both in the 40s and 50s; seemed every household had to have a mangle for sheets and flat work. Some of the wringers were manually operated; the more expensive had a button to push, enabling you to pass clothes through with both hands which made the job somewhat less hazardous.

Nancy Gibbs wrote:

>Back when I was a child my dad and grandfather had a laundry and drycleaning plant, and several of the older employees called the big flatwork ironers "mangles," while my other grandmother called a wringer a "mangle." So for me growing up in Iowa in the 50's the term had both uses, but only by older people. For people of my parents' generation, neither term was used. > > > >

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Subject: Re: indigo prints reproduction From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 11:38:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Hi Laura, Dave and Shirley Shenk from Goshen Indiana do the best modern quilts around. Excellent workmanship and I highly recommend them. See their site at http://www.quiltdesigns.com/html/order.html . And Fasco has wonderful indigo repro fabrics. I also like the indigo prints from this Hungarian source (met them at Quilt Expo-). http://www.lmntl.com/bluedye.html and check out http://www.oregoncoast.com/denisedesigns/indigo.htm for info. I bought the Hungarian tablecloths at Expo and used them in a quilt. Wash and be sure to set color with Retane but I was pleasantly surprised at how little color loss as compared to African indigoes. Blue-and-white quilts for a yacht! And frequent washing indeed....does this person understand that blue is the most likely to fade color, indigo and expensive fabrics withstanding?! And on a yacht, especially in a sunny climate and maybe no curtains over the windows....fading is inevitable. However, if the customer has the bucks and understands all of the above, go for it! >From Pepper Cory in sunny coastal North Carolina who never uses navy fabrics in large chunks in her quilts that will be exposed to the sunlight here!

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Subject: Midwest Quilt Study Group/QHF From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 10:14:38 -0700 X-Message-Number: 14

If you missed The Quilters Hall of Fame=B9s annual Celebration this year in Marion, IN, you missed some real treats among the many exhibits we had. In particular I would like to publicly acknowledge on this list the many members of the Midwest Quilt Study Group who participated (not the least of which was sewing on those sleeves!). It just proves once again what a great resource QHL is for all of us for many of them are members of MWQSG as well as QHL. Those who loaned quilts were Katha Kievet, Karen Portwood, Peg Long, Marilyn Goldman, Joy Swartz, Babette Moorleghen, Mary Ann Drahman, Linda Pumphrey, Molly Butler, Joyce Fisher, Libbie Smith, Mary Persyn, Teri Klassen, Pam Conklin, and Xenia Cord. In addition Peg Long and Joy Swartz prepared all the notes and signage and drove up from southwest Indianapolis to conduct the walk-thru of the exhibit Wednesday night. Amy Korn, one of QHF=B9s Research Associates and a member of the MWQSG, conducted a walk-thru for us on Saturday. And last but hardly least (!) is their fearless leader -- Xenia Cord -- who responded to our request for just such an exhibit late last fall and thus began planting the seeds that blossomed into the exhibit Botanical Beauties:1850-1950. (Watch for coverage of their participation in the fall issue of QHF=B9s newsletter as well.) Thank you one and all for all your time, your quilts and your talents!

Karen Alexander President, The Quilters Hall of Fame

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Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: washing quilts From: Vivien Sayre <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 13:23:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

Sally, I am afraid this is the type that is used to unplug a toilet. Vivien

>Would that plunger be what we would call a 'posser', as opposed to a >'dolly'? If so, the washing process would have been efficient but quite >gentle. The posser doesn't actually agitate the item, but rather it >presses down as gently as if it was the flat of your hand pressing down, >but because of the domed design and holes for water flow it in fact forces >the water through it quite strongly. No agitation, no fist-like >squeezing. DD and I both use modern possers regularly for small or >delicate hand washes, and just a few plunges with the posser thoroughly >wash without friction or stress on the garment.

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Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: washing quilts From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 18:43:25 +0100 X-Message-Number: 16

Vivien Sayre wrote: > > Sally, > I am afraid this is the type that is used to unplug a toilet.

Ah <G>!

But, that said, the design of a plunger is not that different from a posser, and might work in a very similar way....?

Sally W

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Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: washing quilts From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 13:28:54 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 17

eeewwww..... (the mental image of using a toilet plunger to wash quilts)

Kris

--- Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> wrote:

> > > Vivien Sayre wrote: > > > > Sally, > > I am afraid this is the type that is used to unplug a toilet. >

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Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: washing quilts From: Vivien Sayre <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 16:47:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 18

I believe it probably does.

