Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 31, 2007 From: elpaninaroaol.com Date: Tue, 01 J

Linda wrote, "I was at a fair recently where in order to win a "raffle", one had to BUY a pencil for $1.00 and we all know that pencil was a raffle ticket." Please don't take this amiss as I share your view on raffle laws, but even the scenario you lay out above is not legal. Any time a raffle ticket comes into a transaction- no matter how indirectly- it falls under an amazingly complex set of rules that vary by state. This came up a couple of years ago when a motorcycle forum I belong to planned to raffle off a dirt bike that forum members had built for a competition. I did all kinds of research on IRS and state rules- and I was shocked at just how tightly controlled raffles are. Being a non-profit is not enough in some states. There are places where you have to actually function as a non-profit with evidence of legitimate operations for 2-5 years before you can legally hold a raffle at all (Texas and California included.)

So do please check with the appropriate office in your state before proceeding- start with the Comptroller site if searching online. Once you get set up, conducting regular raffles is fairly easy. So it is not as bad as it first appears. The hard part is getting approval to go that route in the first place. There is good reason for such strict regulation- though I think the rules are too stringent for the sake of convenience, with states preferring the ease of no-tolerance when dealing with a complaint.

A more rational approach might be to not regulate raffles where only members of a single organization are solicited- and then only at an in-person event where the drawing is publicly held at the same time/place when tickets are sold. But that is not to be it seems. As for the business of the lawsuit, I do not know all the details- but if the quilt designer has overreacted, then the fact quilting is such a small world will ensure long term justice is served. All artists have a right to defend the rights to their own work- an increasingly complex matter in the internet age, but those artists also earn a living from fellow enthusiasts in their chosen field. What happened to this guild is quite unfortunate, but anyone who thinks (based on known facts)?the designer took excessive and inappropriate action- let it be known and the power of the grapevine will do it's work. These kinds of things are not just about the letter of the law- but about a loose collective of fellow hobbyists who are interested in promoting a friendly and collaborative environment. The designer may be legally "right", but that is meaningless in the practical realities of the aftermath that may come. Happy New Year! Tom.

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Subject: Wiillard, suffragettes, and sewing From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>

Stephanie wrote: I remember a pithy quote from Frances Willard about her opinion of quilting and I would imagine many suffragettes who lived in that same era would have seen needlework in general as a waste of time, especially the fancy kinds of things women of that era were involved in. Willard's comment was, I believe, about the crazy quilts. . . but I don't know where I read it. Anyone? From "Hearts and Hands," the book, on page 91, quoting Willard's diary: "A needle and dlshcloth I could not abide." The domestic arts were not for Frances Willard. Elaine Hedges, takes much of the rest of that chapter, however, to show how Willard brilliantly used women's allegiance to "home," and the domestic arts -- particularly needlework -- to further her causes. The following section, begins on the same page (91) details a much more "adversarial attitude towards women's sewing voiced by the leaders of the woman's rights movement such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Abigail Duniway." Makes for enlightening reading. Julie Silber

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Subject: Sue Reich's QHL comment From: "Linda Heminway" <

I wasn't going to send this response to the digest, however after reading it over, I decided to respond to Sue Reich here, rather than send her a private e-mail, as it actually does have something to do with quilt history. Let's face it, though many men are active in the quilting world, most quilters (probably 95%?) are women and the historical trends that affect women in our society, affect quilting. Sue said: A feeble comparison. I began my quiltmaking in the mid-1970s when Women's Rights groups were telling me that staying home with children was a useless societal activity.I just want to comment on what you said as it really struck me, I thought it wasn't quilt related, but it actually is......when I had my children (my first in 1988) my peers thought I was absolutely NUTS to be a stay at home mom. I was really ostracized by many and felt like a dinosaur among women. In our neighborhood of about 20 homes, I was the ONLY stay at home mom. Some women HAVE to work, but I saw the other side of it. These were affluent homes, their work was truly a choice they made. Sure, if they didn't work, they would have lived in a lesser home in a lesser neighborhood and maybe wouldn't go to the Caribbean each year, but they could have lived on just one income if they wanted to. They chose this vs. staying home with their kids. I think the women's rights groups, who truly fought for us all, may have done some of us a disservice? I think some women throughout the last 20 - 25 year period felt that working was expected of them in order to "have it all". But, maybe not working was truly having it all? Each to their own. At any rate, getting back to how I was put down by the working moms in my neighborhood, they were downright mean to me I have to admit. Funny, how things changed when there was a school snow day and all those kids were having a wonderful time doing craft projects, baking cookies and having fun at my house. In fact, on most days, my house was always "the place to be". All those kids seemed to need an adult presence and gravitated to my house vs. being the latchkey kid home alone. Funny, how I was always the one they would put on the school's emergency phone call list to get their sick kids. I could be trusted with their kids, but I had to be crazy not to be out there working like they were. I was always the class mom, as well, as no one else was home to do that. Boy, were they missing great times. I was the mom who made the quilt with their kid's second grade class, as an end of the year gift for the teacher, with all the appliqud apples on it and all their handprints and scrawled signatures. I was the mom who brought in Featherweight sewing machines, propping the controllers up on the cases so their kid's little feet could reach and I was the one who taught them to thread a needle and how to sew a seam straight. Where were they? They were out in the rat race! I was sad that most of these kids had NEVER even seen a needle and thread before I came to their class with my stuff.I am concerned about these societal trends, quite frankly. No moms at home, and home ec classes that teach basic sewing skills have been eliminated in many schools. If quilting history is to exist a hundred years from now, we need to fix this.When I became a quilter, in 1993, I was treated even more like a crazed person. These working women thought I had to be absolutely stark, raving mad to give up my chance to put the kids in day care and march off in my dress suit to some corporate location far away. I did that, thank you, and for 15 years before having a family and I have to say that it's not all that fun in the end. We didn't drive the fanciest cars or have the best house or furnishings as they were all seemingly competing for, but my kids were well cared for, they were well dressed (as I secretly visited a consignment shop seeking out really nice clothing) and their mom obsessed over quilts. I became an expert at finding ways to fit quilting into my day, even hand appliquing at soccer games (I would draw a crowd, particularly of little kids who were in awe of what I was doing) and bringing hand piecing while sitting in the doctor's office for my son's weekly allergy shots. I recently read an article that there has been a flip-flop of a larger percentage of mom's staying home with children nowadays than in the 80s and 90s. I think our societal trends are reversing. I think women who went out there and worked were regretful that they lost time with their kids and went out into the working world. I think that many young moms are seeing the value in staying home vs. going out there to work and leaving their precious babies with someone else. The pendulum may be swinging in the opposite direction? I'm proud of women's suffrage and the rights we have won, but this doesn't make it so that I am one who HAS to go out to prove anything, I can choose to do what I want. Weather I like her or not, a woman is even running for president, so we can "have it all" if we want to. But, as for me, I have preferred to be the mom, the one who takes care of the house and kids. But, I do this by choice. Had I not chosen that path, I doubt I'd be the quilter, artist and person I am today. I wouldn't have the time to run two different quilt groups for charitable causes. I'm hoping that if this trend has truly reversed itself that woman will truly see the value in home sewing, quilting and "making do" as our fore-mothers have done. There is nothing wrong with that existence and there is nothing wrong with a woman being in the most powerful job in the world, either. But, my position has always been that, by choice, I have chosen the home, the children and it's where I want to be and am most comfortable. So, with our societal trends, so go our quilting trends? I hope my remarks did not offend anyone who chose to work and put their kids in daycare. You have had a right to do that and I have had a right to do my thing as well. Linda Heminway ------=_NextPart_000_0083_01C84C41.C99B9120--

