Subject: Conservator in Detroit From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 16:05:02 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Can anyone send me some names of, specifically, textile conservators in or around Detroit.

Thank you,

Jan

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Subject: RE: Conservator in Detroit From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 15:56:26 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

Good afternoon, QHLers - I can recommend my colleague in Royal Oak: Frances K. Faile, (248) 288-2297. If she can't assist personally, I am sure she can direct you to someone locally who can. Regards, Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

.....specifically, textile conservators in or around Detroit. .....

 

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Subject: Re: Conservator in Detroit From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 18:42:30 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Thank you Meg. I can pass this on with full confidence in your recommendation. jt

Margaret Geiss-Mooney wrote: Good afternoon, QHLers - I can recommend my colleague in Royal Oak: Frances K. Faile,(248) 288-2297. If she can't assist personally, I am sure she can direct you to someone locally who can. Regards,Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

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Subject: Identify this pattern, please, and showing off my brilliant students From: "Pepper Cory" 

Hello all. I've finally written new postings in my blogs. On Quilt Flap, I put up pictures of my latest acquisition. Anybody know the pattern? See http://www.quiltflapper.blogspot.com . On Quilt Studio http://peppercory.blogspot.com see pictures of some of my students' work at the Hampton Roads quilt blow-out last weekend. Enjoy! Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker

203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

________________________________________________________________________

Sally  Ward says:

York is accessible from London by train in just over two hours and therefore a feasible day out for overseas visitors who are in the capital. If you are planning a visit it is worth contacting them in advance to see if you can look at items from store [archives] as well as the exhibition. The Guild Website is at www.quiltersguild.org.uk

The most recent press release is copied below, detailing the first two exhibitions. Out of interest, in view of the recent conversation, it also mentions the Guild's prize possession - the earliest known dated patchwork, which they refer to as the '1718 Patchwork Coverlet'. Because of its fragile condition this is rarely displayed, so if you're in the country between June and September that alone is probably worth the visit.

If you're coming over here any time, its worth bookmarking this page, which can help you make sense of our train timetables and fares.

http://traintimes.org.uk/

Press Release - 6 Feb 2008

Europe's only museum dedicated to quilting and textile arts opens its new facility on 7 June 2008, in historic Yorks medieval St Anthonys Hall. The Quilt Museum and Gallery will become the national headquarters of the Quilters' Guild of the British Isles and its world- famous Heritage Collection.

The earliest known signed and dated patchwork, the colourful 1718 patchwork coverlet, is among some 600 quilts in the Guild's Heritage Collection, which also includes miniature pieces, quilted clothing, tools and equipment. In addition to showing the Heritage Collection, there will be a programme of special textile exhibitions from the UK and abroad.

The inaugural exhibition "Quilts in Time: Journey from Bed to Wall" (7 June to 28 September 2008) is being guest curated by Helen Joseph, former Keeper of Contemporary Craft at Shipley Art Gallery, Gateshead. Around two-thirds of the quilts on display in the opening exhibition will be from the Guild's own Collection while the remainder of items on show will be borrowed from contemporary quiltmakers including artists like Pauline Burbidge.

Visitors will be treated to favourite Collection items like the complex Mrs Billings coverlet; the V for Victory quilt and the Kaleidoscope quilt made for a 'bottom drawer' as well as Michele Walker's Fieldforce, acquired by the Guild in 2006. The iconic 1718 silk patchwork coverlet will also have a rare outing. The "Quilts In Time" exhibition is funded by Arts Council England.

The second exhibition "Quilting Across The Globe" (1 October - 31 December 2008), from the collection of the International Quilt Study Centre in Nebraska, represents a unique coup for the Quilt Museum. It will be the first time the QSC Nebraska has sent an exhibition outside the United States. The St Anthony's show marks the start of an international tour exploring the universal nature of quiltmaking. By grouping together quilts that are not normally associated with each other, the exhibition will demonstrate that quiltmakers everywhere have addressed techniques in similar ways. An early 20th century Hawaiian quilt, for example, will be put alongside a circa 1980 ralli from Pakistan and a 19th-century Pennsylvania cherenschnitte to show the familiar fold and cut method used in appliqué.

Messages in this topic (1) 

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Subject: Re: Identify this pattern, please, and showing off my brilliant students From: rgnixonoct.net Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2008 03:18:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Pepper, After searching high and low through dozens of books and old pattern pamphlets, it surfaced in Rehmel's Quilt ID Book.....#401 Tulip. It is lovely! Congrats on finding such a treasure. Hoping to see tulips around here in the next month or so, Gloria Nixon

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Subject: DC quilt events? From: Barb Robson <robsonbheastlink.ca> Date: Sat, 01 Mar 2008 11:44:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi QHL,

I will be visiting the Washington, DC area April 7-12, does anyone know of any quilt events, exhibitions that are going on that week. Any Guild meetings, shops not to miss? We are driving down from Nova Scotia and will also be visiting Lancaster County, PA. Has anyone ever been to the Craft Show at the Smithsonian?

Thanks,

Barbara Robson Fox Point, Nova Scotia Canada

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Subject: Pepper's mystery block solved From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2008 15:50:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Pepper and all. Funny. I am going through all my old magazines, getting rid of hundreds. One LCPQ, Spring 1983, page 25 - has your quilt block! The quilt was made in 1900. It's called "Tulip." It is patterned on page 44. If you don't have this magazine in your archive, Pepper, you can have mine. Send me your address. What a coincidence!! Debby -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil www.quilterbydesign.com Programs & Workshops Projects Editor, Quilt Magazine

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Subject: Pepper Cory's question From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2008 19:29:40 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Woo hoo! I know this one!

