Subject: Re: NQR "sooner", "boomers" and "okies"
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>
Date: Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:03:19 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

My native OK husband (who should have been a History Professor)
offers the following:

"This is basically correct. The US government relocated various
Indian tribes from the eastern US to what is now the state of
Oklahoma. Common sense is not a strong point for most government
agencies now nor was it back in 1889. Within the interior of Indian
Territory were large areas of "unassigned land". A group of people
from Kansas requested permission from the US government to be allowed to settle on this land. Despite the fact that allowing this
settlement would violate existing treaties the US government gave in
and the first land run was to begin with the firing of a cannon at
noon on April 22, 1889. Some people snuck in early and hid out to try
and claim the choicest parcels. These were the Sooners. The people
who waited for the cannon to be fired were the Boomers.

As for the term "Okie", it began as derogatory term for people who
left Oklahoma during the dust bowl and was popularized in John
Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath. His high school English teacher would
not allow the term to be used in her classroom. He is also quick to
point out that all of the Sooners and the Boomer were "transplanted" as well.

Robby Syler - "on leave from God's Country doing missionary work to
the poor souls in Texas"

And yes, he claims he can breath again every time we drive north over

the Red River!!

Laura Syler
Native Texan, living with a Native Oklahoman too close to the
border!!!
Richardson, TX
Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 15, 2008
From: KennaleeMaol.com

Subject: Whigs Defeat on eboard
Hi - That quilt is mine. Yes, it is dated in the quilting "1867 MRch
14" and
also quilted is "MDCCCLXVII", scissors and initials. I added a
picture of
the Roman numerals to the eboard. Kennalee in California


Subject: Connecticut Post- Quilters fire up their machines
From: "ginghamfrontiernet.net" <ginghamfrontiernet.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2008 08:26:20 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1


Found this article link on the QuiltArt list

http://origin.connpost.com/localnews/ci_8255163

After just reading Heart and Hands and For Purpose and Pleasure it is

nice to see that the legacy of quilters using needle and thread to
help others is continuing. Also is the Sue Rich quoted actually Sue

Reich???

Sandra Starley
Professional Quilt Appraiser
and Artist

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cheddar is better-
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com>

More about cheddar (golden-orange) quilts on the Flap blog today-
http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com
<http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com%20>
For those people like me who need a weekly dose of orange.
From the windy coast-
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
 

Subject: Quilt Show in Lebanon, OH
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
 

*Hi all; Passing on info about a show in OH. Wish I could be there
this year but I'm up to my eyeballs in woven coverlets.
*

*Lebanon** Quilt & Fabric Arts Show & Sale*
/Formerly The Great //Midwest// Quilt Show & Sale/



The 26th annual show and sale will take place *February 29, and
March 1 and 2* at the Warren County History Center, 105 S. Broadway
in Lebanon, Ohio. Vendors from several states will offer for sale new
and antique quilts, quilting and fabric craft supplies, new and vintage
fabrics, and finished fabric-related crafts. Several vendors who
specialize in wool, knitting and hooked rugs will also be
participating.

Enjoy "Star Gazing" at the museum to see an exhibit of quilts
focusing on 19th and 20th century star quilts. The entire museum,
including the old post office addition, is used for the show, which
makes a charming setting for this unique event. Those who attend the
show will also enjoy viewing the world-class Shaker collection as
well as other important pieces relating to Ohio's history.

Parking is available in nearby municipal lots. Many of the
shops in downtown Lebanon will also have a display of quilts in their
windows during this show. Folks who attend the show every year consider visiting the Lebanon shops to be an essential part of their quilt
show experience.

Hours for the show are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday,
and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $5 which includes the show and museum entrance. See wchsmuseum.com for further information.
Proceeds benefit the Warren County Historical Society.


------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Crazy Quilt
From: "Jennifer Perkins" <qltrstoreharlannet.com>

Does anyone have time to do repairs on a crazy quilt? I got a
request
recently (the quilt is in South Dakota), and I just don't have time
to work
on it. She didn't think the damage was very extensive-just 6-8
patches.

Let me know!

Jennifer in Iowa

qltrstoreharlannet.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: V&A Chintz book
From: QuiltEvalsaol.com

I have just received the new V&A chintz book by Rosemary Crill, Chintz: Indian Textiles for the West. Earlier reports of the book being mostly images is  true, and it is not a book that picks up where Irwin left off, as once had  been thought. (Referring to John Irwin and Katherine Brett's, Origins of  Chintz, London 1970.)

