Subject: THE SOUTHERN QUILT CONFERENCE#2 (l o n g) From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2008 22:48:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1 My friend Lynn Gorges wrote me recently saying, I think it is odd that the only post I have seen directly about the Southern Quilt Conference was written by me and it was very short and not very descriptive.  The conference was too good to be ignored.... I told her I imagined folks were sprawled out on their fainting couches all over the country, recuperating. Too tired to address a computer screen. Thinking sweet thoughts.  But Lynn is right: it was too good to be ignored. The best thing I can ever say about such a gathering is that it left me with new understandings, new questions, and the enthusiasm to pursue the answers to those questions. This conference did that for me. It energized me. My guess is that it had that effect on others as well. A general report of the events will appear in the spring BLANKET STATEMENTS, now on the way to press. What I offer here, in response to Lynn remark, is a personal take on the conference----but not short. You might want to wait for BLANKET STATEMENTS.  Forty-five people attended this, the second meeting of the Southern Quilt Conference, held in Huntsville, Alabama, March 14-15 and chaired by Pat Kyser, who was assisted by Carla Rowley and Bets Ramsey. Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, North and South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia were represented from the Southern states. And folks from New England, the Mid-Atlantic area, Colorado, and the Pacific Coast brought their perspective and knowledge to the event.  Driving from Louisiana, across Mississippi and north through Alabama rich Black Belt on March 13th, I thought about this place we call the South. It is a vast and rich land. Everything=8Bflora, fauna, human life--- grows larger and more colorful here. In the low-lying lands of western Alabama that March day, the hardwood swamps and woods along the highway were still grey and leafless, standing on the edge of winter. Here and there a red swamp maple lighted up the gray, and lacy yellow jasmine dripped and looped through the limbs of bare white oaks, hickories, and sweetgums. In a week, the entire land would be spring green. That how it is in this southern country---no small gestures.  I had driven that road for my entire adult lifetime, knew it intimately. And yet, since I had driven it last, I had studied the history of the region and its settlement in the early 1800. I knew the names and conditions of the folks who had settled it. I had read letters written from double-pen log houses in Demopolis and Selma, where white columns would rise within the decade. I knew migration patterns and had tied them to quilts. This time, its past was personal, vivid with meaning.  To get to Huntsville, one must turn east at Tuscaloosa, skirting the rich old cotton town and home of the University of Alabama and passing the gleaming German Art Deco campus of the Mercedes plant. The black belt has absorbed yet another western migration. Turning north at Birmingham and skirting Limestone County, I thought of Talula Bottoms, whose grand-daughter Nancilu Burdick told her story. Here was a woman who had been saved by the beauty of quilting. I remembered how Talula had hated moving from her native Georgia to come to this country, where unfarmed land was cheap and available. Just like all those Virginia women who had come in the forties, leaving everything they knew behind because their husbands had been lured by the soil of the Black Belt and the wealth it augured. Today the unending cotton fields that had once made Huntsville and Decatur so prosperous are gone. Instead, the Redstone Missile Arsenal, NASA, looms large. NASA has helped erase half the architecture of the old town and then helped to build fine museums and libraries and public facilities. A southern story. Not simple. Like Southern history and the quilts that are part of it.  From start to finish, the weekend seemed charmed. Even tornados skipped right over North Alabama and went on to Atlanta. I had invited a quilting friend to join me, a woman who grew up quilting and who has a collection of family quilts that spans the 20th century. She is an advocate at a domestic abuse agency and is accustomed to lots of racket and goings-on. Yet even she was daunted by the sheer amount of talk and laughter. She asked, Do y=B9all always talk so much? I said pretty much we did. She said she believed she would spend an evening in the quiet of our room, resting up from all the talk and ideas. She thought she would do some peaceful writing.  