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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: "jhorsey" 

Babette- There is a wonderful book called "Guide to Lace and Linens" by Elizabeth M. Kurella ISBN:0-930625-89-7 that I have found very informative in describing a lot of detail between hand made and machine lace, and showing closeups of many examples. It was fascinating reading. hope this helps you, Jo in Newnan, Ga -

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Subject: Saved by the Centennial fabric! From: "Pepper Cory" 

Hello all, I recently had a very 'busy and important' (you could tell-) gentleman call me and ask me to evaluate a quilt he owned. Went on and on, over the phone, about how it had been made by an ancestor of his, a woman whose fiancée had been killed in the Civil War etc etc. I said that I appraised quilts but had to see, touch, feel it and so, within an hour, he was at my doorstep. With a great quilt. A not quite 80" square Courthouse Steps Log Cabin. The blocks measured only 4 1'2" and each log a little less than 1/2". Quite lovely, minimally quilted, great colors, and with only two visible mends. Museum quality. He was sure it was 1860-1865 and someone (who?) said it was worth "six figures." Hmmmm. I went and put my foot in it and said, "I doubt the quilt is worth that much but by all means, if you want to sell it and can get that kind of money, that's terrific for you. I think the quilt is later than the Civil War. The prints look more 1875-1880." "Oh no," he almost yelled, "It couldn't be later-" and then went on again with the dead fiancée story. Meanwhile I started to examine the quilt nose-to-nose and bingo! Found it---the tell-tale Centennial fabric with the tiny flags and 1776-1876 written as the "sashing" between the flags. Finally he sputtered down and I showed him the Centennial fabric. I stuck to my date and tried to reassure him that his spinster ancestor could indeed been the maker but not during the Civil War. I also came in with a figure that was not six-figure but quite respectable. I wrote it all down on my appraisal form, was paid, and grudgingly, as he left, he turned and said, "I guess you really do know your stuff." It made my day. So happy Thanksgiving Day to all of you and let's continue to share the knowledge- Pepper Cory from the windy and cool NC coast

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Subject: /the illusive Turkey red book From: "J. G. Row" <JudyGrow@patmedia.net> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2005 10:34:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

> I can't believe that the Ringoes Kid would order the only known copy of > "Andrinople, Le Rouge Magnifique," and keep it for herself. Surely, you > will find it in a holiday package on your doorstep with a postmark from > NJ! Nancy Hahn

Nancy, how did you guess it was me? I didn't drop any hints or anything, but I did mention it in my study group notes, didn't I? That proves to me that people do read those study group reports.

I tried, honestly I tried. More than once. I even found one copy on abebooks.com and ordered it---next day my order was cancelled because, obviously, someone from this list had gotten there first. We have both written to the museum, but have done that before with no response. We'll keep trying.

However, YOU could have thought of your friends back home and brought back extra copies!! Every one of you who went on that trip could have done that. Can you feel the guilt just easing a bit off my shoulders and dropping just a wee bit on yours?

B'gosh, we miss you Nancy!

J. G. Row aka the Ringoes Kid

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: "Dale Drake" <ddrake@ccrtc.com> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2005 10:39:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Babette:

Hi! I teach tatting, and there are, as far as I know, no machine-tatted pieces - no one has developed a machine to do it. If you're having difficulty telling the difference between tatting and crocheted pieces you could send me scanned images off-list and I could help there. What a find! Did she leave any shuttles? Books?

Happy Thanksgiving! Dale in Martinsville, IN

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassett@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2005 10:44:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I have seen chemical lace that imitated tatting, so you do have to watch out for that. Chemical lace is made by stitching cotton thread into a silk backing, then it is dipped in an alkiline bath and the silk dissolves, leaving only the cotton threads in a lacy pattern.

Happy Thanksgiving, everybody!

Best, Lynne

> I teach tatting, and there are, as far as I know, no machine-tatted > pieces - no one has developed a machine to do it.

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2005 07:44:06 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 6

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Hi Dale, I have a piece of imitation Tatting, it's actually chemical lace. I can email a pic if you'd like. My best, Dana

Dale Drake <ddrake@ccrtc.com> wrote: Babette:

Hi! I teach tatting, and there are, as far as I know, no machine-tatted pieces - no one has developed a machine to do it. If you're having difficulty telling the difference between tatting and crocheted pieces you could send me scanned images off-list and I could help there. What a find! Did she leave any shuttles? Books?

Happy Thanksgiving! Dale in Martinsville, IN

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Subject: Identifying lace From: "Newbie Richardson" 

Dear list, Lace is a real specialty area of study! One post mentioned Elizabeth Kurella - she has authored many books - and is the current authority - in print, at least. There are lots of other wonderful books, but they are not as detailed and educationally orientated as Elizabeth's. I have met her and she is a very down to earth person. Another good resource are the guides published by Schifer. These mostly deal with mid 19th c - mid 20th century - but that is mostly what we see, so they are good for identifying pieces that were once yokes for night gowns, cuffs, collars, flounces, etc. Folk used to save all the good trims and buttons to be reused. One rule of thumb for determining hand made from machine made is to look carefully and see if you can find where the yarn was changed or tied off and then see if this is repeated in the same place later in the piece. Or look for carry over yarns in a regular pattern. Those are signs of machine made. Remember, the Europeans had incredible lace and ribbon making machines before WWII - then they were destroyed in the bombing and never rebuilt. So just cause it was "machine made" does not mean it is inferior. the Swiss still have embroidery machines that do amazing work - just think of those wonderful souvenir hankerchiefs ( the expensive ones). Newbie Richardson in Northern VA racing to plant my fall bulbs before the SNOW!