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Subject: Re: Sue Reich's QHL comment From: aol.com Date: Tue, 1 Jan

 With all due respect...this is a quilt list. This is not the place to debate, bash, support or otherwise discuss the feminist movement, except to say that quilt history would not be an academic discipline, or even anyone's hobby, if it hadn't been for books like =Anonymous Was A Womanpointing out that handicrafts and fine art by women had intrinsic merit. Thank you. Lisa Evans (who was the only kid on her block who was taught to sew by her mother, who was the only feminist in the neighborhood)

 

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Subject: Re: Planning ahead From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008

Oh, find a way to get to Shelburne Vermont - the Shelburne Museum is open and their quilt display is great - the whole museum is great too.....or the Bennington, VT museum where the Dear Jane quilt lives..... Mitzi from snowy (with 8-10" more on the way) Vermont

 

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Subject: RE: Sue Reich's QHL comment From: <quiltbakersbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 10:00:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6 Linda, I agree wholeheartedly with you. I think the kids are way more important than any house, car, or vacation is. They grow sooooo fast, and if a woman wants to work, there's always time after the kids are grown. Nancylea -----Original Message----- From: Linda Heminway [mailto:ibquiltncomcast.net]Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 6:45 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Sue Reich's QHL comment I wasn't going to send this response to the digest, however after reading it over, I decided to respond to Sue Reich here, rather than send her a private e-mail, as it actually does have something to do with quilt history. Let's face it, though many men are active in the quilting world, most quilters (probably 95%?) are women and the historical trends that affect women in our society, affect quilting. Sue said: A feeble comparison. I began my quiltmaking in the mid-1970s when Women's Rights groups were telling me that staying home with children was a useless societal activity.I just want to comment on what you said as it really struck me, I thought it wasn't quilt related, but it actually is......when I had my children (my first in 1988) my peers thought I was absolutely NUTS to be a stay at home mom. I was really ostracized by many and felt like a dinosaur among women. In our neighborhood of about 20 homes, I was the ONLY stay at home mom. Some women HAVE to work, but I saw the other side of it. These were affluent homes, their work was truly a choice they made. Sure, if they didn't work, they would have lived in a lesser home in a lesser neighborhood and maybe wouldn't go to the Caribbean each year, but they could have lived on just one income if they wanted to. They chose this vs. staying home with their kids. I think the women's rights groups, who truly fought for us all, may have done some of us a disservice? I think some women throughout the last 20 - 25 year period felt that working was expected of them in order to "have it all". But, maybe not working was truly having it all? Each to their own. At any rate, getting back to how I was put down by the working moms in my neighborhood, they were downright mean to me I have to admit. Funny, how things changed when there was a school snow day and all those kids were having a wonderful time doing craft projects, baking cookies and having fun at my house. In fact, on most days, my house was always "the place to be". All those kids seemed to need an adult presence and gravitated to my house vs. being the latchkey kid home alone. Funny, how I was always the one they would put on the school's emergency phone call list to get their sick kids. I could be trusted with their kids, but I had to be crazy not to be out there working like they were. I was always the class mom, as well, as no one else was home to do that. Boy, were they missing great times. I was the mom who made the quilt with their kid's second grade class, as an end of the year gift for the teacher, with all the appliqud apples on it and all their handprints and scrawled signatures. I was the mom who brought in Featherweight sewing machines, propping the controllers up on the cases so their kid's little feet could reach and I was the one who taught them to thread a needle and how to sew a seam straight. Where were they? They were out in the rat race! I was sad that most of these kids had NEVER even seen a needle and thread before I came to their class with my stuff.I am concerned about these societal trends, quite frankly. No moms at home, and home ec classes that teach basic sewing skills have been eliminated in many schools. If quilting history is to exist a hundred years from now, we need to fix this.When I became a quilter, in 1993, I was treated even more like a crazed person. These working women thought I had to be absolutely stark, raving mad to give up my chance to put the kids in day care and march off in my dress suit to some corporate location far away. I did that, thank you, and for 15 years before having a family and I have to say that it's not all that fun in the end. We didn't drive the fanciest cars or have the best house or furnishings as they were all seemingly competing for, but my kids were well cared for, they were well dressed (as I secretly visited a consignment shop seeking out really nice clothing) and their mom obsessed over quilts. I became an expert at finding ways to fit quilting into my day, even hand appliquing at soccer games (I would draw a crowd, particularly of little kids who were in awe of what I was doing) and bringing hand piecing while sitting in the doctor's office for my son's weekly allergy shots. I recently read an article that there has been a flip-flop of a larger percentage of mom's staying home with children nowadays than in the 80s and 90s. I think our societal trends are reversing. I think women who went out there and worked were regretful that they lost time with their kids and went out into the working world. I think that many young moms are seeing the value in staying home vs. going out there to work and leaving their precious babies with someone else. The pendulum may be swinging in the opposite direction? I'm proud of women's suffrage and the rights we have won, but this doesn't make it so that I am one who HAS to go out to prove anything, I can choose to do what I want. Weather I like her or not, a woman is even running for president, so we can "have it all" if we want to. But, as for me, I have preferred to be the mom, the one who takes care of the house and kids. But, I do this by choice. Had I not chosen that path, I doubt I'd be the quilter, artist and person I am today. I wouldn't have the time to run two different quilt groups for charitable causes. I'm hoping that if this trend has truly reversed itself that woman will truly see the value in home sewing, quilting and "making do" as our fore-mothers have done. There is nothing wrong with that existence and there is nothing wrong with a woman being in the most powerful job in the world, either. But, my position has always been that, by choice, I have chosen the home, the children and it's where I want to be and am most comfortable. So, with our societal trends, so go our quilting trends? I hope my remarks did not offend anyone who chose to work and put their kids in daycare. You have had a right to do that and I have had a right to do my thing as well. Linda Heminway