As Sue Reich has noted earlier, we were joined by a number of our sisters from the World Of Outer Dark. They were pretty easy to spot. They were the ones who were early for every meeting, who could read their maps, and who were waggling dual cameras. The ones with calendars filled out through 2020. I am happy to report that Southern members seduced most, even well-behaved, thoughtful Anita Loscalzo. Some, like Laurie Stubbs, fell so early nobody had to work at the seduction. Lorie mother was a Nashville girl and Lorie herself seems to have a decided predisposition to Southernness. Actually, now that I reflect, Ms. Stubbs might have led some of us astray. Hard to tell.   Teddy Pruett was absent, owing to bidness in Flawrida, but her traveling buddies came. Saturday night, most members headed home, and so we found ourselves 13 at table, which in my book meant somebody had to leave or find a well-behaved dog to take the 14th seat. No one was willing to leave and no dog appeared. Hearing our talk, the waiter brought an extra chair (as if that would unhex us all) and then someone---maybe the delightful Katy Christopherson ---suggested we give it to Teddy spirit. So Teddy, though absent, saved the day. We called her up and told her what a good time we were having and she pretended not to care. We knew she did care, of course. And we toasted her in her forlornness.  Personally, I missed the Texans, who just might be the most Southern of us all, since their land was the last settled by the folks who trekked there from the rest of the South. Most folks seem not to get that about Texas for some reason I fail to understand. Most treat what they see as a Texas attitude as a purely Texas thing, springing fullblown from the size of the state and the riches it has produced. However, anyone who has read the humorists of the Old Southwest (Twain was in their vein) can spot South in those Big Tales from Texas---from way off. Anyhow, the Texans were not there, as they have been at all the earlier Southern meetings, and we missed them and all they bring to such gatherings.  The weekend began with food, of course. Pat Kyser had prepared a really fine evening soup-and-salad meal at her lovely home in an older section of the city. Pat had ended up having to assume responsibility for many things at a most difficult time, her sister final illness. Yet, her house sparkled with order. Nobody was out in HER yard picking up sticks---as they had been in mine last year. Had we been going to nominate one of our number to go up against those from the WOOD in orderliness, Pat would have been my choice. Her comfortable open rooms were filled with talk and laughter that night. Lots of talk. Pat art work was everywhere and captivating. She has used the crazy quilt format to make memory quilts of her family, sort of sumptuous genealogical textiles. Really beautiful, evidence of the deep need to give body to family and preserve a family meanings. Carla Rowley, her co-chair, assumed kitchen duties. Carla has been at every Southern gathering---the Deep South Quilt Study Group and last year Southern Conference.  I think what I remember most from that evening is seeing Hazel Carter for the first time since her heart surgery. I had always thought Hazel looked pretty good, frankly. But I was unprepared for the Renewed Hazel---absolutely glowing! A joy to behold. Hazel is what my favorite aunt calls frisky. I became her permanent admirer after a QHL discussion in which I had inquired after an out-of-print book I had tried long and unsuccessfully to lay hands on. Someone posted a warning about copyrights and others joined in that chorus, suggesting that copying such an item (though it could not be had otherwise) was an offence next to matricide. Then came the personal email from Hazel. It read, GAWD! I=B9m copying it for you. Expect it in a day or so. That when I became her fan. And I was happy to see her back in Full Friskiness.  And of course, there was Karen Alexander, who must have enough frequent-flyer miles to book a space flight to Pluto, if it was still a planet. And Merikay Waldvogel who never, ever changes---just stays the same: you sort of think she just picked an age she liked and was good at and decided to stay put. And Bets, whom we were honoring, though you would never have known it from her quiet demeanor and her jumping in to help the Huntsville folks out. And Lori East, probably the only one among us who has a young child at home. Sue Reich and Barb and their crew had integrated with the natives without problems. The last arrival for supper was Lynn Gorges, who had (this is true) driven from NC to MS, thence to Huntsville. Kind of a tour of the South. (She didn get lost: there was a reason for the detour)  Tired from long journeys, some went to bed at a reasonable hour Thursday evening. Some didn. This, I believe, was when Lorie Stubbs began to share malapropisms and generally prove herself useful. As I said, she fell early. Even with Barb Garrett present to keep folks in line, there was chatter exceedingly wonderful and long. Later, on Saturday night, at the end of our gathering, Barb herself would look across a table and announce, I=B9ve never seen you in jeans! Like I was the 8th wonder of the world. So I think even she was made a little woozy by the brink-of-springness in North Alabama.  