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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: RE: qhl digest: October 30, 2005 From: "Cindy Hamilton" 

Re: What's in a name: Reproductions? Interpretations?

This topic is an important one for me. I've poured 2/3 of my life into my quilts, and I still don't know what to call them. I've always worked within historical time periods, even in the 1960's, when 100% cotton fabrics were hard to find. I could usually locate some that would give an impression of a time period. Even then, I found some reproductions--very close copies of older fabrics. To me, reproduction and replica mean just that-a "very close copy." In this sense, I've only made about 3 "reproductions" or "replicas" over the past 40 years, and the rest have been my original interpretations. My quilts have a historical feel and authenticity that comes from years of studying past styles, patterns, and fabrics, as well as learning to draft my own designs. I tend to describe my quilts as "inspired by" a particular style, time period or pattern. Also, I may say "my interpretation" of. . . I also may use the word "traditional style." This implies that the quilt is not a direct copy of a particular quilt, which is what I want the viewer to understand. It really is hard to come up with a one-word or simple phrase for the quilts being made today out of reproduction fabrics. When we talk about them, I feel the description should indicate whether it is truly a REPLICA of an antique quilt, or a new INTERPRETATION of a past style or pattern. What do you think? Cindy Vermillion Hamilton Pagosa Springs, CO

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Subject: ABC Quilts requests quilts From: "Pam Weeks" <pamworthenhotmail.com> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2005 10:32:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Dear quilting friends,

You may have heard that there is no longer a need for quilts or donations for relief efforts in the southern states so terribly affected by the recent hurricanes, but our National Network Volunteers for ABC Quilts have been overwhelmed by requests for hundreds more quilts. South West Louisiana in particular is in great need as United Way Agencies look for supplies, including quilts, to help settle returning families.

We ask you to consider making quilts, from baby to twin bed-size. When you have finished, please call or e-mail our office to see where to send the quilts. We are going to keep close track of the needs in Louisiana and Texas, and have you send them directly there at first. When they have enough, we are going to begin stock-piling quilts in our National Office to have on the ready.

If you don’t have time to quilt, please consider a monetary donation. We have shipped quilts to the South from all over our National Network, and would like to reimburse some of our volunteers whose resources have been sorely stretched to get quilts where they were needed. Please make your check payable to ABC Quilts.

Our website is www.abcquilts.org; e-mail is carolabcquilts.org and the phone is 800-536-5694.

Thanks so much for helping those in need! And remember to call or e-mail before shipping your quilts.

Pam Weeks Executive Director ABC Quilts Quilts for at-risk babies, prevention education through quilt-making. 569 First NH TPK Northwood, NH 03261

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Subject: ABC Quilts II From: "Pam Weeks" <pamworthenhotmail.com> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2005 10:34:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Dear friends (again)

I forgot to ask those of you who belong to other list serves and networks to forward our ABC Quilts request for quilts where appropriate and with permission.

Thanks!

Pam

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Subject: Re: Festival Winners by Hand or Machine? From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2005 09:32:11 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Somehow I missed the link to the Houston Festival winner. Is this the quilt you are talking about? http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/features/3423990 I'm not sure as the article says it was all done by a long arm. Not that it would be that easy by any means.

There is a slide show showing the amazing detail of the quilt here. http://www.sharonschamber.com/ss5/ The link is broken on her site at http://www.sharonschamber.com/ It looks like the site isn't finished yet.

Judy Anne

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Subject: quilts cut in half From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2005 13:55:08 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5

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Hi all-

re quilts cut in half (I thought I sent this in already, but..............me and computers, ha!!) Years ago there was a fabulous pictorial quilt with a ship in the center, and many folky elements that had been found cut in half, to give to family members, or to use on twin beds, I forget which!. Champion restorer Tracy Jamar skillfully and invisibly got the quilt back together, and it was sold with its important provenance by America Hurrah. I think it was published in an old calendar, and in several books. This one was worthy of the reconnective surgery; some are more sentimental than gorgeous.

People offer me "pairs" sometimes, that are so narrow they must have been one quilt cut down the center for narrow beds.

Early on in both our careers, a midwest picker sent me separate quilted blocks, and the floral vining borders, from a 1870s wool stuffed work floral applique album, the likes of which I have never seen before or since. Each block was a different 3-dimensional flower with leaves, on a charcoal green thin wool ground, probably early Pennsylvania Mennonite. The blocks were cut apart 'cause there was moth damage in some areas, he related. Can you imagine how glorious the quilt was intact?! Now we know we can underlay holes, even find old shawl wools in the same aged patina to patch with, but then...........I still have some of the blocks, because they are so unusual.

And what about the curtains at Winterthur? (Hi Linda!) a group of us got to peek in the storerooms there, and in the curtain room hung dozens of panels cut from quilts to use as drapes, and to rotate seasonally. And don't forgot the linsey-woolseys there cut for upholstery.

Laura Fisher

 

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Subject: quilt photographer in OHIO From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplexdirecway.com> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2005 14:04:04 -0800 X-Message-Number: 6

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Hello All, Julie Silber here. I am looking for a professional quilt photographer in the Southwestern part of Ohio, near Dayton or Cincinnatti Any ideas? Thanks! Julie

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Subject: Re: Obits & Splits From: Mendofleuraol.com Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2005 15:41:12 EST X-Message-Number: 7

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I guess my taste is a little morbid too, but I do occasionally read obituaries for insight about life as well as information. I am especially drawn to the people who have lived long and productive lives. I like to know what their personal history as been, if they were well-educated, and if not, what kind of a life did they create without this enrichment. Often I find that the men and women who were most creative and productive in their lives often did not have the luxury of an advanced education, and some only went as far as the eighth grade. This may not have anything to do with quilt history in a direct way, but I think it does give some balance to our insight about the people in this country who lived with great spirit and worthy accomplishments. These are the values I find very inspiring in reading obits. I have had people look at me in strange ways when I tell them my fascination, but I also love reading biographies, so there is a connection I am sure. This is also why I love quilt history.

Phyllis de Vries

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Subject: removing posts on the e-board From: Alice Kinsler <alicekmbay.net> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2005 20:35:47 -0800 X-Message-Number: 8

Jean, you're absolutely right. I did get an answer on my question about the rainbow fan block (Wilma's quilt block) on the e-board. However, I don't know how to remove it once it's posted. And to make matters worse, I can't remember the password to attempt to do so in the post/edit mode! Kris, could you offer some instruction please and thank you? Alice

 

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Subject: Re: Festival Winners by Hand or Machine? From: CJEdgaraol.com Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2005 01:12:32 EST X-Message-Number: 1

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If you want better pictures of her quilts, Sharon Schamber keeps a Webshots account:

_http://community.webshots.com/user/tearweaver_ (http://community.webshots.com/user/tearweaver)

 

 

Kate Edgar East Lansing MI

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Subject: Re: quilts cut in half From: Mendofleuraol.com Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2005 23:02:42 EST X-Message-Number: 2

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Greetings again,

After reading Laura Fisher's comments today about cutting up old quilts, I have a recent story to relate. A few weeks ago I was in a lovely antique shop in Portland, OR and came upon a very large blue, pink, and white quilt being sold by the shopowner as a "cutter quilt". I was familiar with the expression, but this quilt was so lovely in terms of the fabric (although worn and faded in spots), the extensive quilting, and overall design that I left the shop distressed about what might become of this piece. I was back in the shop the very next day purchasing the quilt simply to save it from imminent destruction. I understand why some quilts are divided for sharing with significant others, but to cut up a quilt because it seems no longer worthy of its original intent is a sad destiny for a piece well worn and used, but still remarkably designed and quilted.

Phyllis de Vries

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Subject: Re: removing posts on the e-board From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2005 04:11:34 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

Certainly! Here is a cut and paste from our website, http://www.quilthistory.com/subscribe.htm

Here's how to post a picture:

To post photos to eboard: Click on the post/edit link in the upper right hand corner underneath Vintage Pictures. The password is vintage. Then click on the tab where you want to put your picture and click on the add a note link again in the upper right hand corner under Vintage Pictures. Add your explanatory note with the picture as an attachment.

To delete or edit the photo, just do the same thing and click on the delete or edit button as appropriate.