 

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Subject: Re: Planning ahead From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 10:19:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7 Hi Alice - The Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum in Lancaster, PA, is a pleasant and doable drive from Winterthur, and well worth the approximately 1 hour drive. At all times there are approximately 32 antique Lancaster County Amish quilts on display, and during the time you will be here there is a wonderful exhibit of antique handmade rugs -- called Rags to Rugs. I roughly counted, and I think there are about 50 antique rugs plus about 15 or 20 new rugs that are all wonderful. Both the quilts and the rugs have wonderful and informative signage. Here's the link -- http://www.quiltandtextilemuseum.com/about/default.asp Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: hobbies vs causes From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>

 Sue and Linda, You are both correct, and your observations insightful from a sociological point of view.. However, the point of the discussion of suffrage quilts and needle work is that there appear to be no needlework objects actually made in support of the Woman's Suffrage movement. That there were (probably) plenty of women who plied the needle arts as a pleasurable pastime while also supporting the political views of the suffragettes in other ways seems to be self evident from the research so far. I think we can all agree that the Woman's Movement in general has a history of throwing the baby out with the bath water - in both the 19th and the 20th centuries. This dichotomy between "home" and "work" has been our Achillies heel. The lack of needlework artifacts supports that theory. I don't think that anyone of us on this list would deny any individual the freedom to decide her own path ( although we might privately lament the consequences of some of those decisions). But do remember, in the 18/19th century women had absolutely no freedom of choice in this regard. Happy New Year to each and everyone of you! Newbie Richardson ------=_

 

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Subject: Re: Planning ahead From: "MARIE SARCHIAPONE" <mariesarchiaponeverizon.net> Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 09:45:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9 Mitzi The dear Jane quilt is only displayed for brief periods. Is it on display now? Marie from Albany which looks like a snow globe

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Subject: Re: Peacock quilt block From: "Marilyn Withrow" <mmwmarilynquilts.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2007 13:19:39 -0800 X-Message-Number: 10 I found a pattern for an embroidered peacock in a Ben Franklin store in Sacramento, CA, a few years ago. It's still packed away, and I've not made it, but one of these days I will.......but I believe it was Aunt Mary's or something like that, and it was originally from the 1920s or 1930s. You might try Herschenmann's catalogs -- I think that's the right name -- they still carry pre-marked pillowcases, table linens, etc., with embroidery patterns. I hope this helps. Marilyn Maddalena Withrow Professional Quilt Appraiser, Judge, Historian, Designer and Speaker www.marilynquilts.com www.footscreekfarms.com "Enjoy the little things in life, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things."

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Subject: Wisconsin Quilts From: Bonnie Bergman <bonnie_mae1yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 07:02:26 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 11 --0-690294215-1199199746=:23795 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Cinda I have the book Wisconsin Quilts, Stories in the Stitches by Ellen Kort. The original book was published in 2001, but I believe a new edition is now available. The book is an outcome of the Wisconsin Quilt History Project, which was a documentation of quilts from Wisconsin's early history through the mid-1900's. It would be a great addition to someone's library who is interested in quilt history. I am enjoying reading about the "thread" on guild raffle quilts. Bonnie

 

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Subject: Re: Peacock quilt block From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 12:12:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12 I happen to have one of their catalogs right here. Their web address is Herrschners.com or their phone number is 800-441-0838. Good luck and best regards, Sharron.......... ....in Spring, TX where it's sunny and cold (47 deg)!!! Woohoo where's my woolies!

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Subject: Men who quilt From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 10:46:19 -0600 X-Message-Number: 13 Linda Heminway commented: "Let's face it, though many men are active in the quilting world, most quilters (probably 95%?) are women " The list members could probably determine what percentage of quilters are men by a simple poll. For instance, the Quilters' Guild of North Dakota has 350 members, of whom 2 are men. That makes .6% male, 99.4% female. Anyone else care to report? Kim

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Subject: Suffragette Quilt From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 08:54:31 -0800 X-Message-Number: 14 Good Morning and Happy New Year to All, There is one Suffragette Quilt - so titled in the following book, Fox, Sandi 1990. Wrapped In Glory Figurative Quilts and Bedcovers 1700-1900. Thames and Hudson. Los Angeles County Museum of Art. page 108. The quilt is dated c. 1875 and possible made by Emma Civey Stahl. There is one block which shows a woman lecturing to a male audience and another showing her driving a buggy with words on a flag "Woman Rig" ... only part of the flag is visible. Fox writes" The quilt's narrative elements are enclosed in circular vignettes, a form of design one would find in popular print illustrations of the period and which might indicate a possible source for the scenes themselves.". Regards, Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: Re: Men who quilt From: Alan <alanalanrkelchner.com> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 09:34:46 -0800 X-Message-Number: 15 It won't be that easy. First, are all male quilters involved in guilds? If not, how many are there? Some guilds will have a greater number than others. Art quilters may have greater numbers. There are probably a few guys who won;t admit that they do it to anyone other than their SO. Too many variable to just canvas your local guild. Alan

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Subject: Re: Men who quilt From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 12:27:33 -0600 X-Message-Number: 17 Alan, Of course it's not perfect, but it should be close enough. For a better estimate than a guess. Kim -----Original Message

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Subject: Re: Planning ahead From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 13:44:08 EST X-Message-Number: 18 -------------------------------1199213048 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I am not sure, probably one has to contact Bennington directly to find out. We have quilters in our area that have finished their Dear Jane quilts (one all by hand) - 4 years in the completion and they are fabulous..... It is not in my future plans anymore - I don't have 4 years laying around unsued at 74. Mitz