In the author's note Rosemary states, "Origins of Chintz is still
essential reading for anyone seriously interested in the subject," but
acknowledges  that it has long been out of print.

Although a well written introduction is provided, this book is
really a pictorial essay of chintz images rather than one providing a lot of information.  Images are all in color (which is very accurate) and the circa date has been  provided. There is also a listing of plates which provides additional  information about the area of India where the chintz is from, dye methods, fabric  use, etc. That said, the images are excellent and provide a good basis for  study to anyone interested in the topic.

It might be noteworthy before anyone goes out to purchase the book
that  after one of the tours when we saw some of the pieces in this
collection at the V&A, one of the participants expressed disappointment to me over what we had  seen. When I asked why, she said she was thinking we would be seeing the  flowery, glazed type of chintzes that are found in pieced quilts and referenced  the styles in Patricia Smith's, Calico and Chintz. Just to be clear, the  images in the Crill book are not that style, but the true painted and block  printed chintzes brought from the East India Companies to Europe.

Of further note to Indian chintz fans, in the later part of the year
and early next year, the Textile Museum in Mulhouse, FR will be hosting
an exhibit of Indian chintz from their collection and from the collection of
the East India Company (Compagnie des Indes) which from what I have been told also has  quite a deep archives of things, even from its earliest days. Anyone that might  be interested in coming with me to see this exhibit can drop me a note  privately.

Warmly,
Deb Roberts



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt collection
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2008 23:19:27 -0500


Thought this varied collection of quilts, cigar silks and flannel
flags from 1850-1930s might be of interest to you all. The redwork is
quite appealing as is the crazy quilt made from wool suiting samples. A
study in designs and fabrics, www.fabrics.net/tourVintageQuilt.asp

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Intricate quilts, in color
From: "Judy Grow" <judygrowpatmedia.net>

I just this minute got back from my local Borders where I saw, for
the first time, two beautiful quilt magazines. The first, 'New Zealand
Quilter" caught my eye because of the most beautiful and intricate
quilt I think I've ever seen. Called, "Renaissance Revival" it is pictured
with its maker Mariya Waters. Inside is an article by the quiltmaker
on how she made this masterpiece of design, inventing new techniques
as  she went. It was exhibited in the International Quilt Festival in
Houston in 2007 and won the founders prize. 20

http://www.quilts.com/fqf07/enVivo/

http://nzquilter.com/index.php?option3Dcom_content&task3Dview&id3D2&It
emid3D29

Quilt Mania is the other magazine, a French publication, in English.
I think Judy Roche's antique quilts had an entire issue a couple of
years  ago. Issue 62 illustrates quilts by Egyptian tentmakers that feature the same sort of symmetry and fields crowded with motifs, in these cases  the lotus or water lily flower seen so often in ancient Egyptian tomb paintings. I couldn't find the images on-line at the magazine's web site, but Australian quiltmaker Jenny Bowker's blog shows some fantastic  quilts. The other links give some history.

http://jennybowker.blogspot.com/2007/08/stitch-like-egyptian-2.html

http://www.quiltmania.com/en/publication/actuellement_kiosque.php

http://origidij.blogspot.com/2007/08/egyptian-tentmakers-at-13th-european
.html

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/198606/tentmakers.of.cairo.htm

Ricky Timms might have been inspired by these Egyptian quilts to
invent  his piecing technique, designed his quilts and write his book on what he  calls "Rhapsody Quilts!" I bought his book a month ago and have been immersed in quilts of this type ever since.

I am so happy to have found these two publications.

Judy Grow
Flemington NJ


---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pencil marks
From: "Janet Bahr" <janetquiltcomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 22 Feb 2008 09:47:55 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

I have been an active lurker for some time now. This list is always
interesting and I enjoy reading all the posts.
I hope I can call upon some experts out there who can help me out.
I just finished making a Baltimore Album. I used a pencil to mark the
quilting lines - probably not the smartest thing to do. The
background
fabric is an off white muslin - Springs Southern Belle.
I have a recipie to remove the lines (which I think I may have gotton
off
this list)

1 part water
3 parts rubbing alcohol
1 to 2 drops pure soap liquid

Rub gently with a soft toothbrush and wipe with a cloth.

Has anyone used this recipie? What were the results?

The quilt has been over 4 years in the making and sure don't want to
ruin it
now!

Thanks so much for any info you can provide.