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Subject: Lce From: "Cindy Samson" <cvs@wmis.net> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2005 10:59:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I once attended a workshop on identifying lace by Elizabeth Kurella, previously mentioned author of Guide to Lace and Linens. She had us examining pieces using very good light and magnifying glasses. = Generally, as with most machine made textiles, the more uniform and even the = stitches appear under magnification, the more likely it is to be machine made. = Her book will give you other tips.

I have visited villages in the Czech Republic and in neighboring = Slovakia in which bobbin lace has traditionally been made made. You probably have examples of bobbin lace in your wonderful treasure. Congratulations and enjoy!

There are wonderful ethnographic museums there with needlework pieces = and costumes that you can't believe - loaded with embroidery, lace and fine workmanship. Today, bobbin lace-making is fading fast. A village I was = in in 1994, "famous" for lacemaking had 5-6 older women gathered in the = square making lace on their bobbin pillows each day, mainly for the tourist = trade. A woman invited me over to her home to show me (sell me!) more items, = which I gladly did. Visiting the same village 10 years later, these women = have died and no one carries on the lacemaking tradition they had.

My father-in-law helped me make a bobbin lace pillow and I have made = some simple straight lace. It is fascinating to do and the tools - threads, bobbins weighted with beautiful glass beads and the pillow on your la, = are great!

Cindy, usually quiet, in snowy Michigan

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Subject: IDENTIFYING LINENS From: Gail Ingram <gingram@tcainternet.com> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2005 10:29:14 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

May I add to the references on laces

Scofield, E. and Zalamea: "20th-Century Linens and Laces: A Guide to Identification..."

DeBonneville, Francoise: "The Book of Fine Linen" (gorgeous! informative. Linens and laces)

Re European machine-made laces: Newbie noted important fact. Some of these---especially some the Alencons (the kind Deborah Kerr was given by Cary Grant's Italian granny when D. called upon her in "An Affair to Remember"), where in some cases the good machine-made laces are actually finer than the handmade and a really practiced eye is often required to tell the difference.

For American (and remember, that means immigrant too) laces, see Warnick and Nilsson: "Legacy of Lace: Identifying, Collecting, and Preserving American Laces." In this book, you are likely to find the laces made "at home." Very clear and good.

There are numerous web sites on specific laces. You might check "Bohemian Laces" on line.

Gail

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Subject: Don't forget Carrickmacross Lace From: "Christine Thresh" <christine@winnowing.com> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2005 08:12:22 -0800 X-Message-Number: 10

Years ago, we published a book on Carrickmacross Lace. I don't have a copy left (lost in a move).

There is some information here: http://www.carrickmacrosslace.net/

Christine Thresh

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Subject: Quilt=Art=Quilts From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawley@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2005 16:45:53 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Every year from Nov. until early Jan. Auburn,NY goes into "quilt mode" with the annual exhibit of art quilts at the Schweinfurth Art Center. Historical sites in town offer quilt-related exhibits and programs. The Cayuga Museum has a charming exhibit called "Speaking of Heroes: Fabric Banners by Alice Gant." The large banners (very much in the tradition of the great illustrators--think N.C. Wyeth) incorporate all kinds of fabrics. What fun to find something totally different. The brochure quotes the artist: "The ever changing cast of characters in my hero series gets broader...and more personal as I consider the attributes of heroism that appeal to me....Words are important to me; they are often included in the design. Sometimes the heroes is either so historically important or so unknown that feel the need for extra text." Some of her heroes are Edward Hicks, Johnny Appleseed, Mother Goose, John J. Audubon, St. Herman (a Russian missionary to the Alaskan natives), Queen Catharine of the Seneca tribe, Lucretia Mott. One of the banners is called "The Secret Life of Mother Goose" shows MG (a goose not an old lady) working on her Baltimore Album quilt. Next door at the Schweinfurth were the kind of quilts I need to see once in a while to shake me out of my comfortable aesthetic prejudices. The Best of Show was surprisingly traditional for this exhibit. It's a large quilt composed of tiny green and brown squares (the browns shade from light to dark in the center) machine quilted with a double needle. Paula Nadelstern's entry (kaleidoscopes, of course) looks like giant peacock feathers. Several pieces had sashiko-like quilting with embroidery floss. There were lots of free-hand grids and large, straight hand stitching as a decorative element. I really liked a bed size quilt called "Living and Dyeing in 3/4 Time" which used old quilt fabrics (not antique, just the kind you wonder why you ever bought) overdyed with brick red, bright orange or brown. Random strips were pieced into triangles then squares and arranged by color to form a medallion. It was beautifully hand quilted with feather motifs. If you find yourself in the Finger Lakes before Jan. 8 this is a great way to spend and afternoon. Auburn also has the Willard Chapel (Tiffany) and the homes of William Seward and Harriet Tubman. Cinda on the Eastern Shore going home to Pennsylvania for Thanksgiving

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: Babette Moorleghen <happyquilterq@sbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2005 21:41:52 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

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I don't have a problem identifying tatting. Yes, I do have a shuttle which appears to be made of ivory (I think). There are actually 2 or three but I will have to go on a hunt to find where I put them! No books that I have come across. Grandma died in 1962 or 63 at the age of 84. My MIL was 87 when she died 5 years ago. I have found some interesting pieces of crochet work that I really puzzled about for a long time... most were only 2-3 inches and were of different designs. Then I came across some newspaper clippings where crochet patterns were for sale, similar to the quilt patterns. I didn't find the actual patterns themselves and have come to the conclusion she looked at the picture in the advertisement and then proceded to make a sample! I also have a nightgown that has a crocheted top with my MIL's initials in it. A dealer once asked me to sell it to her but I just had to say NO! The piece I am really interested in getting information on appears to have been the top to something and is very, very fine lace. Oh, I do have some unusual "sticks" (for lack of a better term) that at first I thought were crochet hooks but there is no "hook" at the end. These, too, appear to be ivory and are very fine. Would love to know what they were used for! There is just way too much of this type of thing that I am in a quandry as to what to do with it all! Hmmm, a lot of the pieces might look good on a crazy quilt... yeah, like I have the time for that!! LOL I'll try and take some digitals of the pieces and post them if someone would be so kind as to tell me how to do that. Thanks Babette

Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> wrote:Hi Dale, I have a piece of imitation Tatting, it's actually chemical lace. I can email a pic if you'd like. My best, Dana

Dale Drake wrote: Babette:

Hi! I teach tatting, and there are, as far as I know, no machine-tatted pieces - no one has developed a machine to do it. If you're having difficulty telling the difference between tatting and crocheted pieces you could send me scanned images off-list and I could help there. What a find! Did she leave any shuttles? Books?

Happy Thanksgiving! Dale in Martinsville, IN

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" 

Are the ivory sticks pointed at one end? They're probably stilettos, used for poking holes in fabric for eyelet embroidery and such.

Best, Lynne

>Oh, I do have some unusual "sticks" (for lack of a better term) that at >first I thought were crochet hooks but there is no "hook" at the end. >These, too, appear to be ivory and are very fine. Would love to know what >they were used for! Thanks Babette

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: alan@alanrkelchner.com Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2005 07:29:18 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

I think you may be right that the little pieces of lace are samples. I'm fortunate that I have a couple of sample books. One is samples pasted into a notebook, along with patterns (print and handwritten). The other is an old needlework book, with samples pasted in. Mostly knitting, but fascinating nonetheless.

As for you shuttle, if there are striations in the material, it's most likely bone. If not it's probably made of that plastic that followed bakelite in the 30's. (name escapes me - )

You're other tool without a hook is probably a stiletto. still fun to have.

Alan

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Subject: That Turkey Red Book From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahn@erols.com> Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2005 10:54:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Yes, Judy, you are 100% correct, I should have brought back copies for my fabric study groups. After all, I did ship back the York Castle Museum quilt exhibit books for friends last spring. I carry so much Catholic guilt on my shoulders, adding some more won't hurt a bit! If I'm ever in Mulhouse again, I will surely get numerous copies. Now isn't that an incredible reason to do that wonderful textile tour again! Today I am bringing "that book" to our Thanksgiving feast where I will share it with a (minimally) French speaking physician, her art teacher sisiter and a niece majoring in surface design. Hopefully I can get some minimal translations, but, just being around others who I know will "ooh" and "ahh" over the book is enough.

And yes, Judy, I read your study group reports over and over when I am out of town so I can "feel" like I am there as I still haven't found folks near Beaufort, SC who share this passion. (HInt, hint, are there any out there in SC who want to see this book and talk antique quilts? I will be heading back down in a few days. I know you have to be out there) How is that for a pathetic plea? And, how appropriate on this Thanksgiving day to say how grateful I am to Judy and Cinda and Xenia and Kris and all the others who keep us all posted on the goings on in the quilt world, no matter where we are.

Nancy Hahn, at home in Bowie, Maryland Soon heading back to Dataw Island, SC

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Subject: Interesting partial quilt From: "kim baird" <kbaird@cableone.net> Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2005 10:14:27 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

On the topic of half quilts, discussed recently, here's an interesting example on eBay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/DATED-1891-AMISH-Half-Quilt-Antique-Vintage-Quilt

amishalfquilt.jpg (52623 bytes)

Kim -

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Subject: Re: Interesting partial quilt From: Pat Cummings <pat@quiltersmuse.com> Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2005 09:40:44 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1 Hi Kim, Sometimes, the edge of a quilt that would not be seen, because the bed was against a wall, would not be finished in the same way as the rest of the borders. It is really anyone's guess as to whether or not this quilt was formerly part of a larger quilt. Without having the quiltmaker here to tell us of her reason for making the quilt in this manner, I can see why it would be assumed that the quilt had been cut in half. Happy Thanksgiving to All, Patricia Cummings Quilter's Muse Publications ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: That Turkey Red Book From: "J. G. Row"

I've been trying very hard to translate on my own but without much success; even after I started using an on-line French-English dictionary my 47 year old French conjugating skills have been left far behind.

The best I can do is go to Alta Vista Babel Fish and type in the entire book, paragraph by paragraph for 150 words at a time translation and then cut and paste into a 2 column document in Word Perfect. However since I haven't yet figured out how to get the accent marks of all kinds into my typing (world keyboard) the translations I get are laughable. When I click on the "world keyboard" I get a box with an "x" in it that doesn't allow me to go any farther.

AHA! Just did a google search for French Accent Marks and found this web page which has all the answers. http://www.mckinnonsc.vic.edu.au/la/lote/french/materials/accents.htm

There's everything for your life -- on-line!

With gingerbread and lemon curd to take for dessert we are off to a Thanksgiving feast.

Happy Thanksgiving to all my on-line friends.

Judy, in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: Re: Interesting partial quilt From: Judy Kelius <quilts@ptd.net> 

This is indeed interesting - it looks like it is half a quilt and it may be Amish. If it is Amish, this is puzzling to me since the Amish don't put any value on worldly items and I wonder if a quilt would be that important to them to cut it in half to pass down through the family. Anyone else's thoughts on this?

Happy Thanksgiving to everyone!

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: 

They are pointed at both ends. I have several pieces that have the eyelet work but not in embroidery. More like collars and cuffs, etc. This is getting interesting. Definitely need to get a book to guide me! Thanks. Babette

"Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassett@comcast.net> wrote:Are the ivory sticks pointed at one end? They're probably stilettos, used for poking holes in fabric for eyelet embroidery and such.

