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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Quilt Symposium Nov 5th, Delawre From: Patricia Keller <berrettUDel.Edu> Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2005 12:22:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

The Alliance for American Quilts Presents

Quilt History in the Making – A Symposium Saturday, November 5, 1:00 pm Reception to follow, 4:00 pm

101 Recitation Hall, University of Delaware Newark, DE

You are cordially invited to attend. For additional information or to RSVP by October 28, please email alliancequiltsyahoo.com or call 302-831-8037.

Program:

Shelly Zegart, president and co-founder of The Alliance for American Quilts, “At the Corner of Paradise and Persuasion: The Vision of the Alliance.”

Quilters’ S.O.S. – Save Our Stories interview with Marilyn Henrion, quilt artist, conducted by Amy Henderson, Alliance board member and University of Delaware Art History PhD Candidate.

Patricia Keller, Alliance board member, University of Delaware, History of American Civilization PhD candidate, “A New Spin on Quilt History: Lancaster County Quilts.”

Janneken Smucker, Alliance board member, University of Delaware, History of American Civilization PhD student, “Shopping for Nostalgia: The Creation of an Amish Quilt Capital.”

If you cannot attend the symposium, please come to a reception and opportunity to see the exhibition QuiltVoices, University Gallery, Old College, 4 pm. See http://www.museums.udel.edu/current/quilt05/quilt-main.html for more information about the exhibit.

For additional information or to RSVP by October 28, please email alliancequiltsyahoo.com or call 302-831-8037.

Directions available at www.udel.edu/admissions/viewbook/visit/directions.html. Parking available at Trabant University Center Garage. Campus maps available at www .udel.edu/buildings.

Sponsored by The Alliance for American Quilts (http://www.centerforthequilt.org) and the Center for Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware (http://materialculture.udel.edu).

A special viewing of Quilt Stories by Teresa Barkley, at the Historical Society of Delaware (www.hsd.org) has been arranged for the morning prior to the symposium. Details available upon RSVP.

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Subject: Quilt Symposium, Nov. 5th, Delaware From: Patricia Keller <berrettUDel.Edu> Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2005 12:33:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

List members may be interested in a reminder of the following event:

The Alliance for American Quilts Presents

Quilt History in the Making – A Symposium Saturday, November 5, 1:00 pm Reception to follow, 4:00 pm

101 Recitation Hall, University of Delaware Newark, DE

You are cordially invited to attend. For additional information or to RSVP by October 28, please email alliancequiltsyahoo.com or call 302-831-8037.

Program:

Shelly Zegart, president and co-founder of The Alliance for American Quilts, “At the Corner of Paradise and Persuasion: The Vision of the Alliance.”

Quilters’ S.O.S. – Save Our Stories interview with Marilyn Henrion, quilt artist, conducted by Amy Henderson, Alliance board member and University of Delaware Art History PhD Candidate.

Patricia Keller, Alliance board member, University of Delaware, History of American Civilization PhD candidate, “A New Spin on Quilt History: Lancaster County Quilts.”

Janneken Smucker, Alliance board member, University of Delaware, History of American Civilization PhD student, “Shopping for Nostalgia: The Creation of an Amish Quilt Capital.”

If you cannot attend the symposium, please come to a reception and opportunity to see the exhibition QuiltVoices, University Gallery, Old College, 4 pm. See http://www.museums.udel.edu/current/quilt05/quilt-main.html for more information about the exhibit.

For additional information or to RSVP by October 28, please email alliancequiltsyahoo.com or call 302-831-8037.

Directions available at www.udel.edu/admissions/viewbook/visit/directions.html. Parking available at Trabant University Center Garage. Campus maps available at www .udel.edu/buildings.

Sponsored by The Alliance for American Quilts (http://www.centerforthequilt.org) and the Center for Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware (http://materialculture.udel.edu).

A special viewing of Quilt Stories by Teresa Barkley, at the Historical Society of Delaware (www.hsd.org) has been arranged for the morning prior to the symposium. Details available upon RSVP.

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Subject: Help needed --cleaning/ conserving quilts after a fire From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2005 16:47:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I was kind of stumped by this so I'm throwing it out to you all. A very nice gentleman called me who had early 20th century pieced quilts, one silk crazy quilt, and several mid 19th jacquard coverlets that have been "infiltrated by soot" (his words). The fire was in the basement of his home but the soot/smoke made its way up into a second floor closet. 1. Is there anything he can do? 2. Is there anyone who could de-soot these...there aren't repairs to be done so I was kinda stumped as to who would take on such a project. He can possibly get his insurance to pay the conservation costs, but he needs an estimate, and of course the work to be done. We're looking at SE PA, NJ or possibly NY or DE. Thanks! Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Subject: Ribbons with Quilts From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2005 19:22:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I'm not sure if this has been discussed here, but I have a question. When a quilt wins a ribbon what happens to the ribbon? I usually keep ribbons that my quilts have won on display in my sewing room. But, the baby quilt I made last spring for my new grandson won a blue ribbon in a local show. The quilt "lives" in my grandson's room at his house and I'm wondering if I should keep the ribbon (marked with quilt information) or should it be with the quilt. I do keep a journal with information and pictures of all my quilts and add info on any shows where the quilt was hung, any ribbons won or other extra information pertinent to the quilt. What are your thoughts on this subject? Judy Knorr

--Boundary_(ID_UQJBL7x70h0jszi6BYonww)--

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Subject: Re: Ribbons with Quilts From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2005 18:45:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Well, what an interesting thing to think about! My thought would be to keep the ribbon in the possession of the winner and with the documentation of the quilt, especially a photo of the quilt with the ribbon on it if possible. This might apply well if the quilt is remaining in the immediate family of the maker and could be reunited at a later date. If the quilt is going to be sold, my question would be this: does the owner of the quilt get the ribbon or the maker who won it? When our quilt bee won a second place in group quilts at our local show, we decided as a bee to send the ribbon on to the person who purchased the quilt at auction later that weekend . But not until we took scads of photos of all of us in front of the quilt with te ribbon. The photo is in our bee scrapbook for "posterity"! Marcia Kaylakie, here in Austin, enjoying a glorious "fall" day of 89 degrees!

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Subject: Re: Kaffe Fasset's new books From: louise-b <vlbequetmcmsys.com> Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2005 20:32:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

What I see in Kaffe Fasset's books are imaginative adaptations of designs to his fabrics. They are often too densely packed - not enough definition between fabrics to suit me - but I find the patterns very inspiring enough that I have all of his books - and several of the quilts are on my 'to do' list.

In the Museums book, p. 64, I found the 1805 Rosettes quilt most interesting, particularly the 2d rosette down on the left side where I can see the barest of outlines for the Double Wedding Ring. Also the use of Drunkard's Path in several of the Medallion quilts.

In the other new book, Quilt Road, there is another medallion quilt from the V&A Museum, Postcards, that they were not able to finish in time for the Museums book. Again a very interesting medallion quilt in several colorways.

Louise -- in mid-Missouri

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Subject: Recap of Oct 12 SCQHG meeting in Southern California From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2005 19:29:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

The Southern California Quilt History Group met this past Wednesday,  October 12th at Bits and Pieces Quilt Shop in Escondido, California. In  attendance were Laurette Carroll, Pat L. Nickols, Sylvia Galbraith, Leah  Zieber, Glorian Sipman, Gale Slagle, Michelle Hilsabeck, Linda McKim,  Kristine Herman and Leslie Weidner. Gale, Kristine and Leslie joined  our group for the first time and we would like to extend them all a warm  welcome. We look forward to seeing you at our next meeting and  encourage anyone in the Southern California area that is interested in  quilt history to join us next month..

 

First up for discussion was scheduling future meetings. It was  concluded that the following schedule would see us through the next  year. (As always, our meetings are not limited by our topic and we  encourage attendees to share and report on any topic, as they desire.)

Nov 9th - Timeframe: 1780-1830  Topic: Whole Cloth Quilts

Jan 11th - Timeframe: 1830-1865  Topic: Signature Quilts

Mar 8th - Timeframe: 1865-1900  Topic: Centennial

May 10th - Timeframe: 1900-1930  Topic: Crazy Quilts

Sep 13th - Timeframe: 1930-1940  Topic: Depression Era

Nov 8th - Timeframe: 1940-Present  Topic: As you Like - or Your Own Making

Some other ideas to consider when searching for information about a  particular time period may include; embroidery on quilts, medallion  style quilts, multitudinous quilts, multigenerational quilts, unusual  blocks, layout of blocks in a quilt (e.g., stripy, alternate blocks,  straight set, medallion, etc.), sampler quilts, backing styles and  fabrics, binding styles and quilting motifs. These represent a very  small selection of ideas for study and you are definitely not limited to  them. 