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Subject: Re: Wisconsin Quilts From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 13:47:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 19 Thanks Bonnie. I have the Wisconsin book. Guess I should actually go to the bookcase before asking questions. Now, does anybody know whether Quilts of the Oregon Trail is new or a new edition of Treasures in the Trunk. Cinda

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Subject: grotesque redwork From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 16:57:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 20 This is a multi-part

 Checkout the Lindberg Kidnapping Quilt on ebay. What a dreadful subject for a quilt. Even I who begged Judy Grow to take me to see the Lindberg House (still standing) think this is creepy. Cinda on the Eastern Shore ------=_

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Subject: men who quilt From: "MARIE SARCHIAPONE" <mariesarchiaponeverizon.net> Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 18:21:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 21 I agree with Alan. I wasn't a member of a guild for a gap of 20yrs. I was still a quilter...not terribly productive...but hey I was out there. And even now I don't advertise it to all my friends that I quilt.

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Subject: Re: grotesque redwork From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 19:31:04 EST X-Message-Number: 22 -------------------------------1199233864 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit That is scary. My father was the Lindbergh's auto mechanic for some years and my brother is the same age as the baby. My parents never were convinced that the right kidnappers were caught. I have met family members over the years, but I would never bid on such a sad quilt. But, wouldn't it be interesting to know more about the maker???? (as a redwork lover all of the patterns are one of a kind so it had to be someone close to the family or knew a lot about them.) Mitzi from Vermont

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Subject: Re: men who quilt From: Alan <alanalanrkelchner.com> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 16:07:20 -0800 X-Message-Number: 23 Exactly. If you were to try and count me through a guild you'd fail miserably. I haven't been a member of a guild in over 5 years. Not that I haven;t gone to the local guilds. The shame is that they seem to have no interest in a guy present. Their loss, I guess. Alan

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Subject: Re: grotesque redwork From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 16:41:25 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 24 What I think is grotesque is the price. Kris --- Mitzioakesaol.com wrote: > That is scary. My father was the Lindbergh's auto mechanic for > some years

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Subject: Re: grotesque redwork From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 20:32:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 25 The Lindbergh case was tragic for everyone involved. The evidence was mishandled, the pre-trial publicity made it impossible for the accused kidnapper to get a fair trial, Hauptmann's attorney was a drunk who mounted a pathetic defense...the list goes on and on. The conviction never would have stood on appeal. I can't imagine why anyone would make a quilt about the case, especially one where it's clear the maker went to the trouble of drafting patterns based on newspaper and magazine photos. It's one of the most fascinating but disturbing quilts I've ever seen. lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: Men who quilt From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 13:13:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 26 Also, since most quilters prior to the 1970's revival don't seem to have signed their quilts, how do we know which quilts were made by men and which by women? Dwight Eisenhower learned to quilt as a boy, and I've heard that Herbert Hoover did as well. A friend of mine who's a farmer knows how to quilt, although he doesn't do it often. Interesting question. Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: grotesque redwork From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 17:27:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 27 Oh my God! That's awful! I know quilts often commemorated things, but this - ! Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: men who quilt From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 20:33:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 28 You aren't the only ones. I've never belonged to a guild and probably won't for the foreseeable future because I'm heavily involved in two other organizations. I only have so much time! :) Lisa Evans

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Subject: Lindberg quilt - "grotesque redwork" From: "MARIE SARCHIAPONE" <mariesarchiaponeverizon.net> Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2008 22:35:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 29 Yes this quilt did take my breath away. How does one sleep under something like that? Was it meant to bear witness? To identify a truly important event in history. Were crimes against children publized before this? Does it honor the family??? It reminded me of a another quilt everyone must know. I believe it was an applique depiction of a farm and its buildings, live stock and fences. Within the fences was a cemetery. Small coffins bearing the names of family members were aligned carefully in the cemetery. Several unlabeled coffins were out side the fence not carefully placed. . The unlabeled coffins were on the quilt equivalent of an on deck circle. Very moving. Speaking of grotesque, but funny as h*** to me was Barbara Brackmans the Sun Sets on Sunbonnet Sue made in the 1970's. There is a block to offend everyone. Each block shows Sue being killed or already dead. I know its sick, but I have laughed for years over this. It is SO '70's because it includes the fall of Skylab, the Johnstown mass suicide, and a space walk gone bad when the teather to the ship broke. My favorite is Sue inside the snake. Marie with an edge in Albany formerly of Lower Manhattan NYC which has nothing to do with my opinion.

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Subject: liindberg quilt: grotesque redwork From: Arden Shelton <Did you see that the item was pulled? It appears that the auction was cancelled.I wonder if there were complaints...arden (Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

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Subject: Re: liindberg quilt: grotesque redwork From: Barb Garrett Number: 2 Good Morning All - My reaction to the quilt in question -- ebay 150199749274 is not the same as some recent posts. When I saw the quilt I was fascinated that someone recorded what at the time was a big news event, in a quilt. I don't find it grotesque, but rather another example of how quilts reflect the time in which they were made. True, the topic isn't one that would appeal to a large number of people, but I wondered why the woman felt compelled to make the quilt. Did she know the family and help them live through the experience? Did she have a child that was the same age, or that she lost during that time? Was she a frustrated journalist who felt this was an important story that needed to be told and saved, and this was how she could do it? To our knowledge, this is the only quilt like this -- patterns weren't printed and sold. To me, that would have been a bit "over the top". I believe that you can tell the history of the United States by studying it's quilts, and this is an example of that idea. It's along the same lines as the redwork patterns of the 1901 World's Fair and McKinley assassination. When looking for the exact date, I found the following paragraph by Cindy Brick in an article on redwork in McCalls quilting magazine -- Newsworthy events were immortalized as redwork patterns, including the 1885 death of Jumbo, Phineas Barnum's circus elephant. One set of patterns commemorated the buildings of the 1901 World's Fair, also known as the Pan-American Exhibition, in Buffalo, New York. When President McKinley was assassinated while visiting the fair's Temple of Music, a new block with his profile was added, along with the mournful caption, "Our Martyred President." The above quote is the last paragraph on this page -- http://www.mccallsquilting.com/legacy/vintage_article07/index1.html

I see the Lindberg quilt as a continuation of this practice -- a bit more intense, but still the same style. As Cindy noted, even the death of an elephant is preserved. This was all done during a time when news wasn't as readily available as it is today. I've seen 1930s embroidered quilts featuring Gone With The Wind and Mickey Mouse that both "captured the historical moment". That's what I see this quilt doing -- documenting the historical event. Just my thoughts, and wishing your all a Happy New Year, Barb in sunny southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Peacock quilt block From: Barbara Burnham Message-Number: 3 Perhaps Aunt Martha? Now marketed by Colonial Patterns, Inc.; they offer at least two peacock embroidery designs today at: http://www.colonialpatterns.com/ There were also several peacock embroidery patterns sold mailorder by newspapers from about 1940's or earlier, under the name of Laura Wheeler or simply by Design Number. I've seen vintage peacock quilts made with tufted or chenille embroidery; not sure of their source. Hope you find what you are looking for.