Best, Lynne

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" 

If they're pointed at both ends, they might be double-pointed knitting needles, used for knitting socks, mittens, etc. How long are they?

Best, Lynne

> They are pointed at both ends. I have several pieces that have the eyelet > work but not in embroidery. More like collars and cuffs, etc. This is > getting interesting. Definitely need to get a book to guide me! Thanks. > Babette

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 23, 2005 From: "Junior/Peggy McBride"

I don't know if this is the correct place to ask this, but I don't know where else to start. Suggestions are welcome.

I have a copy of Rose Wilder Lane's American Needlework, with what I believe is a complete set of patterns that needs a new home. The dust cover on the book is a little rough and the pattern box has split corners, and someone colored on the back of it, but everything appears to be there and the book itself is in good shape.

Is there any interest in this item, or can anyone give me any idea where there might be interest

Peggy McBride

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 23, 2005 From: Judy Kelius <

>I have a copy of Rose Wilder Lane's American Needlework, with what I believe >is a complete set of patterns that needs a new home. Is there any >interest in this item, or can anyone give me any idea where >there might be interest.

This is certainly a wonderful reference (and source of patterns) that everyone should have, but unfortunately it is common and usually sells for very little. They pop up on eBay frequently - I just looked and quickly found nearly 20 listings as I write, most less than $10. If you know someone just starting out in quilt collecting, it would be a great gift. - Judy --=====================_751265==.ALT--

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Subject: Re: Interesting partial quilt From: Barb Garrett 

The item number is 7366217720

First, I must pass along my husband's comment, made as he looked over my shoulder. He's a math teacher and he said "It's very unlikely the quilt was cut in half, because that would mean the original quilt was either 143 x 87.5 or 71.5 x 175, and I don't believe either measurement is likely". Since he's very supportive of my habit, I felt I needed to include his thoughts.

I would have to agree with him also -- it appears to me that possibly one of the borders was removed at some time -- possibly to fit a different sized bed.

Interesting quilt, and I'm glad you pointed it out. These are just my thoughts....

Barb in southeastern PA

 

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: Dana Balsamo 

Hi Alan,

Some ivories have a grain line more prominant than others and can often be confused with bone. A magnifying glass helps. I think the plastic your are referring to is celluloid, one of the first plastics...I know the material from button collecting, yep, I do it all! It was highly flamable which is why it went out of favor. Because it is so flamable, you can do a hot pin test...heat a pin and if it pieces the plastic by melting it, it's celluloid. Be careful not to burn yourself!

My best, Dana

alan@alanrkelchner.com wrote: I think you may be right that the little pieces of lace are samples. I'm fortunate that I have a couple of sample books. One is samples pasted into a notebook, along with patterns (print and handwritten). The other is an old needlework book, with samples pasted in. Mostly knitting, but fascinating nonetheless.

As for you shuttle, if there are striations in the material, it's most likely bone. If not it's probably made of that plastic that followed bakelite in the 30's. (name escapes me - )

You're other tool without a hook is probably a stiletto. still fun to have.

Alan

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: "Sharon in NC"

I know Mom uses a black light to check antiques she is interested in purchasing. My bet is they are not "bone" but ivory... Here is how to test. I had to look it up so I didn't get it backwards..lol..

Black light testing - ivory will reflect the full spectrum and appear bright white or blue. Plastic absorbs some of the light and looks a dull blue or off color.

Bone- The most common material used as an ivory substitute and that composes the skeletal structure of most vertebrates. Bone carvings exhibit black "dots and dashes" on their surface that distinguishes them from ivory.

Porcelain or china repairs will also glow with a black light.

If you are purchasing a house you can check with a black light for cat urine also..lol...Just one of those bits of info you never really need but I find amusing...VBG

Sharon in NC

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: "Pat" 

Hi Babette and Everyone, Delurking here for just a moment. Happy Thanksgiving!

The needles sound like lace needles for making knitted lace. They're ususally less than 2 millimeters thick and 6 to 8 inches long. I believe I have seen shorter ones, but can't put my hand on any references. If you have access to a Piecework index there might be something there. Pat

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Subject: Re: Interesting partial quilt From: "kim baird" 

Yes, I thought that it looked like more than half a quilt as well.

It's definitely well-used, and a new backing was added--I wonder if there was some damage on the part that was cut off.

I have seen a quilt about crib-size that was actually cut down from a larger quilt. The owner caught on fire, and they wrapped her in the quilt to smother the fire. She later died from an infection to her burns, and they cut off the burned parts of the quilt, rebound it, and saved it.

Kim

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Subject: needles From: jeanlester <jeanlester@ntown.net> 

Those sound like either lace needles or tatting needles (most likely). Tatting with needles has been revived and most quilt shows have a vendor that sells the needles--metal, though. My mother has several sets and got another from the swap column in Yankee Magazine. She is 89 and still does all kinds of needlework.