 

To get the meeting into the feel of the Civil War Era, Leah shared a  collection of photographs from before or just after the war years. The  pictures included men, women and children in a variety of poses - the  dress was primarily formal (black silks or wools) but several of the  children and a few women were found in printed cottons. Leah also  shared a single block of unusual design that dates to c1870 or earlier.  The pattern for this block is very similar to Brackman 2065-Broken  Dishes with the exception of the corner squares - instead they were half  square triangles with the dark print toward the center. Leah presented  information about the United States Sanitary Commission and it's  inception during the Civil War. She read some touching quotes that had  been attached to quilts, which were sent to soldiers during the war, as  well as a quote from President Lincoln commending the women of America  for their tremendous effort in support of the troops. As a side note -  there was an interesting bit of information skipped over at the meeting  regarding the USSC and so it will be included here. The USSC did  produce a number of publications that were sold for profit by the  commission. "These publications served the dual function of raising  money to support the USSC while also convincing their audiences of the  importance and correctness of the USSC." They include: Drum Beats and  The Sanitary Commission Bulletin. (See cited sources below) There is a  copy (I believe it to be a reproduction) of The Sanitary Commission  Bulletin at the following web site:  www.civilwarmed.org/shop/product.htm?id3D2000. This site also contains  some other interesting information regarding medicine during the Civil  War. Leah concluded by providing overview of Civil War information  found some books that will be referenced at the end of this summary.  All of the books shared contained information regarding quilts as  related to the Civil War as well as images of quilts made prior to,  during and just after the war years. 

 

Sylvia was next to share with some wonderful blocks of baskets, stars  and signature blocks - some of which were recently purchased at the  annual AQSG conference. She also shared a piece of the Horace Greeley  madder print and the article about this fabric that was published in the  Blanket Statements publication. Sylvia also brought two early chintz  pieces - one a pillar print and the other very unusual with finely  detailed scrollwork scattered about the chintz. One of the pieces had a  very fine and colorful twill tape. With her degree in costume history,  Sylvia is always ready with images of beautiful period costumes and this  meeting was no exception. Sylvia shared a calendar that was all about  Civil War costume entitled 2001- Historic Fashions "During War Times:  1775-1945" Features fashion from the front line to the home front, by Q  Graphics Production Company. She also shared a picture of a "Daughter  of the Regiment" costume, presented to Miss Lizzie Jones, age 10 yrs. by  the men of the 6th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry July 16, 1861. It  consists of: "a Dark velvet jacket, trimmed with gold lace; a skirt of  red, white and blue silk; and a light colored hat, with red, white and  blue feathers, on one side of which was a gilt wreath, in which was a  figure 6. The canteen was of silver, heavily embossed." This costume is  in the collection of the Chicago Historical Society. The costume, and  article The Girls of '61 by M. Cricket Bauer can be found at:  www.sallyqueenassociates.com. Click on "Articles online" at the top of  the page. Sylvia's great-grandfather just happened to be a Confederate  Soldier during the Civil War and she has been lucky enough to do some  research and have copies of his war records. He was William M. Ryals,  of the 1st Alabama Cavalry Regiment, CSA (and was 52 when her  grandmother was born - the 10th of 12 children.) It was quite  interesting to see copies of these historical documents. Sylvia shared  a great Smithsonian book that showed Civil War quilts - it will be  referenced in at the end of this summary. Her final item for sharing  was a recent purchase of a c1840s T-quilt from Mystic, Connecticut.  This unusual quilt had blocks that were large 4-patch blocks (each  4-patch block consisted of two solid squares and two elongated 9-patch  blocks) that were set on point with alternate blocks. The alternate  block fabric was a printed patchwork that looked like tumbling blocks.  It was very unusual to see the elongated 9-patch blocks set inside a  4-patch. Of note, this quilt contained several pieces of original  fabric identical to that found in the first reproduction line of The Old  Sturbridge Village Collection by Marcus Brothers. What a treasure!

 

Laurette was first following lunch. Her first quilt top was  an incredibly beautiful hexagon mosaic stars quilt in delicious madders,  reds, double pinks, greens and chrome orange centers. The top was a  graphic delight. Interestingly, the hexagons in this top were not whip  stitched together as is sometimes found in earlier mosaic quilts. Next  was a nice strippy 9-patch top with lots of different fabrics in the  blocks and several different double pinks for the strips between the  blocks. The fun part of this quilt top was that the rows contained the  same number of blocks, but two rows on one side were longer than the  others. (Finally, someone who sews like I do.) The next quilt top  Laurette shared was an unusual album block, sometimes called chimney  sweep. The unusual thing about this top was that the blocks were all  very scrappy. Most of the blocks contained two or more fabrics and in  some cases there were 5 or 6 different fabrics in a single block. The  last quilt shared by Laurette was an amazingly crisp and new-looking  Lemoyne Stars and Flying Geese quilt. There were 25 Lemoyne Star blocks  (each constructed with 4 different fabrics of mostly darks and mediums -  each different than another) that were straight set with large Flying  Geese sashing between the blocks. The coloration in the geese was such  that they all had double pink backgrounds, but the geese were different,  which helped to create control in the chaos of the quilt. The overall  colors were scrappy with lots of double pinks, madders, greens, some  yellows and browns. The blocks and sashing were bordered in a crisp  double pink border, which pulled the whole quilt together. This beauty  looked as though it had been made yesterday - it was that nice and the  graphic design was well thought through. Laurette's final item shared  was an all-white, incredibly stitched machine quilted petticoat with  hand made trim. It was so finely machine quilted I just had to ask if  it had come from Harriet Hargraves house. (Nope, it was the real deal -  and old.) 

 

Leslie shared a family quilt with the group - a 1938 Postage  Stamp Trip Around the World. The quilt was graphically beautiful and  very colorful with its rings of color created by 1" squares. Leslie  told the group the story of how her mother had put the quilt in the  bedroom closet and for years her father had hung his cloths such that  the hangers stuck right through the edge of the quilt. Evidence to the  story was found in the edges of the quilt, which were in need of repair.  The quilt was quite a treasure and a definite graphic beauty. 

 

Linda - our Civil War Reenactor - shared her reproduction Civil War  quilt that she uses in her reenactment camp. She also brought in a  wonderful 1861 New England Style Weir hand crank, chain stitch miniature  sewing machine in it's original wooden box. The machine is still in  excellent working order and Linda uses it during reenactments. We are  hoping Linda will bring the machine back and give the group a  demonstration at our next meeting. 

 

Pat was the last to share with the group and she started with a  known-maker, 1860 Devil's Claw (or botch handle) quilt. The quilt was  made up of large two color blocks (a dark print and muslin) which were  set on point and sashed with a wide printed red sashing and variable  star corner stones using muslin and the same red print. It was a really  nice quilt made better by the history Pat shared about the family who  made the quilt. Her next quilt was another known maker, this time from  Baltimore, Maryland that was a rather unusual Double Irish Chain quilt  (unusual because it was made with such large pieces and had some  smallish appliquE9 in the white areas). The quilt contained many  fabrics that were once purple but had since faded to a medium brown. In  contrast to the two finished, known-maker quilts Pat shared, her next  sharing consisted of two c1860s tops with no known historical  information. The first was an unusual looking block that was a  variation of the Friendship Block (Brackman #2895) with each block being  constructed with two different dark prints and muslin. All the blocks  were straight set with muslin alternate blocks. The last top was a  scrappy 9-patch alternate block top with a typical Civil War era madder  stripe as the alternate block and a funky green and black stripe that  bordered the entire quilt. Pat also brought along a variety of blocks  and asked the group to place them in their appropriate time periods and  give explanations to justify their choices. This kind of little  challenge is always helpful in educating the group and helping us to  honing our ability to date and discern differences in fabrics. Thanks  to all who shared with the group - it was great meeting with educational  information and delicious eye candy all in one place.

 

 

The following books and web pages were referenced during the meeting  and/or in this summary:

 

The Smithsonian Treasury: American Quilts by Doris M. Bowman 

 

Kentucky Quilts 1800-1900; The Kentucky Quilt Project by John Finley

 

Plain and Fancy; Vermont's People and Their Quilts As A Reflection Of  America by Richard L. Cleveland and Donna Bister

 

For Purpose and Pleasure; Quilting Together In Nineteenth-Century  America by Sandi Fox

 

Hearts and Hands; Women, Quilts, and American Society by Elaine Hedges,  Pat Ferrero, and Julie Silber

 

http://www.civilwarhome.com/sanitarycommission.htm

 

http://www.mith.umd.edu/courses/amvirtual/sanitary/sanitary.htm

 

http://www.forttejon.org/ussc/ussc.html

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Subject: QHL - Midwest Fabric Study Group (long) From: Karen Portwood <acornqltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 19 Oct 2005 06:03:51 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Hello everyone,

After reading Leah's write-up, I remembered in my excitement to get to the AQSG seminar in Denver I neglected to post the MFSG write-up to the list. So for you reading pleasure....

