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Quilters Find a way to care

Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 14, 05 From: Trishherraol.com

Thanks Kris for posting the quilts seen at your Capital Region QSG. I am always thrilled to see quilts from another region all together. It is a wonderful learning experience. Those of us who are interested in regional characteristics can get so much from this.

Of course I say "another region" but upstate NY is my birthplace and a part of the world that was most influential for me. Besides there are great quilts in "them thar hills." Trish

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Subject: seeking info on vintage kit quilt From: "Bill Volckening"

Hi everyone, I'm a collector and I'm new to the list. Can anyone out there direct me to information about kit quilts? A friend gave me a maple leaves vine applique quilt made in the 60's. Apparently, it was available in a catalog, and I'm trying to find out who manufactured it. There is another example of the same quilt on Laura Fisher's web site at:

http://www.laurafisherquilts.com/servlet/q.QItemSearch?start0

Any information would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Bill ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: seeking info on vintage kit quilt From: Sally Ward

> > Any information would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Bill

Go to http://www.geocities.com/qllsite/kits1 for an article on the subject written for the British Quilt History List by QHL member Xenia Cord.

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: seeking info on vintage kit quilt From: "Bill Volckening"

Hi Sally, Thank you very much for the information. I was reading that article just the other day, and it's very interesting! That's great background, but what I'm really looking for is some record of who manufactured the specific kit. A friend mentioned she thought it was from Herschner's catalog -- but I know nothing about Herschner's. Is there any place where I might find information on vintage kits from Herschner's? Many thanks, Bill 

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Subject: Re: seeking info on vintage kit quilt From: Sally Ward

Sorry Bill, I didn't read your query properly. There are several knowledgeable members of this list for whom kit quilts are a speciality, I'm sure one will have the answer. I'm just awake before them, on the other side of the pond....<G>

Sally W

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Subject: Re: Alphabet quilts From: Blackeyesandysueaol.com 

Cinda, One of the best alphabet quilts that I have ever seen is at the Shelborne. It has alphabets in multiple variations. It was in the show they had two years ago. There is so much minute detail that you have to look close to be awe inspired by this quilt. I found a wonderful 1930's tumbling blocks pink and blue crib quilt this year that has the alphabet with representitative pictures clustered in the center blocks of the quilt. I also have a "P" quilt. Polly Mello Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: Alphabet quilts From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>

Alphabet quilts:

Woodard & Greenstein, th Century Quilts, p.129 Safford & Bishop. p. 136 Pfeffer, Quilt Masterpieces, p. 55 Brackman, Encyclopedia of Applique, 152 and 153

Xenia

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Subject: alphabet quilts From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> 

I collect only 'P' quilts-naturally! Pepper in North Carolina

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Subject: Question about Esprit quilts From: "Bill Volckening"

Hi,

I recently purchased two crib quilts that were formerly part of the Esprit collection. Although I'm researching them for more information, currently the only identifying characteristic that connects these quilts to Esprit is the velcro sewn on the backs of the quilts. Esprit used to hang their quilts using velcro, and both quilts have velcro strips carefully sewn around the perimeter.

So, here's my question: do I leave the velcro on? or do I remove it?

Thanks, Bill 

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Subject: Re: alphabet quilts From: "Bill Volckening"

Here's one for ya: http://www.gordongallery.net/pquilt.html ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Scottie dog lightbulb From: "Marilyn Withrow"

Yes, yes, yes, Sally -- that IS one like I had. I see it sold for $127.50. Unbelievable -- for what was probably 25 cents then -- but if I'd known about it, I'd probably have bit on it that high, too. So now I'll keep looking. Thanks!!! Marilyn Maddalena Withrow

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Subject: RE: Question about Esprit quilts From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney"

Hi QHLers - If the Velcro is sewn on directly to the quilts' backs and/or is looking yellowish, it should be removed promptly. If the Velcro was first sewn on to another piece of fabric or twill tape, it should be OK if it is the soft 1/2 of the Velcro. It should be removed in any case if it is the hard/hook 1/2 of the Velcro. When you store the quilts (ideally rolled versus folded), you should use a clean sheet on the back to keep the Velcro strips from snagging on other parts of the quilt. If the stitching is causing distortion on the front of the quilts, the strips should also be removed.

Regards, Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

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Subject: Re: alphabet quilts From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> 

Bill Volckening wrote: > Here's one for ya: http://www.gordongallery.net/pquilt.html

Is the photo inadvertently reversed? Why is this P facing the wrong way? How do we know it wasn't actually a 'b', the other way up, or even a 6?