Jean

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Subject: Andrinople book From: Daniele Seyrig <d.seyrig@wanadoo.fr> Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 15:22:31 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

I just spoke with the lady in the Mulhouse museum shop .She has 30 copies left of the book and her colleague just emailed with price (49 euros ,about $54 ) and postage to someone in the US ( whose name they kept secret VBG ) If you want to order and have a problem please email privately , I'll try and help . Hope this helps ! Daniele near Paris

Daniele Seyrig Les theories passent , la grenouille reste (Jean Rostand )

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Subject: Celluloid From: "Newbie Richardson" 

The thread about the crotchet and knitting supplies mentioned that the lace needles could be celluloid. That brings me to this warning for all you collectors. Old celluloid has a nasty habit of disintegrating and when it gets damp, it can turn into hydrochloric acid - not a good thing in a textile collection. It is found in the form of buttons, pocketbook handles, clasps, hair ornaments and combs, compacts, buttons, etc. It was VERY popular in the 1890's - 1920's as a faux tortoise shell/bone/ivory substitute. You want to keep those items separated from the rest of your collection. If a pipe bursts, for instance, and those clothes with celluloid buttons get wet, the the buttons can eat through the surrounding fabric as they disintegrate. It poses no threat if it is kept under good conditions: cool dry storage which is dark. It starts to fall apart by becoming very brittle and cracking. This is why all the old movie buffs are working so hard to put all the old movie footage on disks before the film literally melts away. As mentioned before in some of the posts, to test for it, heat a needle with a match until it is very hot, then stick it into an inconspicuous place on the object. If it goes in easily - and you smell burning plastic - you have celloid. If it is not easy to slip it in and it smells like burned hair - then you have a protein: bone, ivory or tortoise shell. Newbie Richardson in COLD Northern VA - but I did get most of my bulbs in on Wednesfday!

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Subject: Saved by a monogram From: "Newbie Richardson" <

Pepper's story about being saved by Centennial fabric reminds me of a similar situation. I had aclient who was relocating to Assisted Living and wanted to distribute her goodies to her younger family members - fairly. She brought me many boxes filed with fun textiles to evaluate. Peeking out from underneath were the REAL goddies - but the first thing she presented me with was a crazy quilt ( a very nice one, English, and fairly early: 1879). She anounced that it was from her ancestor from Baltimore and was made in 1820 - hmmm. So taking a tape measure I took LONG time measuring while I tried to think my way out of this jam - then I saw the monogram. "EPM", I said to her, "can you tell me who EPM might of been?" "Oh", she replied, not skipping a beat, "that was great -aunt Effie - she was English and she married great uncle Harold in 1880 and moved to Baltimore - How silly of me, my dear, some times my memories get muddled. I am sorry." Bingo! Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 23, 2005 From

Dear Peggy, Search for your book on _www.bookfinder.com_ (http://www.bookfinder.com) and that will give you an idea of its worth. Then, if you donate it to a worthy cause or library, you will know its value. The Alliance for the Quilt is auctioning items to raise funds. Perhaps they would be interested. Janet in Fort Worth

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: 

Pat, Had had already measured the needles that found them to be about this size. I have never heard of "knitted lace". I will have to put a couple of books on Lace as my Must Need for Christmas present list! I am also looking very closely at the pieces I have to see if there is a starting/stopping point. I can see where there is hand stitching to bring pieces together. Is that what I should be looking for? Definitely will need a really good magnifying glass as some of these pieces are finer than any I have ever seen.

Now an aside onto quilting... A local sewing machine shop had a very large donation of fabric given to them and the owner invited me in to take my pick of whatevery I wanted and to notify our local guild for their charity quilt group. Anyway, to make a long story short, I picked up 2 quilt tops that immediately grabbed my attention. One is a lovely embroidered block quilt with pink gingham surrounding the blocks. The second one I could tell was older with some shirtings and indigoes. To my surprise as I opened the top to look closer at it was a card pinned to one corner with documentation giving name, birth/death dates, how related to the one who had the top, and the date of 1920's and made from Uncle... shirts and Aunt... dresses. I was thrilled! The top is in excellent condition and definitely the find of the year for me!

Happy Thanksgiving (belated) to all! Babette Hi Babette and Everyone, Delurking here for just a moment. Happy Thanksgiving!

The needles sound like lace needles for making knitted lace. They're ususally less than 2 millimeters thick and 6 to 8 inches long. I believe I have seen shorter ones, but can't put my hand on any references. If you have access to a Piecework index there might be something there. Pat

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Subject: re: crochet/tatting/lace From: "Pat" 

Hi Babette, These old eyes are having a very hard time seeing the stitches in some doilies and edgings I have, but that at first glance look like they are crocheted could be knitted. I found a few pictures in the Golden Hands encyclopedia set I have. If you have any books on knitting or any of those old booklets from Coats & Clarks there should be some examples. I just took a quick glance at the instructions and one knit edging is knit along the narrow edge - in other words, 7 stitches were cast on as opposed to creating a long chain and working the length of the chain. The example they gave was to use C&C Knit Cro-Sheen (sp?) with size 1 needles or Big Ball No. 30 with size 0 (zero) needles. I'm not quite sure what it is that you are trying to determine.

Pat

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Subject: study group photos at web site From: "J. G. Row"

Kris, our list Mom, has notified me that she has put the photos I took together with the notes from our last Studio Quilt Study Group meeting. They are on the Quilthistory.com web site for your delectation this Thanksgiving Day weekend.

http://www.quilthistory.com/study/SQSG1115.htm 

Hope you enjoy them.

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: Re: knitted lace From: Pat Kyser 

With a house full of wonderful family for the holiday, I have not been paying close attention to the knitted lace discussion. I know my sister's mother-in-law on a ranch in West Texas used to make yards and yards of very delicate knitted lace on tiny steel needles. I was a bit envious because my sister even had it on dish towels and kitchen curtains, taking it much for granted because of the quantity on hand from Granny. My sister is not the Pack Rat I am, so I'm sure she has no instruction books left.

This morning I dug out my old Therese de Dillmont Encyclopedia of Needlework and found info on knitted lace patterns. There is no date on it; it's part of the DMC Library, published in France and had sold over a million and a half copies at that time. Mine may be a reprint of an earlier one and I've had it over twenty years.

"The other Pat" is correct in that the pieces are knitted across (cast on 7 stitches) and not the long way.

Also found 1947 edition of Good Housekeeping Needlecraft Encyclopedia with knitted stitches that make lacy scalloped or pointed borders, but not true knitted lace.