*****************

The Midwest Fabric Study Group met on Sunday, September 25th, 2005 at the Daisy Barrel in Fairborn, Ohio. Our topic for the afternoon was quilts not made of cotton.

 

We began with a discussion about what other kinds of fabric one might find in a quilt and the connection to such fabric with clothing from the period. Our unofficial facilitator for the day, Amy Korn, gave each of us a two page reference table of different terms, dates, and descriptions of said fabric. We learned there is a difference between a weave structure and the name of a fabric (think satin). We also learned that some fabrics were woven with a different warp and weft such as challis. Challis can be a combination of wool/silk or wool/cotton. We learned that the term De Laine came after challis and it refers to very sheer wool. This term came in to vogue around 1836 according to the Oxford English Dictionary.

 

One of our members brought actual examples of a hank of linen, unprocessed wool, and real cotton bolls. Along with these fibers she also brought a mini microscope, which can be found at Radio Shack. We each took turns looking at the various fibers to see what differences we noticed. An interesting observation we had was that the hank of linen felt unusually cool to the touch when compared to the other fibers. We were also each given three pieces of fabric to use as study pieces to see if we could identify the fiber content after having studied the raw fibers!

 

After our initial information session, we started the day with a wool challis dress, modeled by Joy Swartz, and a child's dress in a similar floral stripe style print. Next was a very long woven wool paisley shawl in rich reds and black. Our first quilt was a richly colored wool log cabin quilt done in the barn raising setting in shades of red, browns, greens and blues with magenta center squares. The back had an interesting brown and burnt orange printed wool paisley fabric which resembled what you might have seen in a paisley shawl. This same print appeared on the front in one of the log cabin rounds! This quilt had no batting and was bound with a red wool twill tape. This same tape was used as ties at the block intersections and was tied in neat little bows with the very center bow tied in the form of a modern style gift bow. We saw another wool log cabin with a decidedly Pennsylvania feel to it due to the pieced brown cotton stripe backing! It was set using the sunshine and shadows setting. The squares found near the center of the quilt were mostly green and tan solids with lavender centers. This quilt had a wide turquoise blue border we found to be interesting. Overall a very pleasing quilt.

 

Next we moved on to fabrics with a more slick texture. The first was an embroidered silk Ruby McKim flower garden quilt made by Ethel Trick of Kokomo, Indiana, in 1929-30. This quilt actually had a label on it from its original maker. It was made to go in a show and thus the label! We also saw an eBay purchase that looks to be Amish by the turquoise and orchid colors and block pattern. We believe it to be made from Dacron which would give it a 1950s circa date.

 

The quilt that was the most fun was an 1870 crazy quilt made in Warren County, Ohio. It was composed of the usual satins, brocades, and velvets. What made it fun was the 6+ inch ruffle along two edges!

 

Anyone will tell you, we never turn a quilt away no matter what it is! We wound

up the day looking at some off topic show and tell. Our first was actually two

different toile pieces that one of our lucky traveling members purchased on her

recent trip to France with the textile study tour! The first piece was a quilted

remnant piece featuring the monuments of Paris. See:

The Monuments of Paris -Riffel, Melanie, and Sophie Rouart, La Toile de Jouy.

Paris: Cidadelles & Mazenod, 2003. p. 185 - shows the Monuments of Paris

toile and says it was manufactured by Soehnée l'Aîné et Cie, Mulhouse, Alsace,

ca. 1816.

 

The second piece was a yardage piece featuring the story of Joseph. See:

The Story of Joseph - Michele Palmer, Toile: The Storied Fabrics of Europe

and America (Schiffer, 2003). She attributes the design to Oberkampf

Printworks, ca. 1825, designed by F. Pieters, after Oberkampf. died. She

says he avoided biblical subjects because he was Protestant and the country

was Catholic, so the design was printed after his death.

 

We also got to see two books printed in French one on the subject of turkey red and the other early Provencal clothing styles.

 

Next was a hold over quilt from last meeting's topic of quilts with multitudinous pieces. This one was an ocean waves quilt with half-square triangles the size of a quarter! What a wonderful quilt.

 

The last two quilts we saw came from a member's father's collection. The first was a very graphic flying geese worked with white geese set in vertical rows and set with a double pink strip. Those white geese certainly popped off that pink background! The next from the same collection was a medallion style quilt almost a baby size done in red and white. The center was a small lone star with a border of half-square triangles followed by a red print border and finally a row of red and white flying geese. The back we found to be interesting as it was definitely a 1940-50s print however the red in the print matched the red in the front.

 

Our next meeting will be studying the color blue. So please bring any quilts, tops, blocks with the color blue in them! We will meet Saturday, November 19th, 2005 at the Brownsburg Public Library in Brownsburg, Indiana. Contact Joy at blenny3aol.com or Peg at margaretlong70cs.com for details. The meeting will start at 11:00 a.m. as usual. Also, remember to bring a brown bag lunch.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Karen Portwood

--------------------------------- Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs. Try it free. --0-1444639985-1129727031:55527--

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Subject: my previous posting From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 19 Oct 2005 15:19:33 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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The vermont book that the Hardin cotton crazy quilt is on the cover of is the book about Vermont folk art, not just quilts, published in the 1970s (I still can't remember the exact title-sorry!!) The Foundation Rose quilt is on my website now-- laurafisherquilts.com-- under 19th c. floral appliques, I can't give you the website inventory number cause you can't get to an image on it using just the number; this is a technical tweaking my webmaster has to invent. As to those who emailed about books, quilts etc. tomorrow I will respond; I've been out. thanks and warm regards, Laura Fisher

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Subject: Pattern source From: Trimble4aol.com Date: Thu, 20 Oct 2005 13:15:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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Hi,

Do any of you know the source of this pattern? I know I should know but can't think of it. eBay: VINTAGE FLOWER GARDEN QUILT -NEW TAKE ON AN OLD PATTERN (item 7358206417 end time Oct-21-05 20:36:37 PDT)

Thanks a million!

Lori

"Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche

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Subject: Re: Pattern source From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Thu, 20 Oct 2005 10:38:14 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Lori, That is the Ruby McKim Flower Garden quilt - Pattern published in 1930.

You knew that! :) Julia

> >

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Subject: Help! From: "Edith L. Taylor" <etaylorku.edu> Date: Thu, 20 Oct 2005 10:11:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Dear all:

I used Retayne (for the first time) on a piece of Guatemalen fabric I have, in hot water as the manufacturer suggested. It did remove the blue excess dye, but now the blue is deposited all over the inside of my washing machine. Help!

Should I run an empty tub of water with Synthrapol in it? Should it be hot or cold? Any help you can offer is greatly appreciated.

Edie

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Subject: Re: Help! From: HKnight453aol.com Date: Thu, 20 Oct 2005 16:43:59 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

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Scrub tub with bleach solution 10% or so, then, run a rinse cycle of hot through the tub. This is why I gave up dying. (Dying fabric-I mean). Heather

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Subject: Re: Help! From: "Alan" <alanalanrkelchner.com> Date: Thu, 20 Oct 2005 19:07:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Perhaps run the machine with some bleach?

Alan

Alan R. Kelchner Fiber Artist Website - http://www.alanrkelchner.com ----- Original Message ----- From: "Edith L. Taylor" <etaylorku.edu> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Thursday, October 20, 2005 11:11 AM Subject: [qhl] Help!

lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: Help! From: Gloria hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Thu, 20 Oct 2005 16:37:24 -0800 X-Message-Number: 6

I wash wool which bleeds a great deal of red, black and blue. My dryer is permanently stained blue inside, but nothing comes off on the clothing. I would think after running the machine a couple of times with the bleach, it would be safe for clothing, even if it remains stained.

Gloria

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Subject: Wool From: CAROL GODREAU <imaquilter2sbcglobal.net> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 06:34:50 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

QHLer's I have only used a small amount of wool and never thought much about the bleeding. I washed in hot water and dryed to felt the wool. It just never occurred to me that I should have used synthropol to set the dye in the wools or something. The few small projects I did do probably won't be washed, just vacuumed so they will be fine, BUT...

Q. I am planning a large wool wallhanging project and am now rethinking future care of the project. Any suggestions from users of felted wool.