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: Alphabet quilts From: Mitzioakesaol.com 

The alphabet quilt you mention at the Shelburne Museum is known as the Ida Beck quilt - it has 8 alphabets, every month of the year, its flower and birthstone, every holiday and season, over 70 different flowers and birds. It is mostly embroidery (the finest I have ever seen) with some piecing and with hand quilted background. It is the most fabulous work of art I have ever seen (I know this quilt well as I volunteer at the Museum and have sat with the quilt for 3 years as a demonstrator in the quilt display areas). The quilt was made by a 70 year old shut in (from birth) and it was made in the early 1950s. When offered to Mrs. Electra Webb she wasn't sure she wanted it since it was new and she liked old things. Her secretary told her that it would get old just like her someday! So Electra took it and it has been the Star of the Show for 3 years now (comparable to the Dear Jane quilt that is shown in the Bennington Museum, VT). Ida's quilt will be put to rest for next year at least as the Museum rotates it collection every season. But this is a quilt that cannot be described it has to be seen to appreciate it. Mitzi from Vermont

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Subject: Re: alphabet quilts From: "Bill Volckening"

Good question! Couldn't say, I just found it with a google search for "P" quilts...it is backwards though, I noticed that, too... ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Question about Esprit quilts From: "Bill Volckening"

Thanks for the info Margaret. Both quilts are dark colors. One is black and the other is dark blue. It would be difficult to see any yellowing, but I am also inclined to remove the velcro. Although the velcro links the quilts to the Esprit collection, I think I can establish that link by talking to Julie Silber or Susie Thompkins.

I think I'll remove the velcro but save it just for the heck of it... ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Alphabet, Scottie Dog and Shelburne quilt pics From: Gary Parrett

There is a picture of another alphabet quilt in Kiracofe's American Quilt book, p. 222. If you turn back a page, you will see a picture of a Scottie Dog quilt.(p.2 in this edition).

If you have the tabletop-size book, America's Glorious Quilts, there is a sizeable picture (plate 41) of the Shelburne Embroidered Quilt, which is ever so much more than an alphabet quilt. This was my favorite in the Shelburne exhibit, the one that first comes to mind when I think back on that visit.

Just a note that the Scottie Dog quilt in Kiracofe's book is said to be a 1930's quilt, but the pattern is attributed to Fala. It's amazing that there is still so much to be found about quilts and their history. I receive Barbara Brackman's on-line papers which update her Clues book with new information which revises what which used to be known. This is a part of what makes this history so interesting, as there is always something new to learn and uncover.

Thanks to this list for sharing your "uncoverings".

Karen

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Subject: Calico & Chintz book - heads up From: Jo Morton 

If you are interested in the Calico & Chintz book . . . . . I just 'googled' smithsonian american art museum clicked on 'shop online' there it is - special online sale of Calico & Chintz for $24.95, a popular, out-of-print title, for just two weeks - don't know when the page went up, so hurry!

Happy Holidays! Jo

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Subject: Autumn Leaves Kit From: "Rosie Werner" <rwernerrconnect.com> 

Bill, Herrschners did sell an autumn leaves kit in their 1963-64 catalog. It features two-tone autumn leaves which form a square around a quilted center. The border has appliques leaves in groups of two and three. The edge is notched and has colored binding. Colors available were brown/yellow, red/yellow and green/green.Size of the quilt is 81"x 100". It sold for $6.59. for the top and $10.66 for the top, thread, and finishing kit (includes Mt. Mist batting, quilt backing, quilting thread and needle.) I wasn't able to get at your picture, so I'm not sure if this describes your quilt. Herrschners is a Chicago IL company. I'm not sure when the business started, but I have catalogs from 1915 through the present. They sold many kits (385 so far, by my count) but no one seems to know if they produced any of the kits they sold. (I suspect they might have, because I have not been able to match anywhere near to 385 with other companies.)They did sell kits from Bucilla, Progress, Paragon and Home Needlecraft Creations, Wurzburg, and possibly others. Rosie Werner ------_NextPart_000_0015_01C60232.08156CC0--

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Subject: Esprit quilts and velcro From: Julie Silber

Hello Bill, et al,

I was (and still AM) curator of the Esprit Collection of Quilts since 1983. I believe you bought those quilts on eBay from a woman to whom Esprit (well, I) sold the quilts in the 1990's -- the first time some of the Esprit quilts went out for sale. (We're in a BIG second round right now!) Bill, if you send me photos or the eBay listings of your particular quilts, I can probably identify them for you -- with accession #'s, any history, etc. quiltcomplexdirecway.com

Esprit used Velcro on all four sides of the quilts as the quilts were hung around the company headquarters, on display for the employees AND for the general public for more than 25 years. (Individual quilts were frequently rotated, of courses.) I have never seen any damage resulting from the application of the velcro, though Meg, it sounds like you have...

When I became curator of the collection, in 1983, I made sure that the velcro was applied first to a cotton twill (apron) tape and then hand sewn onto the four sides of the quilts. However, a few of the quilts from "before my time" had Velcro applied directly to the quilts. Even on those, I have not seen any damage -- some after 30 or more years. Of course, we do not know what might be happening beyond the visible.

Just weighing in with my own direct experience.

Julie Silber

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Subject: mystery block From: Julie Silber 

Hello again,

Can anyone identify the block of a late 19th century pieced quilt we have. I'm sure it is listed somewhere but the Holi-Daze have me loopy, and I can not find it in any of the reference books:

Oh, gee -- now I can not remember how to post a photo. Can someone kindly remind me? Meanwhile the quilt is currently on eBay, # 7374876542

Or paste in --

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item7374876542&

Hey, if you can identify it you'll get the $5.00 prize. No on has gotten it yet!