Pat in Alabama, enjoying a wonderfully rainy Sunday morning

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Subject: Therese de Dillmont From: "Newbie Richardson" 

The Encyclopedia of Needlework was first published in 1884 and has never been out of print. I have three volumes - one each from three different female relations - that span the 20th century. The liner notes of the latest edition form Running Press, 1996 tell us that Therese de Dillmont was the owner of numerous needlework schools and shops in France, England, Germany, and Austria. She settled in Mulhouse ( near the Swiss border) and was friends with the grand son of the founder of DMC embroidery threads - with whom she shared a close association. I have consulted it many many times when I have had to mend a piece with any kind of needlework - she lays out the technique in a very straight forward manner. Like an earlier work, the Workwoman's Guide - published in 1838 - there is nothing cutting edge about the trims and embellishments she offers up for instruction. Therefore you can pretty much rely on the fact that these techniques had been around for a good while before she wrote about them. I feel comfortable using any of the trims and techniques laid out in the book when researching any objet from the last half of the 19th century. Newbie

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 27, 2005 From: 

Re: Knitted lace

I spent a good deal of time with my great-grandmother who was born in 1860. She knitted lace by the yard, so quickly that her hands looked like hummingbird wings. It looked like magic to me -- lace growing from needles.

Knitted lace wasn't uncommon in the 19th century. It was available to all who could knit -- mostly every woman.

There are some fine examples in the Newark Museum in NJ, the Met in NY, and also in the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Some nice photographs can be seen in Woman's Day Book of American Needlework. Patterns are available in The Ladies Handbook of Fancy and Ornamental Work, by Florence Hartley, originally printed in 1859, reprinted in 1991. Most of the lace patterns call for two steel needles of ordinary size and coarse cotton if the lace is intended for the trim on the bottom of petticoats or drawers. If the lace is for collars, then fine needles, and cotton thread or netting silk was preferred.

Bright blessings!

Donna Laing Bucks County PA

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Subject: New Book by one of our list members From: "J. G. Row"

One of the members of QHL, Joan Kiplinger, who is also the list mom of the Vintage Fabrics List has written a book with co-authors Judith Gridley and Jessie Mc Clure titled, "Vintage Fabrics, Identification and Value Guide." The publisher is Collector Books, a division of Schroeder Publishing Co. The book costs $19.95. ISBN 

Joan's book looks at fabrics from the years 1880 through 1959 and is profusely and beautifully illustrated with closeups of fabrics, ads, labels, and even microsopic photos of fibers. She has included 82 separate pages on cotton and linen, but includes pages on Nylon, Rayon and Acetate, Silk and Wool.

She includes a chapter on Buying, Pricing and Thread Count, and Fabric Identification by Fiber, Weave and Appearance, Width, and even by the Mill. Most of this information is presented in the form of tables or alphabetical lists which makes the information extremely easy to find.

Especially for collectors of late 19th and early 20th century quilts, this book is a must-have for your library.

Judy, now in Flemington NJ aka The Ringoes Kid judygrow@patmedia.net

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Subject: Re: New Book by one of our list members From: Kris Driessen 

And in the shamelss self promotion department, let me suggest you order it from our website, http://www.quilthistory.com/  There you will also find Calico Man, which is a collection of fabrics by Manny Kopp, also authored by two of our members. Both Vintage Fabrics and Calico Man are must haves if you are seriously dating fabrics used in quilts.

Kris

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Subject: RE: Don't forget Carrickmacross Lace From: 

There are connections between Carrickmacross lace and crocheted lace in Orvieto in Italy (not far from Rome).I've just spent some time there = and took a course in lace crocheting and I can tell you, it's hard work! = You work with cotton thread (the thickness of ordinary basting thread) and = a crochet hook nr. 0.6! The motifs are crocheted with this thin thread = around thicker thread (coton perl=E9) and then they're set in this finer mesh. = Here's a site - in Italian but with the finest pictures, I thought, but there = are more sites in English if you google 'Orvieto' and 'lace'.

Margareta in Europe http://www.merlettiericami.it/comuni/bolsena.htm 

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Subject: Final Update on Quilts for the Coast From: "Pepper Cory"

Tuesday November 28 2005

Hello friends, If you've been meaning to finish a quilt and donate it to Quilts for the = Coast the time to do it is this week! Please get it to the shop no later = than December 1st. The drawing will be the evening of December 2nd and = we'll publicize the person's name that was drawn in an email the = following week. Over 500 quilts have been sent to The Quilted Butterfly and Sewing = Solutions. And if you want an impressive look at what charity can do, = stop by and take a peek at the back room out The Quilted Butterfly. = Seven members of the Crystal Coast Quilt Guild have donated quilts but = if you've been thinking you'd still like to donate a quilt, please do so = this week. I've talked with quilters and guilds from California to Maine = and have been amazed by this outpouring of love. Early on December 9, the truck and U-Haul trailer stuffed with quilts = pulls out for Waveland MS. Patti and Rod Brown and myself will be the = drivers. Our goal is to be in Waveland for church services December 11, = distribute the quilts, and then turn around and head home. It will be a = marathon run--think Smokey and the Bandit without the beer and sherrif! Here's the facts again: donate a quilt to the Quilts for the Coast cause = by December 1 and your name is entered in a drawing for a wonderful = Pfaff sewing machine or quilting machine. Send or drop by your quilt to = either:

The Quilted Butterfly Sewing Solutions 110 Little Nine Road or 1505 S. Glenburnie Rd. Morehead City NC 28557 New Bern NC 28562.

For those of you who live near the coast, I consider Quilts for the = Coast true karma. If a category 4 or 5 hit us here, how would we react? = Surely I would want and appreciate someone else's efforts on my = behalf--make a quilt for Christmas and send it to Mississippi!