Thank you, Carol in CT

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Subject: Quilt doings in NJ From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 09:48:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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On Saturday I had an unexpected treat -- a visit with 30 antique southern New Jersey quilts. I spent the weekend at my quilt guild's annual retreat in Sea Isle City, and learned that there was an exhibit at the Cape May County Historical Museum, a short drive away. This is what their flyer says --

Out Of The Trunk Quilts from the Collection of the Cape May County Historical Museum September 10 thru December 31, 2005

For the first time in many years, the Cape May County Historical Museum is proud to exhibit over 30 quilts from its collection, dating from the 1830s through the 1930s. Merry May, guest curator states, "This is an exciting exhibit of rarely seen quilts, including several Frindship quilts with signatures from early Cape May County families."

The museum is easy to find -- 504 Route 9 North Cape May Court House, NJ 08210 609-465-3535 http://www.cmcmuseum.org/

The hours listed on the website don't agree with the hours they gave me at the museum, so you might want to check with them. They told me the museum is open on Saturday from 10 to 2, but if you arrive before 2, they will let you stay til 3.

There is also a special event on Saturday, October 29 -- Annual Open House. Volunteer quilters will be on hand demonstrating a variety of quiltmaking techniques and answering your questions. Hours are 10 to 4, and admission is free. (Regular admission is $5, $4 for those 60 and over, and well worth it) Non-flash photos can be taken.

The museum is an old house, so the quilts are draped/displayed in the rooms of the house. An upstairs parlor features several crazies. From my notes...

Bricks top 1890 9 Patch Variation 1889 -- each block is nine 9 patches on point Silk Mosaic early 1800s basted onto lightweight fabric, not paper Tuckahoe NJ Friendship red and green 1840 Delectible Mountain 1843 Court House Steps Variation top 1880 Log Cabin 1876 with centennial flag and eagle fabric Log Cabin 1910 Broken Dishes 1900 Floral Applique 1850 red and green Rose of Sharon with buds Friendship 1842 early red prints 9 Patch Variation c1890s in red, white, blue Silk Log Cabin 1876 with very thin logs, said to be made with fabric purchased at the Philadelphia Exposition Goose in the Pond 1900 Sunburst Crib 1860 Friendship 1850 with wonderful fabrics to study Double Hearts Applique 1840 paper folded pattern red on white Friendship Quilt 1848 given to Rev John Jones and Ludy Blue resist coverletd Love Apple red, green and cheddar, with 1860 J S T in the quilting Scrap utility 1900 6 crazy quilts

My guild retreat has conflicted with AQSG the past 2 years, and I'm so glad it didn't this year -- I always enjoy seeing antique quilts, and I'm grateful to this small museum for providing them. I'm also grateful for the contacts with other quilters thru our study groups -- that's how I found out about the exhibit -- from a member of the NJ study group. Please, if you learn of an exhibit of antique quilts, post it to the list -- since small museums/historical societies have limited advertising, this is the only way we will know about those within driving distance, but outside the group's advertising area.

Hoping some of you can get to the exhibit -- it's worth the drive.

Barb in rainy southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Wool From: Pat Cummings <patquiltersmuse.com> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 06:50:47 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

> Q. I am planning a large wool wallhanging project > and am now rethinking future care of the project. Any suggestions from users of felted wool.

> Carol in CT

Hi Carol:

You didn't say what kind of wallhanging you are making. I used all felted wool in an appliquéd wallhanging.

I purchased some of the wool already felted. The background I washed in cold water and dried in the dryer on a warm temperature setting. This compacts the wool and seemed to make it easier to appliqué. This also prevents massive shrinkage if the piece is cleaned by a wet method in the future.

Pat Cummings

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Subject: Re: Quilt doings in NJ From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 07:17:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi Barb, Thanks for the letting us know! Cape May is a nice drive for me, but it sounds like it is worth it. My best, Dana

Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> wrote: On Saturday I had an unexpected treat -- a visit with 30 antique southern New Jersey quilts. I spent the weekend at my quilt guild's annual retreat in Sea Isle City, and learned that there was an exhibit at the Cape May County Historical Museum, a short drive away. This is what their flyer says --

Out Of The Trunk Quilts from the Collection of the Cape May County Historical Museum September 10 thru December 31, 2005

Material Pleasures Affordable Antique and Vintage Quilts, Linens, Lace, Textiles, Buttons & More! www.material-pleasures.com

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Subject: Smoke damaged textiles From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 12:25:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

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Candace and list Your gentleman with the soot infested textiles needs to take them to a dry cleaner that specialises in fire and smoke damage. There are dry cleaners who do this kind of work exclusively - and have gone to classes for it. It has to do with the kinds of solvents needed to deal with all the particulate matter as well as the differing types of matter that has burned, turned into smoke and then been re-deposited in the weave - think plastics, wood, etc. One guy I can recommend from personal experience is John Lappe at Museum Quality in Peeksill NY ( Hudson River Valley - 1 hour from NYC.) 914-788-1100. He comes from several generations of dry cleaners - and he got his masters in conservation from FIT. He will do hand dry cleaning. I use him for my 18th c emboidered silks among other things. Newbie Richardson

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Subject: More sightings of UGRR related things From: Pat Cummings <patquiltersmuse.com> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 15:55:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Hi! I posted this before but perhaps it did not get posted because I forgot to delete the extra "trailer" at the end. Will try again.

My mother died a week ago today, so we were involved with the usual arrangements, out of town company, etc. After getting through the week, we decided to go to a quilt show today, to a small quilt show here in NH.

Prominently displayed at the front of the exhibit were two small "Underground Railroad" Sampler quilts. Two ladies were oohing and aahing over them and mentioned that the maker(s) used Eleanor Burns book. Jim turned to me and quietly said, "There is just no getting away from this thing is there? The myth will never die".

This event came on the heels of my just having read the book reference list that has recently been the one sent to candidates in the master craftsman in quiltmaking certification program through the Embroiderers' Guild of America. Hidden in Plain View is listed as a "history" book there.

I can't do a thing about the quilts in the show other than to complain and grumble. In the latter instance, the book title will be removed. As the new Chairman of the Master Craftsman in Quiltmaking Program, this book will not be included "on my watch".

Frankly, I am appalled and insulted about this occurrence and even more livid because the organization published a ten page article I wrote on the subject (NeedleArts magazine). Someone isn't paying attention.

I will work very hard to put together a more suitable book list for candidates, one more attuned to actual quilt history, and to the discussion of techniques that are necessary to know in order to achieve the goal of being a called a "master craftsman".

Patricia Cummings E.G.A. certified master craftsman in quiltmaking, 2000

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Subject: Help--dye bleeding From: pkeirsteadcomcast.net Date: Mon, 24 Oct 2005 03:02:16 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

I was nearly finished piecing a quilt top when I dampened it to remove a spot. Then, to my horror, I realized the dark blue fabric was bleeding into the white. I had pre-washed the fabric, but obviously not well enough.

Is there any way to wash the entire top and remove the excess blue dye without its bleeding into the white? I have enough fabric left over to experiment with.

I want to be able to wash the finished quilt, and I will go no further until I determine whether it will be safe to do so.

Thank you for your help. I know I'll find the answer among this wonderful group.

Peggy Keirstead Richardson, Texas

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Subject: dye bleeding From: "Rosie Werner" <rwernerrconnect.com> Date: Mon, 24 Oct 2005 08:05:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I had a similar problem. I was blocking a feathered star wall hanging in  preparation for entering it at the fair. When I wet it the navy blue  hand dye fabric bled all over the light fabrics. I too had washed the  fabric beforehand and rinsed till it ran clear. I used Synthrapol, which  takes off the excess surface dye, keeps it in suspension in the water so  it cannot deposit again on the fabric. I had to wash it twice, but every  bit of the dye came out. Good luck. Rosie Werner ----

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 23, 2005 From: Cassie Kilroy Thompson <cassiektearthlink.net> Date: Mon, 24 Oct 2005 09:11:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Peggy: No way of knowing for sure whether this will work, BUT it has worked on some cottons I had bleed (after pre-washing as well). I bought a product called "Color Catcher" (Johnson & Johnson, Shout, http://www.shoutitout.com might have more info). I machine-washed the quilt top in just cold water and one of their "dye-trapping wash cloths" and the color came out of the white (and I am sure it came out of the red, too). I have an old silky fabric wedding ring that bled all over the place and am going to try it on that one of these days since it is already "ruined". Good luck..... -- Cassie Kilroy Thompson Clarksville, MD (member, Catonsville Village Quilters) cassiektearthlink.net ----- On Oct 24, 2005, at 12:00 AM, Quilt History List digest wrote:

Subject: Help--dye bleeding From: pkeirsteadcomcast.net Date: Mon, 24 Oct 2005 03:02:16 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

I was nearly finished piecing a quilt top when I dampened it to remove a spot. Then, to my horror, I realized the dark blue fabric was bleeding into the white. I had pre-washed the fabric, but obviously not well enough.

Is there any way to wash the entire top and remove the excess blue dye without its bleeding into the white? I have enough fabric left over to experiment with.