Thanks, Julie Silber

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Subject: Autumn Leaves (again) From: "Rosie Werner" 

Now that I've seen the pictures of the autumn leaves quilt, I can give you more accurate information. I'm posting it here in case anyone else is interested. It is not the kit from Herrschners. This is a Lee Wards product. It was offered in Lee Wards catalogs from 1953 to 1969. From 1953 to 1958 it was called "Trailing Leaf" #7402 and was available in greens and grays only. The quilting pattern was a diagonal grid in the center and a quilted border with leaves quilted within 2 lines. The outside border was quilted with a diagonal grid and the outer edge was echo quilted around the leaves in the border. From 1962 - 1968 they called it "Trailing Leaves" #9128. It was now available in 2 color choices: Autumn Leaves (golden yellow, greens, dk.brown, tan & red.) and greens with grays.The green/gray color combo was discontinued after 1964. The quilting pattern also changed. The center had a diagonal grid, but the leaves were quilted around the leaf sprays, as though they were also attached to the branch. The outer border is quilted with a diagonal grid.Your quilt was probably purchased somewhere between 1962 and 1968. The embroidered embellishments were probably part of the kit directions. Thread kits could be purchased along with the quilt top kit. In 1969, Lee Wards offered a quilt kit with a similar design. This one was for cross-stitch on prequilted fabric. Rosie

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Subject: Re: Autumn Leaves (again) From: "Bill Volckening" <williamvolckeningcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 16 Dec 05 :54:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Wow, Rosie -- you're AWESOME, and you nailed it!!

I spoke today with the person who gave me the quilt, and she says the top piece came with blue markings on it for the quilting design. Those markings are still evident on the quilt. She also told me her mother bought the thread as part of the kit, but purchased her other supplies (batting, backing, etc.) elsewhere. Apparently, her mother did the buttonhole embellishment stitching around each leaf before applying the leaves to the top. The quilting is diagonal diamonds around the outer border, with a small line separating that border from the center. The center quilting is a wavy diamond grid with the leaf sprays as you described.

The quilt was given to my friend as a wedding gift (first marriage). Her mother made about 25 quilts during her life, and we know where at least three of them are. The quiltmaker, by the way, was Frieda Ruder Moser, a German immigrant who was born in 1900 in Hugsweier, Germany. She moved to the US in 1925, resided in Kidron, Ohio, and lived to be 77. I have a whole page of notes about Moser, the family, and Moser's quiltmaking. My friend is going to lend me Moser's passport photo, which I will scan for my own records.

I am corresponding with an eBay seller about getting hold of a 1964 Lee Wards catalog. Thanks again for tracking it down.

Cheers! Bill ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Autumn Leaves Kit From: "Bill Volckening" <williamvolckeningcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 16 Dec 05 15:42:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi All,

Many thanks for all the excellent responses to my question. I'm very excited and impressed by the people participating in this discussion group and their collective wealth of knowledge. One of the replies mentioned the kit may have been available through Lee Wards 1964 catalog, and I think I've found a copy of the catalog through eBay. I'll keep you all posted if I find more specific information.

The person who gave me the quilt is the daughter of the maker. I have interviewed her and have some great notes on the provenance, plus some anecdotes on what it was like growing up in a small home with a large quilt frame occupying the small livingroom space. Interestingly, the woman who gave it to me was a finalist in the 21st Pillsbury Bake Off. Her recipe and picture is in one of the old Bake Off cookbooks, and I have a copy of that, too. She gave me the quilt because she felt nobody in her family would appreciate it as much as I. She is thrilled about all the information I'm collecting.

Thanks again, Bill ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Autumn Leaves Kit From: MargaretFaheyaol.com Date: Sat, 17 Dec 05 11:15:45 EST X-Message-Number: 3

-------------------------------1134836145 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Your excitement is contagious. Bravo! I'm off to sew up some presents with a lift in my heart. Thank you.

Margaret

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Subject: velcro and quilts From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Sat, 17 Dec 05 12:35:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Dear List, Velcro is problematic in terms of using it to display quilts - not in and of itself - but by the careless handling that it seems to encourage. Think about how you dis-engage a Velcro closure: you probably take the end of the object and pull to separate the hooks from the loops. This "technique", which is almost instinctive to those of us who have taken off shoes or kids coats which fastened with Velcro, is very stressful to the fragile fibers of antique quilts. It is the FORCE with which the hooks and loops are separated which is the problem. So, when you are de-installing a Velcro mounted quilt from a display, use a spatula of some kind to separate the hooks from the loops. This kind of thin, blunt instrument causes the force to be evenly distributed and minimizes any pull on the fragile fibers of the antique object. Think of it in terms of an old lady at the massage therapist's - they do not massage her quilte as forcefully as they would a college kid - she would bruise. Ho ho ho! Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Block mystery solved! From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplexdirecway.com> Date: Sat, 17 Dec 05 16:35:58 -0800 X-Message-Number: 5

From Yesterday: Can anyone identify the block of a late 19th century pieced quilt we have. I'm sure it is listed somewhere but the Holi-Daze have me loopy, and I can not find it in any of the reference books:

Oh, gee -- now I can not remember how to post a photo. Can someone kindly remind me? Meanwhile the quilt is currently on eBay, # 7374876542

Or paste in --

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item7374876542&rd1&sspagenam eSTRK%3AMESE%3AIT&rd1

Hey, if you can identify it you'll get the $5.00 prize. No on has gotten it yet!

TODAY: QHL to the rescue AGAIN! Xenia found it -- or something VERY close. She wrote: " Hi, Julie - if you have Brackman's Encyclopedia, check #72 - it is very close to your block, and is called Blind Man's Fancy (ladies Art Co. #1)."

