Subject: online generators:Question on software From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> 

There are many online fun "generators" out there. You can turn photos into drawings

http://generatorblog.blogspot.com/

Here's the sketch generator: Have fun!.....arden

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

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Subject: Re: online generators:Question on software From: Arden Shelton <

http://sporkforge.com/imaging/sketch.php (sketch generator)

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

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Subject: Mountain Mist and Flags From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Sun, 24 

Hi to all - I have a comment and a question. First the question. Most of u= s have seen Mountain Mist Wrappers/Patterns many many times, and most of us= own a stack of them. I would venture to guess that you, as I, see the sam= e ones over and over. But a couple of weeks ago I was given yet another on= e, and it is a pattern I've never seen, not on the wrapper nor in the cloth= . As an appraiser, I've flapped many a Mtn Mist pattern, but again have ne= ver seen this one nor do I even remember any reference to it. It is Patter= n No 68, Nine Patch Nosegay. Simple appliqued posies alternate with 9-patc= hes, on point, but the 9-patches are stylized - there is a tiny sashing aro= und all but two of the squares in the 9-patch. Difficult to describe. If = anyone on the list has seen the real quilt, or has a photo of one, I'd real= ly like to see it. Linda and Vicki - I went to the MM/Leggett and Platt we= bsite, and yall don't have a photo of one, either. I'm just a bit fascinat= ed to find a pattern I didn't know about. Could be my own ignorance, I sup= pose, (Lawd, I hope it ain't that) but I am hoping it is a rare bird to the= rest of you as well. The comment refers to the recent discussion of flag= fabrics. Something that none of you would guess about me is that in a per= fect world, I would love nothing more than to be a professional conservator= of flags. I adore flags, and would delight in hour after hour spent hunch= ed over a table with a curved needle, attaching the remaining shreds of som= e historical banner to a foundation. SO, I have a wonderful book on Americ= an flags, The Stars and Stripes: The American FLag as Art and as History f= rom the Birth of the Republic to the Present by Boleslaw and Marie Louise = D'otrange Mastai. Some title, huh? It has absolutely every bit of trivia = and history concerning flags, finite details, engaging text, fascinating st= ories of the reason behind the design, ........and doesn't say spit about f= iber content. It mentions a silk flag here and there, something evident = from the photos - 255 color plates! but in most cases fiber content is no= t mentioned. What an oversight. Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.comTeddy Prue= tt www.teddypruett.comBusier than a thousand legged wormtying shoestrings!! ________________________________________________________

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Subject: RE: Mountain Mist and Flags From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Sun, 24 Feb 2008 09:52:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Teddy,

This probably does not help much but there is a small snip of a photo of = the Nine Patch Nosegay #68 on page 4 of the Mountain Mist Blue Book of = Quilts published in 1996. I don't have any my older copies unpacked to look = but I too would love to see a larger photo of the entire design.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle (In sunny Lancaster County, PA)

"It is Pattern No 68, Nine Patch Nosegay. Simple appliqu=E9d posies = alternate with 9-patches, on point, but the 9-patches are stylized - there is a = tiny sashing around all but two of the squares in the 9-patch. Difficult to describe. If anyone on the list has seen the real quilt, or has a photo = of one, I'd really like to see it."

Teddy Pruett

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Subject: RE: Mountain Mist and Flags From: <bearspawcox.net> Date: Sun, 24 Feb 2008 10:11:53 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Teddy,

In The Mountain Mist Blue Book of Quilts there is a small picture of a portion of the Nine Patch Nosegay on page 30. It's probably the same picture as the one in the 1996 edition. My edition is probably earlier and has no date. I've never seen this pattern made up either!

Donna Skvarla

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Subject: Mountain Mist From: "ginghamfrontiernet.net" <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Mon, 

Hey Miz Teddy, There is a color photo on page 34 of The Mountain Mist Blue Book of=A0  Quilts.=A0 The photo shows 4 applique blocks around the pieced nine  patch block.=A0 Book is odd sized (10 x 8) with a textured blue cover  and undated (but cataloged as 1966).=A0 The 1996 book notes the pattern  was copyrighted in 1937. The nine patch block is Brackman pieced #4121 'nine patch nose gay-  Mountain Mist (alternate with applique block)'. I have not seen the quilt in the cloth yet.