Kris

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Subject: little green singer From: "Jan Drechsler" <quiltdocadelphia.net> Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 09:41:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

About a month or two ago folks were discussing a small, vintage green Singer sewing machine that they liked. Does anyone recall the model number of the machine or have the qhl messages? I spent last Saturday morning in the storeroom at my church, during clean-up day. We 'found' the inside of the storeroom including two sewing machines that no one wanted. So I have this green one...It came home with me but I am trying to decide if I should take it to the hospice 2nd hand store. Sorry for the repetition. Jan -- Jan Drechsler Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher

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Subject: singer machine model question From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <sandjlokenatt.net> Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2005 12:15:11 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

My sister, who lives many states away, asked for a walking foot for her machine for Christmas. She has an old Singer, which has the word Merrill under the word Singer, plus a number 502C on the side. Would that be a low shank machine? She has nothing to compare it to, so doesn't know. When I searched for those terms, I found nothing. I know many of you are experts on old machines, so I thought to ask here. She thinks it's a portable but no longer has a case. It is electric. Thanks tons for any help you can give. I'd have to wait weeks for the sewing machine man to come to my local fabric store, and he only stays a few hours to pick up machines that he repairs, some on the spot. Jean in MN

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Subject: A really big prize for a quilt From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2005 15:57:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

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Hello all, It was all over Market and Festival but I'd thought I'd mention it here. = All American Crafts is going all-out with a $100,000 prize contest. = Check out the details at = http://www.quiltingchallenge.com/information/rules.shtml . Seems the = publisher of Fabric Trends magazine is a reality TV fan and is applying = this formula to quilting. Go for it! Pepper

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Subject: quilt photographer From: CarylSchuetzcs.com Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2005 17:17:42 EST X-Message-Number: 7

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Hi Julie, I am a professional quilt and textiles photographer located in Indianapolis, which is west of Dayton and NW of Cincy. Caryl Schuetz

> Subject: quilt photographer in OHIO > From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplexdirecway.com> > >

""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" Caryl Schuetz Professional Association of Appraisers - Quilted Textiles certified by the American Quilter's Society P.O. Box 68827 Traders Point Indianapolis, Indiana 46268 www.quiltvalues.com """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""

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Subject: Another interestin NYTimes article -- not an obit From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2005 19:38:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

"Restoring Medici Splendor, One Stitch at a Time."

"Seated on wooden stools at intervals along a 15-foot-long frame, their bodies bent into C's, the women steadied their gaze just inches above the tapestry's topside and strategically poked their needles into the 400-year-old fabric. Then, stooping, they looked beneath the frame at the tapestry's backside, making certain that their threads were positioned exactly right."

"Up and down, one painstaking stitch at a time, they have been performing their needle wizardry for nearly a year as they tried to return the work - the first 16th-century Italian tapestry in the museum's collection - to its original splendor."

Sounds like me doing the stab stitch while quilting.

For the entire article.......

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/01/arts/design/01tape.html

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: Another interestin NYTimes article -- not an obit From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 00:43:53 +0000 X-Message-Number: 9

Then, stooping, they looked beneath the frame at > the tapestry's backside, making certain that their threads were > positioned exactly right."

There's an alternative.... York Minster Broderers work in teams, mattress below the tapestry, and when one pushes the needle down from the top, a second returns it from below. I guess that allows them to work into the centre of a larger area.

Sally Ward

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Subject: nytimes photos From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2005 20:50:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Rats! In the paper there are three photos, one showing them washing the tapestry. It is too small to really see what they are doing and they don't include that photo on the web site.

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

 

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Subject: Re: Old Singers From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca> Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 22:38:32 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Jan inquired about a little green Singer she found in her church's storeroom.

If it is a straight stitcher, most likely it is a 185. Solid little machine, takes easily available low shank feet, and is deceptively heavy. Our machine discussion a few weeks ago was about little Kenmores, wasn't it? I don't remember seeing a particular model named.

And for Jean in MN: Your sister's 502C likely says "Merritt" on it. That was Isaac Singer's middle name, and one of the very few "names" ever used on a Singer made machine. I'll bet it's a straight low shank machine. Have you any other machines that take these feet? Try one on the Merritt and see if it works. Turn the wheel by hand and see if the needle hits anything. If it does, STOP. If it works, it works. Also, replacement cases are still available new at SM dealers.

Jennifer Hill Calgary, AB

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Subject: Re: small green Singer SM From: louise-b <vlbequetmcmsys.com> Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 10:39:47 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Probably it is an 185, the later version of the 99. This is a 3/4 size machine. If you can find the serial number send it to me and I will do further checking. Cleaned up and oiled it should be a good sewing machine. I have an 185J (made in Canada) that I use occasionally to check out buttonholers on as it the only electric vertical stitch SM that I have).

Louise -- in mid-Missouri

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Subject: replica or reproduction quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2005 10:06:19 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

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I feel the need to stick in my 2 cents from the perspective of a dealer in antique and vintage quilts.

In the marketplace there are several different categories of quilts for sale, which have different value: authentic antique or vintage quilts, which are typically considered to date from the mid-20th century on back; quilts made using old tops that were quilted recently; contemporary quilts made overseas for sale here, some of which copy old designs; quilts made now here by individual quilters copying old patterns,and sometimes using contemporary fabrics that are reproductions of the old; art quilts, and tradition-based quilts of your original design or interpretation, that may incorporate reproduction fabrics, or use only contemporary designs.

This is all pretty confusing to the buyer looking for an old or antique quilt.

Often a person comes in to my shop for an appraisal of an "old" quilt they bought, and I have to tell them it is NOT antique, and that it does have the value they invested when they thought, or were mistakenly told, that it was antique.

Traditional patterns made with reproduction fabrics are the most confusing; some of those reproduction fabrics are remarkably accurate renditions. Only from studying the history, and handling quilts over time can one get a sense how a fabric of a certain age would look and feel.

That's why we urge LABELLING your work. If you use reproduction fabrics in a traditional format, try to append to it information about your choices. Rather than simply pinning a note to the quilt, it would be great to print the information on a cotton strip to sew on the back, along with your name, town, state, date. Any information will help future historians, and will aid in accurately valuing the quilt if it enters the resale market.

I had a quilt restorer once who looooooved to make exact reproductions of old quilts, especially blue and whites and house quilts, using repro fabrics and sometimes including old material too, she would sell them at auction or through wholesale channels and get lots of pleasure (and financial reward) from the prices they fetched as "old".

And companies and people today that sell "Amish" quilts, or "Balitmore Album Quilts" knowing those labels increase value; their product is so far removed from the historical context that led to the creation of those sought-after categories, accordingly to the quilt police, they should be required to add the term replica or reproduction to anything they sell.

So, the quilts you make today are contemporary quilts in the time line of quilt history, not antique or vintage, even if their designs may be traditional and not modern. If you make quilts in old patterns using reproduction fabrics those would be considered replica or reproduction. How do china and silver companies characterize their repros of old patterns, what sort of labelling do they use to sell the product?

Laura Fisher

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Subject: Re: little green singer From: "Shannon Funcke" <huklbrynetins.net> 

It's probably a 185. They are a 3/4 size machine ~ equivalent to a Singe= r 99 of earlier vintage. This one is more than likely a 1960's era. They'= re really nice little machines~  Shannon A vintage Singer collector and user :)  -------Original Message-------  From: Quilt History List Date: Tuesday, November 01, 2005 08:48:53 To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] little green singer  About a month or two ago folks were discussing a small, vintage green Sin= ger sewing machine that they liked. Does anyone recall the model number of th= e machine or have the qhl messages? I spent last Saturday morning in the storeroom at my church, during clean= -up day. We 'found' the inside of the storeroom including two sewing machines=  that no one wanted. So I have this green one...It came home with me but I= am trying to decide if I should take it to the hospice 2nd hand store. Sorry for the repetition. Jan --Jan Drechsler Quilt Restoration; Quilting teacher

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Subject: Re: replica or reproduction quilts From: Mendofleuraol.com Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2005 13:20:16 EST X-Message-Number: 5

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Thank you, Laura, for the insight and suggestions on ways to categorize, define, and label quilts of varying time periods including reproduction quilts. Very helpful! Phyllis

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Subject: restoration From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2005 15:19:51 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 6

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For all those interested in restoration, TRACY JAMAR will be doing a workshop on Saturday from 1:00 to 3:00 at the Monmouth County Historical Society, Longstreet Living Farm in HOLMDEL, New Jersey. Though the focus is on hooked rug restoration, surely there will be tips and insider stuff relevant to anyone interested in old textiles. And she loves to answer questions and problem solve.

She is also exhibiting at the Wilton CT Craft Fair in December, at which she'll show her rugs, but I think there are people there with quilts too.

Laura FIsher

 

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Subject: Creating a Category From: "Lorraine Forster" <circusvuelycos.com> Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 08:50:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

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How about the name pseudo-repros. If there is a spot on my kitchen floor I drop a wet rag and wash it with my foot. I often pseudo-scrub this way.

LO  CIRCUSVUE-my pseudo-villa

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Search for businesses by name, location, or phone number. -Lycos Yellow Pa= ges

http://r.lycos.com/r/yp_emailfooter/http://yellowpages.lycos.com/default.as= p?SRC=3Dlycos10

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Subject: Re: Replica or Reproduction quilts From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com> Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 09:15:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

As both an antique dealer of antique textiles and a quilter who adores creating small traditional style quilts of appropriate antique fabrics, I very carefully (and cautiously) label any of my newly-created quilts from vintage fabrics. Initially I attached a label to the back, with all the pertinent info, such as "Bowmansville Star, Created by Nancy J. Hahn, Bowie Maryland, September 2001, Of Circa 1890 fabrics with contemporary backing and binding, In the style of the quilts made by the women of Bowmansville, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania." However, as an antique dealer who has learned to carefully scrutinize everything, I realized that once these little treasures leave my estate (I don't sell them), the sewn on labels can be easily removed and then what..........As I once was a calligrapher in an earlier life, I dug out pens and fabrics and found out that permanent Sharpie pens and Pigma pens will nicely write on fabric, plus, they don't seep through the batting and onto the face of the quilt if I write on the quilt backing. Even off-white Ecology cloth backing to Ecology cloth quilt front. So, now I write directly on the back of the quilt all my "label" info, putting it at least 6"-8" in from the edge, so even if the quilted piece is cut down, it will still be marked as a recently created piece. I figured that since we write on friendship quilts with these pens, writing on the back couldn't be detrimental to the fabric-any thoughts on this?