Vivien

At 06:43 PM 7/22/2005 +0100, you wrote:

>Vivien Sayre wrote: >>Sally, >>I am afraid this is the type that is used to unplug a toilet. > >Ah <G>! > >But, that said, the design of a plunger is not that different from a >posser, and might work in a very similar way....? > >Sally W

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Subject: quilt motifs around my house From: "Mary Voss" <vossmacatawa.org> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 22:59:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 19

I have a friendship quilt block motif in the backsplash tiles behind my stove. The background tiles are off white and the motif tiles are a jade green. I have a wooden quilt block (looks like a wood puzzle) also hanging in my kitchen. Three quilted wallhangings hang in my upper level as well as a glass door cabinet in which I store the antique quilts. I made myself some business cards featuring one of my quilts. I use the Printmaster program which includes a template for business cards and used one of my quilt photos from my hard drive. By the way I found a wonderful free photo program that can be downloaded directly from the web. Just type in the name "Picasa "in your search engine (it comes from Google.) And it will tell you all about it. You can easily download photos from your camera and then print or e-mail with one click. It will also arrange all your photos into albums. If you can't find it let me know and I will send the address. - Mary from Holland

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Subject: Re: indigo prints reproduction From: "Shannon Funcke" <huklbrynetins.net> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 00:07:51 -0500 (Central Daylight Time) X-Message-Number: 20

--------------Boundary-00=_3LJ036E1VA4000000000 Content-Type: Text/Plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Laura -=0D =0D I would start here for the indigo blue printed fabric: www reproductionfabrics.com . They are wonderful...not affiliated, have just had great service.=0D =0D As far as someone to create new pieced quilts for her by copying old patterns, are you looking for a custom quilter? If that's what you're talking about, contact me privately and we'll talk.=0D =0D Shannon

 

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Subject: Re: indigo prints reproduction From: "Merry Endres" <merrymenetnet.net> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2005 23:01:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I don't know if I can help, but I'm quite proficient at copying quilt patterns in Electric Quilt.

Hugs, Merry ----- Original Message ----- From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 5:13 PM Subject: [qhl] indigo prints reproduction

Hi all--A client wants indigo and white quilts for her yacht (can you imagine!) and is reluctant to use antiques because these will likely need frequent washing. If I choose to get involved in such a project, who or where would be the best resource to create new pieced quilts for her, copying old pattern(s). And, which fabric line or quilt shop might have reproduction 1880s indigo blue printed fabric to use for this purpose? Any leads would be appreciated.

And, re quilty stuff all around us---I am amused to notice that nearly every day there's an article in the New York Times that uses a quilt reference to comment on some social issue crisis--i.e., a crazy quilt of regulations", "a patchwork of run-down buildings..."etc. For a while I clipped them out in case they would find re-use in a lecture or article, but now that they appear so often, my interest seems to be waning. Does this occur in your local papers?

I remember way back when I first started handling quilts part-time, my boss at the NYC Human Rights Commision had significant input on Jesse Jackson's Presidential campaign; he made an eloquent speech using patchwork quilt references to describe the multi-ethnic multi-racial nature of the people of the U.S.

Laura FIsher

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Subject: Indigo dyed fabric From: Donald Beld 

I have made many natural indigo dyed fabric quilts using the authentic fabrics from www.reproductionfabrics.com from up in Montana. They get their indigo fabrics from a South African company that moved to South Africa in the 1880's from England. They have been making indigo fabrics ever sense. They have two lines--original 19th Century nglish designs and early 1900's American designs. The fabric has to be "set" to prevent both bleeding and fading; but there is a rinse available to do that.

I highly recommend these fabrics--they are fabulous to work with. Best, Don Beld

--0-1867941053-1122093409=:85387--

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Subject: Re: quilts in other arenas From: "Virginia Berger" 

RE: quilting references in non-quilt areas

I support my quilt habit by doing taxes and business analysis for farmers. There is a new disease in soybeans that is in Brazil and moving north on air currents (which is why my Iowa farmers have suddenly become hurricane watchers!). Anyway, one of the chemicals approved to treat this disease has the brand name QUILT! I'm not sure why or if this is an acronym or what but it is going to drive me crazy.

Virginia

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Subject: Feedsack Newsletter From: "The Motls" 

I am looking for numbers 1 thru 20 of the former Feedsack Club = newsletter, Switches and Swatches. If anyone would like to sell them or = trade for something, please contact me at motljefnet.com Thanks, Chris ------=_NextPart_000_0026_01C58F60.498B5E70--

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Subject: Percy Kent WWII feedsacks 

Good morning all,

I have been trying to figure out how many different feedsack prints Kent did in their Nations series with the WWII theme. Kris, I found your reference to them in your great article, but nowhere on the net can I find info about whether there was more than one design. Anyone know for sure?

Thanks,

Tom.