Pepper asked, "On Quilt Flap, I put up pictures of my latest = acquisition. Anybody know the pattern? See http://www.quiltflapper.blogspot.com ."

I've been recently researching this one and I've found several names for = it. Your quilt block pattern is a version of Botch Handle, aka Devil's = Claw. aka Cluster of Lilies. Brackman has it as 2058a in her pieced = pattern encyclopedia. There's also "The Corner Star" from the Kansas = City Star, 1939. See Brackman, page #259.

Bishop and Safanda had it as "Botch Handle", but the original source of = the name is not clear.

The "Lily" name comes from Ladies Art Company, #365, published in 1897.

The "Devil's Claw" name, Brackman's #1952a, came from the LAC editions = dated either 1889 or 1895. There's a list of a number of other names for = this block, also, on Brackman, page 246.

Anyone else have any good information on this block?

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Quilt/Coverlet Pattern e-board From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2008 03:56:48 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I've added a double woven c. 1840 Jacquard coverlet with the carpenter's wheel pattern to the e-board under general. Does anyone know when this pattern began to be used in quilts?

Check under clothing for one of my 20th century wool bathing suits.

Jan

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Subject: Re: Identify this pattern, please From: "ginghamfrontiernet.net" <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2008 00:45:10 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I posted the identification yesterday on Pepper's blog. I found it in

Maggie Malone's block book on page 223: #3082 Old Blue or Tulip Variation (no source indicated).

Sandra Starley Professional Quilt Appraiser and Artist Moab, Utah art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

Come see my antique quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

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Subject: quilt show From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2008 11:51:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------090104000505050909040002 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The annual month-long FarmPark quilt show is currently in progress in

Kirtland OH, a tad east of Cleveland.

I noticed that one of the winners is on our list, Beverly Macbeth. She took top place in the best representation for traditional quilt with her Lincoln Logs II. Maybe she will share it with us on the eboard??

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Subject: Re: Quilt/Coverlet Pattern e-board From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2008 17:02:03 +0000 X-Message-Number: 4

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I am really enjoying the quilt/coverlet exchange. I will try to attach a picture. I do not know how to post on eboard. I have an 1852 coverlet piece made in St. Paris, Champaign County, Ohio, by J Werick for Mercy Hill. It has a border of weeping willows and urns. It reminds me of the New York quilts with weeping willow borders, except for the urns. A mourning piece? Polly Mello Cold and clear in Maryland --NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_22296_1204477323_1--

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Subject: Re: DC quilt events? From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 12:35:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi Barb, You are in luck! The next DAR exhibit "Telling Their Stories: Samplers and Silk Needlework" opens April 11. Okay, I know it's not quilts, but the DAR always has quilts on display in the back of the gallery and in the period rooms and if you love quilts you probably won't turn up your nose at other kinds of needlework. I am a constant cheerlearder for the DAR because they are dedicated to sharing their great quilt collection. The address is 1776 D St., NW and the phone # is (202) 879-3241. Right across D St. is the headquarters of the American Red Cross. They offer tours of their collection whcih includes gifts given in recognition of their relief work. It's an interesting place. Just down 17th St. is the Organization of American States building (one of the most beautiful in a city filled with architectural gems). Of course, the Renwick Gallery on the corner of 17th and Pennsylvania showcases the Smithsonian crafts collection. You can have lots of fun in those few blocks near the White House. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Coverlets (long) From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 12:50:49 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

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As I understand the history of coverlets in this country, geometric coverlets were "home-woven" by women and some men, as a way of making

something beautiful and useful from farm-raised wool and home dyeing

and spinning. The patterns were maintained in handwritten pattern drafts, traded, and often given locally recognizable names. This tradition coexisted side by side with coverlets woven by professional

weavers, many from the British Isles, France and Germany, who wove on

more complex looms. The punch card system that was invented by Jacquard in France about 1803 (and almost caused his death!) appeared

in the US in the 1820s. The cards determined which of the warp threads were raised and lowered with each pass of the shuttle, a task

requiring thought and attention for the home weaver. It appears that

professional weavers using a card system might make their own cards from patterns, and once made they could use the series over and over. Certainly they had to create new cards each year if their coverlets were dated, and create cards for the owner's name if it was

to appear on the coverlet.

If a person wanted a figured and fancy coverlet, he or she selected the body design from a book of patterns kept by the professional weaver, and often brought prepared and dyed yarn for the weaver's use. The border pattern and the corner block were often at the discretion of the weaver, who identified himself by a name or device

in the corner block, and often by the border pattern as well. Samuel

Stinger of Indiana, for instance, is as readily identified by his grapes and grapevine border as he is by his distinctive corner block

(either a star and date or an eagle and date).

A good book is Clarita S. Anderson, American Coverlets and Their Weavers, Coverlets from the Collection of Foster and Muriel McCarl (2002), which includes an expanded version of the earlier Checklist of American Coverlet Weavers (1978) done by the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center at Colonial Willamsburg. If there is a drawback to the Anderson volume, it is that the study of selected coverlets is weak on Indiana coverlets, and speaks not at all about those from Kentucky and Illinois and even more westerly, because the

balance of the McCarl collection was heavy in coverlets from the central Atlantic states.

An out-of-print but excellent look at Indiana coverlet weavers in Pauline Montgomery, Indiana Coverlet Weavers and Their Coverlets (1974), and I can suggest other volumes for other states and areas if

anyone is interested.

And BTW, Sarah LaTourette of Indiana may be the only woman professional weaver; she and her father and brother wove together in

Fountain Co., Indiana.