I want to be able to wash the finished quilt, and I will go no further until I determine whether it will be safe to do so.

Thank you for your help. I know I'll find the answer among this wonderful group.

Peggy Keirstead Richardson, Texas

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Peggy, you might have good luck washing the quilt in Biz. Biz seems to  remove the bleeding without harm to the quilt. I have used it numerous  times with very nice results. Jeannie Austin Graham Washington ----- Original Message ----- 

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Subject: quilt within quilt From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 24 Oct 2005 09:34:18 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hello- A couple came to the museum today and brought a quilt with them. It was randomly machine-pieced fabric straight-set rectangles in a top that was tied. Examining inside one of the deteriorated fabrics were randomly pieced fabric straight-set rectangles in a top that was hand quilted. And, examining inside one of the deteriorated fabrics inside THAT top was a hand-quilted quilt that had half-square triangles in the piecing. If anyone is researching quilts within quilts, please email me off-list and the owner said I could give you contact information. I have never see a quilt within a quilt within a quilt! Judy Schwender Curator of Collections / Registrar Museum of the American Quilter's Society

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Subject: Underground Railroad...yet From: "Audrey Cameron" <audreycamerononetel.com> Date: Mon, 24 Oct 2005 15:48:45 +0100 X-Message-Number: 5

Hello, There is a wonderful web  sitehttp://pathways.thinkport.org/secrets/secret_quilt.cfm - well worked  out & interesting letting you make your own quilt with "message" blocks  to help you or your friends along the Underground Railroad.

It's a shame it's not valid hostory. I am afraid this is a new myth for  US history.  Audrey Cameron in a very well dark October day in Lincolnshire, England ------_NextPart_000_000E_01C5D8B2.6A702580--

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Subject: Fwd: Appraisers Assn of America national meeting From: ZegrtQuiltaol.com Date: Mon, 24 Oct 2005 15:23:01 EDT X-Message-Number: 6

In a message dated 10/24/2005 3:05:53 PM Eastern Standard Time, ZegrtQuilt writes

AAA National Conference November Fri Nov 11 E28093through Monday November 14 My part: Sunday Nov 13-3:30-5:00 p.m. Saybrook Room Yale Club New York, N.Y. by membership registration only  Title: Quilts : The E2809CPerils of PaulineE2809D. Misperceptions vs r eality in the world of old quilts. How can you establish value when auction houses rarely have these objects for sale ? How do you determine comps? Old rules donE28099t apply anymore. Beginning with The GeeE28099s Bend phenomena and going beyond to the worl d of Amish quilts the group will look at the perils and misperceptions in these u nique areas and others .  Special attention will be given to the importance of due diligence given th e explosion of technology and the resultant proliferation of excellent reproduction fabrics from all time periods.

I am on this program and created this plan for my breakout session. It is great that they are having a session about quilts since most of the appraise rs in the national organizations know so little about quilts. There are exceptions , of course.

I would like to make my part of this national meeting very interesting and informative but not in the usual "this is a quilt" way. I am asking for you r help and I welcome your thoughts on any of the topics I am covering but I am  especially interested to see if any of you have a quilt made of the original  19th C fabrics and another of the repros from the exact same period. I would love to be able to show the people attending several examples of how good the repros have become. Comparison is the best way to do that. If you are willin g to lend the actual quilts that would be the best. If any of you have slides wit h such comparisons. they would work also and lastly some great samples of the best examples of repress both 19th c and 20th c feedsacks. I would like to h ave all three if at all possible. I will have a resource list for participants a nd if you choose to help with this, I am more than happy to list you with your contact information as a resource

I am also looking for input re where you all go to get your comps these days...and what you feel are the most reliable and respected sources. I have many Amish and Gee's Bend stories to tell, but another really unusual  one is always welcome. I would like to have this info by the end of the week if possible, especiall y if we have to arrange for you to send things to me in advance by snail mail. 

Thanks so much for thinking about this.

Shelly Zegart President, The Alliance for American Quilts 

Shelly Zegart zegrtquiltaol.com 502-897-7566 http://www.shellyquilts.com/ http://www.centerforthequilt.org/

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Subject: Re: quilt within quilt From: Blackeyesandysueaol.com Date: Tue, 25 Oct 2005 00:44:09 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

Judy, I have seen it several times. I have one. Many times when a quilt worn out it was recycled to be the "batting" for a new quilt. Polly

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Subject: A quilt top From: Mendofleuraol.com Date: Mon, 24 Oct 2005 22:46:51 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

List members,

Many years ago I inherited a quilt top from my Great Grandmother. I always wondered why it was very narrow yet long. Recently my ninety year old mother revealed that it had been cut in half for two sisters that both wanted it, my mother, the baby of the family, not being one of them. For some reason, she was given one of the halves, but cannot remember which sister gave her the piece. She is now the only surviving sibling in her family of twelve children. She was born in Salem, Oregon and raised in Portland. I post this question - is this typical to divide a quilt or top in this manner, and what is my best approach in finding the other half? As far as I know, none of my cousins have an interest in quilts. I would love to find the match to this piece if it even exists. It is a bow tie pattern, one that is not remarkable, yet worthy of its twin. Ironically, my mother and her brother were the only twins in this large family. Certainly, the other half of this quilt is somewhere. Perhaps it was made into pillows. I hope not. Any insight would be welcome.

Phyllis

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Subject: RE: quilt within quilt From: <patch_madamsympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 25 Oct 2005 13:14:30 +0000 X-Message-Number: 3

http://community.webshots.com/user/hemming117 Judy, if you go to my webshots page- click on link to Great Grandmother's quilt-this one is a quilt within a quilt! Its one of my most cherished possessions.

:) Kathryn

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Subject: Maryland Public Television & UGRR Quilt Myth From: Ark Quilts

I looked up the web site posted to QHL by Audrey Cameron about the web site on Underground Railroad Quilts http://pathways.thinkport.org/secrets/secret_quilt.cfm and discovered it was a link to pages posted by the Maryland Public Television. The following disclaimer appeared on one of their pages called, The Language of Quilts. http://pathways.thinkport.org/secrets/quilts2.cfm

"Some people question whether quilts were actually used as a form of secret communication. They say that there is little in writing or oral reports that says this is true. However, others, such as Tobin and Dobard, think otherwise. After all, they say, the Underground Railroad was built on secrecy. No one would have written down information like this, or told too many others. If the secrets were well known, lives would be at stake. What do you think?" This information is copyrighted 2005.

In answer to their questions, What do you think?, I think they should consult other sources of information that either support the information they represent or present unbiased sources of information so that both points of view are respresented. If anyone has a list of recommended UGRR web sites & printed sources in a bibliography, would you email me a copy and email a copy to the Maryland Public Television ?

Apparently this web site was underwritten by a competitive/discretionary grant from the U.S. Dept. of Education. http://www.ed.gov/programs/starschools/index.html Perhaps the QHL needs to contact them re: how their grants are being used to prevent unproven theories as facts to the educational community. Has anyone on this list sent information about the UGRR myth to the U.S. Dept. of ED?

Just musing about teaching facts vs. myths in the 21st. century. What's the use of having a wealthy amount of information that can be accessed instantaneously by millions of people if we don't separate fact from unproven fact or fiction?

C. Ark A High School Library Media Specialist & Avid Quilt History Fan from NW Ohio

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Subject: Half quilts From: "kim baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Tue, 25 Oct 2005 10:14:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Phyllis--

In our survey of quilts for the ND Quilt Project, we found one quilt (of the 3500) that was cut in half like yours. It was a similar situation--two daughters, one quilt. I never did find out what became of the other half.

In your case, it should be simple genealogy research--trace the family, asking everyone about the other half. Sending photos will help.