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Subject: Oregon Trail Book From: "Judy Anne"  Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2008 23:41:43 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4 The new Oregon Trail book has added information in it but also includes the Treasures in the Trunk material. You see larger pictures of the quilts as the pages are larger. It's organized differently and has a different publisher. I really like having the new one even though I have the old and I think anyone with special interest in pioneer quilts would want it. Judy Breneman

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Subject: Re: liindberg quilt: grotesque redwork From: "Sharon Stark"

As the owner of the quilt in question, I am more than a little surprised at the reaction on our list. As Barb says, it's the recording of a historic event in redwork, the continuation of a by then longstanding tradition. The event itself was certainly widely followed, and as residents of the Flemington, NJ area (including our Judy Grow) can attest, it quite consumed the attention of the whole area from the time of the kidnapping through the entire trial and beyond. Is it odd that someone from the area should commemorate the happenings? I can't imagine sleeping under this quilt either, (though someone apparently did) but I certainly don't see the subject as taboo in any way, nor more grotesque than depictions of "martyred" presidents or other historic figures. As for the price being grostesque, Kris, I wonder how many quilts of lesser historic importance have brought a greater price? Or how one puts a value on anything unique? And we are accepting offers below the asking price. We've seen pieces of toast with images of the virgin sell for HUGE prices on eBay, after all..... I guess the reason that I was so surprised by the reaction of the members of this list is mainly that there was no such reaction at all when we took the quilt to Judy's for quilt study group back in May 06. Fascination, yes, and a lot of interest. The Russian "Auschwitz" quilt discussed here last month didn't even seem to evoke such a reaction. If we are to be true to our assertions that quilting is a genuine art form, then it should embrace all subjects as does writing, painting and sculpture. If we don't take Pablo Picasso to task for his historic painting "Guernica", why should this particular quilter suffer our slings and arrows? Sharon Stark

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Subject: RE: Suffragette Quilt From: "Newbie Richardson"  Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2008 11:57:22 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6 Julia, Interesting - does the book say whether this quilt/cover has a western provenance? (I don't own that one...) The Western states have always been so much more progressive abut women's equality. There is Coe College in Iowa, Oberlin in Ohio (1830's) and that wonderful school in Missouri - (have lost the name, it is in the same town as the state school) - also dates to the early 1830's - just to name a few who educated women in theearly 19th century and all of these established before the "Seven Sisters" in the East. Newbie

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Subject: RE: Suffragette Quilt From: "Miller, Maretta K" Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 12:13:40 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7 I believe the Missouri school you are thinking of is Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri...

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Subject: Re: signature quilts From: DON JAN MASENTHIN

I thought some of you might be interested in an article published in the local paper in Topeka, Kansas in November. I've had a lot of response and recently learned it was posted on AP and has been published in other locations. I have only just begun to work on my research thanks to a remodeling project, lack of electricty (ice storm) and of course the holidays. I would appreciate any tips or clues all of you experts could share since I am a total novice in this area, but what I lack in experience, I make up for in enthusiasm. You have raisede some great questions lately about signature quilts, and I can't wait to learn more about mine. Here is the link. http://www.cjonline.com/stories/112507/lif_220330951.shtml Jan Masenthin Topeka, KS --0-914433962-1199297403=:78823--

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Subject: Re: signature quilts From: xenia cord

 Hi, Jan - Given the date range for your signature quilt, you might consider that it was a fundraiser for the American Red Cross (which is also suggested by the colors). There is an interesting article in =20the December 1917 issue of The Modern Priscilla magazine. The page 2 =20article, called "Wartime Activities of Significance to Women" details =20a Red Cross quilt as planned by Clara Washburn Angell and says that, fully subscribed, the quilt design can raise $1000. This quilt is composed of small red crosses, around which signatures can be arranged, and a large, central red cross where signatures of important dignitaries may be placed. The fundraising plan says spaces can be sold at 25=A2 each, with 4 names to a square, raising $253. The reverse side of the quilt is also made up of white squares, on which 4 names can be written, raising $266. The "memorial blocks" around the center cross were to be sold for $25 each, or $200, and the red blocks at the center, forming the cross, could be sold for $50 each ($250 total) to people who did not want their names used (!). This would raise a grand total of $1009. Rules were given for procedures that would conform to the Red Cross's regulations and restrictions, and a sidebar article shows a sample fund drive ticket and describes knitted items that women could also contribute, and ways children might participate =20through the Junior Red Cross auxiliaries. Suggested gifts to be sent =20directly to soldiers are also listed. As encouragement to small groups to undertake the quilt project, the article points out that $1000 would allow the Red Cross to purchase an army ambulance, or equipment for 18 nurses $55, or bedding for 129 beds, or assistance for "several" military families, or 280 pounds of yarn. Further, the article says that the quilt may be designed as shown (with crosses) or "planned according to more original ideas." And the resulting quilt could raise funds a second time if placed at auction - all by using 6 yards of bleached cotton sheeting 90" wide, and 6 yards of 27" wide Turkey red! Xenia --Apple-Mail-2--198145374 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 <html><body style=3D"word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Hi, Jan - Given the date range for your signature quilt, you might consider that it was a fundraiser for the American Red Cross (which is also suggested by the colors). =A0There is an interesting article in the December 1917 issue of <i>The Modern Priscilla</i> magazine. =A0The page 2 article, called "Wartime Activities of Significance to Women" details a Red Cross quilt as planned by Clara Washburn Angell and says that, fully subscribed, the quilt design can raise $1000. =A0This quilt is=A0composed=A0of small red crosses, around which signatures can be arranged, and a large, central red cross where signatures of important dignitaries may be placed.<div><br class=3D"webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>The fundraising plan says spaces can be sold at 25=A2 each, with 4 names to a square, raising $253. =A0The reverse side of the quilt is also made up of white squares, on which 4 names can be written, raising $266. =A0The "memorial blocks" around the center cross were to be sold for $25 each, or $200, and the red blocks at the center, forming the cross, could be sold for $50 each ($250 total) to people who did not want their names used (!). =A0This would raise a grand total of $1009. =A0Rules were given for procedures that would conform to the Red Cross's regulations and restrictions, and a sidebar article shows a sample fund drive ticket and describes knitted items that women could also contribute, and ways children might participate through the Junior Red Cross auxiliaries. =A0Suggested gifts to be sent directly to soldiers are also listed.</div><div><br class=3D"webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>As encouragement to small groups to undertake the quilt project, the article points out that $1000 would allow the Red Cross to purchase an army ambulance, or equipment for 18 nurses $55, or bedding for 129 beds, or assistance for "several" military families, or 280 pounds of yarn.</div><div><br class=3D"webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>Further,the article says that the quilt may be designed as shown (with crosses) or "planned according to more original ideas." =A0And the resulting quilt could raise funds a second time if placed at auction - all by using 6 yards of bleached cotton sheeting 90" wide, and 6 yards of =A027" wide Turkey red!</div><div><br class=3D"webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>Xenia</div><div><br class=3D"webkit-block-placeholder"></div></body></html>--Apple-Mail-2--198145374--