What was the color scheme of the one you appraised?=A0 The one pictured  has a grey ground with peach and white flowers, blue buds, green  leaves; same colors plus yellow in the nine patch and green sashing  around all blocks and green and white sashing in nine patch.

Sandra Starley Professional Quilt Appraiser and Artist Moab, Utah http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

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Subject: Southern Quilt Conference '08 From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2008 08:09:23 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

A reminder that if you've been considering registering for the Southern Quilt Conference '08 being held in Huntsville, AL, March 14-15, time is running short . Your registration check must be received by MARCH 10, which is our caterers' cut off date. Email me privately if you want registration materials. Also, if you have Southern quilts to share, we'll be doing Show and Tell after the dinner Friday night. Pat Kyser patkyserhiwaay.net

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Subject: RE: Software Part 2 From: "Nancy" <izannah1msn.com> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2008 12:21:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Probably most any photo editing program has that capability--I use Photoshop Elements (the less expensive version of Photoshop) and in that program you pick something from the Filter menu. There are a lot of choices there. I think perhaps Poster Edges under the Artistic submenu would come the closest to a coloring book style. Photocopy under Sketch also might do what you want. But you can check out all the different options available. If it's a color photo, you might want to first make it black and white.

Good luck,

Nancy in PA

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Subject: Quilt - Coverlet connection From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2008 19:12:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Good Evening Everyone --

While wandering around ebay looking for PA Quilts I found an interesting cross-over to coverlets. The design on this 1847 PA signed coverlet is very similar to the Oak Leaf quilt pattern -- and the coverlet actually identifies the pattern by woven name. While not a quilt, I think it's an interesting connection and wanted to share. I'm not bidding -- just loved seeing it. It's ebay auction number 170196802682 or try this tiny url --

http://tinyurl.com/2vffua

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Black Threads: Peugeot - Toile-pattern From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2008 17:31:58 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Way to go finding this Kyra! There goes my DH's T-Bird.

http://blackthreads.blogspot.com/2008/01/peugeot-toile-pattern.html

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Subject: RE: Quilt - Coverlet connection From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2008 09:08:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Barb and list, In the Textile in Bedroom class I team taught last year at the Smithsonian/Corcoran Masters program I devoted a full hour to the coverlet-quilt design connection. There are lots of such cross over designs out there - but the evidence is scattered across museum storage. At least I don't think anyone has looked at this specific piece of it. Book idea anyone? (Not me!) Newbie

-

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Subject: RE: Quilt - Coverlet connection From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2008 16:12:11 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

What's in a name? I'm interested that the coverlet this conversation

refers to is a woven item. In the UK an important part of our 'quilt' history consists of patchworks which have been 'quilted' to a backing, therefore only two layers and not technically a quilt. Our historians always carefully refer to these as coverlets and that word is a distinct category of fabric bed cover.

To what extent are two-layer 'quilts' (guess I should be careful about the inverted commas) a significant part of your quilting history, and

do you make any distinction between them and woven coverlets - which I suspect we would call blankets or bedcovers?

Sally Ward Almost blown off her feet this afternoon in Yorkshire.