Nancy Hahn, now enjoying my new home in the Beaufort, SC area, desperately searching for other antique quilt fanatics in this area. Boy, do I miss my study groups back in Maryland and NJ!

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Subject: repros From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> Date: Thu, 3 Nov 2005 09:10:10 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi to all. Re the recent talk about replications and reproductions.

At my guild meeting this week I saw a fantastic grouping of classic = blocks made using Civil War repro fabrics. Terrific setting. Some were = sashed so that they floated and others were set diagonally with 4 large = triangles. Machine pieced. I got to help lady figure out her final = decisions re her sashing around the larger central medallion block. = (Isn't it great how talking things over with others can help us make our = decisions?)

But I admit I was sorry to learn that she was going to hire a long arm = quilter! She was present and a part of the final decision. It will be = beautiful, of course, but I YEARNED for the hand quilting! So, at least = it will be quite obvious to most (I hope!) that it is not a real vintage = quilt, despite the fabrics & block designs!

The fabrics are beautiful "repros" - but many were done in colors not = typical of that period of time. Had you noticed that the companies often = are now printing so-called reproductions in any colors that will "sell" = ? NOT just what is typical or realistic to the time period? Any = comments?

However, the maker of this quilt and I had a great conversation about a = quilt we made in our guild many years ago to donate to a Civil War = Battlefield Museum PRIOR to the days when repro fabrics were sold! It = was to be displayed on a bed in a room of an old house still standing on = the battlefield. (They were using a horrible quilt that was a = 1960s/1970s one! The husband of a guild member saw it and asked us to = make a more appropriate one to donate!)

We searched in many shops for what was similar and did a pretty good job = of finding fabrics that met our researched guidelines. It truly made us = better informed and we loved the trips in 2 states to do our buying. We = used an authentic charm quilt that I own as our guide. (And, YES, we did = make a label!) Shortly afterwards the Civil War fabric repros were = available, of course, but we really only had fabrics that happened to = fit the colors & print styles of 1850-1860. None were being sold as a "C = W repro"!

Best Wishes to all...I love this List...it will sustain me while all my = books & fabrics are being boxed & moved to a new smaller location. = Downsizing is NOT fun. But YOU are my Lifeline, so I'll survive! CB of OZ ------=_NextPart_000_0028_01C5E056.64607720--

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Subject: RE: divided quilts - an old log cabin from ME From: <seatermindspring.com> 

Dear List,

 

I have both halves of a divided Log Cabin spread that I found in a trunk in my grandfather's barn loft with other quilts in 1987 in Deer Isle, Maine. My mother attributed one tied quilt in the trunk to her father's mother, my great grandmother Lizzie (Small) Small (1861-1951), married 1881 to Stephen Morey Small (1859-1926). My grandfather Melville Small (1894-1982) had died before we found the trunk; we speculate that he acquired it at the 1967 death of his brother who stayed home with Lizzie and ran the family farm. My mother and her cousins did not recall seeing the other quilts before although there are lots of quilts in every generation of the extended family. My mother (1924-2005) lived with Lizzie every summer while she was growing up, when her father and mother returned to Deer Isle from MA to help on the farm. Lizzie was one of 10 siblings and Stephen the youngest of 13 siblings. Stephen's mother Eliza Small (1811-1901) lived with Stephen & Lizzie so some quilts could be from her as well.

 

I always wondered why the log cabin was divided in two and never thought of the explanation of passing down the quilt since I have always had both pieces, nor had I heard of the practice. The halved size, 38" x76", doesn't make sense to me for a bed. I find many quilts in island families that appear to be cut down from worn utility quilts, and many quilts with worn quilts inside for batting, but this is the only quilt in good condition that I have seen divided. It has nicer workmanship than the remaining quilts from Lizzie which were made much later in her life.

 

The scrap Log Cabin is in Barnraising setting, 9.5" squares, with unusually large 2.5" red centers. The 5 light logs are all black on white (occasionally red or blue figures as well) conversational cottons and the dark logs are red or brown madder dress prints. The green gingham foundation was seamed for a back, and the spread was bound in a red print. There is no batting and no separate back. It is entirely hand pieced, even the binding, and was originally 76" square. I tentatively date it 1880-1910.

 

Where the spread is cut in half, the new binding, also entirely by hand, uses a red print with a white figure of a square fan that was also used for a number of blocks in a 1930s-1940s scrap utility 4patch/9patch tied quilt found in the same trunk. More exciting to me was that I recognized this red print from scraps in a crazy quilt made for me to use in New Jersey before 1955 by my grandfather's wife on Deer Isle. Subsequently I found in a Deer Isle cousin's family an almost identical crazy quilt made by my grandfather's sister, as though the sisters-in-law had worked together from the same scrap bag. Unfortunately no descendant's of my grandfather's sister remember any of these quilts discussed.

 

It appears that the splitting or at least the binding of the split was done late in the life of the quilt, but why and by whom? Perhaps Lizzie inherited half and then later got the other half when another relative died! And then bound the halves to match!

 

More info or photos on request.

 

Susan Seater

seatermindspring.com

 

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Subject: Re: Pseudo scrubbing - OT From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Thu, 3 Nov 2005 

In a message dated 11/3/2005 9:02:14 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, circusvuelycos.com writes:

How about the name pseudo-repros. If there is a spot on my kitchen floor I drop a wet rag and wash it with my foot. I often pseudo-scrub this way

I love the idea of pseudo-scrubbing. I used to tie large sponges on my grandkids feet, wet the floor, and they'd have a blast skating around, but washing the floor with their feet. I tried it, too, and it worked well (at the time I was unable to bend over at all).

You're on to something.

Carol Grace

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Subject: Re: Replica or Reproduction quilts From: Mendofleuraol.com Date: Thu, 3 Nov 2005 10:51:45 EST X-Message-Number: 6

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Nancy Hahn-

Thanks for the detailed instructions on marking quilts. It definitely is a perfect way to document a piece without the fear in the future of someone removing the label and selling the piece as authentic. My only problem is that my penmanship will not have the beauty of a calligraphers. It was great talking to you last night. Somewhere in you area there are some antique quilt fanatics waiting to be discovered!

It is pouring rain in Portland.

Phyllis

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Subject: Re: Replica or Reproduction quilts From: "Sharon in NC" <patchworksecrets2earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 3 Nov 2005 19:02:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I have archival pens that let me print in a calligraphy style. They are much easier to use than those old fashioned quill style pens I learned with over 20 years ago..lol. I think I purchased them in a stationary store when we lived outside New Orleans... I need to look for more since I think I am down to my last one. As I recall they came in a set of 12..4 colors three of each if I remember right.. I checked but I can't read the writing on it anymore to even tell what company manufactured them. It shouldn't be hard to find them. I find all this discussion on reproduction pieces interesting. I have lots of vintage fabric pieces I have been slowly collecting and cutting for quilts but had never thought about how they needed to be labeled once I am finished.. Thanks everyone for the info!

Sharon in NC

 

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Subject: Divided quilt From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 23:17:08 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

Lo and behold today I saw a divided quilt. It is in the collection of the York Castle Museum (page 86 of the catalogue 'Through the Needle's Eye). Thought to be two matching bedcovers until examined closely prior to photography for the book. When laid out side by side it is quite clear that they each have one wobbly edge which matches the other and shows that they were quite roughly cut in half.

This was a thrifty quilt. Severe wear in some places reveals another quilt underneath, which had been patched in places. Then this large quilt was re-covered with Turkey Red prints top and bottom, and quilted again. It was used like this for some time because one side of each half shows uniform fading. At a later date it was cut in two and neatend to make the pair of covers. One cover was then much more heavily used, sustained a lot of wear, and faded on the other side in a way that the unused half did not. (does that all make sense?)

But they remained in the ownership of the maker (born 1830) until donation to the museum, so the split must just have been for practical purposes, not a shared inheritance.

Sally W In a very wet Yorkshisre

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Subject: Re: Divided quilt From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 23:40:24 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

Picture of the Whitby divided quilt now on eboard 'quilts'.

Sally W

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Subject: Re: Divided quilt From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 15:55:31 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Thank you Sally - Now can we see the quilt underneath? It looks wonderful too. Julia Zgliniec

 

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Subject: Re: Divided quilt From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au> Date: Sat, 5 Nov 2005 19:16:22 +1000 X-Message-Number: 1

I was just thinking whether there may be another explanation for divided quilts. Last night I was doing a talk on my 'collection' and held up an fairly early eBay purchase of mine.. a 1920s Ohio Star. I had bought it cos it was cheap and it had a big split done the middle of the quilt. Quite difficult to repair.. but easy to split the quilt along the rip and re bind two nice pieces.

Is It possible that was the genesis of the idea. Suzy Atkins

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Subject: Re: Divided quilt From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 12:08:34 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

Your wish is my command <G>. On eboard under 'Chintz Quilt 1820-1840'.

Sally W

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Subject: York Chintz Quilt From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 08:15:56 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Sally, Oh you ARE a dear! I was really only teasing as I didn't think it would be possible to see the quilt under the Turkey Red split one - but Thank you for the wonderful treat. The printed medallions are most interesting.