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Subject: I think I saved some quilts! From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 11:29:08 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 10 --0-1874389382-1199302148=:58441 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Hi all, As curator here at the Museum of the American Quilter's Society I receive requests about how to clean quilts, as I did this morning. I sent my standard reply (which includes Xenia's "Lay down until the feeling goes away" caveat) and it is a fairly long reply. I thought you all would get a chuckle about the thank you I got: "Thank you very much! My aunt (who owns many quilts made by her mother back in the early 1900's) and I have been very concerned about some of the horrible advice we've been given (including hanging them on the clothes line and spraying them with a hose!!). You're advice will go a long way with us in the preservation of these priceless heirlooms. Thank you very, very much!!" Sounds sort of like something Lucy & Ethel would do, doesn't it? Judy Schwender --------------------------------- Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage. --0-1874389382-1199302148=:58441--

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Subject: Re: liindberg quilt: grotesque redwork From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 14:34:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11 Sharon and Barb are absolutely right. The Lindberg quilt is a unique historical document. The visceral reaction is because it records the violent death of a baby which is much more distressing and personal than other sad events commemorated in redwork such as the assassination of President McKinley or the sinking of the Titanic. I first heard about the Lindberg kidknapping from my parents who were young adults when it happened. I read a lot about the crime and the trial and learned more from my mother-in-law who was a friend of the daughter of the presiding judge. "Crime of the Century" is a much over-used term, but I believe this was it. As I said in my original post, Judy Grow took me to see the Lindberg house. I was surprised by how affected I was to see the "scene of the crime." After nearly 80 years it is still a sad and powerful story. Thanks Barb and Sharon for your insights. It would be fascinating to know something about the woman who made the quilt. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: liindberg quilt: grotesque redwork From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 14:47:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12 My fella just told me he once talked to Bruno Hauptmann's widow...she used to live in south Philadelphia. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: liindberg quilt: grotesque redwork From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 14:26:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13 I actually think it is kinda cool, and if I were a curator in an appropriate museum in NJ, I would have bought it in a second! I think as a folky expression of current events it is non pareil. Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: Planning ahead From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 14:56:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14 Alice, I would be glad to do a personal show and tell for you with an appointment...quilts, samplers, and other textile objects. We are about an hour north west of Philadelphia -- an easy drive -- and actually could be a nice detour between NYC and Winterthur. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center www.schwenkfelder.com -----

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Subject: Jane Stickle quilt From: "Bobbi Finley" <bobbi_finleymsn.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 14:51:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15 This is a multi-part message in MIME format. - A few years ago when I was planning a trip to the Shelburne and the Vermont Quilt Show, I called ahead and tried to arrange to see the Jane Stickle quilt (can't we call it by its real name?) at the Bennington museum. I was told that it was only on exhibit once a year. I even tried to describe myself as a quilt historian (I don't consider myself a quilt historian) and that I was (at the time) on the board of AQSG (I never threw that around either but I really wanted to see that quilt). All to no avail. I was told that they could not be getting the quilt out of storage for everyone who called and wanted to see it or there would be nothing left of it. Again, it was only on display once a year. I guess it doesn't hurt to try again. Good luck! Bobbi Finley

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Subject: Re: I think I saved some quilts! From: Jeanne Jabs  Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 11:58:19 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 16 --0-153283059-1199303899=:70777 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit That is quite a mental picture Judy. And I can picture it very well. Lucy would be holding the hose and Ethel would be directing "OH LUCY, LOOK WHAT YOU DID" !!!!!!!!!!!!

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Subject: Re: Wisconsin Quilts, Quilts of the Oregon trail. From: Laura Robins-Morris

 Cinda, et al, From an interview of Mary Bywater Cross on antiquequiltdating.com : "Another project has been the opportunity to reissue both of my books onquilts of migration, Treasures in the Trunk: Quilts of the Oregon Trailand Quilts and Women of the Mormon Migrations. This is an opportunitythat rarely surfaces so I=92m especially pleased. Both books have beenrevised and expanded with new quilts, new resources and a new focus onwomen=92s roles in the building of community in the West. Look for themnext year." http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/cross.html I was wondering too and haven't yet seen a copy to compare it to theolder book. The new book is published by Schiffer. Also wonder if Wisconsin Quilts is a re-issue, but with addedinformation. It won't come out until May or so. Laura in Seattle

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Subject: Copyright From: Carol's Quilt Closet <>