Xenia --Apple-Mail-1-687266124--

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Subject: RE: Coverlets (long) From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 13:35:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

In southeastern PA weaving was a male profession...which is different than in other parts of the country, such as New England. Candace Perry

-----Original Message----- From: xenia cord [mailto:xenialegacyquilts.net] Sent: Sunday, March 02, 2008 12:51 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Coverlets (long)

As I understand the history of coverlets in this country, geometric coverlets were "home-woven" by women and some men, as a way of making

something beautiful and useful from farm-raised wool and home dyeing

and spinning. The patterns were maintained in handwritten pattern drafts, traded, and often given locally recognizable names. This tradition coexisted side by side with coverlets woven by professional

weavers, many from the British Isles, France and Germany, who wove on

more complex looms. The punch card system that was invented by Jacquard in France about 1803 (and almost caused his death!) appeared

in the US in the 1820s. The cards determined which of the warp threads were raised and lowered with each pass of the shuttle, a task

requiring thought and attention for the home weaver. It appears that

professional weavers using a card system might make their own cards from patterns, and once made they could use the series over and over. Certainly they had to create new cards each year if their coverlets were dated, and create cards for the owner's name if it was

to appear on the coverlet.

If a person wanted a figured and fancy coverlet, he or she selected the body design from a book of patterns kept by the professional weaver, and often brought prepared and dyed yarn for the weaver's use. The border pattern and the corner block were often at the discretion of the weaver, who identified himself by a name or device

in the corner block, and often by the border pattern as well. Samuel

Stinger of Indiana, for instance, is as readily identified by his grapes and grapevine border as he is by his distinctive corner block

(either a star and date or an eagle and date).

A good book is Clarita S. Anderson, American Coverlets and Their Weavers, Coverlets from the Collection of Foster and Muriel McCarl (2002), which includes an expanded version of the earlier Checklist of American Coverlet Weavers (1978) done by the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center at Colonial Willamsburg. If there is a drawback to the Anderson volume, it is that the study of selected coverlets is weak on Indiana coverlets, and speaks not at all about those from Kentucky and Illinois and even more westerly, because the

balance of the McCarl collection was heavy in coverlets from the central Atlantic states.

An out-of-print but excellent look at Indiana coverlet weavers in Pauline Montgomery, Indiana Coverlet Weavers and Their Coverlets (1974), and I can suggest other volumes for other states and areas if

anyone is interested.

And BTW, Sarah LaTourette of Indiana may be the only woman professional weaver; she and her father and brother wove together in

Fountain Co., Indiana.

Xenia

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: candaceschwenkfelder.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1770637Clyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: Coverlets (long) From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 13:38:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Don't leave us hanging! How did Jacquard's invention almost cause his death? Cinda

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Subject: woven coverlets From: Polly Greene <pjgreeneeastlink.ca> Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2008 14:11:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

The type of weave in a coverlet was reflected by the type of loom owned by the weaver. Professional weavers owned either a Jacquard, multi-harness loom or, more commonly a simple four-harness loom. The

pictorial coverlets with buildings, trees, lettering, etc. were woven

on the Jacquard. Double-woven coverlets with a reversible pattern (such as the Welch coverlets) could be woven on a multi-harness loom. These double weave patterns were done in two separate layers. Summer and Winter coverlets were also done on multi-harness

looms. They were also reversible with the light parts being dark on the reverse but without the separate layers. The most common weave for coverlets was Overshot and they were done on simple four-harness looms. These coverlets generally have small geometric patterns and could be woven in the home by a relatively unskilled weaver. As a rule men wove during the winter when farm work was reduced to daily chores. Polly in Nova Scotia

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Subject: I love this group! From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorygmail.com> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 13:37:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

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Wow-lots of you folks looked up my old quilt's name! Although I realized my Pink Lady is a cousin to the Devil's Claw/Botch Handle/Lily family, my bet is on plain old Tulip, as illustrated in block #401 of the Rehmel book--it looks the most like mine! Florine also spotted its fraternal twin in the Georgia Quilts book. What a great response-thank you all! Pepper

-- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com peppercory.blogspot.com quiltflapper.blogspot.com Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker

203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

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Subject: Re: Coverlets (long) From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 13:52:57 EST X-Message-Number: 11

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One can still see these coverlets woven on the Jacquard loom at the Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, VT. Museum opens in mid May..... Mitzi from snowy Vermont

**************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living. (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/ 2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)

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Subject: Conservator in Detroit From: "Linda Eaton" <LEatonwinterthur.org> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 13:48:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Howard Sutcliffe is the textile conservator at the Detroit Institute of Art - he might be willing to give advice or undertake private conservation projects, or can help find someone who can. Linda Eaton

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Subject: Re: Coverlets (long) From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 14:18:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

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<Don't leave us hanging! How did Jacquard's invention almost  cause his death? Cinda>

As you would expect - by his weaver compatriots who thought his  invention would put them all out of business!

Copied from Wikipedia: Joseph Marie Jacquard (7 July 1752=967 August 

1834) was a straw hat maker[1] before becoming a French silk weaver  and inventor, who improved on the original punched card design of  Jacques de Vaucanson's loom of 1745, to invent the Jacquard loom  mechanism in 1804-1805. Jacquard's loom mechanism is controlled by  recorded patterns of holes in a string of cards, and allows what is  now known as the Jacquard weaving of intricate patterns.