She GETS the $5.00 PRIZE. No Kidding! Thanks! Julie

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Subject: Lee Wards catalog From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 07:50:16 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Bill reported finding a 1964 Lee Wards catalog on eBay. I am always impressed with what one can find on the web, and eBay is amazing. Someone actually is selling a Lee Wards catalog from 41 years ago??? Amazing.

I live in a town about 10 miles south of Elgin, and Lee Wards was very much a part of my growing up, since my mother was a crafter, and I was her assistant. There was no eBay back then or any time that Lee Wards was still in business, and I would have never thought to keep any catalogs for historical purposes. I do give myself permission NOT to be the archivist for everything, but I packrat enough. I guess some of that stuff could have been valuable information to some today. I'm glad someone else had the packrat gene and took advantage of it.

I've kept a few Keepsake Quilting catalogs for the pictures, especially the one with my pattern on the cover. Hmmmmmmm. I'll have to tell my kids. :)

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net

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Subject: Laurel Horton's new book From: Gail Ingram <gingramtcainternet.com> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 08:51:28 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

I thought some of you might wish to know that Laurel Horton's new book, "Mary Black's Family Quilts: Meaning and Memory in Everyday Life" is at last available. I had pre-ordered at Amazon, which recently notified me my order would be sent in February.

Yet the book is available now, both in hardback and paperback, from The University of South Carolina Press or from Laurel herself.

This is the Press's characterization of the book:

"Laurel Horton has researched and written the remarkable story of a collection of sixteen quilts made by Mary Black and women in her family. Mary Louisa Snoddy Black was born in 1860 and lived her whole life in the vicinity of Spartanburg, South Carolina. Shortly before her death in 1927, Mary and her daughters sewed onto each quilt a handwritten label containing information about the maker and the quilt itself. This book brings together the authorB9s meticulous research, thoughtful interpretation, and stylish writing to set a new standard for the study of quilts and quiltmaking as material behavior within the everyday lives of ordinary people."

Gail Ingram

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Subject: RE: Velcro & $5 From: "Teddy Pruett" <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 10:58:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

<<Xenia found it -- She GETS the $5.00 PRIZE. No Kidding! Thanks! Julie>>

So, Why are we not surprised?????? Those of us fortunate to know Xenia AND her home very well, can tell you that not only does she possess a photographic memory, but her MAC is set up in the midst of a wondrous library. SHe seldom has to get out of her chair to research the depths and/or idiosyncracies of quilt history. Or lack thereof. And X, don't send me an admonishing e-mail for telling on you! Miz Julia Z is about the same. I'm always interested to see which of them hits "reply" the first. That relieves me of all responsibility - I know that they will handle all replies adequately, and I can just sit here digging my toe in the dirt and looking at the ceiling.

As for Velcro, I will relay one small bit of info. Paul Pilgrim told me that he and GR sent a display of antique quilts to China, I believe. A far away place, nonetheless, and that the quilts were not unpacked for quite a while after they were returned. These quilts had velcro attached, and Paul said that there were instances where the portion of the quilt that was velcro'ed simply fell away. Of course, it has been a number of years since this conversation, but it impacted me greatly. Many of you know Gerald Roy, and may want to verify this info some time. But I think it is accurate.

Ho Ho Ho. Teddy Pruett

_________________________________________________________________ Don’t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search! http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm000636ave/direct/01/

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Subject: Theory of what happened to Pilgrim/Roy quilts From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 11:51:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Teddy, et all I have been told of the damage to those quilts. The only thing I can think of is that somehow, moisture was trapped behind the velcro causing the fabric to rot. Anyone who has worn nylon on a very hot and humid day can attest to how it does not "breathe". That is one reason why sewing it on to cotton twill tape before sewing it on to the quilt is a good idea. I am also wondering if there was anyway that the velcro used was the adhesive type - that was also sewn on? The chemical interaction of th glue and extreme humidity would not be kind to fibers. Just speculating Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Another mystery answer From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 11:11:11 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

I wrote to Julie privately after she posted Xenia's finding for the name of the mystery block. I had found two other close matches but didn't send them on because I figured they were "close but no cigar." Julie encouraged me to post this here.

Seeing that Xenia's was close enough, I also offer these two: Brackman's #2439 "Duck and Ducklings" and 2442 "Unnamed" with Bishop and Safanda as the source.

However, none of these is perfectly "right on." Interesting.

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net

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Subject: Re: Theory of what happened to Pilgrim/Roy quilts From: "Julia D. Zgliniec" <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 10:05:26 -0800 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi Newbie and All, Paul told me it was the adhesive type of Velcro - which of course makes perfect sense in this case. I have one area in my home where the wooden board has velcro attached. Quilts with the velcro attached to the sleeve on the quilt are just pressed to the board. These are quilts I have made and change frequently. This serves as an example of one way to display a quilt to clients when they come to my home. By far my favorite method is for sleeves.

Regards to all, Julia Zgliniec, Poway, CA

> >

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Subject: Velcro v sleeves From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 19:08:52 +0000 X-Message-Number: 7

My volunteer duties have required me to sew both sleeves and velcro (on calico) to quilts for display. Few vintage quilts are perfectly square, and my observation was that quilts hung with a sleeve on one edge could be teased and coaxed and eased into hanging nicely, whereas the edge of those on velcro was immovable with the result that the rest of the quilt hung with much more 'wave'.