Janet B in Sunny (for the moment) Washington State



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: pencil marks
From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2008 15:18:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I've never used your recipe but - A few years ago a new-to-quilting
member
of our guild marked the annual donation quilt VERY heavily with a
pencil
(I swear it was a carpenter's pencil). I used Spray & Wash and a
toothbrush to get the marks off. It was tedious work and seemed to
take
forever but eventually it came out well enough that it won an
honorable
mention at Quilt Festival in Houston.

Don't give up!

Best regards,
Sharron........
...in Spring, TX where it's 48 deg and now the sun has come out!
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: pencil marks
From: <quiltbakersbcglobal.net>
Date: Fri, 22 Feb 2008 14:12:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Can't you erase them with a white (block)pencil eraser? Nancylea

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt exhibit in VA
From: palamporeaol.com

They have an exhibit of 125 quilts on display until May 20th. THey
are offering group tours for $5.00. For more information you can check
out their website:?
www.craborchardmuseum.com?

Anyone live near this site to give a report on the quilts?

Lynn Lancaster Gorges
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: quilt exhibit in VA
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2008 06:49:51 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Lynn,

Thank you for the information about the Crab Orchard Museum - it will
be a
wonderful side trip on my way down to the SQC next month. How could
I not
stop when I will be driving right by on I-81? If there are no
reports by
then, I will be happy to share information about what I find.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle
(Lancaster County, PA)


---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Baltimore Quilt Exhibit at The Quilters Hall of Fame
From: karenquiltrockisland.com
Date: Fri, 22 Feb 2008 18:38:02 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 3

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Lisa Iversen, Executive Director

February 22, 2008

The Quilters Hall of Fame announces an Exhibit of Baltimore Album
Quilts
from the Baltimore AppliquE9 Society of Maryland

The Quilters Hall of Fame opens on March 4th with an exhibit
featuring a
collection of over 30 Baltimore Album Quilts and Blocks from the
Baltimor
e
AppliquE9 Society in Maryland. Guest curator Marylou McDonald is a
quilt
teacher, lecturer, historian and past president of the Baltimore
AppliquE9
Society.

The Baltimore Album style quilt became popular in Baltimore, Maryland
during the mid-nineteenth century. Many of the quilts made used a
mostly
red and green color scheme on a white or cream color background.
Frequently these quilts were made by several different quilters and
included basket, cornucopias, and floral designs or themes relating
to
family, work, and patriotism. Many of these were signature or
presentatio
n
quilts, often made by several quilters as a gift for a bride or
special
person. These quilts were highly treasured and preserved by many of
the
recipients, and exist to this day.

The exhibit includes over 30 contemporary Album-style quilts and many
quilt blocks. The Baltimore AppliquE9 Society supports the
preservation
of
quilts, textiles, and related documents in museum and historical
society
collections, and promotes the art of appliquE9 and quilting
perfected by
Baltimore women in the mid-nineteenth century and revived in the
1980s.
The Quilters Hall of Fame is honored to present this collection of
fine
quilting to the public. Calendar for the Baltimore AppliquE9 Society
featuring beautiful photographs of Baltimore quilts, and Baltimore
Album
Quilt patterns will be available for purchase in the Museum92s Gift
Stor
e
throughout the show.

Quilters Hall of Fame honoree William Rush Dunton, Jr., M.D.
co-founded
The National Society for the Promotion of Occupational Therapy in
1917. H
e
wrote Old Quilts in 1946 after having collected Baltimore Album
Quilts
since the 1920s. Dr. Dunton corresponded with Marie Webster, who sent
quilts to him for display at the hospital for the enjoyment of his
patients. Dr. Dunton has been called the 93father of occupational
thera
py94
because he advocated quilting as a therapeutic activity.

An exhibit preview for Members and Donors of The Quilters Hall of
Fame
will be held on Monday afternoon, March 3, from 1-4pm. Light
refreshments
will be served. On March 22nd at 1:30pm, Master Quilter Bernice
Enyeart
will present a one-hour program on Baltimore Quilts in the Community
Room
at The Quilters Hall of Fame. Admission is free for TQHF Members and
$5.0
0
for non-members. Not a member yet? No problem, memberships will be
available for purchase at that time. Please call to have your name
added
to the guest list for either or both of these events. 765-664-9333.

The Quilters Hall of Fame is located in the home where Marie Webster
live
d
and operated an early mail-order quilt pattern business. The location
has
been designated a National Historic Landmark and a Landmark of
Women's
History, and the only official landmark honoring a quiltmaker.