BTW, the half quilt we found is actually rather famous. There is a photograph at the State Historical Society titled "quilters in the Pendroy Post Office" that shows this quilt being quilted bac in the 1880's. You've probably seen it, it gets used in many books. You can see a not very good scan of it here: http://home.att.net/~pendroysiteimages/quilters.jpg

Kim

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Subject: Re: A quilt top From: Blackeyesandysueaol.com Date: 

Phyllis, A few years ago I bought a small border piece of a beautiful circa 1850 applique quilt. The border piece was a rouched rose vine. The quilt must have been magnificent. I bought it from the owner that told me that their mother had cut the quilt up into small tray cover sized pieces and divided it among her children. I have had people tell me that quilts should never leave their families. That would be ideal, except, many quilts run out of any one in the family that values them or wants to or knows how to care for them. Be careful who you leave your quilts to for posterity. It is better to give or sell them to some one who will vallue and care for them. Write what you know about the quilts history on white cotton fabric with a pigma pen and sew it as a label to the back. Good luck finding the other half. Ask as many decendants of your family members as you can get in touch with. It may or may not survive but it could be stored or forgotten in a family members home. Send photos of the half that you have to family. Even if it is not found now, one might come across it in the future and remember that you are looking for it. Polly Mello

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Subject: Crib quilt within a quilt From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: 

Many years ago, at the height of my Amish Quilt collecting, I purchased an Ohio Amish Crib quilt in an Irish Chain pattern that was dated in the teens. After owning it for a few weeks, I realized that there was another quilt inside. The back of the crib quilt was definitely a 19th century fabric and I could see that there were two quilting patterns on the back . One that was obviously for the Irish Chain but the other one didn't make any sense. I decided to explore a little further. I picked apart several of the small squares in different areas of the quilt. It was obvious that the quilt inside was a 19th century quilt and it had not been washed. This fact made me thing that there might not be much wrong with the quilt inside. After sole searching for a couple of weeks, I decided to gamble and remove the Irish Chain top all together. It took a while but sure enough, inside was a wonderful 19th century crib quilt in tones of browns, blues and greens. It had never been used or washed and I still own this quilt and the top that was removed. I guess the last owner just didn't like the one inside and decided to recover it. I have had many others as well, that had quilts used as batting. Once I had a quilt with 4 different tops. All were badly worn but its a great study piece.

Darwin

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Subject: Re: Half quilts From: Mendofleuraol.com Date: Tue, 25 Oct 2005 13:43:15 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

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Kim,

Thank you for your comments. Obviously, this is not common practice to divide a quilt in this way. I am glad to know most preserve the pieces they inherit, or at best, do not divide them. It seems like cutting a treasured book in half to share, and without the other half, one never really gets any sense of the original whole. I'll keep you posted on what I find.

Phyllis

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Subject: looking for pepper cory From: CAROL GODREAU <imaquilter2sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 25 Oct 2005 16:58:59 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Sorry to post this way.

Pepper, if you sign on would you mind sending me an email. It's in regards to Patti Brown and quilts for miss and Louisiana.

Thank you, Carol, CT

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Subject: Divided Quilts From: Pat Lyons <patricialyonscableone.net> Date: Wed, 26 Oct 2005 10:28:59 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

Divided quilts may not be as uncommon as we think. Sharon Harleman Tandy wrote her Master's Thesis at Boise State University on a divided quilt.

When I lived in the Northern Kentucky suburbs of Cincinnati, I encountered a quiet tradition of dividing/splitting quilts among family members. I say "quiet" because those for whom it was a family tradition were aware of the larger society's opprobrium for the practice. There was even a framer who specialized in this. It was not clear whether he actually split the quilts, or just mounted and framed the remnants after the deed was done. A good friend of ours couldn't wait to show me her divided family quilt, proudly mounted, framed, and hung in her family room. (Her sister has the other half similarly hung in her FL home.) Because she is a good friend, I could ask probing questions. From what I learned in this one instance, this practice might have dated back as much as a century, and appeared to be practiced in the urban and suburban areas of Northern and northeastern Kentucky. Then again, this is just where this extended family had lived.

Polly's point is well taken. In her instance and in the case I'm familiar with, these remnants at least are still extant and even treasured.

Not the geographic distribution in just these few examples: Phyllis inquires about an Oregon quilt, Sharon wrote about an Idaho quilt, Kim references a North Dakota quilt, I know of a Northern Kentucky quilt, and Polly's in Maryland. These may not be so uncommon, and seem to be widely distributed.

Pat Lyons in Pocatello, Idaho (no, I haven't encountered any divided quilts here yet, but I have heard murmurings of the practice)

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 26, 2005 From: Diane Shink <dimacquiltsympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 27 Oct 2005 01:11:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

This discussion re quilts divided in half is interesting. Here in Montreal I have seen two examples. I purchased half a log cabin quilt at a second hand store, 1940's fabrics but the filling is a hand woven Catalogne which Quebec is noted for, I still wonder where the other half is.. A few years ago I met a curator of a local museum, who had brought a small quilt to Montreal for consultation with Quebec museum officials. I was permitted to examine it and was delighted to see a raspberry pink calamanco quilt. The Quebec officials had simply labeled it a lindsey Woolsey crib quilt and indeed that is the backing but only one edge of the quilt has the knife edge finish typical of the time.. This quilt has documentation .made in 1761 and brought to Quebec in 1792 by United Empire Loyalists. My research indicates that the probable size of the original quilt was 100x100 and it was cut into 6 pieces. It would be wonderful if the other 5 pieces still exist, maybe somewhere in a closet or at the back of a museum storage area. I know I should do genealogical research as to number of people in the family etc but there never seem to be enough hours in the day. I have spoken to Lynn Bassett and she has pictures of this small piece. In relation to quilts within quilts within quilts as an appraiser I too have seen a few, most recently at an antique show . My assistant went home, across the street and brought back quilts one of which was a whole cloth 1950' style print. When I examined it under the inadequate lights in the tent I saw 2 quilting designs and could identify an Irish chain design under the whole cloth, even the artisan who was re-caining chair seats was impressed. Diane Shink, Quebec.

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Subject: NQR - looking for someone in North Andover, Mass From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Thu, 27 Oct 2005 06:46:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Dear List If any of you is in (or very near) North Andover, Mass could you please help me find a caterer? My sister is going in for serious neck surgery next week. She has two young elementary school kids and a husband who can't boil water without scorching the pan! I would like the name of someone I could hire to do a bunch "freeze ahead" meals to put in her freezer. I tried the Yellow pages but as this is the Boston area the list was way too long to sort thorugh! Please email me privately. Thank you so much Newbie Richardson pastcraftsverizon.net

 

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Subject: divided Qs From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Thu, 27 Oct 2005 07:04:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

 

Add MO to the list of divided quilt locations. About 15 years ago I  visited a quilter in a nearby town. Hanging at top of her stairs (very  visible when you entered front door!) was a long narrow Victorian Crazy  quilt. Yes, divided between 2 sisters. It was simply cut down center.  Then the cut side had been bound with black fabric. I do not know the  actual location of quilt when it was divided! But the one side was in  MO.

I have a vague recollection of another that was cut into 3 parts for  same reason. 3 Sisters. 1 quilt of Grandma's making! Ended up as 3 crib  quilts. Cut crosswise.

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Subject: Re: Divided quilts From: "munseyjuno.com" <munseyjuno.com> Date: Thu, 27 Oct 2005 12:22:41 GMT X-Message-Number: 4

Although I have known re-covered quilts - a common practice in my own Ne w Hampshire family and by my Nova Scotian grandmother, I haven't persona lly run into the divided quilt practice. 

However, it was a common practice in the 19th and early 20th C to divide up a woman's "good" china set upon her death. My Haverhill, MA grandmo ther owned a half dozen or more examples of the "good" china from her fa mily. There is at least a cup and saucer, but often cup, saucer, and de ssert plate and occasionally a dinner plate. Grandmother had carefully  identified each one with a stick-on label. After she died, a housekeepe r hired by my grandfather carefully scrubbed each label off to "get them clean"! So much for identification. Since one finds partial sets of s ilverware placesettings or half dozens of teaspoons etc. in the antique  shops, it may have been a practice to divide the silver service, too. I n fact, I have 6 teaspoons and 6 coffee spoons from the estate of my hus band's grandmother that do not match her silver service and appear to be an older pattern. It isn't a big leap to dividing a treasured quilt, e specially if the family may not have owned sterling silver or imported p orcelain. Sandra on Cape Cod

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Subject: Re: Divided Quilts From: "jocelynmdelphiforums.com" <jocelynmdelphiforums.com> Date: Thu, 27 Oct 2005 13:48:27 +0000 X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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On October 26, 2005, Pat Lyons wrote:

> Divided quilts may not be as uncommon as we think. > Sharon Harleman Tandy wrote her Master's Thesis at

>Boise State University on a divided quilt:

Pat,

My family contributed two divided quilts to Sharon's thesis.

Both were divided by my mother, from family quilts that had

reached the too-shabby-for-use stage. One she made into 4 wall

hangings, for herself and each of her daughters. Another she

divided into individual blocks and was able to salvage enough

that all of my generation got one block. It was a Dove in the

Window quilt, and mine is matted and framed with a navy-blue mat

that is the same color as the blue and white fabric in the block.

We shot pictures for Sharon, and I know she used them during her

thesis defense but I don't know if they're included in the

thesis itself. If anyone looks, I'm talking about the Sunbonnet

Sue wallhangings and the Dove in the Window blocks. :)

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Subject: Re: Divided Quilts From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Thu, 27 Oct 2005 07:54:53 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Dear QHL, One half of a divided quilt made it to California and turned up in the Quilt Days held for our state project.