In obtaining copyright permission you must not only write to the author or publisher for permission to use the written article but to the author of any graphs, jpeg's, charts, pictures, slideshows within that article. As some authors use other's works within their article they too get permission for use and that should be noted via a copyright statement of sort. Some pictures are altered from an original drawing and hence need statements of such with: redrawn with permission (noting original source). Their are many complexities in copyright law. I have been obtaining permissions for faculty in a medical school for many years and copyright has changed tremendously with the electronic submissions of material opposed to hardcopy laws. One seminar with a Washington DC copyright lawyer said it best. If you can feel it in your gut that it is not your work in it's entiretythen find the originator of the work and ask for permission. Many are willing to let you use their work depending on your use of it, others may ask a small fee. At one time I used a free pattern download to make copies for those attendees taking a bus trip to a quilt show. I knew it was safe for [my one fair copy use to download and print] but not to print close to 40 copies. Each person would have had to print their own copy via their own computer in order to avoid copyright infringement. I wrote for permission and was grantedsuch for no fee. This is small scale but you can see what using the gut feeling factor is. This is the same with using any one piece of work or pattern within your guild classes. I hesitated to reply to the list and I am probably preaching to the choir here for so many of you are published and know the difference but if this helps a novice that is a member of a guild and reading this right now this email will have done it's job. It is sad that the California guild had to experience such a devastating ending to something that started as so well intentioned. Carol in cold CT

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Subject: Xmas travels From: "Lucinda Cawley"  Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 15:25:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 19 Traveling on the Northeast Extension of the PA Turnpike (which I often do) I never miss the chance to stop at the Schwenkfelder Heritage Center to see what new delight Candace Perry has put together. Until Feb. 1, in addition to the Christmas Putz (miniature scenes with houses animals and people) you can see beaded whimsies from the collection of Dr. Thomas Schantz. To quote from the exhibit schedule "These exquisitely detailed little treasures which range from pin cushions to picture frames and everything in between were made by Native Americans for sale to tourists at such attractions as Niagara Falls." This is one of those delightful exhibits that makes your face hurt. I never stopped smiling from the minute I walked through the door. Picture a beaded canoe with the word "boat" on the side and next to it another canoe that says "fast boat." I have two whimsies of my own which I keep in the living room because it makes me happy to look at them. I keep thinking that since I spend so much time in Central NY (I pass the entrance to the Onandaga Reservation each time I go to visit my daughters) I'll be able to developed a collection, but the whimsies are few and far between and very expensive. The two I have I found in Lancaster Co. (where all good, old stuff ends up). I went to the Quilts=Art=Quilts exhibit at the Schweinfurth Center in Auburn, NY. Call me a Philistine if you must (I'll readily admit I don't do Art Quilts myself) but I was very disappointed. I try to get to Q=A=Q every year and I always find several things that blow me away (confirmed traditionalist that I am). Not this year! Do you ever go to a guild quilt show and feel like all the exhibitors took the same workshops? That's how I felt (with a few exceptions) about these quilts. It seems as if all the artists were told "Take tulle, or some other transparent material, paint or dye it, cut it into squares or rectangles, arrange randomly on a background." I love to see the work produced by the members of the Art Bee in my guild because even when they start from the same place they end up going in very different directions. I perked up just outside of Skaneateles. I've plotted every quilt shop in the Finger Lakes on my mental map and one of the best is on route 20. It has comfy chairs and a fireplace as well as a huge fabric selection. It's enough to overcome my aversion to the NY State tax. I have great luck with sale fabric because I don't do "pretty" so the stuff I like often gets left. I found Marcus Bros. cricket playing billiards for $4 a yard. One of the great advantages of belonging to AQSG is the membership directory which means I can find someone to answer questions about any place I plan to visit. Last week the big question was where take pre-teen children to eat in Williamsburg. We were introducing out two oldest grandchildren to Wmsburg and it was definitely a child-oriented visit, but I did get half an hour to myself in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, my first visit since Abby moved into the DeWitt Wallace building. Bobbi Finley told me not to miss the doll's underwear in the toy exhibit. Indeed, the doll in question had doll-sized stays! There were half a dozen quilts to be seen. An 1832 candlewick spread from South Carolina is signed Martha Ann Garrison features magnificent eagles. Harriet Ann Richards Touching Stars was made in Winchester, VA in 1840 and has various red, yellow and green pints (it's included in the 2008 Wmsburg quilt calendar but the colors aren't good) and glorious quilting, grapes, feathers, flowers with the marking lines visible. Also from Winchester is a chintz appliqué framed by turkey red Delectable Mountains made in 1822 by Amelia Lauck for a son's marriage (four of Amelia's quilts survive; perhaps she made one for each of her 11 children and there are more to be found). Lucy Daniel made a corded and stuffed whitework quilt in Middlesex Co. VA in 1801. I had no time at all for the wonderful collection of samplers displayed in the same gallery, but I'll go back before long and spend a whole day. On the subject of Colonial Williamsburg I'm sorry to say that it has taken a distinctly commercial turn. All along Duke of Gloucester St. are souvenir shops. You house them in period buildings and costume the sales clerks in 18th century garb but they are still peddling a lot of pseudo-Colonial knick-knacks at exorbitant prices. Tickets to Colonial Williamsburg are very expensive and yet almost all of the holiday activities required and extra ticket at $10-$15 per person. I believe in the educational mission of museums and I regret that they are increasingly becoming reserved for the financially privileged among us. I know, I know it costs lots of money to maintain these institutions, but still! Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: liindberg quilt: grotesque redwork From: Kris Driessen

Thanks, Cinda, for clarifying this. And, Barb, I hereby knight you "The Voice of Reason" for 2008. I did, indeed, react to the quilt the way a 2008 woman would, and not a woman of 1932. Given the communications of the time - and the fact the country was deep in a depression - I can see why someone would want to memorialize the event in a quilt. As for the grotesque price - that is more my disappointment with society than the quilt. It's only the macabre subject that makes this relatively ordinary quilt so valuable. But, as I often say to endless people who ask me, "How much is my quilt worth?", this quilt too is worth what someone is willing to pay for it. Kris

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Subject: Re: Men who quilt, and other things From: "Force Majeure Quilt Restoration"  Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 17:49:47 -0600 X-Message-Number: 21 I was on active duty in the Coast Guard when I had my daughter. My Chief Radioman and his wife presented her with a quillow. The cover of the quillow featured a flawlessly executed needlepoint design. After exclaiming over it at some length, the Chief shyly admitted that it was he who had done the needlepoint. He had taken it up while at sea as something to do when he gave up smoking. Traditionally, boatswain's mates have always learned how to sew (dating back to the age of sail, when they had to be able to make repairs to canvas sails) and to do fancywork (similar to macrame). Even today, sewing is considered a useful skill as there are still canvas covers still in use on ships and those in aviation survivalman rating (the same guys that jump out of helicopters to pull your soggy carcass out of the water) use sewing skills to repair certain equipment. Pride is taken in technique and finished appearance. I would not be surprised to find that there are men in these ratings who have discovered a talent for and enjoyment in wielding a neede and have sought more creative outlets. Too bad they didn't show Kevin Costner at a sewing machine in "The Guardian."