Regards, Julia Zgliniec

> >

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Subject: Re: York Chintz Quilt From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 17:24:08 +0000 X-Message-Number: 4

The printed medallions are most interesting.

Very common over here, sold for furnishing chairs etc. but often incorporated into other things. Someone who has seen many hundreds more quilts than I said yesterday she had seen more 'baby bird feedings' than she could remember.

Sally

 

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Subject: divided quilts From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplexdirecway.com> Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 12:47:26 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

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Hello All, Julie Silber here. I have not read ALl of the many entries in this current thread on DIVIDED or SPLIT quilts. But if the Deborah Coates quilt we found in Cazenovia, New York while researching for "Hearts and Hands" in the very late 1980s has not yet been mentioned, please check it out. You can read about it in the book H&H on page 71. Extraordinary story. Sorry if this duplicates any earlier listings. If you don't have the book, e-mail me at quiltcomplexdirecway.com Julie

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Subject: price of printed cottons 19th century From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplexdirecway.com> Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 12:50:48 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

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Hello again, We have a quilt with the following inscription on the back in "old handwriting": "C E(?) B Ely 1855 Blue calico in this quilt bought at the time of the war 1812 at 75 cts pr yd Pieced by Grandma Ely". Does anyone know the figures on the price of printed cottons in the decades mentioned - 1810's - 1850s? Thanks, Julie Silber

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Subject: The Great American Quilt Revival From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net> Date: Sun, 6 Nov 2005 18:56:05 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I just received a copy of 'The Great American Quilt Revival' DVD, produced by Bonesteel Films. I ordered my copy through The Quilters Hall of Fame. I have not gotten to watch the whole documentary... but what I have seen is excellent!! There are interviews with Jinny Beyer, Jeffrey Gutcheon, Jean Ray Laury, Rosalind Webster Perry, Hazel Carter, Karen Alexander, Yvonne Porcella, Donna Wilder, Karey Bresnahan, Jonathan Holstein, Cuesta Benberry and Barbara Brackman, hosted by Georgia Bonesteel. I started quilting in the early 70s, so it is fun to revisit the early days of this 'quilt revival'. It will be really neat to share this with my DGD, Allison, because although I think of these as things that have happened in my lifetime... to her, some of it will be 'history'. Has anyone else viewed this video... if not, you might want to put it on your Christmas list!! Happy Stitching, Karan

 

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Subject: Archive Password, Please From: Ann-Louise Beaumont <albeaumontcomcast.net> Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 08:33:53 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I too need the current archive password. Many thanks and Best Wishes Ann-Louise Beaumont in Greeley CO.

-- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Free Edition. Version: 7.1.362 / Virus Database: 267.12.8/162 - Release Date: 11/5/05

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Subject: Re: Archive Password, Please From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 7 Nov 2005 10:02:56 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Archives are for paid members - it's not a big deal, really. Any donation made helps pay for the listserv and the server space used to store the archives, so they are the only ones that get passwords to the archives.

If you feel in the mood to donate (it's not a requirement), you can read more at http://www.quilthistory.com/subscribe.htm

Kris, buried in her new POS system. Store ownwers who know what I mean, please send chocolate...

--- Ann-Louise Beaumont <albeaumontcomcast.net> wrote:

> I too need the current archive password. > Many thanks and Best Wishes

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Subject: Re: price of printed cottons 19th century From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassettcomcast.net> Date: Mon, 7 Nov 2005 15:31:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Hi Julie,

I can give you some figures for Massachusetts. In the 1780s-1790s, imported chintz cost between $1.00 and $1.25 a yard, while fine calico cost about $1.10. By 1840, American calicoes cost generally around 15 to 25 cents a yard, but as low as 4 or 5 cents a yard, while imported calicoes cost 25 to 50 cents, according to my research in Worcester County newspapers. Over in Franklin County, in 1833, calicoes were selling for 12.5 to 25 cents. Sorry I don't have any prices for the 18teens--but after the War of 1812, British cloth manufacturers flooded the American market with inexpensive fabrics to try and kill off the fledgling American fabric industry, which had gained a foothold during Jefferson's Embargo.

Hope this helps!

Best, Lynne

> Does anyone know the figures on the price of printed cottons in the > decades mentioned - > 1810's - 1850s? > Julie Silber

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 06, 2005 From: Trishherraol.com Date: Mon, 7 Nov 2005 23:32:41 EST X-Message-Number: 4

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In a message dated 11/7/2005 12:07:49 AM Eastern Standard Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

Hello All, Julie Silber here. I have not read ALl of the many entries in this current thread on DIVIDED or SPLIT quilts. But if the Deborah Coates quilt we found in Cazenovia, New York while researching for "Hearts and Hands" in the very late 1980s has not yet been mentioned, please check it out. You can read about it in the book H&H on page 71. Extraordinary story. Sorry if this duplicates any earlier listings. If you don't have the book, e-mail me at quiltcomplexdirecway.com Julie

Glad you brought that up Julie. As you all probably know it is in the collection of the Heritage Center Museums in Lancaster. It originated from our county, made by a Quaker who was active in the Antislavery movement and had a home that was a stop on the UGRR. This is not one of THOSE QUILTS, however. But a wonderful historic piece. Thanks to your work and Jon Holstein's assistance it came home to Lancaster County. Sadly, it was divided right down the middle through the image of the slave! Each daughter got half, but we treasure it. Also appears in Quilting Traditions: Pieces from the Past, the book the Heritage Center Museum published as a result of our quilt documentation project.

Trish Herr

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Subject: Red Cross Quilt - WWII - from Jacquet River, NB Canada From: "Judy Lyons" <judy.lyonssympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 4 Nov 2005 14:01:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello everyone. I was just reading my Nov/Dec 2005 Canadian Legion Magazine and found this interesting Request. I thought I would put it out to everyone just in case someone could help.

"Quilt with red crosses and family names from village of Jacquet River, N.B. made by women of Red cross Society June 1941 for the North Shore N.B.) Regt. Used in hospital in England. Info sought from those who saw it or know its location. Allan Roy"

If you think you saw it, please let me know and I will pass it along. It caught my attention because my father was part of that regiment.

Judy Lyons AQS Certified Canadian Quilt Appraiser judy.lyonssympatico.ca

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Subject: Re: Divided quilt From: Denise Clausen <nadyneoregoncoast.com> Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 09:30:41 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

Your wish is my command <G>. On eboard under 'Chintz Quilt 1820-1840'.

> Sally W

Excuse me.... what and where is eboard???? From one not in the know Denise C

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Subject: Eastern Shore Quilt Study Group From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2005 11:51:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Everyone who joined the Eastern shore Quilt Study Group at the University of Delaware and the DE Historical Society was excited about what we saw. At the University the exhibit "Quiltvoices" highlights the quilts of people who have been interviewed by the Quilters'-Save Our Stories project. The purpose of Q.S.O.S. is to preserve the stories of contemporary quiltmakers. The project attaches the quiltmakers' motivations and feelings to the quilts. You can checkout full-text interviews with photos at www.centerforthequilt.org/specialfeatures. The artists include Jean Ray Laury, Madge Ziegler, Juanita Yeager, Teddy Pruett, the makers of a fascinating Hmong Friendship quilt and many others. It was a departure from our focus on antique quilts but everyone agreed that stretching our eyes and brains is a very good thing. The exhibit ends Dec. 9. At the Historical Society we saw Quilt Stories by Teresa Barkley, about 40 quilts representing 35 years of work. Teresa began sewing at age 4 and majored in clothing and design at the University of Delaware. She works primarily as a patternmaker in NYC. Many of her quilts are reminiscent of postage stamps (either inspired by a particular stamp or expressing an idea as a stamp). She is a master at incorporating vintage textiles and other objects in her work. The exhibit runs through Dec. 31. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Jacquet River, New Brunswick WWII quilt From: "Judy Lyons" <judy.lyonssympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2005 09:45:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Hello everyone. I'm trying this again because I can't see the first message I sent anywhere on the digest.

I was just reading my Nov/Dec 2005 Canadian Legion Magazine and found this interesting Request. I thought I would put it out to everyone just in case someone could help.

"Quilt with red crosses and family names from village of Jacquet River, N.B. made by women of Red cross Society June 1941 for the North Shore N.B.) Regt. Used in hospital in England. Info sought from those who saw it or know its location. Allan Roy"

If you think you saw it, please let me know and I will pass it along. It caught my attention because my father was part of that regiment.