There is a picture of it in : Laury, Jean Ray and California Heritage Quilt Project 1990. Ho For California Pioneer Womean and Their Quilts. E.P. Dutton, New York. Regional Survey Pages 26 and 27. It was a beautiful album syle applique quilt, heavily quilted. Although the quilt was made in VA, it was divided in MO and one part was sent to CA.

Regards, Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: Re: divided Qs From: Mendofleuraol.com Date: Fri, 28 Oct 2005 00:50:30 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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I am finding by many of your responses that divided quilts may have not been "common practice", but they were divided by common caring and love for the one who had created them. I guess that is why they now seem endearing and more rare. I must say I am gleaning much from the comments and realizing that half of a quilt says more than I ever imagined it would.

Phyllis

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Subject: Divided quilts From: Beth Donaldson <quiltsmuseum.msu.edu> Date: Fri, 28 Oct 2005 09:20:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

About 15 years ago I was commissioned to make a quilt out of a family wedding gown. Six blocks were hand quilted with different motifs on the white satin. Each block was individually bound, then stitched together. Each block also had the embroidered name of a different child of the woman who first wore the dress. The intention of the owner (a daughter who also wore the gown) was to someday divide the quilt and give each child their own block. A side note, both marriages where the gown was worn ended in divorce! Beth

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Subject: Obituary of interest to textile historians From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Fri, 28 Oct 2005 12:33:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

http://www.nytimes.com/pages/obituaries/index.html

If you can't get there through the link, Google "Kathryn O. Scott, 94, Textile Work Pioneer, Dies." A really interesting obituary. She leaves "no immediate survivors."

As an aside, the voice of the Jolly Green Giant also died.

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: divided Qs From: Gloria hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Fri, 28 Oct 2005 10:26:10 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

We have divided a family quilt in the last 10 years. My Grandmother made a summer spread in the late 1920's, while she was pregnant with her sixth child. She had my mom quilt it in the 1960's. We cut away the part over the pillow and the main center basket. I have the main center basket as a 3 x 4 foot wall hanging in my dining room. My cousin will keep the other portion, which has been framed and really looks nice.

Gloria

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Subject: Greeting from Festival! From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Fri, 28 Oct 2005 23:06:35 

Good evening all,

Just got back from another week of working in downtown Houston, one of the side benefits being that I could attend preview night and then walk a few blocks to spend a long lunch today browsing.

Wednesday's Preview Night crowd was about 50-60% of what I saw last year. I think everyone was really worried about parking with Game 4 of the World Series a couple of blocks in one direction and a Rocket's game a couple of blocks in the other direction! Tuesday night for Game 3, many of the pay lots right by the Convention Center were $50-75 each instead of the usual $5-10 for special events. There was a real fuss at the Courthouse because people on jury duty had an almost impossible task finding parking since several garages shut down for business hour parking to be able to accomodate baseball fans at a much higher price starting in the early afternoon.

But good things came to the faithful. Houston takes care of Festival-goers and when Mom and I headed to Preview Night we had little traffic to deal with and plenty of parking in the Hilton (attached to the Convention Center) for $10 a spot. With that worry aside, we set out to have a blast!

Thanks to the smaller crowds, there was time to check out a few of the prize winners before dashing over to the quilt vendors. I am not familiar with how all the prizes work, but what I believe was the grand prize/best of show winner was a quilt called "Scarlet Serenade" (pdf shot on the website at quilts.com.) This quilt was just incredible. I loved the simplicity of the design- deceptive given how crushingly difficult it must have been to get all those points in the Mariner's Compass-inspired elements so perfectly sharp. To my eyes, despite the masterful craftsmanship, the quilt's depth of color and contrast was what really made it a worthy winner. I cannot recall having ever seen such a pure and passionate shade of red in a quilt- the perfect offset to the white and ivory shades of the compass points.

Baltimore Album IV, another top prize-winner, had an obvious immediate appeal due to its enormous complexity that flowed brilliantly. But closeup, this quilt became all the more inspiring. The photo on quilts.com does not even begin to demonstrate the achingly complex and emotional quilting on this piece. I could have stared at it for hours in wonder the whole night.

And then it was time to head for the booths! Maybe with time I am getting more disctriminating, but I felt like there were fewer really top of the line antique and vintage quilts for sale this year. That said- what there was tended to be very unusual and incredibly fine. On Wednesday night I saw many things I have read about, but never seen in person. One vendor had a very endearing tile quilt for a start- wonderful piece. At another place, I saw a large funeral/memorial quilt in what I would say was a Baltimore album type format. It came with a touching story about how it came to be made in memory of a military officer. On close examination, many of the flowers in the quilt appeared to have been made from officer uniform clothing- perhaps that of the deceased?- this is the part where tears develop in the eyes.

I also saw my first New York Beauty in person- still wondering why this quilt is called New York Beauty when every one I have ever read about was made well outside of New York?! (this one came from Georgia), along with many other wonderful old quilts the likes of which I have never seen.

Even though there seemed fewer great pieces this year, I hope in the future to see as many new and really enchanting things again in the future.

It seems my research project on the pine tree/cherry quilt reached a few years lol (a good thing!) and I was able to find out some more info here and there when a couple of folks made the connection between me and the emails. Even found the Primedia booth with back issues of Vintage Quilting Magazine- this issue was not there unfortunately, but I am now able to order it and check it out!

In fabrics, I saw very little western this year- but Batiks seem even more popular than ever. Great news too since I found a lot of really neat ones, including some handmade examples that were directly imported. That said, I did not hit all that many fabric spots- so I might have missed where all the new Henry western prints could be found.

Hope all other attendees had as much fun as we did! As fun as Preview Night it, I enjoyed going today and having more time to leisurely stroll around. Big crowd, but less pressure to "get there first" for all the quilts lol. Two vendors reported also that Thursday's crowd was huge, likely thanks in part to so many staying home on Wednesday.

Take care,

Tom.

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Subject: Obits & Splits From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 08:54:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

<< Google "Kathryn O. Scott, 94, Textile Work Pioneer, Dies." A really interesting obituary.>>

And, I ask you, what would we do without our friends to keep us in touch with the world? I read every word of the obit, and I want to be this woman when I grow up. I want museums waiting impatiently for my arrival, I want people listening to my every very wise word, I want to get my hands on wonderful things that no one sees, I want to get inside the underwear of someone famous............well, on second thought........

I absolutely do not have time to surf the net, look at ebay, or read the NYT - and I am truly grateful for those of you who do so, and send the hotlinks so that people like myself can click on, enjoy, and get right back out of there.

Before we get off the subject of divided quilts, I notice that no one has mentioned the term "Solomon's Choice" for the practice of dividing quilts. That is the term I always use, and I must have heard it somewhere. Just a little FYI for those of you really tuned in to the subject.

<<As an aside, the voice of the Jolly Green Giant also died.>> As the former owner of a small chain of supermarkets who attended many, many trade shows, I am sooooooo familiar with the Green Giant image and voice. What a very sad Ho Ho Ho to hear. And now, back to the previously scheduled sociology homework.....

Teddy Pruett in hurricane free Florida

_________________________________________________________________ Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE! http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/

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Subject: Divided quilts From: Kaytripletaol.com Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 09:50:34 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

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There is a book about a family divided quilt. The Salt Lake City 14th Ward Album Quilt, 1857 - Stories of the Relief Society Women and Their Quilt by Carol Holindrake Nielson is about a particular quilt which her husband inherited. She did the genealogy and tracked down the other half, put the two halves together for the book, then researched the lives of the women who made blocks for the raffle quilt. The great-great-grandfather had won the quilt when he was 12 years old. A written version of the story had been passed down with the quilt. After his first wife had died, he cut the quilt in two and it was given to the two oldest daughters. It was passed down through the lines to the oldest daughter, until Mr. Nielson was the oldest son in a family with no daughters. The book is quite interesting.

Kay Triplett

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Subject: Re: Obits & Splits From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 12:32:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

> I absolutely do not have time to surf the net, look at ebay, or read the > NYT - and I am truly grateful for those of you who do so, and send the > hotlinks so that people like myself can click on, enjoy, and get right > back out of there.

Teddy,

I've got to admit -- I don't read the NYT every day, (although it does have a new meaning in my life, and I see a lot of their pictures every day) but my husband sits with the NYT and his coffee every single morning. He glances at the front page then goes right to the obituaries -- perhaps he's waiting to see if he gets a write-up there. I think it is a morbid taste, but he does share interesting obits with me, as with the Scott obituary yesterday. I get to the book review and the magazine and it usually takes me a week to read everything there.

At 65 I'm supposed to be taking it easy, but I am busier than I ever was! No time to read newspapers. And thank goodness for that.

Thanks to Elpaninaro for sending us to the Houston winner's site. Are the Japanese the only ones doing quilts completely by hand anymore?