Sally W

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Subject: RE: Lee Wards catalog From: "Kay" <Kaytreestump.com> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 10:34:30 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

I like the fact that my over-stuffed office with old quilting, weaving and spinning magazines now has an excuse for existing! Perhaps one day, a treasure will spring from all of this chaos that will finance something wonderful for my children!

Kay Fair, MLIS www.finderware.com Small Library Software

-----Original Message----- From: Barbara Vlack [mailto:cptvdeosbcglobal.net] Sent: Sunday, December 18, 05 6:50 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Lee Wards catalog

Bill reported finding a 1964 Lee Wards catalog on eBay. I am always impressed with what one can find on the web, and eBay is amazing. Someone actually is selling a Lee Wards catalog from 41 years ago??? Amazing.

I live in a town about 10 miles south of Elgin, and Lee Wards was very much a part of my growing up, since my mother was a crafter, and I was her assistant. There was no eBay back then or any time that Lee Wards was still in business, and I would have never thought to keep any catalogs for historical purposes. I do give myself permission NOT to be the archivist for everything, but I packrat enough. I guess some of that stuff could have been valuable information to some today. I'm glad someone else had the packrat gene and took advantage of it.

I've kept a few Keepsake Quilting catalogs for the pictures, especially the one with my pattern on the cover. Hmmmmmmm. I'll have to tell my kids. :)

Barb Vlack cptvdeosbcglobal.net

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Subject: Re: velcro and quilts From: "Bill Volckening" <williamvolckeningcomcast.net> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 14:24:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Hi All,

Thank you everyone for the good advice on the velcro. Special thanks to Julie Silber. Julie has verified that the crib quilts were once part of the Esprit Collection, and when things settle down after the holidays, she and I will be corresponding about additional information she may have. (I'm excited!!)

I have already received one of the two quilts -- the other one is at my parents' home in Maine (Christmas gift). Both quilts are dark colored and not really susceptible to staining. Esprit was very careful about how the velcro was applied. It was applied in several strips, ranging from 3-5" in length, and was stitched to the perimeter of the back. There was no adhesive on the velcro, and the soft strip (rather than the hooked strip) was used on the quilts -- so the velcro is not catching on the quilt fabric when the quilt is rolled or folded.

Although I have a strong feeling the velcro has not caused (and is not causing) any damage or fabric deterioration to the quilts, I have decided to remove it. There were a few considerations in the decision:

1) conservation - although there was no adhesive and staining is not an issue, it would be very difficult to determine whether or not the velcro used was an archival product. I'm sure Esprit would have used archival velcro if it was available, but I don't know whether or not archival velcro was available when the velcro was applied to the quilt. I think velcro is typically a stable, archival product unless it has adhesive - but I could be wrong. Better safe than sorry.

2) display - I display quilts using hanging sleeves (or channels) rather than velcro, so I don't need the velcro for display purposes;

3) authentication - the use of velcro helped authenticate the quilts as being formerly part of the Esprit Collection. Now that the curator is in contact with me, I can gather other types authentication and documentation.

I appreciate all the helpful suggestions everyone has offered. The plan of action is to photograph the velcro on the quilts, carefully remove it, and save it with notes about what it is. I may also include notes from this discussion. Future quilt historians might get a good laugh out of the whole thing, but I think they would appreciate that we all cared about it.

Thanks again, Bill

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Subject: Researching Genealogy for Friendship Quilts From: "Bill Volckening" <williamvolckeningcomcast.net> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 14:48:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Hi All,

I have two friendship quilts, and I'm seeking information about how to research the genealogy of the makers.

The first quilt is a Schoolhouse quilt: the blocks were made by  different people for Cora B. Fitch between 1896 and 1897. In 1929, the quilt was finished and quilted by Marjorie Fitch, presumably a descendent of Cora. Each block is signed in ink with the maker’s name and hometown. Top center-right block says "Cora B. Fitch's quilt, 1896-97." The adjoining upper right corner block says "Marjorie M.L. Fitch, quilted 1929.

Other names and places include:

Mrs. P.H. Hyde, Richfield Spr., NY Mrs. Anson Davis, Toddsville, NY Miss Lovina Gibbs, Fly Creek, NY Mrs. John Pickens, Middlefield, NY Miss Kittie Page, Middlefield, NY Mrs. Deloss Hunt, Middlefield, NY Miss Nellie Tompson, Middlefield, NY Miss T.L. Davis, Oaksville, NY Mrs. Wm. Bliss, Toddsville, NY Mrs. W.L. Brown, Middlefield, NY Mrs. Jeanette Gibbs, Fly Creek, NY Mrs. Thos. Brice, Richfield Spr., NY Mrs. Nellie Finch, Toddsville, NY Miss Jessie Talbot, Middlefield, NY Mrs. M. S. Ottaway, Lentsville, NY Mrs. John Kane, Fly Creek, NY Mrs. Ed Talbot, Middlefield, NY Miss Flora Hunt, Middlefield, NY

The second quilt is a contained crazy block with depression/post-depression era feedsack fabrics and starburst medallions in the center of each block. Names are embroidered on the center circle of each starburst. The person who sold me the quilt said it was from the 30's and was made in Wichita, Kansas. The center block says "School Dist. 71." The names include:

Madge Tharp Paula + Eddie Pauline S. Mary Walker Betty Tharp Goldie Dunn Billy Grossner Willia + Betty Lee Flora Howard Dixie Lee Dunn Lottie Kohovalzky (or Konovalzky)

I have poked around on the internet to try to find information about the people whose names are on the quilt. I have also contacted local historical societies -- but so far, I haven't turned up much.