He was born at Lyons. On the death of his father, who was a working  weaver, he inherited two looms, with which he started business on his 

own account. He did not prosper though, and was at last forced to  become a limeburner at Bresse, while his wife supported herself at  Lyons by plaiting straw. In 1793 he took part in the unsuccessful  defense of Lyons against the troops of the Convention; but afterwards 

served in their ranks on the Rhone and Loire. After seeing some  active service, in which his young son was shot down at his side, he  again returned to Lyons. There he obtained a situation in a factory,  and employed his spare time in constructing his improved loom, of  which he had conceived the idea several years previously. In 1801 he  exhibited his invention at the industrial exhibition at Paris; and in 

1803 he was summoned to Paris and attached to the Conservatoire des  Arts et Metiers. A loom by Jacques de Vaucanson on display there  suggested various improvements in his own, which he gradually  perfected to its final state. Although his invention was fiercely  opposed by the silk-weavers, who feared that its introduction, owing  to the saving of labour, would deprive them of their livelihood, its  advantages secured its general adoption, and by 1812 there were  11,000 Jacquard looms in use in France.

etc.

Xenia

--Apple-Mail-2-692497482--

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Subject: South Africa From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 15:03:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

Does anyone have a contact for someone studying quilt history in South Africa? Thanks. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: DC quilt events? From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 12:56:22 -0600 X-Message-Number: 15

I haven't been there myself, but I'm told the DAR museum always has quilts in their period rooms.

Check and see if Sandi Fox's exhibit is still up at the Smithsonian, too.

Steph Whitson Higgins >

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Subject: RE: Mountain Mist and Flags From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 16:07:07 EST X-Message-Number: 16

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Teddy,

The Nine Patch Nosegay No.68 is in one of my Mountain Mist Bluebooks, the 1957 edition on page 34. It is not in color. I did see one of these quilts years ago in Pinks, Green and yellow.

As a pack-rat, I rarely get rid of anything but several years ago did give away all of my Mountain Mist paper patterns and as usual, now wish I had kept them. My aunt, who quilted every minute she could, made these Mountain Mist quilts often. She preferred the pieced quilts as "her hands did not like her to applique". I now understand what she meant!

Hope all is well, Alma Moates Professional Quilt Appraiser Pensacola, Florida

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Subject: RE: South Africa From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 15:45:51 -0600 X-Message-Number: 17

Lucinda, Kay Triplett has just moved to Africa. She might be inclined to study quilt history in South Africa. She's on one of our lists. Best regards, Sharron............... .......in gloomy Spring, TX

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Subject: Down by the Old Mill Stream From: "Pam Weeks" <pamela.weeksgmail.com> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 18:15:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 18

Hi to all. I am back from a wonderful AQSG Regional gathering at the University of Rhode Island, and after hearing how much their quilt documentation book is selling for, have decided that I'll put my copy on the market.

I've had Kris's permission to post my eBay sales in the past and hope this still applies. I've got this book on and will be adding many more things in the weeks to come as I finish the work of selling all of my quilts, antique fabrics and books. I'm going to try a new way of things--collecting photos of things, not the things!

Just moved my books and other things for the second time in 8 months, and will never do it again, except from here to the post office, or to the NH Historical Society for the really good NH stuff that belongs there.

Here's the eBay item number-- 270216296671

Happy bidding!

-- Pam Weeks

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Subject: 1838 Woven Coverlet From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 22:41:50 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

This coverlet belongs to my Daughter in Law's mother. I think it's an interesting one with the dark and light side and the hunting scene is great.

http://www.womenfolk.com/grandmothers/coverlet.htm

Judy Breneman

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Subject: Jacquard Loom From: "Karey Bresenhan" <KareyBquilts.com> Date: Sun, 2 Mar 2008 23:57:26 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

I thought some of you might enjoy knowing that the great-great-great-granddaughter of Joseph Jacquard is a delightful older lady who, with her equally delightful husband, owns L'Escalier d'Argent, a tiny but wonderful shop located in the arcades of the Palais Royal gardens in Paris. She still has silk manufacturers in Lyon who reprint some of the old "documents" (designs) for her in the heaviest, most gorgeous silk imaginable. She makes these into men's ties, cravats, handkerchiefs, and wedding vests. It seems that at the fanciest of Paris weddings, the men wear the traditional pearl gray cut-away ensemble, very sober, very conservative, very traditional. But under that coat they cut loose with these incredible silk vests or waistcoats. I try to visit with this charming couple every time we get to Paris (which is certainly not often enough!), and I have seen absolutely sumptuous vests there--many featuring wild animals such as tigers or cheetahs or jungle florals, etc. Many of these are 19th century "documents" and were originally produced by friends of Joseph Jacquard. I once tried to convince her there would be a market in the quilt world for the "left overs" of these silks, but between her halting English and my non-existent French, this was just too complicated a subject! It's nice to know that a distant family member has stayed active in the textile field in such a special way. Karey Bresenhan

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Subject: Re: 1838 Woven Coverlet From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 08:55:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Judy's post and picture, especially since her posted coverlet came from the Ithaca Carpet Factory, reminds me that many figured coverlet

weavers also produced heavy, flat rugs using coarser yarns in the same patterns as their coverlets. The carpets were woven in strips and sewn together by hand; when they were removed from the room for cleaning the strips could be disconnected, making for easier handling, and rejoined in a different sequence, improving wear. Straw was often used under them for softer footing.

Occasionally one can find long strips of this carpeting in antique shops, usually unidentified <g>.