The exhibit will be displayed through June 30, 2008. Hours are
Tuesday
through Saturday, 10am until 4pm. Quilters Hall of Fame is located at
926
South Washington Street in Marion, Indiana. Please visit the website
www.quiltershalloffame.org for information about our hours,
directions to
the museum, and special events.

Contact: Lisa Iversen, Executive Director
The Quilters Hall of Fame
926 South Washington Street
Marion, Indiana 46952
765-664-9333
www.quiltershalloffame.org

February 22, 2008

The Quilters Hall of Fame announces an Exhibit of Baltimore Album
Quilts
from the Baltimore AppliquE9 Society in Maryland

The Quilters Hall of Fame opens on March 4th with an exhibit
featuring a
collection of over 30 Baltimore Album Quilts and Blocks from the
Baltimor
e
AppliquE9 Society in Maryland. Guest curator Marylou McDonald is a
quilt
teacher, lecturer, historian and a member of the Baltimore AppliquE9
Society.

The Baltimore Album style quilt became popular in Baltimore, Maryland
during the mid-nineteenth century. Many of the quilts made used a
mostly
red and green color scheme on a white or cream color background.
Frequently these quilts were made by several different quilters and
included basket, cornucopias, and floral designs or themes relating
to
family, work, and patriotism. Many of these were signature or
presentatio
n
quilts, often made by several quilters as a gift for a bride or
special
person. These quilts were highly treasured and preserved by many of
the
recipients, and exist to this day.

The exhibit includes over 30 contemporary Album-style quilts and many
quilt blocks. The Baltimore AppliquE9 Society supports the
preservation
of
quilts, textiles, and related documents in museum and historical
society
collections, and promotes the art of appliquE9 and quilting
perfected by
Baltimore women in the mid-nineteenth century and revived in the
1980s.
The Quilters Hall of Fame is honored to present this collection of
fine
quilting to the public. Calendar for the Baltimore AppliquE9 Society
featuring beautiful photographs of Baltimore quilts, and Baltimore
Album
Quilt patterns will be available for purchase in the Museum92s Gift
Stor
e
throughout the show.

Quilters Hall of Fame honoree William Rush Dunton, Jr., M.D.
co-founded
The National Society for the Promotion of Occupational Therapy in
1917. H
e
wrote Old Quilts in 1946 after having collected Baltimore Album
Quilts
since the 1920s. Dr. Dunton corresponded with Marie Webster, who sent
quilts to him for display at the hospital for the enjoyment of his
patients. Dr. Dunton has been called the 93father of occupational
thera
py94
because he advocated quilting as a therapeutic activity.

An exhibit preview for Members and Donors of The Quilters Hall of
Fame
will be held on Monday afternoon, March 3, from 1-4pm. Light
refreshments
will be served. On March 22nd at 1:30pm, Master Quilter Bernice
Enyeart
will present a one-hour program on Baltimore Quilts in the Community
Room
at The Quilters Hall of Fame. Admission is free for TQHF Members and
$5.0
0
for non-members. Not a member yet? No problem, memberships will be
available for purchase at that time. Please call to have your name
added
to the guest list for either or both of these events. 765-664-9333.

The Quilters Hall of Fame is located in the home where Marie Webster
live
d
and operated an early mail-order quilt pattern business. The location
has
been designated a National Historic Landmark and a Landmark of
Women's
History, and the only official landmark honoring a quiltmaker.

The exhibit will be displayed through June 30, 2008. Hours are
Tuesday
through Saturday, 10am until 4pm. Quilters Hall of Fame is located at
926
South Washington Street in Marion, Indiana. Please visit the website
www.quiltershalloffame.org for information about our hours,
directions to
the museum, and special events.

The Quilters Hall of Fame
926 South Washington Street
Marion, Indiana 46952
765-664-9333
www.quiltershalloffame.org


posted by Karen Alexander
President of TQHF



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 'Lists'
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2008 06:32:48 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

Does anyone know what the width(s) of 18th and 19th century list(e)s
were? Did the widths vary? I'm trying to picture a list carpet -
were
they made from all fabric types and weights joined end to end? Were
they wide enough to be folded in on themselves for bulk? I've looked
at
several pics of the carpets but they're in black and white which
makes
it difficult to discern what is going on in the piece.

Also, would they ever have been used to bind the edge of a quilt?

Jan
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: FYI - Downloads
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>


Just FYI - for those of you who haven't seen this list of
downloadable
files. They add items continuously and include various fiber topics.

http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books.html


Jan


Site Statistics

This site started in May 1999. The first document was Cyrus Uhler's
Draught and Cording, made from scans done at Lebanon Valley College
Library. The first document scanned locally was de Lantsheere's
/Trésor
de L'Art Dentellier/ from a delapidated original purchased at a sale
at
the University of Arizona Library.