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Subject: RE: Quilt - Coverlet connection From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2008 08:52:16 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Good Morning All, I too believe there is a crossover. I notice it in the similarity between the PA 4 block Eagle quilts with the circular design element in the center and woven coverlets with the same design elements - 4 eagles with a circular motif in the center. Ricky Clark discusses this topic in the chapter "Design Influences and Shared Style" pages 59-65. of her book. Clark, Ricky (1994). Quilted Gardens. Floral Quilts of the Nineteenth Century. Rutledge Hil Pressl. Nashvill,, History

Regards, Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: RE: Quilt - Coverlet connection From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2008 12:09:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

You have to be a little cautious -- the patterns aren't universal and not all weavers did all the patterns -- at least this is my casual observation. For instance, some of the killer coverlets from NY that have lions and what have you don't necessarily crop up in PA. Here in this part of PA I think the weavers were pretty one-note, as it were. Candace Perry 

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Subject: Re: Quilt - Coverlet connection From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2008 13:18:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I, who know nothing about woven coverlets, was visiting a lady in DE who has many. I asked for a quick tutorial. I spied one with a border of trees and asked "Is that from New York State?". It was. I based my guess on the NY quilts with weeping trees in the border (#1 on my quilt collection wish list). I agree with Newbie. This subject cries out for further exploration. Barb, I love the Oak Leaf and Reel you found on eBay. In 1847 Lackawanna Co., location of Scranton, the "Jewel of the Northeast," was still part of Luzerne Co. Sugar Loaf Township is near Hazleton where travelers on I-81 can almost always expect bad weather. I expect to know much more about the subject of coverlets after Suzanne Cawley's presentation at the FVF Seminar. By the way, if anyone on the list is free the first weekend in April there have been a couple of cancellations and you may still be able to register for the Seminar. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Quilts and Coverlets From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2008 17:30:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Y'all have been talking about individual patterns, right? Great pic Barb and timely because I had just seen a quilt with the nearly exact

oak leaf design (no words) and a pine tree border the day before your

post. I've recently been studying coverlets in collections in the Springs and have been throwing out none too subtle hints for a while that this would make a fabulous exhibit idea: showing the two together. I've seen entire quilts that were so obviously inspired by a whole woven coverlet, that you can almost name the coverlet from looking at the quilt. Most of those I have seen were indigo and white with a

few that also had red. I surmise that they were recreated from earlier coverlets about the time of the centennial when coverlet weaving again became popular. Below is a link to an example of a contemporary piece

made by Lois K. Ide of Bucyrus, OH. This is from the Ohio Memory Project site in case the links below don't take you right to the pics: http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/NewLogin  enter 'quilt' into the search box

 Lois Ide Monkey and the Leopard Quilt

These four images are of a quilt named "Monkey and the Leopard". The theme is from a French fable by LaFontaine (1621-1695). The quilt is made from antique cotton indigo and reds, is hand appliqued, and is hand quilted. Lois K. Ide designed and quilted the piece in Bucyrus, Crawford County, Ohio during 1986 -1987. Ide took her inspiration from a woven

coverlet (possibly done in Ohio) with monkeys and leopards in the border, circa 1830-1840. Ruching can be seen in the butterflies and flowers. Much of the detailing in the stars and throughout the quilt is done with embroidery.

The first images are of the front and back. The third image is a close-up view of the signature block on the back. The fourth image shows the piece of coverlet that inspired the quilt design. It measures 155 cm x 140 cm (61inches x 55 inches). This quilt has been published in /Great American Quilts,/ 1991.

Lois Ide, a native Ohioan and resident of Bucyrus, began sewing at the early age of four. She learned from her mother, applique and patchwork, and from her aunt, embroidery. After years of mastering her craft, Mrs. Ide became an internationally known teacher with students worldwide and a master quilter.

And, Newbie, Coverlet-Quilt design connections would be a wonderful AQSG presentation.

Jan

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Subject: RE: Quilt - Coverlet connection From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2008 21:18:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Hi Sally -

I enjoyed your post because it reminds us that while we have the same

"basic" language, some words translate differently, depending on which side of the ocean you are on.

You wrote -- In the UK an important part of our 'quilt' history consists of patchworks which have been 'quilted' to a backing, therefore only two

layers and not technically a quilt. Our historians always carefully refer to these as coverlets and that word is a distinct category of fabric bed cover.