Judy Lyons AQS Certified Canadian Quilt Appraiser judy.lyonssympatico.ca AQS Certified Canadian Quilt Appraiser judy.lyonssympatico.ca

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Subject: Re: Red Cross Quilt - WWII - from Jacquet River, NB Canada From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2005 08:22:36 EST X-Message-Number: 5

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Check with quilter Sue Reich - she just did a trunk show on WW2 quilts for us. I do not have her address etc, but I am sure Google can help out. Also the NE Quilt Museum has had these quilts on display all summer and they may help you locate the one you are looking for. What a wonderful collection Sue has - it was a great show she did (even under the circumstances of just having lost her son in Irag!!!!) Mitzi Oakes Green Mtn. Quilters President Vermont

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Subject: Just a curiosity! From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2005 13:21:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Just a curiosity! Has anyone ever seen these quilts finished? I have two copies of Ladies' Home Journals for January and November, 1905. They both have quilts inspired by literature and art of the time. One is a quilt designed by Ernest Seton Thompson, a popular illustrator and writer of a series of nature adventures. This quilt has a center medallion pictorial of appliqued antelopes with the mountains in the background. There are numerous borders with appliqued trees, rabbits and characters from his books in the corners. The directions are in prose with notation for the colors to be used and suggestions for threads. There are no individual, exact-sized patterns. As a matter of fact, there is this Editor's note that states "It is impossible for us to supply any patterns for this quilt. When the design was originally made by Mr. Seton for THE JOURNAL it was our intention to offer to supply patterns. But practical obstacles presented themselves, making it impossible to do this. All that can be told, then, about the quilt is told here." The quilt designed for the November issue is called "A Child's Good-Night Bedquilt" by Jessie Wilcox Smith. It was inspired by two sources of children's literature; Mother Goose and Stevenson's "Child's Garden of Verses." It is also a medallion, applique quilt with the saying "In winter I get up and dress by yellow candle light In summer quite the other way. I have to go to bed by day." Appliqued children in bed clothing circle a child kneeing by his bed with his back facing out. The directions are very general, just addressing suggestions of colors to be used. There is another quilt referenced in the first magazine. It was a quilt designed by Maxfield Parrish called "A Child's Circus." The two quilts in question are very intricate. I am curious if they were ever made up and if this was part of an entire series. Thanks, sue

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Subject: Lovely Lane and other lovely things From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2005 13:26:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

"If you want to see Baltimore Album quilts you have to come when they're out." That's the only thing to say when visitors ask "Where can I see Baltimore Album quilts?" Many people think that there are always some on display in Charm City. Unfortunately not. Last Thursday, Friday and Saturday the Lovely Lane Methodist Church shared its four Baltimores, the Mayflower quilt and the John Wesley Album quilt (as well as about 30 other quilts belonging to churches in the Baltimore-Washington Conference). Another highlight was the silent auction of one-block-reproduction quilts made by members of the Baltimore Appliqué Society. they were amazing (especially to someone like me born without the appliqué gene). It was obvious that people had heeded the "come when they're out" dictum. The prize probably goes to Fionna Grey who came from England, but there were also people from all over the US. There is a small catalogue with pictures of all the quilts. It was part of the admission and I don't know if they had any left over, but you can see great pictures of the four Lovely Lane quilts in "The Baltimore Album Quilt Tradition" published by the MD Historical Soc. in 1999, pp. 82-89. I knew in my heart that no member of the BAS would choose to reproduce my all-time favorite Baltimore Album block the "harp on the willow tree" on the Reverend Lipscomb Quilt. My humble opinion is that appliqué people are too hung-up on pretty to appreciate the bizarre and unusual (G). The "harp on the willow tree" block is unique, as far as I know. I'll be the first to admit that it's sort of weird and ungainly, but it is just so cool. I spent a lot of time begging the appliqué queens of the BAS to make a pattern for me. I got no takers even though I groveled even more shamelessly than usual.. If you have the MDHS book you can see a detail of the block on p. 86. Unfortunately when the quilt is hanging that block is upside down (this may be one reason that nobody else likes it). The John Wesley quilt is the one recently discovered in a nursing home in Gaithersburg, MD. It was first exhibited last year at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The catalogue entry says "this quilt boasts an extraordinary assemblage of blocks...created through nearly every technique known to album quilting." The most interesting block is an inked portrait of John Wesley, hence the name. The Mayflower Quilt was the showstopper. It did not come on the Mayflower, but there is sound evidence that it arrived on the Angel Gabriel in 1638. It is believed to be the oldest known quilt in the US. It is trapunto-style quilted with indigo dyed thread. The motifs are spirals, hearts, flowers etc. all corded. It's probably about 6 ft. square. I know nothing about quilts of the 17th century (nor does anyone else I talked to at the show). I wish An Moonen, Katherine Berenson and Karen Evans could put their heads together on this one. Lovely Lane is interested in selling the quilt. they are raising funds to restore their organ. The church is worth a visit. It was built by Stanford White in Etruscan Revival style. The circular sanctuary is as White designed it--everything is a mellow brick red: the walls, the upholstery, the carpet. The windows are below a domed ceiling which is painted as the night sky of the day the church was dedicated. You can see great pictures at www.lovelylane.net. I love visiting churches so forgive me for the non-quilt related digression. From Baltimore I went to Winterthur to see a fraktur exhibit where I learned some things about inks and paper that filled huge gaps in my admittedly rudimentary knowledge of the subject. On the way to the fraktur gallery was an exquisite, small exhibit called "Needles and haystacks" featuring school girl embroideries with pastoral themes. Many of the pieces were from Boston. I'm used to seeing the mid-Atlantic samplers and embroideries. These were different. The permanent exhibition galleries always have a couple of exciting quilts and other textiles. There was a spectacular chintz appliqué Diamond on Point with stuffed quilting, lots of Prussian blues and fabulous chintzes made in Baltimore Co. by Sophia Myers Pearce circa 1840. There was a fragment (a bird) printed by John Hewson and yardage of toiles, indigos resist and block prints. An 1820-1840 Chester Co. (PA) silk quilt in alternating strips of brown and gray could serve as a visual definition of a Quaker quilt. The best news is that Wintethur is planning a major quilt exhibit for 2007. Be still my heart! I'll keep you posted. On Sunday the Dating Club met; the topic was turkey red. Bunnie Jordan brought a new book "A Perfect Red" by Amy Butler Greenfield. It's a history of the dye. Bunnie also recommended http://www.colour-experience.org/teknicolour/teknol_turkey_gallery/teknol_turkey_gallery_9.htm. Check it out. It's always great to look at turkey red. We saw an 1840s Delectable Mountain variation done in a single turkey red print with wonderful double rodded quilting; strips of 1840s turkey red Flying Geese put together in the late 20th century with a beige tone on tone; a red and green Pot of Flowers four block, a PA German Bow Tie with turkey red ties set as Four Patches on yellow with double blue sashing (excess is not enough); in the same vein a Lone Star (11 different colors) on a chrome orange background with a turkey red dogtooth border (WOW!). A lady who joined us for the first time with some family quilts she wanted to learn about showed us a Single Irish Chain (appropriately turkey red) made in Steubenville, OH about 1830. It was stuffed and corded. She's probably wondering if we hyperventilate whenever a new member joins the group. When Hazel said turkey red a number of members heard redwork so we got to see some lovely examples. I really do plan to stay home from now until Thanksgiving. I'm thinking about trying to make sense of my sewing room and make a dent in the pile of new books waiting to be read. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: price of printed cottons 19th century From: <chrisajetlink.net> Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2005 12:46:39 -0800 X-Message-Number: 8

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Hi Julie-

In the Maryland Album book, pg. 50 some prices are given for 1803 and = 1817.

Prices for calicoes in 1803 "ranged from 2 shillings, 4 pence to 4 = shillings, 9 pence and included striped and Indian calico. In 1817 = chintz sold for 60 to 70 cents a yd. and calico for 25 to 50 cents/yd." = This merchant also sold Marseilles quilting "for those who preferred not = to quilt" at a cost of 10 and 13 shillings/yd. in 1803.

I am intrigued by the Ely noted on your quilt. Did you see the Prince's = Feather in the vintage store part of the RMQM? The feathers were made = from pink and aqua Ely&Walker calicos- the typical prints they made, but = the quilt looked 19th century rather than 20th.

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

C E(?) B Ely 1855 Blue calico in this quilt bought at the time of the war 1812 at 75 cts pr yd Pieced by Grandma Ely". Does anyone know the figures on the price of printed cottons in the decades = mentioned - 1810's - 1850s? Thanks, Julie Silber

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Subject: Re: The Great American Quilt Revival From: <chrisajetlink.net>

I totally agree with you Karen. This DVD honored the individuals who = have been most involved in the changes that have happened during our = lifetime. Each of the people you listed, talk about aspects that they = don't always talk about, social history, the times, the behind the = scenes events. I really enjoyed this part. The photography is very good, = many quilts and places are featured, especially Jonathan Holstein's = comments about his Whitney adventures.

The focus is not on quilting, but the ways in which it has grown and the = events that have occurred in life which quilts have been a part of, such = as the Names Project, 9-11, Whitney, Marie Webster's book and patchwork = company, etc. Barbara does address the ugrr myth too. I can see many = uses for this DVD, in class rooms, quilt groups, women's programs and = for personal archives. Bravo Georgia Bonesteel and her company (which is = mostly made up of her family)!

Kim Wulfert www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: Help, please From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> 

Hello ladies. I have a sweet little mystery and I need your help.

A friend found a paper pattern for a pieced "Harrison Quilt" and I am = intrigued about it's source and date. The pattern involved half-square = triangles and squares in a nine-patch arrangement. It is from "the = Fancy-Work Department of Farm and Fireside" of Springfield, Ohio. The = instructions refer to 30-inch wide and 36-inch wide fabric and 72-inch = wide sheeting.

I did a little internet search on WorldCat and found that this = publication was published in Springfield, Ohio from 1877 to 1930 when it = became Country Home Magazine. I have no other clues to tell me which = year or volume this printed pattern may have come from. It is blank on = the backside, so it is also possible it had to be ordered and was mailed = to the recipient. BUT, the instructions/printing suggest that it might = have been a reprint from a magazine because there are two patterns = discussed in a column beside the pattern pieces, but only one set of = pattern pieces.