I found this quote at this wonderful website, one that bears more browsing!

www.victoriana.com/Carpet/carpet.htm

<Ingrain carpet, popular in middle-class homes in 18th and 19th century America, was a flat, woven, reversible wool carpet. This coarse area rug was woven on a jacquard loom accommodating up to six

colored weft threads. In many middle class homes of the 1800s at least one room had ingrain carpet.>

Xenia --Apple-Mail-1-759540991--

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Subject: Bev's quilt From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2008 09:00:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Bev's award winning Lincoln Logs II quilt is now on the eboard. See quilt tab. www.vintagepictures.eboard.com

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Subject: QHL - Another copy of Down by the Old Mill Stream on eBay From: Lisa Portwood <

Hi all,

Since it appears several others are in search of a copy of "Down by the Old Mill Stream," I wanted to pass along that there is another copy listed on eBay right now.

No affiliation, just trying to pass the word to those in need. Good luck!

Best, Lisa

--------------------------------- Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage. --0-1210934880-1204552459=:21291--

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Subject: woven coverlets From: Polly Greene <pjgreeneeastlink.ca> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2008 11:36:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

A coverlet was reflected by the type of loom owned by the weaver. Professional weavers owned either a Jacquard, multi-harness loom or, more commonly a simple four-harness loom. The pictorial coverlets with buildings, trees, lettering, etc. were woven on the Jacquard. Double-woven coverlets with a reversible pattern (such as the Welch coverlets) could be woven on a multi-harness loom. These double weave patterns were done in two separate layers. Summer and Winter coverlets were also done on multi-harness looms. They were also reversible with the light parts being dark on the reverse but without the separate layers. The most common weave for coverlets was Overshot and they were done on simple four-harness looms. These coverlets generally have small geometric patterns and could be woven in the home by a relatively unskilled weaver. As a rule men wove during the winter when farm work was reduced to daily chores. Polly in Nova Scotia

---

The type of weave in a coverlet was reflected by the type of loom owned by the weaver. Professional weavers owned either a Jacquard, multi-harness loom or, more commonly a simple four-harness loom. The pictorial coverlets with buildings, trees, lettering, etc. were woven on the Jacquard. Double-woven coverlets with a reversible pattern (such as the Welch coverlets) could be woven on a multi-harness loom. These double weave patterns were done in two separate layers. Summer and Winter coverlets were also done on multi-harness looms. They were also reversible with the light parts being dark on the reverse but without the separate layers. The most common weave for coverlets was Overshot and they were done on simple four-harness looms. These coverlets generally have small geometric patterns and could be woven in the home by a relatively unskilled weaver. As a rule men wove during the winter when farm work was reduced to daily chores. Polly in Nova Scotia

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Subject: Re South Africa From: Ann-Louise Beaumont <albeaumonthotmail.com> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 15:41:36 +0000 X-Message-Number: 7

Rosalie Dace of Durban, South Africa, is listed as an instructor in the Can= adian Quilters' Association/Association canadienne de la courtepointe's bro= chure for Quilt Canada 2008 which is being held in St. John's Newfoundland = and Labrador. According to her bio she has been teaching quiltmaking in So= uth Africa since 1983, so I would expect her to know the quilt world people= down there. Maybe she could help you, Cinda.  Best Wishes, Ann-Louise Beaumont in blustery British Columbia

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Subject: RE: Bev's quilt From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 09:52:53 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

Bev's quilt is gorgeous! I love those fabrics. Best regards, Sharron........... ......in rainy Spring, TX.

-

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Subject: Web site search From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 08:50:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

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Howdy friends and neighbors. As I actually have no neighbors, I should rep= hrase that but it sounds right to me this morning. Some of you may remembe= r the ill-fated local "quilt walk" with which I was involved last year. Th= e little to-do wherein the walk was disrupted by the fact that the city cho= se that week to jackhammer the sidewalks and rent out the gazebo we were t= o utilize; we realized the historical hotel that was the headquarters for = the shindig hadn't had a name sign on it for nearly 60 years and people wer= e riding all around it in a desperate search for the building where they st= opped to ask directions. Oh - and a couple more little items - we were in = the midst of wildfires and all the major highways were closed down. To say= it was less than successful..........well......  SO, the powers that be - NOT ME (I am not dragging out another 100 quilts, = destroying my house inthe process, running around town hanging and displayi= ng and cleaning filth and spiders out of shop windows.........no no no no n= o.) However, I would like to give them some great ideas that they might ut= ilize. I know the outdoor quilt show/one day quilt show "a la Sisters" is= a hot item these days, and many of the shows have websites. I will be gra= teful for any websites you may know of that I can share with the show coord= inators. Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com

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Subject: "Myth and Methodology:Shelly Zegart Unpicks African American Quilt Scholarship" From: ZegrtQuiltaol.com Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 15:37:12 EST X-Message-Number: 10

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In the January-February issue of Selvedge (a British based international textile magazine) I have written a lengthy article discussing major exhibitions and publications since the 1970's that have ,in some way, contributed to the perpetuation of myths and stereotypes around African American quilt scholarship. Themes resonating throughout the article are the need to expose questionable evidence,a myopic view of African American quilts,poor quilt history,stereotypes,cliches, lapses in good scholarship and more.

Of course, the subject really needs book length space (and that is probably where I should go with it now that I have this start) to place into

context, for example, the work of Roland Freeman, Carolyn Mazloomi and others and how they fit (or don't) into the context of my larger argument. Alas, words were limited for this piece but it is a good beginning.

Below is a quote about the article from Dr. Bernard Herman, Head of the Art History Department at the University of Delaware , a professor of Art and Architectural History, contributor to the most recent Gee's Bend project, the Architecture of the Quilt and author of an upcoming book ,Quilt Spaces, UNC Press, based on interviews with 40 of the Gee's Bend quiltmakers

"Absolutely first rate article! They should have given you more space! Smart, candid, insightful, thorough--required reading (and it will be in my class two weeks from now)!!"