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Subject: RE: Ben Franklins From: "Donna" Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 18:26:29 -0600 X-Message-Number: 22 Ben Franklins - Manor Drugs - Stockton Blvd. - WOW - I grew up there! Donna -

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Subject: Cleaning quilts From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 19:39:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 23 Spraying them with a hose? Nooooo...... Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: I think I saved some quilts! - Lucy and Ethel From: "Lisa Evans"

Number: 24 "Hi, friends, I'm your Vitameatavegemin Girl, and I'm here to show you - *hic* - how to clean your clothies on the quilt line - *hic* - " Lisa Evans

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Subject: RE: I think I saved some quilts! From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney"

Oh my, QHLers - After reading Judy's email, this scenario came to my mind to finish it off: then Ricki lets the dogs get out accidently; the dogs run pell-mell thru the soggy sagging quilts, with Lucy and Ethel running thru/around the quilts trying to catch the dogs. Then Ricki comes out to help just as the lawn sprinklers come on full force, to drench everyone and everything (including the poor quilts again). Eckkk! <g> Happy New Year! Meg .

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Subject: washing quilts From: "Carroll" Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2008 17:48:33 -0800 X-Message-Number: 26 This is what happened the last time I tried to dry a quilt out back on the lawn. First the wind blew it off the sheet and onto the grass where it got dirty - had to wash it again. Then after I laid it out again, the dog ran across it leaving a trail of footprints across it. Into the wash again (and brought the dog in this time.) Then, the pool sweep went on and sprayed the chlorinated pool water across the quilt. Into the wash again. I finally dried it by laying it on a room size sheet of plastic on the living room floor, with the door open and a fan blowing air over it. After that hectic quilt washing, I have continued to use this method of drying quilts indoors. It's surprisingly fast really, the quilts always dry in one day. Laurette Carroll Southern California (where we are promised much needed rain later this week) Look to the Future with Hope Margaret wrote - After reading Judy's email, this scenario came to my mind to finish it off: then Ricki lets the dogs get out accidently; the dogs run pell-mell thru the soggy sagging quilts, with Lucy and Ethel running thru/around the quilts trying to catch the dogs. Then Ricki comes out to help just as the lawn sprinklers come on full force, to drench everyone and everything (including the poor quilts again).

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Subject: RE: washing/drying quilts From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" < Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 19:45:58 -0800 X-Message-Number: 27 Good evening, QHLers - The method Laurette outlined for drying her washed quilts inside also works very well for those of you who live in those locations with high humidity but have air conditioning (don't open a door). The dehumidifier component of the air conditioner removes the moisture in the house air, hastening the drying process of the quilt. ALWAYS make sure the quilt is COMPLETELY and TOTALLY dry before you put it away (whether rolled, boxed, folded) or mould/mildew may start growing. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______

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Subject: Jan's Signature quilt From: "Jean Carlton"  Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 13:45:07 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1 That's a lovely example, Jan. It's hard to see it full view - can you explain the construction - looks like it must be a 'y' seam to put the square in? I have not seen that setting but it's very graphic......keep us posted on your research. jean

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Subject: Re: Peacock quilt block  The Florida quilt documentation book has a peacock quilt made in 1 in. sq. pieces.She said it took her several years to make it in the 1930s, if I remember correctly. Amy G. in cold Miami

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Subject: men who quilt From: Joe Cunningham Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2008 20:54:06 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3 I travel around all the time and teach classes and etc. In my experience, the average ratio of women to men in quilt guilds is about 99 to 1. But, I often have men in my classes who somehow knew about me and signed up for the class even though they were not in the guild. When I teach at my local quilt shop here in San Francisco men have been know to show up completely unknown to the owner. So there may be a few more out there than the 1% we see in the guilds. But I do not think it is a large number. Joe Cunningham www.joethequilter.com

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Subject: RE: Suffragette Quilt From: Julia Zgliniec Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2008 07:58:19 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4 Good Morning All, Newbie, the text says that the quilt was given to Marion Gabriel of Elgin Illinois in 1882. She is the daughter of the presumed maker. The quilt was entered by her in the 1929 Chicago Evening American Quilt Contest and was one of the finalists. Nothing else is mentioned about the origin. Julia >

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Subject: Capital Region Study Group From: Kris Driessen  Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2008 13:30:34 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5 The next meeting of the Capital Region Quilt Study Group will be: Saturday, January 5 10:30am to 3:00pm (room set up at 10:00am) Helderberg Room (larger of the 2 rooms) Guilderland Public Library 2228 Western Avenue Guilderland, NY 518-456-2400 Our discussion topic for this meeting will be center medallions.

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Subject: Images and More From: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Wow - 2008, I can hardly believe it. Happy New Year to everyone on the QHL list - Kris can you believe it has been 12 years since you started?? I can't. 2007 has certainly been a year of changes for many of us - and I wish all a healthy and happy 2008. For those who might be interested, the Museum of Printed Textiles in Mulhouse, FR, has given me permission to share some photographs that I took there last year of their exhibit, "Relief du Etoffe". These can be found on my new website - (_www.worldofquiltstravel.com/Mulhouseimages.htm_ (http://www.worldofquiltstravel.com/Mulhouseimages.htm) ).

If you haven't seen images from other tours, please feel free to click on the photo gallery link to see more quilt and textile images relating to quilt and textile history. While you are visiting the site, please be sure to note that I now offer the opportunity to use travel as a fundraiser for your study group or guild to donate to their favorite 501 c-3, or for a 501 c-3 to benefit on their own. Info is available under the link "Fundraising?" Lots of new things and programs in place for free travel as well. By the way, I know some of you have written about the upcoming trip to France, and while I hesitate to mention it here, I will use it as a way to remind anyone who is thinking of joining the group that January 20 is the last day to register if you want to participate on that great airfare. Again, all the best for 2008. Warmly, Deb R

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