I would love to find the issue in which this pattern might have been = featured. I can order a number of issues through interlibrary loan if I = can identify reasonable date parameters. Given that it was probably = before 1930, from the clues above (30-inch wide fabric) can any of you = give me a best guess as to when this pattern might have been published.

Many thanks for your help.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE ------=

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Subject: PRICE OF FABRIC From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2005 22:33:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Five years ago I posted to QHL about prices I had noted from a 19th century daybook from Ringoes NJ. I forgot about that post, but Beth Donaldson found it and sent it on to Julie Silber (who asked about prices), who sent it back to me. I thought that many of you who have since become interested in the price of fabric would like to read it again.

Ringoes NJ was very rural, but was (and is) near the Delaware River although north of the falls, and was equidistant between New York and Philadelphia.

Date: Mon, 4 Dec 2000 Subject: 19th century prices

I did a local oral history today at a friend's house. Jane had been born and raised on the farm, and indeed it had been in her family from the 1760's until her father sold it in 1959..

She brought photo albums and other pertinant things and spoke for over an hour on what it was like growing up in our farming community.

I looked through the day book of her great-great-grandfather, wherein he wrote down every credit and every debit in his life. I copied three items you might find interesting:

on 21 December 1865

1 1/2 yards calico $.38/yard

paper of hair pins -- $.05

paper of pins -- $.10

13 3/4 yards gingham  $.125/yard -- $1.72

1 3/4 yards drilling -- $.22

5 yards cottonade  $.20/yard

on 28 April 1866 and the days following--

3 yards muslin  .28/yard -- $1.40

goods for repairing dress -- $ .82

1 spool cotton, 1 skein silk -- $.15

1 pattern -- $.15

pins -- $.15

1/2 yard dress goods -- $.25

on 29 May 1879

9 1/4 yards calico $.0625/yard -- $.58

3/4 yard muslin $.07/yard

15 buttons -- $.15

4 yards chintz $.10/yard -- $.40

to making dress by Rachel -- $.40 (per day)

Can anyone tell me what "cottonade" is?

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: cottonade From: joan kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 08 Nov 2005 23:07:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Judy -- cottonade is one name for hickory shirting, a heavy twilled striped cotton shirting. Resembles ticking, ligher weight, softer feel. Similar to cottonade which is used for trousering. Usually yarn dyed in blue, brown and white. Source: Fabrics, Grace Denny, 1926.

 

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Subject: Re: cottonade From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Wed, 9 Nov 2005 01:08:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

cottonade is one name for hickory shirting, a heavy > twilled striped cotton shirting. Resembles ticking, ligher weight, softer > feel. Source: Fabrics, Grace Denny, 1926.

Joan,

Thanks for looking that up for me. I googled cottonade as well, and found an interesting (28 page) paper on the local Trenton Historical Society website titled, "Trenton Textiles and the Eagle Factory: A first Taste of the Industrial Revolution."

http://trentonhistory.org/documents/EagleFactory.htm

Early 19th century forays into textile mills in Trenton, New Jersey, to compete with New England's mills; the founders, the families, the fires, and the failures.

In 1827... "twenty-four of the 34 handlooms still in use at the factory were producing cottonade, a thick, stout cotton fabric. The remaining ten were making 3/4 muslin."

Lots of good information in the paper

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Subject: fat quarters From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Wed, 09 Nov 2005 12:14:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Hello to the current quilters on the list! Can anyone tell me what the standard dimensions are for a "fat quarter?" - or if there is one? I am designing the layout pages for my 18th c. doll dress patterns and want to include a layout for fat quarters. ( Please don't ask about the patterns, I will announce them when they are available!) The ones I bought recently say that they measure 18" by 22" - or a half of a yard cut in half. However, when I measured they were in fact 22 by 22 - 3/4 of a yard cut in half. There seems to be no consistency - except that they are no smaller than 18 by 22. I understand that the term fat quarter is just that a half of a yard cut in half, and is also a way of repackaging remnants. So, if I stick with 18 by 22 as my dimension - am I safe? Thanks Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Re: fat quarters From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> 

Hi Newbie, Yes, 18"x22" is the norm for a FQ, but due to different selvage widths, that could vary. I buy Dupioni silk FQs and they are only 18"x18" because their width is 36". That 22"x22" one, well, I think you got lucky, or had a new girl cutting. I have heard of 'long' yards of 39" or 40", but never a long FQ! Hugs, Dana

Newbie Richardson <pastcraftsverizon.net> wrote: Hello to the current quilters on the list! Can anyone tell me what the standard dimensions are for a "fat quarter?" - or if there is one? I am designing the layout pages for my 18th c. doll dress patterns and want to include a layout for fat quarters. ( Please don't ask about the patterns, I will announce them when they are available!) The ones I bought recently say that they measure 18" by 22" - or a half of a yard cut in half. However, when I measured they were in fact 22 by 22 - 3/4 of a yard cut in half. There seems to be no consistency - except that they are no smaller than 18 by 22. I understand that the term fat quarter is just that a half of a yard cut in half, and is also a way of repackaging remnants. So, if I stick with 18 by 22 as my dimension - am I safe? Thanks Newbie Richardson

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Subject: 19th C. Prices From: "Lloyd E. Miller" <lemillernycap.rr.com> Date: Wed, 09 Nov 2005 14:20:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Among some odd pieces of ephemera I've acquired along the way is a ledger book apparently from a dry goods store dated 1854 and 1855. This was found in upper NY state, but otherwise there is no clue about where or who. Among the interesting entries (which are the wholesale prices paid):

July 15,1854

4 gross pearl buttons .45......$1.80 2 gross agate buttons .95.....$1.90 2 gross thimbles  >85.....$1.70

1 gross vest buckles  $.25

2 gross steel pins  12 1/2........$.25 5 lbs Linen thread No 30 .70 ....$3.50 3 lbs " " " " No 35 .80....$2.40

1 doz sissors $2.12 20 gross hooks and eyes 9c $1.80 5 lbs whale bone $2.50

6 lbs white thread .35............$2.10 2 box Spool silk $1.75 4 C Scane(sic) silk 52 1/2 .....$2.10

April 16, 1855

2 gross coat buttons  $.45.... $.90 1 gross black jet vest buttons (size 1/4) $.16 " " " " " " " (size1/6) $.18 " " " " " " " (size 1/3) $.31

1/2 Doz Sewing Birds  $5.25 .......$2.62

8 C silk on skein .45 $3.60 (Presume C = 100)

This establishment also sold slate pencils, blacking, steamboat cases, cigars, envelops, snuff boxes, etc etc.

Wouldn't it be fun to be in a time warp to visit that store!

Linda Miller in Upstate NY

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Subject: Re: 19th C. Prices From: TEXTIQUEaol.com Date: Wed, 9 Nov 2005 14:38:21 EST X-Message-Number: 5

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Hi all;

I have several years of bound copies of newspapers from Washington D. C., dating between 1821 and 1824, I think. I have been considering extracting just the information that Julie has asked for as well as all other textile ads, ship off-loads, and other related items. The newspapers are beginning to disintegrate and they will be too expensive to conserve. I've talked to a conservator already. When I lived in OH, these books were from Supreme Court Justice Collett, who was from Lebanon, OH, and served many more years in office. He had the books bound and sent home for his family to read. Unfortunately, I didn't get the whole stack. <Grrrr> They are a great but deteriorating resource. Would anyone be interested in seeing such a resource in print?

Jan Thomas Colorado Springs

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Subject: Appropriate Quilt for an 1834 California Adobe From: "Lynn Davidson" <LynnA.Davidsonverizon.net> Date: Wed, 09 Nov 2005 16:50:18 -0800 X-Message-Number: 6

I had the pleasure this weekend of visiting the Palomares Adobe in Pomona, California.

The Palomares family was granted land by Mexico. This was the second adobe that the family built. It is believed construction was completed in 1834. The family lived in the adobe until about 1850.

There were some lovely period furnishings and china. I was JARRED by the double wedding ring quilt on one bed. I thought that maybe, just, maybe, the Red and White Princess Feather on another bed might have made it to the adobe before the family left.

I came home and pulled out my Kiracofe book, trying to decide what type of quilt might have been appropriate to the adobe. 2 thoughts, 1) being so "remote" quilt fashions would have taken some time to get to Southern Califonria, maybe as long as 10 years, and 2) with the American Influence being so slight in Southern California prior to 1850, would they have had quilts on the beds at all?

Your thoughts would be appreciated.

Lynn Davidson

 

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Subject: WWII quilts, Houston, UGRR etc From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Wed, 9 Nov 2005 23:53:10 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

Hello QHlers,

I have been on the road for 19 days on QHF-related business and am just catching up on all the QHL posts. I especially enjoyed the recent discussions on divided quilts and heard a heart-breaking story from an antique dealer in Houston from Illinois about just such a quilt -- a magnificent 4-Block that four daughters couldn't stop squabbling over as their mother lay dying. The dealer was called to the house by the father and had offered each of the daughters $200 apiece, but they couldn't come to an agreement for each of them wanted the entire amount for herself. The father finally got up out of his rocker, got a pair of scissors and cut the quilt into 4 parts to end the squabbling. The dealer cried all the way home, and found one of the blocks in an antique shop about a week later. The owner said he bought it from one of the daughter's for $50.