My thanks to Leigh Fellner for many conversations and contributions to the article.

I welcome your input and comments . Email me at _zegartquiltgmail.com_ (mailto:zegartquiltgmail.com)

Thanks Shelly Zegart

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Subject: Jacquard woven carpet and stuff From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2008 13:54:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

Xenia; I have always referred to these as Kidderminsters; Americanized to ingrain or scotch carpets. I'd love to know if that is a misunderstanding on my part. If anyone has a piece they would like to sell, I am in the market. Doesn't have to be a big piece, just a piece. I'm currently helping with a coverlet exhibit and the museum doesn't have an example. I don't have an example in my collection either. As far as I'm concerned they need it to "complete" their exhibit so I want to get them one. Because they were walked on, wearing was a problem much more so than the bed coverings and consequently many of them were just thrown away.

The Pikes Peak Weaver's Guild has been documenting the weave structures and designs of the coverlets at the Pioneers Museum and when this is finished and the exhibit up, that information will go on-line at their website. They followed the model of Clarita Anderson's unprecedented 17,000 coverlet database. It will be linked to the National Museum of the Coverlet in PA. I'm not a weaver but a researcher of weavers and it is our hope that this project will be the impetus for other groups to do the same.

Now, to your reference to Montgomery's _Indiana Coverlet Weavers and Their Coverlets_. Despite some of the out-of-date information, it is by far, in my opinion, the most interesting of the woven coverlet books.

She lays out pages, not just a paragraph, on several of the IN weavers and their stories are wonderful. I discovered Sarah LaTourette in her book and have taken her under my wing for a special study. That doesn't mean the other books aren't amazing works but the IN book started me on my coverlet collection journey - yes, they are primarily from IN. My prize is a Samuel Stinger who enjoys living with me because he gets petted every now and then. I know that's silly but he's kind of like a friend. It is primarily black and white with a few color plates, 2 pgs of which show the astounding dye work of the Sam's little group of weavers. What you can't see is the three-dimensional quality and tightness of his weaving. If anyone is interested in getting a copy (OOP), I know of 2 that are for sale. Contact me off-list and I'll give you e-dresses. (disclaimer: I don't get a cut)

Joseph Marie Jacquard did more than revolutionize the silk weaving industry in France in taking what once required weeks and months and reducing it to a few hours or a day. Napoleon pinned a medal on him, paid him a small amount and promptly nationalized his loom. His work, as is usually the case, was an improvement on many earlier attempts to mechanize figured silk weaving. He perfected the punched-card system: one card for each line of weaving that could be changed to create new patterns. That led to self-playing instruments and eventually the IBM card - so, essentially a simple program. His loom was the reader and together we call that the computer. This and all the others have written are very short explanations of what was one of the most prominent inventions of the early 19th century. My computers have all been affectionately named after him so I'm working on Joseph Marie the 8th. :)

Jan, who has a very bad case of textile disease and won't take the pill for it.

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Subject: Commemorative fabric From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 16:44:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

If you go to the Newsweek website and search for the March 3 issue you'll find pictures of Pres. Bush's recent trip to Africa including two which show people dressed in two different Bush fabrics. If anyone knows a source for these PLEASE let me know. Cinda a Yellow Dog Democrat but Catholic collector

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Subject: Re: "Myth and Methodology:Shelly Zegart Unpicks African American Quilt Scholarship" From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 15:58:55 -0600 X-Message-Number: 13

Congratulations and please do move forward with a book-length project.

I am a neophyte when it comes to this list and very intimidated by all the wisdom and scholarship here. Even your name intimidates me. :-).

That being said, as a white quilt-lover/student who has always been fascinated by African-American history (and at times riddled with angst and guilt over it), I have always wondered why it is that "African-American quilt" seems to mean "inferior workmanship/bright colors" to most people. Aren't the masterpieces of the south that were created by slave hands also "African American" --if not in design, at least in the context of workmanship? I believe we do our African-American "stitching sisters" a great disservice when we perpetuate what I believe is myth. The work of African-American textile artists today should speak loudly to this faulty assumption. The artists of the past names may be lost to time, but that does not mean that the lady of the plantation should receive all the credit for the masterpiece quilts from the south and the world at large equate poor workmanship with black hands.

My 2 cents.

Stephanie Whitson Higgins

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Subject: Re: Commemorative fabric From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 14:05:26 -0800 X-Message-Number: 14

I don't know about the Bush fabric, but I posted a small picture of fabric that has ALL the presidents (including George W.) on about.com at: http://forums.about.com/n/pfx/forum.aspx?msg=53729.4&nav=messages&webtag=ab-quilting#a4

I think you can visit the site as a guest.

Christine Thresh on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog

From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>

> Cinda a Yellow Dog Democrat but Catholic collector

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Subject: RE: "Myth and Methodology:Shelly Zegart Unpicks African American Quilt Scholarship" From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2008 19:00:22 -0600 X-Message-Number: 15

Is this article in the "Responsibility" issue? I can't see any dates. Best regards, Sharron ........ .....in Spring, TX where a cold front came through today!

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Subject: President Bush - Commemorative Fabric From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com> Date:

Hello -

I have a couple images of the President Bush commemorative fabric, which was showcased during visit to Tanzania in Feb 2008.