So, where else should I look?

Thanks in advance, Bill ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Researching Genealogy for Friendship Quilts From: "kim baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Sun, 18 Dec 05 19:30:05 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

For genealogy research, check US census records, then state birth and death records.

-----Original Message----- From: Bill Volckening [mailto:williamvolckeningcomcast.net] Sent: Sunday, December 18, 05 1:48 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Researching Genealogy for Friendship Quilts

Hi All,

I have two friendship quilts, and I'm seeking information about how to research the genealogy of the makers.

The first quilt is a Schoolhouse quilt: the blocks were made by  different people for Cora B. Fitch between 1896 and 1897. In 1929, the quilt was finished and quilted by Marjorie Fitch, presumably a descendent of Cora. Each block is signed in ink with the maker's name and hometown. Top center-right block says "Cora B. Fitch's quilt, 1896-97." The adjoining upper right corner block says "Marjorie M.L. Fitch, quilted 1929.

Other names and places include:

Mrs. P.H. Hyde, Richfield Spr., NY Mrs. Anson Davis, Toddsville, NY Miss Lovina Gibbs, Fly Creek, NY Mrs. John Pickens, Middlefield, NY Miss Kittie Page, Middlefield, NY Mrs. Deloss Hunt, Middlefield, NY Miss Nellie Tompson, Middlefield, NY Miss T.L. Davis, Oaksville, NY Mrs. Wm. Bliss, Toddsville, NY Mrs. W.L. Brown, Middlefield, NY Mrs. Jeanette Gibbs, Fly Creek, NY Mrs. Thos. Brice, Richfield Spr., NY Mrs. Nellie Finch, Toddsville, NY Miss Jessie Talbot, Middlefield, NY Mrs. M. S. Ottaway, Lentsville, NY Mrs. John Kane, Fly Creek, NY Mrs. Ed Talbot, Middlefield, NY Miss Flora Hunt, Middlefield, NY

The second quilt is a contained crazy block with depression/post-depression era feedsack fabrics and starburst medallions in the center of each block. Names are embroidered on the center circle of each starburst. The person who sold me the quilt said it was from the 30's and was made in Wichita, Kansas. The center block says "School Dist. 71." The names include:

Madge Tharp Paula + Eddie Pauline S. Mary Walker Betty Tharp Goldie Dunn Billy Grossner Willia + Betty Lee Flora Howard Dixie Lee Dunn Lottie Kohovalzky (or Konovalzky)

I have poked around on the internet to try to find information about the people whose names are on the quilt. I have also contacted local historical societies -- but so far, I haven't turned up much.

So, where else should I look?

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Subject: Re: Researching Genealogy for Friendship Quilts From: "Lucinda Cawley"

It should be fairly easy to identify the names on the Schoolhouse quilt. Middlefield, NY is in Otsego County, as is Richfield Springs. You can rent microfilm of the 1900 census through your public library (I'm assuming you don't have your own microfilm reader.). Start looking in Middlefield since most of the names are from there and you'll find them pretty quickly. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Mass reproduction or not? From: Barbara Burnham

Isn't this one of the reproductions from the Smithsonian collection that were made in China? Are these reproductions documented anywhere for reference?

ebay item 7374535908 Seller states: "~Guaranteed 100% to be Old & Original~ ... 1900 Antique Baltimore Album Appliqué Quilt ... NOT a Reproduction! GUARANTEED 100% to be 75+ years old! ... We have been in business for over 25 years researching, buying, and selling antiques."

Barbara Burnham Ellicott City, MD

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Subject: Re: Mass reproduction or not? From: Judy Kelius 

At 07:47 AM 12/14/05, you wrote: >Isn't this one of the reproductions from the Smithsonian collection >that were made in China? Are these reproductions documented anywhere >for reference? ebay item 7374535908

I agree it looks new to me! I'll bet my house that it is no more than  years old.

Did you notice the statement "It is also hand quilted with at least 10 stitches to the inch (counting the under and over stitch)"? That's really about five stitches to the inch the way most of us define it! - In my opinion, one of the marks of an import. From what I can see, the applique is also done with large stitches but it's hard to tell since there are no real closeups.

Another indication of an import . . . the stems are not appliqued but machine zig-zagged. (That alone kills her statement that it is guaranteed to be at least 75 years old since that hadn't even been invented yet!)

Someone got taken, and the seller hid the bidder's ID so you can't even see who it was. Ugh . . . makes those who sell the real thing have to work that much harder.

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Subject: Mass reproduction or not? From: "Lorraine Olsson"

Well, Look at this one .............. Ebay Item number: 7376144072

"Offered for bid is one King Size quilt made in 1992 in China. This quilt was purchased in 1993 brand new for $300. It is not an American-made quilt. It is not an antique. It is just like a quilt which just sold on eBay on December 18th for $2605.00!"