In my part of the "New World", what you are describing would be called (by quilt historians and documentors) a quilted summer spread. Run of the mill quilters and average people would probably call it a quilt because it has quilting stitches and they aren't particular about needing 3 layers. We would agree with you that the word coverlet is a distinct category of bed cover -- in our case, a bed covering woven on a large loom. To us, quilts and coverlets represent 2 different techniques and 2 non-overlapping categories of bed coverings.

You asked - To what extent are two-layer 'quilts' (guess I should be careful about the inverted commas) a significant part of your quilting history, and do you make any distinction between them and woven coverlets - which I suspect we would call blankets or bedcovers?

We have several styles of "summer spreads" -- one layer with finished

edge, two layers without quilting, and two layers with quilting but no batting. We see a fair number of them in my area, although 3 layers with a very thin batting would be the most common. As to distinguishing two-layer quilts from woven coverlets -- they are from

totally different families of bedding here and would not be confused with each other. The "only" time the word coverlet is used during a quilt documentation is when someone brings a woven "piece of bedding" in and we must explain why it isn't a quilt ("but it was on the bed, so it must be a quilt", is the owner's usual reply. No, it's a coverlet, we usually reply). A two-layer "quilt" is part of the larger "quilt family" (which includes crazies, which aren't always 3 layers), and is not part of the coverlet family, which includes both mundane woven patterns and the beautiful motif woven designs being described here -- eagles, trees, oak leaves.

We would never call a woven coverlet a blanket. The word blanket brings to my mind images of factory mass produced, disposable bedding. Some blankets are nicer than others, like Indian blankets. If you go to

www.amazon.com and search under books for coverlets and you will see 2 books about American made coverlets listed.

These links have some nice pictures of beautiful American woven coverlets -- http://www.historic-american.com/WovenCoverlets.html http://www.greencastlemuseum.org/Special_Exhibits/coverlets.htm http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/amqc/ho_10.125.410.htm

The woven coverlets I'm most familiar with in my area often have German roots. Were woven items like those illustrated above made in England in the 1700s and early 1800s? An interesting comparison in terminology.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: RE: Quilt - Coverlet connection From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2008 12:00:47 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

Thanks, Barb, for your lovely clear explanation. I think we may have

stumbled here upon a significant difference in definition which we need to be aware of.

I think your 'summer spread' we would be likely to call a 'top', qualified by 'quilt', 'patchwork' or even 'unfinished'. Your categorical description that the only time you use coverlet is for a

woven cover, and that a two-layer quilt is not part of the coverlet family, is something that I think British historians need to absorb.

We would certainly in some cases describe a woven coverlet as a blanket (or perhaps 'bedspread'). I know what you mean about mundane

blankets, but we also have things like the traditional Welsh woven blankets, some of which I see on Jen Jones' site qualified with the description 'tapestry' blankets.

http://www.jen-jones.com/Blanket%20thumbnails.htm

It is tricky, this common language thing.

Sally Ward

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Subject: coverlet clues From: palamporeaol.com Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2008 07:29:44 -0500 

I love this new discussion. Coverlets are a favorite of mine, but rather overwhelming because they can be so similar and timeless. Are there any things other than "lions" and "tree borders" that "say" New York State? What says Penn.? What says Indiana, Ohio, Tenn., NC, etc???????? Go to this site Nat. Museum of the American Coverlet in Bedford, PA--- http://www.coverletmuseum.org/printedcotton.htm? Look at the coverlets, but also read about Mary Kovel's new line of fabric based on coverlets. Interesting..... My husband had rotator cuff surgery yesterday. Doing pretty well except the meds that are supposed to help him sleep are keeping him awake. I am a bit foggy this morning because it was a toss and turn night.

Thanks for "giving" me wonderful coverlets this morning.

Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio The Creative Caregiver New Bern, NC palamporeaol.com

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Subject: Re: Coverlet connection From: Trishherraol.com Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2008 10:19:18 EST X-Message-Number: 3

I normally don't get involved in online discussions, but as an avowed

coverlet lover/freak/collector/researcher, my comment is that there is not much new under the sun. Trish Herr

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Subject: Re: Coverlet connection From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2008 09:43:26 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Please...if anyone has seen a woven coverlet with the words 'zur ruhe' on it, not necessarily but probably in the corner block, contact me (my current research obsession). Also an avowed coverlet lover/freak/collector/quasi-researcher who regularly talks to Sam Stinger, calls the Muir "John" (short for John, Robert, Thomas & Wm) and just knows Sarah LaTourette can't find me because I moved to Colorado. If anyone sees her, give her my e-address.

Incidentally, since I have moved here, I've noticed the wools are starting to feel scratchy which makes me think they are drying out. They are stored archivally in my den. A weaver suggested I spritz them with a eucalyptus and lanolin mixture but that didn't sound like such a good idea. Have you ever tried to get lanolin off your hands after picking a fleece? I'm considering an occasional spritz of de-ionized

water since they don't need a bath and a good long time to dry. Any thoughts?

Mary Koval is designing line 2 of the coverlet fabrics for the museum in Bedford. They also plan to add, online, accessories (such as hand bags) and a small rug in the tradition of Kidderminsters.

Jan

Trishherraol.com wrote: > I normally don't get involved in online discussions, but as an avowed > coverlet lover/freak/collector/researcher, my comment is that there is not much new > under the sun. Trish Herr

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Subject: Quilt exhibit in Wilberforce, OH From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:45:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I don't remember seeing this exciting news go through the list. I searched the archives to make sure that I wasn't duplicating. If I am, please forgive. My brother sent me this very exciting notice from the Antique Collector's Guide:

"In the nearly four centuries since the 1619 arrival of three African women in Jamestown, VA, the history of black women has often been neglected.

Changing that is the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce, Ohio. Its latest exhibition, 'Quilting African American Women's History: Our Challenges, Creativity, and Champions' will open March 8.

This quilt show is curated by internationally known quilt artist and historian, Dr. Carolyn L. Mazloomi expressly for the National Afro-American Museum, a part of the Ohio Historical Society and commemorates the 2008 National Women's History Month theme.

The show will run through Nov. 8 and then tour the country.

For more information, call 937-36-4944 or 800-752-2603."

Here is a website link: http://ohsweb.ohiohistory.org/places/sw13/index.shtml

Peg

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Subject: RE: Quilt - Coverlet connection From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2008 18:11:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi Sally -

Thank you for the link to Jen's website. Based on her pictures, I think your Tapestry Blankets are our woven coverlets. All of your Welsh Blankets are beautiful, and definitely many steps above the "factory produced" blankets I envision when I hear that word..

You wrote -- I think your 'summer spread' we would be likely to call a 'top'

In my area, which is Mid Atlantic States (NJ, PA, MD, DE), if the "top" has hems, we call it a summer spread, as the hems indicate that it is

"finished" for use. If the top has raw edges, we call it a top, implying that it is a "quilt in progress". The existence of hems is the difference. Some one layer summer spreads have no visible seam

allowances, while some are literally "hemmed tops". The 2 layer summer spreads have no visible seam allowances.

The differences in definitions is quite interesting, and definitely something we need to know about.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: New UK Quilt Museum From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 28 

Apologies to folks on BQTHL for the cross-posting, but I think its  worth mentioning on this list that there is a new dedicated Quilt  Museum opening here in the UK in June. The building is to be home to 

all the activities of the Quilters Guild of the British Isles and will

always have an exhibit available. The museum is in York, which is  accessible from London by train in just over two hours and therefore a 

feasible day out for overseas visitors who are in the capital. If you 

are planning a visit it is worth contacting them in advance to see if 

you can look at items from store as well as the exhibition. The Guild 

Website is at www.quiltersguild.org.uk

The most recent press release is copied below, detailing the first two 

exhibitions. Out of interest, in view of the recent conversation, it 

also mentions the Guild's prize possession - the earliest known dated 

patchwork, which they refer to as the '1718 Patchwork Coverlet'.  Because of its fragile condition this is rarely displayed, so if  you're in the country between June and September that alone is  probably worth the visit.