The articles are from 216 sources. Fifty-eight periodicals are
represented. Twenty-one languages are represented.

http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pencil marks recipe
From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2008 09:53:06 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 6

I have a recipie to remove the lines (which I think
I may have gotton off this list)

> 1 part water
> 3 parts rubbing alcohol
> 1 to 2 drops pure soap liquid
Rub gently with a soft toothbrush and wipe with a
cloth. Has anyone used this recipie? What were the
results?

i am also a lurker and have used a variation of this
recipe besides giving it out to many others throughout
the years. notice that mine says not to use dawn, i
believe the reason given has something to do with the
blue dye used in the coloration of the product.

¼ c water,
¾ c rubbing alcohol,
1/8 tsp. dishwashing liquid white or clear is best **
do NOT use dawn
mix and apply with a cotton swab or gently scrub with
a new soft toothbrush. wipe dry with a cloth.
it is a good idea to test this before applying to your
whole quilt.


when i had to mark a quilt on a mottled grey and mauve
fabric, i used a heavy hand just to be able to see the
lines. it was also the border so didn't have time to
help wear away with use. since i had such a large
area, i made a double batch and added extra water and
put it into a spray bottle. as i sprayed onto the
marks, i literally saw them disappear before my very
eyes. i did use a q-tip on a few places that were
stubborn. of course after that i put the quilt in
water making sure it was well rinsed. i hope it works
for you.
patti

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question on software
From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net>

Can anyone recommend a good, basic, inexpensive block drafting
software?
Thanks!

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Question on software
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2008 15:50:49 -0800
X-Message-Number: 8

I saw this on the web: http://rapidresizer.com/designer.php

I have not tried it out, but I am going to do the 48 hour free trial.

I did use the Rapid Resizer program and bought it after the free
trial. See
my trial: http://winnowings.blogspot.com/2008/02/resizing-images.html

Christine Thresh
on an island in the California Delta
http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog

Can anyone recommend a good, basic, inexpensive block drafting
software?
Thanks!

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Question on software
From: "Kay Sorensen" <Kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2008 19:07:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

I noticed you did the original sketch with Paint shop Pro.
Couldn't you have erased the photo layer and then enlarged the
remaining
layer with the sketch in Paint Shop Pro?
K

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Question on software
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2008 17:20:25 -0800
X-Message-Number: 10

I don't know.

I wanted an exact top to bottom measurement for height -- 69 inches.
And I
don't know how to tile in Paint Shop Pro. Maybe there is a way, but I
have
not found it. Perhaps I need a newer version of PSP.

The Rapid Resizer was so easy.

I have no affiliation with the company.

Christine Thresh
on an island in the California Delta
http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Software Part 2
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net>
Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2008 19:51:06 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11

I'm so glad someone brought up a software question.

Is there a software that allows you to switch a jpeg photo into
outline
sketch or coloring book type drawing?

Something very simple (like two steps simple).

In the middle 1990s we had an Adobe photo program (maybe Adobe #4)
which
came with our HP computer and it did exactly that (two simple steps)
-- our
dog spud became an outline drawing of our dog Spud.

Someone said Impression X, but I have heard very little about this
program.

Any suggestions using a software program available today?

Thanks,

Sue
-----------------------------------------------

Subject: Pencil Marks
From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca>
Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2008 18:01:26 -0700
X-Message-Number: 12

1 part water
3 parts rubbing alcohol
1 to 2 drops pure soap liquid

I use a similar recipe to remove my pencil marks. Sometimes it works

and sometimes it doesn't. But I have never found it to cause any
harm to a quilt even when the marks don't come out. I like to mark
as little and as lightly as possible, using a hard lead (2H or 4H) in

a 0.5mm mechanical pencil. For example, I never pencil in
cross-hatching lines - I use masking tape and remove it immediately
when I've finished a daily quilting session. My general experience
is that this solution works best on pre-washed fabrics, so perhaps
some finishes in virgin fabric react with the graphite. In any case,

never press pencil marks with an iron, and as I say, mark as light as

you can so that you can figure out where to stitch. In many cases my

stitches conceal the pencil marks and I don't need to bother with any

removal. I've never had a show judge remark on any pencil lines - I
guess there is plenty else to critique without getting up that close!

Jennifer Hill
Calgary, AB