Cheers, Lorraine in Oz

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Subject: Re: Mass reproduction or not? From: Barb Garrett X-Message-Number: 5

At 07:47 AM 12/14/05, you wrote: Isn't this one of the reproductions from the Smithsonian collection that were made in China? Are these reproductions documented anywhere for reference? ebay item 7374535908

In the enlargement of the cornucopia -- 4th picture from the bottom -- the 2 yellow fabrics look like Aunt Grace (Marcus Brothers) fabrics from the 1990s. Those same yellows appear in other blocks, but are easiest seen in this one.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Mass reproduction or not? From: Barbara Burnham

Thanks Lorraine, that made my day! I wish I could post positive feedback for that seller's wonderfully blatant honesty. I will keep a printed copy of that ebay auction. (I didn't actually receive my question posted on QHL, so I thought it never went through.) But I am also wondering if there is any handy reference as to which of these quilts were licensed to SI (? or others) by the Smithsonian, and when, for mass reproduction in China. Mimi Dietrich's book "Quilts from the Smithsonian" was published 1995 (after those reproductions appeared on the market) from other quilts in the collection. Barbara Burnham Ellicott City, MD

Lorraine Olsson <svenpnc.com.au> wrote:

Well, Look at this one .............. Ebay Item number: 7376144072

"Offered for bid is one King Size quilt made in 1992 in China. This quilt was purchased in 1993 brand new for $300. It is not an American-made quilt. It is not an antique. It is just like a quilt which just sold on eBay on December 18th for $2605.00!"

Cheers, Lorraine in Oz

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Subject: re: researching From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com> 

A few years ago I noted a Letter to the Editor of a local newspaper. The  out of state writer was asking for anyone with personal info on a list  of names to write her. Although the names were not from a Friendship  Quilt, but a Signature Album Notebook, which was very popular in the old  days, the request might help in quilt research too.

Later the writer sent another letter thanking those who'd written and  sent a photo copy of the item to them, due to the interest it had  precipitated. I treasure a similar album that was my mother's - dated  1903. Many of my relatives signed it. But I admit I wish it was a  Friendship QUILT!

A friend with a quilt that was done for a minister went to the church  and went through the membership list from the 19s. One of my quilts  was done by a 4H Club so I started with state records of what county had  a specific County Agent and the dates he was there. That helped me learn  that the quilt may have ended up in MO, but it came from AR. 

So we sometimes can start at specific sources, but the census records  are really useful, as well as the birth, death & marriage records. I  recall a lady in CA who really enjoyed a trip to VT just because she'd  found a VT friendship quilt. The specific town mentioned on the quilt  made a very big fuss over her and honored her with a big day at the town  library with a display of the quilt.

Right now some folks in my town are researching old one room school  house histories! The time seems right for similar projects. Maybe we  should all make 06 a Friendship Quilt Year!!! cb in mo oz

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Subject: Re: Researching Genealogy for Friendship Quilts From: "Candace Perry"

www.Familysearch.org. I find it invaluable when seeking people...it's hit or miss, not like the census, but good for quick clues and searches. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: Mass reproduction or not? From: 

The completed auction -- 7374535908

The comparison auction -- 7376144072

I posted the 2 auctions on the Baltimore Album Quilt List and someone wrote back that the second auction was done by a friend of her's because she could think of no other way to point out the inaccuracy of the first listing. Her friend says she bought her quilt at Dillards in 1994.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Researching Genealogy for Friendship Quilts 

Thanks Candace! That's a source I didn't know about and I just found some ancestors I didn't know I had! The interesting thing is they found my father through his death record but not his birth - but it listed his twin sister's birth record.

At 09:14 AM 12/19/05, you wrote: >www.Familysearch.org. I find it invaluable when seeking people...it's hit >or miss, not like the census, but good for quick clues and searches. Candace >Perry

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Judy wrote: "Another indication of an import . . . the stems are not appliqued but machine zig-zagged. (That alone kills her statement that it is guaranteed to be at least 75 years old since that hadn't even been invented yet!)"

Afraid this is not true--companies made zig zag attachments for straight stitch machines. The needle didn't move side to side, but the attachment moved the fabric side to side between stitches. I'm not sure how early this was available, but definitely more than 75 years ago.

If you ever used one of those buttonhole attachments for a straight stitch machine, you can see how it was done. (Am I dating myself?)

It's amazing how many and how wonderful attachments were made for early sewing machines.

Kim

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Subject: Re: Researching Genealogy for Friendship Quilts From: 

Dear QHL, In my spare time (haha) I am also involved in genealogy. It is another of those passions that involve the searching out of small tidbits of information and fitting them into a puzzle to make a picture. The most complete source for all things regarding genealogy is Cyndi's List. It has so many links it. Start there. Another resource is the Family Search site by the LDS. This site is good if you have any dates associated with the names on your quilts. This helps weed out the duplicates when you do a search.

http://www.cyndislist.com/index.htm#US

Good Luck, Julia Dehm Zgliniec, Poway, CA

> >

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There's a sucker born every minute.

IMHO, the issue isn't so much whether or not the item is a reproduction. Obviously, it is.

The seller used a "private auction" function to protect himself from others pointing out to bidders that the item was a reproduction. I feel that action was an abuse of the private auction function, and I have reported it to eBay.