I was able to attend the American Folklore Society's annual meeting in Atlanta Oct 21 at the beginning of my trip. Went to hear three panels, each one containing at least one presenter who had something to say about the UGRR myth. I will try to write a brief synopsis in a few days once I unpack and find my notes. Laurel Horton from this list was a moderator of one of the panels and Terri Klassen, also of this list, was a panelist on one of the other panels.

I also attended the IQF in Houston for only the second time. I am still reeling from sensory and information overload. Katie Pasquini Masopust, this year's Silver Star Award winner, was a hoot. What a sense of humor that woman has in addition to her incredible sense of design and color!! Karey Bresenhan said she didn't think any Silver Star winner had ever had as much fun enjoying her entire Silver Star Week as Katie did this year, making it that much more fun for everyone. Her friends even made her a large star-crown, which they set upon her head once she was up on the dais at the banquet. Katie sat there waving her hand (as others were trying to be serious) in the same way the Queen of England waves her hand when waving to her subjects. Needless to say, she had the crowd in stitches most of the evening.

While in Houston a European quilter I met shared some information with me that she says she learned from a friend (who married into a Japanese family) about the Japanese "guild" training system. (It rather reminded me of the very early guild/craftsman systems of Europe) . I am wondering if any of you know any more about this system and could share it with the list. I did not take notes on the spot and am not sure I got it all straight in my head, but my recollection is that she seemed to imply that not all the quilts being entered in contests are solely made by the name on the entry because of the nature of the Japanese guild system -- i.e. that the "guild" system requires that it be a team effort. Could someone please clarify for me? I must say that the Japanese quilts reflecting traditional American quilt patterns were magnificent and won many of the top prizes in handquilting. They were also handpieced. The workmanship was incredible.

Speaking of Sue Reich's WWII quilts and workshop, I would like to share with you that Sue is coming to Marion, IN, for The Quilters Hall of Fame's 2006 Celebration (at which Virginia Avery will be inducted as our 36th honoree) July 13-16, to present the same WWII quilts workshop that she has presented at AQSG the past two years. If you would like to receive the registration mailing in late March, just send your snailmail address to quiltershalloffamesbcglobal.net with the words "2006 Celebration Registration Request" in the subject line. In addition to Jinny Avery's lectures and Sue's workshop, Yvonne Porcella and Eleanor Burns will also be lecturing and teaching.

Karen Alexander www.quiltershalloffame.org

PS: I just learned that the Bonesteel documentary -- "Great American Quilt Revival" -- earned the Audience Award Winner - Documentary award at the Ashville Film Festival a few days ago. Be to sure to check with your local PBS affiliate to see when it is scheduled to air in your area.

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Subject: BLOSSER/ WELTY QUILTS From: TEXTIQUEaol.com Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2005 14:30:57 EST X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi all;

For those of you interested in the Eudora Welty connection to the Blosser quilts, please review Ricky Clark's Quilts In Community about OH quilts. There is a Welty quilt and its maker pictured inside. (not like Margaret's at all) I don't yet know how she is related to Eudora or Margaret Culp Blosser but she is. For those of you who saw my pictures and Julie Silber's quilt made by Margaret; many, if not all the names were Anabaptists.

Any suggestions as to what to read to immerse myself in the Anabaptist history?

Not sure of Eudora Welty's religious connection...yet.

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Subject: Southeastern PA Christmas events From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2005 16:31:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

While not totally quilt related, I wanted to tell everyone about A Pennsylvania German Holiday Tour, on Saturday, December3, 2005, 10 am to 5 pm. Their promo flyer says -- Christmas Market: A Tour of Pennsylvania German Traditions and Folk Art is a one-day event which combines holiday events at the Mennonite Heritage Center, Goschenhoppen Historian's Museum and Schwenkfelder Library and Heritage Center. The below link will take you to a page that describes what will be at Goschenhoppens, and it has links to the other 2 museums.

http://www.goschenhoppen.org/currevent_1.htm

The quiltie part is at the Mennonite Heritage Center -- from November 16 to December 24, the exhibit Passing on the Comfort: The War, the Quilts and the Women Who Made Them will be on display. This is an exhibit of 18 quilts sent in 1946 to the Netherlands as part of the post war relief effort. The exhibit is very interesting. It began it's 3 year US and Canada tour in April and is back in PA for a bit. This site will give you information about the quilt exhibit and its tour.

http://www.mcc.org/quilts/

All 3 of these museums are wonderful and I know from talking to some of the people involved that it will be a wonderful event. Our own Candace will undoubtedly do her usual exceptional job to make the displays at Schwenkfelder a delight for the eyes. Their Putz is worth the trip by itself.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Brandywine River Museum quilt exhibit From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2005 16:41:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

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Oh, it's so great to live in southeastern PA -- what can I say <grin>. Beginning in January, the Brandywine River Museum will host a quilt exhibit --

For the Joy of It: Appliquéd Quilts from the Judy Roche Collection January 21 through March 19, 2006 In a world of quilt competitions where precision and technical skills are paramount, the creativity and passion of quilt makers are often underappreciated. For this exhibition, guest curators Deborah E. Kraak and Lynne Z. Bassett have selected 23 appliquéd quilts from celebrated expert Judy Roche's extensive collection that clearly demonstrate excellence in design and the joy that quilt makers derive from their craft.

This museum does a beautiful job on it's quilt displays. This is a link to their website --

http://www.brandywinemuseum.org/calendar.html

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: BLOSSER/ WELTY QUILTS-Amish history From: "Peter Leate" <craftersbigpond.net.au> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 08:15:40 +1000 X-Message-Number: 5

Read "A History of the Amish" by Steven Nolt , just revised and updated. See

http://www.mennolink.org/books/stevenolt.html and a review at http://www.wm.edu/oieahc/wmq/Apr03/smaby_apr03.pdf

I had 2 lectures by Steven in val d'Argent in September at the #11 European Quilt Meeting and had some interesting conversations with him.

That meeting was great , by the way, with a diverse range of quilts on display including a wonderful collection of historic Amish quilts and also intorduced us to Welsh quilts through an incredible dispay of Jen Jones' quilts and her passionate presentation of them on the last night. These are something to behhold! Peter from OZ

Blocks

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Subject: Re: 19th C. Prices From: "Bonnie Dwyer" <bonniedwyeradelphia.net> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 08:44:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Jan, Since you are dealing with published newspapers, I would assume these are available somewhere on microfilm -- or in some other format. Check with your local or a nearby larger library. Although they probably won't have them, they should be able to help you find out where they do exist.

"A good reference librarian is the ultimate search engine!"

Bonnie Dwyer Quilt Appraiser Manchester, Maine

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Subject: Humility Blocks From: Ann-Louise Beaumont <albeaumontcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 07:26:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Recently the subject of humility blocks, or the purposeful mistake came up in a discussion. While I am aware of the belief that Amish quilters put intentional mistakes into their work, since only God is perfect, I seem to recall a QHL discussion or some magazine article suggesting that this is more myth than practice. The archive search suggests more of a discussion than what comes up with the search engine. I have scanned the copy of "The Amish Quilt" by Eve Wheatcroft Granick that I bought from Xenia in Denver and didn't find any discussion of purposeful mistakes. However, I may have just missed it. Is there a verdict on purposeful mistakes in quilting culture in general and in Amish culture in particular? Can anyone suggest further reading on the topic? As a personal aside, the Amish quilts I saw at Quilt Mania in Dallas looked pretty darn perfect to me. Thanks for any help. Best Wishes, Ann-Louise Beaumont in Greeley, CO.

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Subject: old newspapers From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 09:55:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

>.. several years of bound copies of newspapers 1821 and 1824, I think. >They are beginning to disintegrate ...and will be too expensive to >conserve... They >are a deteriorating resource. ... seeing such a >resource in print?

Jan,

Of course we would all like to see them in print, but don't know what you are suggesting to do.

If you can or will unbind them, the individual pages can be encapsulated between two layers of mylar (buy it by the roll) with adhesive transfer tape holding the two layers of mylar together. This way the individual pages can be handled and will always be supported. It is a lot of work, but probably would not be too terribly expensive if you are willing to do the work.

Exactly one year ago I bought a roll of mylar 42 inches wide by 100 feet long for $65.00. Half inch AT tape is about $3.00 a roll. You could get a great number of pages supported for under $100.00.

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: RE: Humility Blocks From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 09:00:31 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

Ann-Louise, I know Sara Miller, of Kalona, IA, who used to have a wonderful quilt shop, Kalona Kountry Kreations. She has a Drunkard's Path quilt that her mother made, and the girls in the family helped quilt. There is one patch turned the wrong way. Sara said her mother was just furious when they turned the quilt & discovered the incorrect patch... but by that time, couldn't take it out & fix it. Sara said she did not know of any Amish "humility" block tradition, in the Indiana or Iowa Amish. The quilt is currently on exhibit at the Grout Museum in Waterloo, IA, as part of their exhibit "Treasured Quilts from Renowned Iowa Quilters" http://www.groutmuseumdistrict.org/exhibits/exhbtdscpt3.html This is an excellent exhibit, focusing on Iowa's contributions to the quilting community. If you might be in northeast Iowa, the exhibit is open until March 25, 2006. Karan

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Subject: Re: Humility Blocks From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 10:17:30 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Just an aside on the idea of humility blocks: If a quilter has to make a purposeful mistake in order to satisfy the idea that only God is perfect, isn't this prideful, rather than humble? To me that would be the main reason not to believe in this idea.