Pepper Cory

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Subject: Humility Blocks revisited From: "Ellen Lessmann" <

I have had a fascination for this theme for a long time, and even though the list seems pretty well in agreement that it is a myth (and I have great respect for the expertise of our membership), I still have some reservations. Perhaps it was not used as much as a show of "humility" as participation in a fad. I can well imagine my 'fore-mothers', out on the plains, hearing of a neighbor who had put a fashionable "humility" block in a quilt, doing the same. Not in the spirit of humility necessarily, but in the spirit of fashion. After all, these women did read the newspapers and send letters, as well as follow magazines and patterns, and much visiting was done. I can allow the occasional orange or gold that shows up as a 'gold standard' thing, and I can well understand the occasional misplaced block, but I still see these in so many quilts -- I can't help but wonder if it was done to be fashionable for lack of a better description of a fad. And, yes, I do think quilts have followed fashion trends--Grandmother's Flower Garden, Double Wedding Ring, and even the 'Rag' quilts we are currently seeing.

Respectfully-- Ellen in Omaha

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Subject: Civil War or Bicentennial Quilt ?? OOn Ebay From: Ark Quilts

There is an interesting item on Ebay --new today. This seller has some excellent closeup photos of some of the blocks & fabrics. But my question is.....is this a Civil War quilt or does the U.S. Grant fabric with the "Let us have peace" phrase a bicentennial commemorative ?

Item # 7371264106 Civil War basket quilt -- U.S. Grant "Let us have peace"

http://cgi.ebay.com/Civil-War-BASKET-Quilt-

 

rk in NW Ohio where it is snowing

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Subject: Re: Civil War or Bicentennial Quilt ?? OOn Ebay From: "Lucinda Cawley"

"Let us have peace" was Grant's campaign slogan in 1868. Cinda on the Eastern shore

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Subject: Margaret Techy From: "Louise" <ltiemann@stny.rr.com>

I was wondering if anyone has done research on Margaret Techy who worked for the Cleveland Plain Dealer in the early 1930's. A quilter friend of mine thought that Blanket Statements newsletter just had an article on here. Can anyone confirm this? If so, who was the researcher?

I have many of the quilt patterns that she designed, plus the 1943 book she published on Filet Crochet.

Thanks, Louise ----------------------------------------------------------------------

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Subject: Civil War Diary Quilt book From: Debby Kratovil 

Forgive me if this has already been discussed. I don't always read my Listserve emails. I received the magazine's copy of the new KP Books "The Civil War Diary Quilt" and on the first quick read/glance, I find it fascinating. I am disappointed that the blocks are presented as traceable for templates and piecing and not with other methods for creating them. I can draft my own blocks, so this, in fact, won't be an issue for me should I want to sew any of them. But each of the 121 blocks is accompanied by a real diary entry from one of 10 women who lived through the Civil War. It is reminiscent of the Dear Jane book, but instead of "conversations" between Brenda and Jane, we get an up-close-and-personal glimpse because we get to read from each woman's own writings. So, any of you QHL members who would like to give me your take, I'd love to hear from you! Debby -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://www.quilterbydesign.com Special Projects Editor - QUILT Magazine Quilt Workshops & Programs

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Subject: Photo - Gee's Bend US Postage Stamps - Aug 2006 - booklet of 10 From:

Good Morning - This week the United States Postal Service annouced 10 = new stamps featuring quilts by African American women of Gee's Bend. = Enjoy - Kyra Hicks, Black Threads: An African American Quilting = Sourcebook www.BlackThreads.com=20

From the official press release (Nov 30) http://www.usps.com/communications/news/stamps/2005/sr05_054.htm Gee's Bend Quilts The American Treasures series continues Aug. 24 in Chicago at the = American Philatelic Stamp Show with the dedication "American Treasures: = Gee's Bend Quilts" stamps depicting quilts made by African-American = women of Gee Bend, AL. Located southwest of Selma, on a big bend in the = meandering Alabama River, Gee's Bend - officially named Boykin in 1949 - = is a community made up primarily of African-American women descended = from slaves. Although quilts were created for the practical purpose of = keeping warm, they also demonstrate how ingenuity and improvisation are = prized in Gee's Bend. The stamp images are based on photographs of 10 = quilts made between 1940 and 2001.

From Scott Stamps =20 http://www.scottonline.com/NewsandNotes/NN_issues2006.asp

Quilts of Gee's Bend, Alabama, American Treasures Series, booklet of ten = self-adhesive stamps depicting Housetop quilt by Mary Lee Bendolph, = Chinese Coins quilt by Arlonzia Pettway, Roman Stripes quilt by Loretta = Pettway, Medallion with Checkerboard Center quilt by Patty Ann Williams, = Housetop and Half-Log Cabin quilt, by Lottie Mooney, Bars and = String-pieced Columns quilt by Jessie T. Pettway, Nine Patch quilt by = Ruth P. Mosely, Medallion quilt by Loretta Pettway, Pig in a Pen = Medallion quilt by Minnie Sue Coleman, and Blocks and Strips quilt by = Annie Mae Young

Images of the stamps from Virtual Stamp Club: http://www.virtualstampclub.com/2006usnew.html 

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Subject: Re: Civil War or Bicentennial Quilt ?? OOn Ebay From: "Carroll"

C. Ark wrote........

> There is an interesting item on Ebay --new today. This seller has some > excellent closeup photos of some of the blocks & fabrics. But my question > is.....is this a Civil War quilt or does the U.S. Grant fabric with the > "Let us have peace" phrase a bicentennial commemorative ?

I checked my copy of the book "Threads of History" and it shows this fabric and gives the date of 1868, and describes it as yard goods.