Bill ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Mass reproduction or not? From: TEXTIQUEaol.com 

The seller used a "private auction" function to protect himself from others pointing out to bidders that the item was a reproduction. I feel that action was an abuse of the private auction function, and I have reported it to eBay.

Bill

I had the same experience with the "private auction" on eBay. A pre-1850 'Ohio' sampler turned up one day under the protection of this function. The seller had found a sampler in OH and contacted two of us who had researched the book ( and continue to document) along with the author. Ten minutes of research told us each, separately, that it was made in England but eventually 'moved' to OH due to emigration of descendants. This info was forwarded to the seller and shortly thereafter it turned up on eBay in a 'private auction' deceptively worded as "Sampler from Warren County, OH". It sold for more money as an OH sampler and I just cringed. My advice to buyers is always know your product and research its background. A friend once told me that the best way to learn is spending your own money on a fake.

Jan Thomas

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Subject: A Perfect Red From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> 

"Cheap Color" is the title of the epilogue to "A Perfect Red" by Amy Butler Greenfield. The book is about cochineal. The epilogue discusses the fall from grace of red as a color of power and high status in the last half of the 19th century as the price of new, artificial dyes brought bright colors within reach of those at the bottom of the economic ladder. "The invention of factory dyes made color cheap, in every sense of the word. To many people in the upper classes, color became hopelessly vulgar. Its very ubiquity made it declasse....By 1900...people who wanted to appear respectable avoided bright color." In the th century blue and black have become the status colors, symbols of power and wealth (black particularly). Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: zigzag for future reference From: "Sharon in NC"

I asked experts in the field of sewing machines about the zigzag  dating.. Here is what Graham Forsdyke ( head of ISMACS and one of the  foremost leaders in sewing machine info) had to say about it.

I've got Singer as producing their first z-z in 1889 --- a little behind the Kayser and Naumann factories

Graham F

I thought someone might want it for their info books on dating.

Sharon in NC

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Subject: Re: Mass reproduction or not? From: Meandle217aol.com 

Hi, everyone - I have not posted in the past, but have read with interest the various topics that this list has covered. However. I cannot keep quiet about the above-named subject.

I must confess that I (before I became hooked on quilt history) bought one of the Smithsonian reproduction quilts, Eliza Baile's Bride's Quilt) from the Spiegel Catalog around 1991 or early '92. I just pulled it out of the closet (where it is hidden in case any of my quilting friends should drop by) and found that the fabrics and quilting patterns appear exactly the same as the eBay quilt which sold for $2605. I believe at the time of my purchase the catalog offered also the Bible Quilt and an American Eagle quilt and I think I paid either $299 or $399. Actually, it was not a bad investment...It is all cotton, quilted with 5-6 stitches per inch one side. The one thing that to me screams reproduction is the fact that the flower stems and vines are machine satin stitched. I have used it off and on throughout the years, washed it often, and it still looks darned good. My heart aches for the winning eBay bidder and how convenient for the seller to keep the bidders private!

Just my five cents...

Marilyn Eastman

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Subject: velcro From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

Bill wrote..."use of velcro helped authentic the quilts as being from the Esprit Collection......" It's good that Julie the person was able to authentic the quilts, 'cause I would have urged caution if the seller's provenance linking an item to Esprit was only the presence of the velcro!

Dealers handle so many quilts that were once hung, mounted using velcro, and hardly a one from Esprit. In fact, I think most dealers prefer to arrange mounting using velcro rather than sleeves. Velcro enables easy adjustments in how a quilt hangs overall; slightly raising or lowering areas at the top end can minimize any waving effect or cattywampus appearance that might result because quilts are rarely absolutely straight-edged.

With a sleeve, if the top edge is irregular, the sleeve has to be sewn on below the top end in such a way that the quilt will hang straight down; it cannot be sewn on at, say, the edge of the binding all across the end from which it will be hung. And with a sleeve, whatever is inserted makes a little bump out ridge at the top that is apparent, especially so if you use a dowel, while with velcro the whole quilt hangs down flat.

Some dealers have velcro applied in strips with a narrow separation so that when the quilt gets folded for storage, there is flexibility (a solid length of velcro is more rigid) Always apply the "eye" soft fuzzy side to the quilt, and anchor the hook side to the lath strip or the wooden stretcher. I've bought many quilts that have velcro (not the adhesive kind) on the back, which I have left on to reduce costs of preparing it for mounting in future!

I've encountered quilts that had rings and loops attached at intervals, sewn on decades ago and leaving a sagging impression; that's always a no-no now! I"ve seen quilts with unremovable rust stains from tacks or nails, never the way to hang textiles.

The best-and most costly of course-is hanging with the weight supported from all four sides using a stretcher mount.Some framers use velcro on all four sides, others prefer sewing a width of cloth to all four sides, then stapling that around the stretcher.

Laura Fisher

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Subject: Autumn Leaves From: louise-b <vlbequetmcmsys.com>

I am working my way through the new "Minnesota Quilts" and seeing many wonderful quilts. One is "Autumn Leaves" on p. 169 that was made from a Lee Wards kit in 1948. Wonderful quilt.

I have somewhere (I hope) a 1969 Herrschners catalog from one of my auction buys 4-5 years ago. It was interesting to go through it and see the quilt kits.

Louise Bequette -- in mid-Missouri



 



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