Visit www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com

Best,

Kyra E. Hicks author, "Black Threads: An African American Quilting Sourcebook"

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Subject: Antique quilt day From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net> Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2008 09:50:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Teddy mentioned the wildfire-plagued Quilt Walk in Lake City and it reminded me that a similar event is scheduled to take place on Sat. March 15 in Trenton, FL. This is the home of the Suwannee Valley Qult Shoppe. Trenton is about 30+ miles west of Gainesville and Ocala. The quilt shop is well-stocked and there is a nice lunch room there. I believe merchants will display vintage quilts, there will be bed-turning to show off other examples of vintage pieces and educate the public. 352-463-3842 is the shop number, and a flyer is available to download at http://www.suwanneeshops.com/ Hope you can attend. Nancy Roberts

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Subject: uggr From: Alan <alanalanrkelchner.com> Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2008 06:46:24 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Another bit of mis-information to be squelched. Ladies, have at it! http://www.charleston.net/news/2008/mar/04/ artist_unveils_design_mural32566/

Alan

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Subject: Shelley's article From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2008 12:41:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

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Hello all-I went straight to the website for Selvedge and ordered the issue of the magazine that Shelley Z's article appeared in. Be warned: the website is slow to load, rather arty, and does not have an index of article titles so you must dink around trying to find the right one. The back issues are not listed by the months, but rather by overall metaphysical terms, as to what's in the issue. Example: Shelley's article is in Responsibility. Not until the final window of the ordering process was I reassured that the process was safe (the little padlock icon) and the confirmation, just come into my email, says, *"We only do one mailing per month, therefore it could take up to six weeks to receive your issue. Best Wishes, Selvedge." *Oh dear, we're in Art Land- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com peppercory.blogspot.com quiltflapper.blogspot.com Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker

203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

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Subject: Selvedge Magazine From: "Karen Musgrave" <KarenMusgravesbcglobal.net> Date: 

I bought my copy at Borders.

Karen Musgrave 

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Subject: Selvedge with Zegart article should be at Borders From: ZegrtQuiltaol.com Date: Tue, 4 

They might have replaced the Jan. Feb 08 issues with Mar. April but it is worth a try to check with them. Shelly

Shelly Zegart zegrtquiltaol.com 502-897-7566 502-897-3819 _www.shellyquilts.com_ (http://www.shellyquilts.com/)

**************It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms, and advice on AOL Money & Finance. (http://money.aol.com/tax?NCID=aolprf00030000000001)

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Subject: Selvedge Magazine From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2008 20:26:53 +0000 X-Message-Number: 7

I've been a subscriber to Selvedge since I picked up the first issue

at a quilt show so I feel I should speak up for it. Its primary drive is visual. If you were to look at the guidelines for contributions you would see that an article is only as good as its photographs. In

UK magazine publishing it is unique, being interested in all facets of textiles and producing a visually invigorating magazine. Think Fibrearts on heavy quality paper. It is not part of the big magazine

industry, but a small independent exercise, run from a small office

and started up, much like QNM all those years ago, by one woman with a vision.

It may indeed be Art Land, but as such its a welcome world apart from

other UK offerings. I hope you enjoy everything about your issue when you finally get it, Pepper, not just Shelley's excellent article. You will find the content varied, thought provoking and a

visual treat. The magazine is only about three years old, and growing and changing all the time. I see from the website they are in fact working on an index, so they are on the learning curve <G>

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: President Bush - Commemorative Fabric From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2008 17:03:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Thanks Kyra, This is a fascinating topic. If anone finds a source for this fabric please share it. I know I'm not the only one who'd love to have it. Go to www.adireafricantextiles.com and see a collection called Images of Power: African Presidents on Printed Fabric. It's amazing. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Off-Topic Sampler and Litchfield Academy presentation in CT - FYI From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2008 17:41:20 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9

I would love to be in the audience for this lecture but I can't so I thought I'd let y'all know about it.

Jan

Women's History Month Lecture: Proof of Prosperity Wednesday, March 12, 2008 Time: 7:00 pm Location: Fairfield Museum and History Center 370 Beach Road, Fairfield, CT 06824

Learn about the legacy of Sarah Pierce and her infamous academy for girls in Litchfield. Marvel at the beautiful art and needlework created by girls attending Sarah Pierce's Litchfield Female Academy; a foundation for girls' education in early America. Ms. Templeton Brickley has pieced together their unwritten history through their artwork; idyllic scenes of life real and imagined. On exhibit at the Fairfield Museum is a rare mourning scene painted on silk by Sarah Turney, believed to have been created at the Litchfield Academy.

The presentation will be led by Lynne Templeton Brickley who received her Ed.D. in history of education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and who's dissertation was the basis of the 1993 exhibition on the academy at the Litchfield History Museum. Fee: Free for members; Non-Members: $5 Pre-registration suggested. For more information and to register, please contact infofairfieldhs.org or call 203-259-1598.

http://www.fairfieldhistoricalsociety.org/whats-happening.php

_______________________________________

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Subject: RE: uggr From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2008 10:18:29 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

I vented! These articles just wear me out! Thanks for the heads up, Alan.

Best regards, Sharron.......... ......in Spring, TX where it was 80 deg. yesterday and 46 deg. today...but it's sunny!

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Subject: RE: Selvedge Magazine From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2008 16:51:05 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Thank you for simplifying that! I'll go to Borders tomorrow! I tried to order, but unlike Pepper, I got to baffled to make it to the end! Best regards, Sharron............. ...in Spring, TX where it's a Chamber of Commerce day!

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Subject: A+ for Selvedge Magazine From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2008 22:12:07 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

I agree with everything Sally said about Selvedge- it is a fabulous = magazine to look through again and again. It isn't one you throw away. It's = different from Fiberarts, much higher quality of paper and photographs, more like stationary than a magazine, and I really think highly of Fiberarts, so p[lease don't take that from what I said. I wish America could put their name on magazines similar in quality and content as Selvedge and Quilt Mania. I buy mine at Barnes and Noble. Congrats Shelly!

Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD New Pathways into Quilt History www.antiquequiltdating.com www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com =A0

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Subject: cigarette smoke From: "Fawn Valentine" <fawnvalentineverizon.net> Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2008 22:19:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

A friend called to say she and her husband inherited several early 20th-century quilts made by his mother, a few of them apparently never laundered. However, the last person to have the quilts was a heavy smoker and the quilts are permeated with cigarette smoke. What can she do to remove the odor? Thank you for your advice. Fawn Valentine

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Subject: Re: cigarette smoke From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2008 07:58:48 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5

Xenia - Look! Over there! Is that the HINDENBURG?

(Fawn - throw them in the washing machine. Gentle cycle. Use Tide.)

Xenia - No, it's not the Hindenburg? Are you sure?

(Fawn - It's not the smell that troubles me, it is the yellow stuff that the smoke leaves behind.)

Xenia - Oh, I guess I was wrong, it's not the Hindenburg. Sorry about that.

Kris

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Subject: UGGR quilt From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2008 11:13:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

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The one photo with the plaid and small check appear to be cotton cheviot, a very coarse cousin to gingham which didn't appear until the latter 19thC, as best as I've been able to research. I have several quilt squares of cheviot; fabric is very similar to that in the photo.

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Subject: Re: UGGR quilt From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2008 11:57:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

You know, this stuff is really wearing me out. I have sent the following email to the seller "roadshowfinds". I'm not myself this morning as I was far too kind. I've bookmarked this sale and this seller. I don't know how much good it will do but he/she bears watching. Maybe a constant bombardment of emails would keep him/her on the straight and narrow with accurate information to describe his/her finds. I wish we had a better way of retaliation.

"I was just looking over your feedback results. It's obvious you are a long-time and very well respected purveyor of antique goods. It's unfortunate to see that you've either climbed on the inaccurate bandwagon of the UGRR myth or you're simply uninformed. I find the latter hard to believe in your line of business. Truth in advertising is always the best way. I hope your good reputation isn't sullied by the inaccurate wording of your Cherry Basket Quilt."

Thanks for bringing this to our attention, Margareta.

Best regards, Sharron .............. ...in Spring, TX where it's starting out cool but should be another sunny day in God's Country (don't you just hate Texans!!!).

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Subject: washing quilts From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2008 09:06:34 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 8

Actually - before my advice gets quoted TOO much - you really can't give blanket advice like that without actually seeing the quilt. A "19th century quilt" could easily be a crazy quilt or a wool-batted comforter.

So while I will admit to occasionally throwing things in the washing machine and hoping for the best, I have never done it with something I considered precious or fragile.

Someday I have to show y'all my measles quilt top. It did need to be washed and I was careful, but I didn't realize all of the dots in a particular print would wash away with the dirt. Took it out of the washer and the only thing that was holding it together was the seams.

Live and learn and learn and learn...

Kris

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Subject: For all you crazy quilt lovers- From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2008 12:34:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

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The latest on the Quilt Flap blog http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com just for you! Pepper

-- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com peppercory.blogspot.com quiltflapper.blogspot.com Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker

203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

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Subject: RE: washing quilts/cigarette smoke From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2008 10:00:16 -0800 X-Message-Number: 10

Good morning, QHLers - Kris sure got MY blood pressure up until I read her next posting. <g> Other "19th century quilts" I've seen professionally have turned out to be wool/cotton woven coverlets (all types) as well as those 20th C China-made quilts (somehow the care tag label got trimmed away..surprise, surprise). Most conservators, including myself, are happy to consult and go over the good, the bad and the ugly possibilities for individual beloved objects. I am a great fan of 'cooperative conservation' where I work with the owners to provide advice and supplies and the owners provide the labor - makes conservation work very affordable! <g> Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

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Subject: someone to teach quilting near Detroit? From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2008 13:00:46 -0800 X-Message-Number: 11

Hello all,

Julie Silber here. A perhaps unusual request:

I know a very special 13 year old girl in the Detroit area. She wants two things "more than anything" -- to have a piano teacher, and to LEARN TO MAKE QUILTS. (She can already sew...)

She can not afford to pay for either, and I want to help her. Anyone know a quilt maker (or piano teacher) in the Detroit area who would be willing to make a terrific young girl's dreams come true?

Thanks, Julie Silber (quiltcomplexhughes.net)

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Subject: RE: someone to teach quilting near Detroit? From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu> Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2008 15:39:29 -0600 X-Message-Number: 12

Thank you Julie, for facilitating a solution. If she were near me, I'd take it on.

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Subject: a request for images of Mariner's Compass quilts From: ZegrtQuiltaol.com Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2008 21:54:21 EST X-Message-Number: 13

I am in need of some images asap for an article about Mariner's Compass quilts that I am writing for a Japanese magazine. I am looking for a mix of both antique and contemporary quilts. Digital images size and resolution we need will be 20X20cm 350dpe at the maximum(sent to me on a CD only, not emailed) The magazine may also be able to use slides and transparancies if they are of good quality. I will reimburse for shipping costs.

All of you have such great resources and have been so kind and responsive to my requests for exhibition quilts, that I am hoping you will help me locate great examples of Mariner's Compass quilts for this article..

Many thanks in advance,

Shelly Zegart

Shelly Zegart zegrtquiltaol.com 502-897-7566 502-897-3819 _www.shellyquilts.com_ (http://www.shellyquilts.com/)