Laurette Carroll Southern California

Look to the Future with Hope

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Subject: humility blocks From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@comcast.net> 

I tend to agree in general that many 'mistakes' we see in quilts are probably most often just that - I make quilts and know how easy it is to reverse something or whatever but......Just yesterday I examined a quilt that brought the 'humility' block idea back for me, too. I will post photo on Eboard but it's a bowtie - the entire quilt is consistent in having the knot match the two ends of each tie - EXCEPT in ONE block along the outer edge where the knot is different. VERY different. Really stands out and I first thought it might be a restoration but it's not. Strikes me as odd that the maker would be so careful to follow her plan throughout the quilt except for one lone block. I believe she certainly had enough fabric of something to use the same in all three positions and if she had run out, I think she could have come closer than she did to matching when substituting. The fact that not one single other block uses anything but the matching fabric and that this is on an outer edge makes me think it's very possible that, for some reason, she did it on purpose. Fun to speculate! Jean

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Subject: Mourning Quilts From: TEXTIQUE@aol.com 

Hi all;

Does anyone know of mourning quilt collectors who will loan for an exhibit?

Jan Thomas Colorado Springs

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Subject: Humility From: Joe Cunningham 

I see that Ellen Lessman wrote to inquire whether humility blocks might have been a fad of some sort, after seeing them so frequently. It is worth repeating that there is not a bit of evidence for it. No one from the 19th century, that I know of, talks about deliberate mistakes so as to avoid competing with God. Also, I do not think a fad could account for the misplacement of elements in quilts from every corner of the country, from every ethnic group.

I can only speak from my own experience on this. I have been making quilts for 26 years now, and have made many dozens of them. Of all the mistakes they contain, none have been deliberate. And I work in a studio with great tools, wonderful light. Imagine if I were working by oil lamp in a corner of the living room. Humility is thrust upon me nearly every time I sew; I do not need to pretend I have it.

Joe Cunningham, humble quilter from San Francisco

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Subject: Re: Mourning Quilts From: 

Jan, I don't know a specific collector but we did have mourning quilts here in Connecticut. They are owned by Historical societies and private individuals, I could put you in touch with them if you would like. sue reich

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Subject: Re: humility blocks From: 

Jean here is something else to speculate on.. I was piecing a scrappy churn dash back a few years ago, my DD who was 8 at the time wanted to "help" so I let her pick out the fabric for the blocks and sew them , with some help from me, into a block for the quilt..HER block had to have different fabrics in each unit of the block and they could not match like the rest of the blocks. Since the quilt was going to a grandmother I left the odd block in, signed her name to it and sent it with a note as to why it did not coordinate. So it may be some of those blocks that don't exactly fit the makers overall quality have a chance of being a dear daughters first attempt to create a block just like mom made and have her hard work and care recognized by earning a place in one of "Mom's quilts".. Just something to think about..

Sharon in NC

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Subject: Re: humility blocks From: 

Just had another hhmmm thought.. What if the weather turned bad and they were desperate to get the quilt done but didn't have enough for that last block. I know sometimes I take for granted how easy it is to obtain fabric even those who live in the boonies.. Have to remind myself how many back then had to make do or do without.. No quilts in cold weather would be like saying no power to us now.. Can't even imagine it..

Sharon in NC

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Subject: RE: Humility From: "Velia Lauerman" 

BRAVO ! Joe Cunningham, for those words of wisdom. Years ago when Mom created works of art for her 11 children and I was just starting to quilt with her I would praise her work to my friends and family. She would say to me " Don't put me up so high it's tuff coming down. Even with those not so even stitches and now loved pieces family and friends would like to own one of her heirlooms. You are right, as she was, to say we have enough of our little or big trademarks and only God is perfect.Velia

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Subject: re:Civil War or Bicentennial Quilt ?? OOn Ebay From: "Kathy Moore"

I believe the Summer 2005 issues of Blanket Statements has a good = article about these fabrics.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: American Needlework From: Palampore@aol.com Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2005

Recently I purchased a boxed set of Woman's Day patterns---- American Needlework, Simon & Schuster, NY, 1963. They are patterns of incredible textiles from museums. The needlework skills are: embroidery, crewel work, cross-stitch, needlepoint, patchwork, applique, quilting, hooking, crochet, knitting, weaving, candlewicking, and rugmaking. All of the patterns had been a part of a series in the magazine beginning in 1961. When they had overwhelming interest in them they decided to put out a boxed set. Make sure you look for these when out doing yard sales, etc. I bought mine for $5. I am trying to "thin out" a bit at an antique booth downtown, but not sure I can part with this treasure. I am sure many of you out there probably already own this set. Don't you agree that it is a great collection of information and fabulous full size patterns? What was happening in 1961 that prompted this interest in historic textiles? When I looked for a date I was so sure it would be around the time of the Bicentennial. Off to sew. Lynn Lancaster Gorges in New Bern, NC

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Subject: Colonial Revival? From: Julie Silber 

OK,

I need a lesson. Colonial Revival 101, please. We have a red, green and white c.1920 Mariner's Compass quilt listed on eBay now. I heard from a well known quilt historian who said, and I quote, "You have a smashing Colonial Revival Mariner's Compass quilt on e-bay right now. Wow!"

Rather than reveal my ignorance to her directly, I thought I would ask you guys to help me. What elements make it an example of Colonial Revival?

DHmarinerscompass.jpg (91538 bytes)

Your humble student, Julie Silber

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Subject: Re: Colonial Revival? From: Dana Balsamo

Hi Julie, That is a stunning quilt!! Here is Kim Wulferts website with a section dedicated to Colonial Revival Quilts http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/medallion.html My best, Dana




 



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