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Fallen Timbers Quilt From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 12:11:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi Everyone, I haven't posted for awhile, but I am so excited about this quilt that I had to share it with you. You can see it and close ups at www.vintagepictures.eboard.com under general category.

I volunteered last year to design--and mostly make my guild's 2006 Opportunity Quilt--because I wanted to do something with the old traditions to honor the firefighters and police officers who died in the collapse of the Twin Towers on the 5th Commemoration of that horrible event.

So I took a variation of Drunkard's Path called Falling Timbers and designed this quilt. It is made with reproduction fabrics and is ENTIRELY hand pieced, hand trapunto, and hand quilted--mostly by me--all the quilting is mine and I personally cut out all of the pieces by hand with scissors (the old fashioned way), marked them for sewing and had the women in my guild piece them by hand. It has been appraised by an AQS certified appraiser at a value of $5,000.00.

I love history and quilting and enjoy taking the old ideas and old ways and making something new. I hope you all enjoy seeing it. Best, Don Beld

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Subject: Re: Festival Winners by Hand or Machine? From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 15:17:41 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

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In a message dated 10/29/2005 11:33:13 AM Central Standard Time, JudyGrowpatmedia.net writes:

> Thanks to Elpaninaro for sending us to the Houston winner's site. Are the > Japanese the only ones doing quilts completely by hand anymore? >

Hi Judy,

You raise a question I had meant to ask earlier. How does all that work in terms of hand versus machine? Are many of the quilts in this competition machine pieced and /or quilted? Given how long it must take to do some of these by hand, I figured machine was fairly common. If that Baltimore Quilt IV was done completely by hand, then I stand in awe that it could be completed in a few months time! (assuming the contest parameters were announced sometime after last year's Festival, which I do not know.)

Take care,

Tom.

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Subject: creating a category From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 16:00:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Last weekend in Lancaster Co. I bought what is clearly an attempt by someone (circa 1970) to reproduce a classic 19th century applique quilt. In fact, I have the feeling that I've seen the original. Sixteen large (17") Oak Leaf and Reel motifs are appliqued to a cotton sheet. On three sides there is a swag and leaf border with stars, thistles, tulips and other, unidentifiable, shapes. The Oak Leaf and Reel pieces are stuffed. The workmanship is not bad, but the maker obviously had limited fabrics available. She used only two Ely Walker prints: a mint green printed with a darker green flower and an orange and yellow print. What should we call something like this? "Reproduction quilt" evokes what so many of us are doing now with all of the great repro fabrics available (not to mention the profusion of books about and images of antique quilts). I also have a summer spread (1930s) and a Princes Feather quilt (polyester batt) which are obviously trying to recreate the look of 19th century quilts without access to appropriate fabrics. Any suggestions? Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: creating a category From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 15:25:45 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

Interesting question!

IMHO, these have to be called reproductions or recreations, with their time periods included. After all, current quilters are not the only ones to have tried to revisit the past, often creating quilts in designs from earlier periods, but done in their contemporary or "more pleasing" colors. For instance, I have an early 1930s Prince's Feather in alternating blades of plain bright pink and plain medium green. I see this as a retake on the "classic" red and green compositions of the 1850s. And the 1920-30s women's magazines and pattern and kit sources based much of their advertising on the idea of endorsing feminine ideals by making quilts "like our foremothers did." So we got pastel Irish Chains and Lone Stars and Whig's Defeat and Harrison Rose etc. - and even crazy quilts in pastel cotton prints.

The Bicentennial and the slightly earlier "new earth movement" urged recreating the past, but the textile industry had not yet recognized the potential there. Do we not have 1970s remakes of Baltimore Album quilts? There was at least one pattern source (Women's Day magazine, I think) that promoted this. I have the blocks, execrably done in Ely & Walker gold, brown, green, and red and pink prints (all similar / alike but in different colorways). Bless her heart, she could not applique, and the figures were pretty clunky at that, and the fabrics too coarse to turn under smoothly, but she persisted! And she did all the blocks, but apparently gave up when it came time to assemble the top and quilt it.

And what about the Harriet Powers Bible quilt? Surely the licensed creations by the Smithsonian have to be called reproductions.

Lots of food for thought in Cinda's question...

Xenia

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Subject: Re: creating a category From: "Karen Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 16:49:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

I'd call it pre-Bicentennial Revival.

Karen Evans

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Subject: Re: Obits & Splits From: AG32040aol.com Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 17:40:01 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

Teddy, Glad you are in hurricane free Fla.,but do you have to rub it in .Just kidding .We in south Fla. cheer when we get power this year. This is the third time this year we have been out for almost a week. I love my quilts,but tired of moving them back and forth to saftey . Amy Goodhart in the hurricane zone

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Subject: source for book From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 05:20:53 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I'm looking for a source for this particular book: Ladies Art Company Quilt Pattern Book, Patchwork & Appliqué Groves Publishing Co. Kansas City, MO

It's on the AQS Quilt Appraisal program course study book list.

Thanks if you can help,

Linda Heminway

Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: obits and reproductions From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 05:14:13 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

I confess that I too read obits. I think of them as mini-biographies and I love to read biographies. It's history but in the context of everyday life.

As to the 1970s reproduction quilts, the term "vintage reproduction" comes to mind.

Mary Anne (in cold No. FL)

__________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

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Subject: Re: creating a category From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 23:46:35 +1000 X-Message-Number: 3

From the world of furniture , they use the term revival. So in the 1920s a lot of Jacobean Revival furniture was made which looked a lot like the furniture form the 18th century to the average person but quite different to those with knowledge.

Is that suitable?? Suzy .

>> What should we call something like this? "Reproduction quilt" evokes >> what so many of us are doing now with all of the great repro fabrics >> available (not to mention the profusion of books about and images of >> antique quilts). Any suggestions?

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Subject: Re: Fallen Timbers Quilt From: Pat Cummings <patquiltersmuse.com> Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 12:27:15 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Dear Don:

Thanks so much for sharing the image of the quilt you designed and you and your guild worked on. It is a wonderful tribute, and a true inspiration.

As always, best wishes,

Pat Cummings www.quiltersmuse.com

--- Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> wrote:

> Hi Everyone, I haven't posted for awhile, but I am > so excited about this quilt that I had to share it > with you. You can see it and close ups at > www.vintagepictures.eboard.com

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Subject: Re: Obits & Splits From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 09:28:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Teddy P. wrote: > Before we get off the subject of divided quilts, I notice that no one has > mentioned the term "Solomon's Choice" for the practice of dividing quilts . > That is the term I always use, and I must have heard it somewhere. Just  a > little FYI for those of you really tuned in to the subject. >

Teddy, it was the first thing I thought of---Solomon's ploy failing (for he must have known his women---and besides he was dealing with a baby, not quilts). While I myself have never known a quilt divided for this reason, all my life I've known people who cherished quilts so they would have divided them. I think most of them have been devious enough to secure the whole quilt, by hook or by crook and maybe by both.

I was surprised when list members imagined amicable divisions. I myself believe if someone were so amicable, she would not lay scissors to the quilt, would do like Solomon knew the real mother of that baby would do: leave it whole.

Has NOBODY else had such thoughts?

Now here is a subject for your sociology paper, Teddy, for the splits speak to the value vested in these quilts. Even IF they were harmonious splits made by altruistic, turn-the-other-cheek Solomaic women.

Gail

P.S. Does anyone remember that wonderful section of "Huck Finn" where Jim waxes eloquent about Solomon? He misses the point of the story (maybe), but tells Huck, 'DonB9t talk to me about Solomon. Why he'd just as soon chop a chile in two as a cat.' He attributes Solomon's lack of wisdom to his havin g thousands of wives and a commensurate number of chillun 'runnin around the house.' Says Solomon doesn't know "how to value chillun. Now you give me a man that got only two or three chillun. That's a man who knows how to value a chile." I've always thought Jim might have been wiser than Solomon. I bet a lot of these heirloom splits were made by women who didn't have a housefu l of quilts.

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Subject: The E Board From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 07:44:47 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi all I've not visited the Eboard for some time and did so today - and I wonder if this suggestion makes sense. I saw a few things (like someone looking for a block name) that may already have been answered and in fact may have been posted months ago. If we put the date at the beginning (or end) of our text - and included our name or email addy it would really help those of us who only check in once in awhile and are not always 'current'! What do you think? Jean

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Subject: source for book From: "Rosie Werner" <rwernerrconnect.com> Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 21:33:00 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

Linda, Is it the Ladies Art catalog that you are looking for? That has the same  title you listed. It's 27 pages long. I have 2 copies that were  published by Ladies Art in St. Louis, not Groves Publishing Co. If this  is what you need, I am willing to part with the duplicate. Rosie Werner rwernerrconnect.com




 



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