If you're coming over here any time, its worth bookmarking this page, 

which can help you make sense of our train timetables and fares.

http://traintimes.org.uk/

Sally Ward

Press Release - 6 Feb 2008

Europe's only museum dedicated to quilting and textile arts opens its 

new facility on 7 June 2008, in historic Yorks medieval St Anthonys  Hall.

The Quilt Museum and Gallery will become the national headquarters of 

the Quilters' Guild of the British Isles and its world-famous Heritage 

Collection.

The earliest known signed and dated patchwork, the colourful 1718  patchwork coverlet, is among some 600 quilts in the Guild's Heritage  Collection, which also includes miniature pieces, quilted clothing,  tools and equipment. In addition to showing the Heritage Collection,  there will be a programme of special textile exhibitions from the UK  and abroad.

The inaugural exhibition "Quilts in Time: Journey from Bed to Wall" (7 

June to 28 September 2008) is being guest curated by Helen Joseph,  former Keeper of Contemporary Craft at Shipley Art Gallery, Gateshead. 

Around two-thirds of the quilts on display in the opening exhibition  will be from the Guild's own Collection while the remainder of items  on show will be borrowed from contemporary quiltmakers including  artists like Pauline Burbidge.

Visitors will be treated to favourite Collection items like the  complex Mrs Billings coverlet; the V for Victory quilt and the  Kaleidoscope quilt made for a 'bottom drawer' as well as Michele  Walker=92s Fieldforce, acquired by the Guild in 2006. The iconic 1718 

silk patchwork coverlet will also have a rare outing. The "Quilts In  Time" exhibition is funded by Arts Council England.

The second exhibition "Quilting Across The Globe" (1 October - 31  December 2008), from the collection of the International Quilt Study  Centre in Nebraska, represents a unique coup for the Quilt Museum. It 

will be the first time the QSC Nebraska has sent an exhibition outside 

the United States. The St Anthony's show marks the start of an  international tour exploring the universal nature of quiltmaking. By  grouping together quilts that are not normally associated with each  other, the exhibition will demonstrate that quiltmakers everywhere  have addressed techniques in similar ways. An early 20th century  Hawaiian quilt, for example, will be put alongside a circa 1980 ralli 

from Pakistan and a 19th-century Pennsylvania cherenschnitte to show  the familiar fold and cut method used in appliqu=E9.=

--Apple-Mail-1-398192439--

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Subject: More on coverlets From: gjbakkomearthlink.net Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2008 09:49:07 -0600 (GMT-06:00) X-Message-Number: 2

In my research on candlewicking, I have found candlewick weaving referred as both "woven spreads" and "coverlets". I find that calling the woven version a coverlet helps to distinguish it from the hand embroidered spread and quilt. And, acccording to America's Quilts and Coverlets, there are navy and white candlewick coverlets, one in the Henry Ford Collection, and one in the collection of the Wadsworth Atheneum.

If anyone knows of other 2-color candlewicks, I would be thrilled to have that information. Also any candlewick quilts (both embroidered and quilted). Contact me off list.

Gail Bakkom

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Subject: Welsh woven blankets/tapestries From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2008 10:16:59 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

Sally Ward posted the link:

http://www.jen-jones.com/Blanket%20thumbnails.htm

Was anyone else struck by the resemblance to Amish coloring in a few of those brilliant vintage Welsh woven blankets? (Can't help but think Amish with all the comparative research going on between Welsh quilts and Amish quilts.) How old are these traditional woven blankets? How far back in their tradition do those brilliant colors in their weaving go?

Karen Alexander San Juans Islands where sun has been peeking through almost daily for two weeks!

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Subject: Re: Welsh woven blankets/tapestries From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 00:06:50 +0000 X-Message-Number: 5

> How old are these traditional woven blankets? How far back in > their tradition do those brilliant colors in their weaving go?

There's some historical information, and more great pictures, here

http://www.gtj.org.uk/en/item10/27026

Sally Ward