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Subject: political ribbon From: Palamporeaol.com 

I was asked to help identify the man on the quilt. I personally don't think that he is Andrew Jackson or ???? (Can't remember the name of the second guess.). I think that it is probably William Henry Harrison or more likely John Tyler. I think that it was a ribbon used during the 1840 presidential campaign. I think that it is Tyler because the campaign used his involvement in the Battle of Tippecanoe as a cornerstone for many of the slogans. Therefore the military uniform makes sense. He also had a long skinny face. If my husband, Will, were home I think that he would agree with me. The only photo I found of a ribbon from the campaign is of Wm Henry Harrison. If anyone has better searching skills on the internet than I do (which won't take much) I bet you will find this ribbon is Tyler. Below is info. about the campaign. I think that this was the first campaign that used textiles heavily. Julie Powell would know much more about this than I do. Hope I was of help. Lynn Gorges (read the material below........)

Article from American History Magazine

 

1840 Presidential Campaign: A Ceaseless Torrent of Music "We are far ahead in singing and in electioneering emblems," Greeley wrote. His efforts produced other campaign papers: the Flail in Vermont, Old Tip's Broom in Ohio, the Pilot in Baltimore, and the Hard Cider Press in Chicago. These penny newspapers contained not only songs but anecdotes and campaign updates as well. In addition, those so inclined could purchase Harrison and Tyler neckties, "Tippecanoe tobacco," "Tippecanoe shaving soap," and buttons and ribbons. Farmers gained local press coverage by naming their horses "Tip" and "Ty." One couple in Cincinnati baptized their twins "Harrison" and "Tyler." Another proud mother named her newborn triplets "William," "Henry," and "Harrison." The beautiful girls, God bless their souls, Souls, souls, the country through Will all, to a man, do all they can For Tippecanoe and Tyler, too.

-------------------------------1122129258--

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Subject: Re: political ribbon From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> 

> I was asked to help identify the man on the quilt. I personally don't think > that he is Andrew Jackson or ???? (Can't remember the name of the second > guess.). I think that it is probably William Henry Harrison or more likely > John > Tyler. I think that it was a ribbon used during the 1840 presidential > campaign. I think that it is Tyler because the campaign used his > involvement in > the Battle of Tippecanoe as a cornerstone for many of the slogans. Therefore > the military uniform makes sense. He also had a long skinny face. I think that this was the first campaign that used textiles > heavily. > Julie Powell would know much more about this than I do.

To add to Lynn's 5 cents. I've looked through lots of American history books for political cartoons, photos, political images of Tyler the Prolific (he had a jillion children), Harrison, and Zachary Taylor.

The photograph I'm viewing is taken on slant, so it's hard to see facial features, details.

I say ask Julie or hisorian of he era.

I know that Harrison and Tyler are more in the period for such materials, but could one rule out Zacary Taylor? He was NOT skinny by time of Civil War, but earlier political images I've seen resemble this one. He was tremendously popular into annexation of Texas and later. He was the leader who in time offered Lee command of the Union armies and was sincerely disappointed when Lee turned his offer down. He commanded Grant, Lee, Jackson, McClelland, Sherman, and everybody else who turned up in the Civil War.

What do fabrics suggest about dating? Any other images?

Lynn, just where is Will when he's needed?!

Gail

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Subject: Re: Indigo dyed fabric From: Barb Garrett 

I recommend using the indigo fabrics that are imported from Africa -- I get them from Sandy McCay -- her selection is great -- and her website to see the selection is --

http://www.cottoninthecabin.com/catalogue.htm

Once they are washed, they are soft and wonderful to work with, and the excess dye has been removed -- one word of warning, do not try to hand rinse to remove the excess dye -- unless you like the look of blue tinted hands -- guess how I know that happens <grin>? Follow Sandy's directions for good results.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Indigo dyed fabric From: "J. G. Row" 

> > http://www.cottoninthecabin.com/catalogue.htm > > Once they are washed, they are soft and wonderful to work with, and the > excess dye has been removed . Follow Sandy's directions for good results. > > Barb in southeastern PA >

And follow those directions again, and then again. I've washed mine perhaps 4 times before the water stopped having a blue tint.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid, soon to be the Raritan Kid (somehow it just doesn't have the same ring) judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: Indigo dyed fabric From: "J. G. Row" 

I've just posted a photo to www.vintagepictures.com . Look under the quilt tab for Mystery Man.

I've posted the block with the fabric from the 1840's 9-patch variation quilt we saw at the Gloucester County Historical Society that contains a portrait of an unknown man with foliage and eagles.

Barb Garrett researched the fabric and told me that B. Brackman published in QNM back in 1995 (my copies are packed in anticipation of our move) that this fabric is a portrait of Lafayette from the Centennial year of 1876. The time periods don't match up. This quilt and this fabric is 30 years earlier.

I've also put up two portraits of Zachary Taylor, my national hero of choice. Others have said Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, and John Paul Jones.

Also, do you think that plant with the pendant fruit/flowers would be any kind of clue?

Does anyone have Julie Powell's book handy? Mine is also packed.