Quilters know, anyway, that myriad little errors creep into their work without assistance; it may not be so glaring as a block turned the wrong way, but they are there - mismeasured borders, crooked stitches, fudged seams etc.!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Humility Blocks From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 11:51:49 EST X-Message-Number: 6

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In a message dated 11/11/2005 9:27:16 AM Central Standard Time, xenialegacyquilts.net writes:

> Just an aside on the idea of humility blocks: If a quilter has to make > a purposeful mistake in order to satisfy the idea that only God is > perfect, isn't this prideful, rather than humble?

Good thought! I never considered that.

The more books I read, the more of a message I get that the notion of a Humility Block is largely a myth.

Yet even at Festival more than one dealer was keen to point them out and tell the "story" of why the mistake was intentional. The story rages on, but seemingly from the commercial side of this hobby.

Reminds me of what I told my grandmother last year- I told her I thought it would be fun if I pieced a tumbling block that she and my mother could quilt so we would have a 3 generation piece like some of our old family quilts.

She laughed and said the only reason we have family quilts that took 3 generations to make is that there were some lazy quiltmakers!

(And as long as it is taking me to piece this ^*#* thing, I think we might have another one in the family now... :) )

Take care,

Tom.

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Subject: Re: old newspapers From: TEXTIQUEaol.com Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 12:08:26 EST X-Message-Number: 7

Thanks Judy,

I have done paper encapsulation in a museum setting but I seem to be in one of my 'duh' moments and hadn't thought of doing it myself. The problem with encapsulating single pages is that they are bound on the edge with glue and I'm not sure how to remove that without injuring already extremely fragile paper. Any suggestions? My thought about extracting items from the papers was to categorize them for ease of researching. There is a lot of data there that would be useful also for genealogists, UGRR researchers, etc (and some that are just so funny that I love to read them). While I seem to glory in the hunt, sometimes its nice just to open a book or slip a disc in the computer and find what you're looking for.

In Bonnie Dwyer's reply that I might be able to find more material in microfilm: what a good thought. My favorite genealogist Sharon DeBartolo Carmack has written Carmack's Guide to Copyright & Contracts - a good and inexpensive book. She writes that images, which I think also means microfilm, fall under copyright laws. So, I can use my newspapers that are in the public domain since mine date between 1821 & 1824 but I can't categorize and reprint great amounts of material from microfilm which may be copyrighted. When I use material from microfilm, I always credit the source but I have never really looked to see if they even are copywrited Any thoughts on this would be appreciated and I'm going to e-mail Sharon as well.

Jan

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Subject: FRAGILE PAPER From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrowpatmedia.net> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 14:22:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

>The problem with encapsulating single pages is that they are bound on the >edge >with glue and I'm not sure how to remove that without injuring already >extremely fragile paper. Any suggestions?

A really sharp razor blade (single edge, no notch) and a metal straight edge. Many passes -- don't try to cut through everything all at once.

Or, I've had some contemporary paperback books spiral bound at my local Mailboxes store (Staples does it too). They have a machine/tool that cuts the pages away from the binding. If the machine is long enough to do a newspaper sheet, that might be an idea.

You could set up a tripod with your digital camera and take digi photos of the interesting bits. Those would easily go on a CD.

I just thought -- in the 1820's they were still using 100% rag for paper, or at the most rag mixed with a very small amount of wood pulp. Unless these papers were stored in a 200 degree attic, I don't understand how they could be as brittle as you say.

Still thinking.

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrowpatmedia.net

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Subject: Re: FRAGILE PAPER From: TEXTIQUEaol.com Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 15:06:28 EST X-Message-Number: 9

Judy;

I read an article once about Egyptian mummies being sent to the states by the boatload just to use the linen wrapping for papermaking. You would think the sheets would be in good condition and toward the centers of both books (about 200 pages in each) they are pretty white, but the edges are all flaking off and the foxing gets worse the closer you get to the outer papers. I had to lay a cloth on my table when I tried to read them to pick up all that fell off so I've given up on opening them until I decide what to do. I have them wrapped in acid-free paper with a sheet of the same used to interleaf each page. They were bound in a cardstock not leather so I think its possible it was done later than Judge Collett's lifetime. His signature is on every paper. I thought as a Supreme Court Judge, some museum would be interested in conserving the papers but no takers so far: much is about daily congressional affairs. I purchased them for $5 from a museum that couldn't afford to take care of them. I have his family history at my home in OH. They were in this condition when I purchased them.....again, trying to rescue the strays. My sister tells me I'm a hopeless case.

I want to organize the articles probably for my own research more than others. You see, every time I sat down to find something in them I got lost in sheer pleasure of reading about all the glorious fabrics "Just Received from London" on the ship Concord and "Bounty for Escaped Slave", real estate transfers, marriages and on and on. They report things going on in the Northwest and all over the east coast; schools opening, advertisements.

I'm still working on it and I like the idea of the mylar. It would be worth the time to me.

Jan

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Subject: Re: Humility Blocks From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 

Just a short note - I am a volunteer at the Shelburne (VT) Museum who has roughly 400 quilts in their possession and the 'intended mistake' is always asked by visitors. I was told many, many years ago that it was the Native American Indians who wove a mistake into their weavings so as not to make their Gods angry since only they were perfect. Myths? Who really knows. I have seen quilts where the makers (or their heirs) have shown the errors they have made purposely to make peace with God. Myth or not it is a nice story to tell over and over again. Now, I have no problem making an error in my quilts - they come naturally! Mitzi Oakes, Vermont

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Subject: humility shumility! From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2005 15:47:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Have enjoyed the humility block discussion but I believe the humility block myth is a nice story--like the red square in the middle of the Log Cabin representing the hearth or that the Wild Goose Chase block was an Underground Railroad symbol--but it's just that, a story. I directly asked several Amish quiltmakers about it and they laughed. They said the first time they'd heard it was from an 'English' (anyone that's not Amish-) quilt dealer. They said their own thoughts were that putting in a block 'wrong' deliberately would be contrary to trying to make the quilt as best they could. As to the "mistake" in Indian weavings-the traditional Navajo weaver leaves a thread trail out of the design because of a spiritual principle--the spirit needs to escape the pattern. Have a nice weekend! Pepper Cory

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Subject: Re: Humility Blocks From: "Quiltstuff" <quiltstuffoptusnet.com.au> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2005 11:38:45 +1000 X-Message-Number: 12

I do a small lecture on quilting myths.. and although I do point out that I can't 100% know what was the norm back then, I do have a lovely quilt from about 1900, strippy flying geese with a bunch of geese the wrong way round.

Given that a large amount of points are chopped off on the quilt and there are some obvious poor sewing, I get the listeners to consider whether this woman would actually worry whether God would think her quilts were perfect or that she thought her quilt was perfect and therefore included a deliberate mistake.

I highly doubt it.

Suzy Atkins

 

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Subject: ebay applique quilt From: "ginghamfrontiernet.net" <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2005 02:52:20 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Just found a delightful folk art applique medallion style quilt with a 4 sprig floral center surrounded by a sun-like circle with trees and birds and flowers in the 4 corners and a floral vine border, etc. etc. item #7364338896

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7364338896&fromMakeTrack=true

Enjoy.

Sandra Starley professional quilt appraiser Moab, Utah

(click on the thumbnails below) 

folkartquilt.jpg (99830 bytes) folkartquiltcloseup.jpg (138573 bytes) folkartquiltborder.jpg (112801 bytes) folkartquiltstem.jpg (121353 bytes) folkartquiltfabric.jpg (128819 bytes)

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Subject: Re: ebay applique quilt From: "Lorraine Olsson" <svenpnc.com.au> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2005 21:45:12 +1100 X-Message-Number: 2

----- > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7364338896&fromMakeTrack=true >

Is the date that is mentioned a little too early for the fabrics used? Maybe 1880s??

Lorraine in Oz

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Subject: Textile Tour to Great Britian From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2005 11:27:10 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Dear QHL, I just wanted to mention to anyone considering the Textile Tour to Great Britain that is led by Deb Roberts that it should be wonderful!

I had the good fortune to take the tour to France and it was one of the best tours I have ever taken. Oh La La!! The opportunities to see fabulous fabrics and textiles with private tours of the textile museums was really wonderful. there was enough free time even in a packed schedule and plenty of shopping. But the best was the other people on the tour - such fun we had in the back of the bus!!! I have signed up for the GB tour and want to encourage anyone who is unsure that it should be just as good. In addition, we should meet some of our fellow list members in the UK

If anyone has any questions, contact me and I will be happy to answer them if I can or you may contact Deb Roberts directly at Deborah Roberts R <QuiltEvalsaol.com> The tour dates are May 1 - May 13, 2006

Regards, Julia Zgliniec - no affiliation - just a happy traveler

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Subject: Re: Textile Tour to Great Britian From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> 

.... we should meet some of our fellow > list members in the UK

If there are any UK based QHL listmembers who didn't hear about the possible 'tea party' on BQHL but might be interested to meet up with members of this tour, please contact me privately.

Sally Ward SallyTattersntlworld.com




 



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