Judy, aka the Ringoes Kid, soon to be the Raritan Kid (somehow it just doesn't have the same ring) judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: William Henry Harrison in Gloucester From: Carol Elmore 

I looked at some photocopied pictures from Threads of History by Collins. I was trying once to verify pictures of him and Tyler for a piece of fabric that I have. The portrait on the Gloucester County Historical Society 9-patch is William Henry Harrison in my opinion. If you look on pp. 97-99 of the Collins book (especially the one at the top of pg. 98) you'll see several bandanas with pictures of him that look just like this photo. He was commander in chief of the Northwestern Army during the War of 1812 and thus would have worn a military uniform as in the picture. He used this image in his 1840 campaign.

Carol Elmore AQS Certified Appraiser Manhattan, KS

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Subject: Re: Indigo dyed fabric From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" 

Dear QHL, The figure in the picture is indeed General Lafayette. The yardage was printed in the 1840s I believe and then printed again for the Centennial. It is pictured on page 191 of Collins, Threads of History. I purchased a fragment of this fabric at the AQSG silent auction in Williamsburg. Regards, Julia

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Subject: Harrison or Lafayette From: Carol Elmore 

Julia is right about the picture. I have a copy of p. 191 in Collins but the date for the fabric there is 1876. Maybe there was an earlier version of it printed in 1840 or maybe Collins wasn't correct on the date this fabric was printed. Does anyone have a good portrait of Lafayette? I still think it resembles W.H. Harrison. Maybe Collins didn't identify the person in the fabric correctly. Incidentally the caption for the bottom two pictures on p. 191 are turned around but both two fabrics were supposedly printed in 1876. This is a real mystery.

Carol Elmore AQS Certified Appraiser Manhattan, KS

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Subject: quilt references From: Laura Fisher 

Hi all - thanks for all the replies to my indigo fabric request. I will share it with the client, and see if she wants to proceed.

As to colorfastness, what a good point Pepper made. I remember being in someone's glass- enclosed Hamptons summer house admiring here cushy huge down sofas covered in turquoise--turns out a few months earlier they had been bought as dark indigo-denim-covered Ralph Lauren sofas, and in such a short time the color was completely transformed by the sun.

Re quilt references in newspapers, I should have added that I am thrilled to see that quilts are part of everyone's consciousness now, and what once was a rare analogy is now a commonplace reference.

Have you noticed also the use of quilt patterns in new architecture? We all know about the Italian tile mosaic floors and their resemblance to quilt patterns, but now it seems that rather than add on ornament that could fall off buildings, architects design building surfaces with geometric patterns in light and dark tones that sure resemble quilts! I will try to develop a photo inventory of these in NYC and post them from time to time.

Re flooring, years ago I sold some Amish quilts to Armstrong Tile and they created floor tiles with an accompanying guidebook to show how to make quilt patterns for your floor. Don't know if they still offer this service.

There is a carpet tile company called FLOR that sells packages with instructions on how to create patterns using several colors, and one could fashion a floor quilt if one wanted.

And, probably 25 years ago, in House Beasutiful or some other magazine Gloria Vanderbilt actually put quilts on floor, covered with plexi or polyurethane or something. Talk about surrounding oneself with quilts.

OK, now, back to my paperwork!

Laura

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Subject: Re: Indigo dyed fabric From: "Karan Flanscha" 

Judy, Could you become "Judy, formerly known as the Ringoes Kid" ?? Maybe this heat is getting to me :) Time for some ice cream!! Karan

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Subject: Re: Mystery Man From: Xenia Cord 

The man in the printed fabric image is the Marquis de Lafayette. Fabric was printed in 1824 when he made his farewell tour of the US, his first return here since his Revolutionary War service when he was a mere lad. The fabric was reprinted (see, we are not the only ones to do it) in 1876, as shown on the quilt in Collins, when the nation celebrated everything it could about the Revolution and its heroes.

I have several copies of the 1876 image, and have seen the earlier one in a quilt from IQSC.

Xenia

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Subject: QHL: Cheater Cloth From: "Susan Wildemuth" 

I have recently inherited some treasures from a senior friend who passed last February. One of the items "appears" to be a top dated 1938 and it looks like it was made with cheater cloth. The panels are muslin and the pictures printed on them are things like cowboys, indians, baseball players, and so on.

When did cheater cloth first come on the market?

Thanks-- Sue in Illinois

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Subject: Re: Harrison or Lafayette From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" 

Dear Carol and QHL, I should know that it is always better to check my sources before posting!

In looking through my files on Lafayette, I find at least 4 different images for various ribbons and an image of the yardage under discussion - which according to the source ( Early American Auctions) was printed in 1824, the same time as many of the Lafayette commemortive ribbons were printed. The portrait on one of the ribbons looks very similar to the one on the yardage.

Julia Zgliniec


 



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