So, that the outside part of the weekend. Nobody did anything really wretched or dissolute, though the ubiquitous Ms. Gorges, owner of palampores galore, was photographed derriere in air yanking up rootings of the hotel oakleaf hydrangeas. She had left one such hot stem in my room the night before. One of the bignews things in the plant world right now is the relative ease with which plant DNA can be sorted out. I told her that, but she seems unfazed. Brazen North Carolinian.  Everyone was ready for the presentations the first morning. The first day began with Dale Rhodes=B9 discussion of an 1881 signature quilt made in the Ohio Star pattern and signed by a wide variety of well-known people of the time, ranging from the writers Hawthorne, Whittier, Holmes, and Longfellow to Frederick Douglass and Charles Francis Adams to numerous Union generals and prominent politicians and wives like Julia Grant. Dale had purchased the piece in Boston. It had been made to raise money for the GAR relief fund. She described how she had discovered its twin, which was accompanied by a scrapbook. This historic quilt had prompted the creation of another signature quilt, this one made by Huntsville women to fund the restoration of historic local building. It had EVERYBODY from Tina Turner, she of the gorgeous gams, to Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter. My favorite block had the signatures of Dr. Seuss, Captain Kangaroo, Ronald McDonald, and a Wild Thing by Maurice Sendak. The Wild Thing couldn write, so it just drew a picture of itself.  Vista Mahan, of Rising Fawn, Georgia, a member of the original Southern Quilt Symposium, reprised her informative chapter on Georgia Cotton Mills in Georgia Quilts. She noted that by the year 1826 Georgia led the world in cotton production, and she traced the development of the manufacture of cotton fabrics in the state, relating it to models in Lowell, Massachusetts. Mahan showed the number of ways Southern quilts were impacted by the advent of textile mills in the South.  Frances Osborn Robb, a historian of photography, spoke on Quilts in Alabama Photographs. Robb explored the questions of what photographs meant, both to those in them and to succeeding generations. Tracing the history of photography back to the Daguerreotypes of 1830-1840 (the first Alabama Daguerreotype dates to three months after the process was invented), she showed photographs in which cotton figured prominently (e.g., an interesting photograph of a cotton porch, a part of the porch in venacular architecture which was put to use in fall and winter as a place to store cotton for home use). Robb also pointed out how quilts were used to indicate status and identity. One of the more interesting photographs was a 1910 Franklin County photo which showed an African-American mother and son posed against a quilt that might easily have been included in the more recent Gee Bend quilts. (So much for those who dismiss out of hand the possibility of cultural links!) She likened many early photographs to the paintings of Hans Holbein and the Dutch genre painters, in which the objects a family chose to include revealed both the character and aspirations of the family. A number of the photographs discussed were from the well-known WPA and Farm Relief Board collections, made during the Great Depression. Robb noted the need to consider the photographer mission in interpreting and evaluating these photographs, noting that in the early 1930s photographers were assigned to show signs of poverty and ruin, in order to support President Roosevelt political efforts. Then, as the nation grew close to war, others were sent out to photograph scenes that would support the picture of the strong family and the inventiveness and self-sufficiency of farm families. On the way back to Louisiana, I stopped in Eutaw, which has some of the finest second empire furniture I've seen, and there was an early photograph (?) of a local family. They stood well-dressed, in an orderly row on their (unpainted) front porch. In front of them was what had to be a new empire side table---polished to high heaven and its glass knobs reflecting light. I've never seen furniture used in that way before.  The group visited the Huntsville Museum of Art, where Curator Deborah Taylor discussed an exceptional crazy quilt on display there, the Hobbes Crazy Quilt, and its journey from Alabama to Texas and then back home again, thanks to the generosity of a family member who provided for its conservation and display in her will. Her slide presentation added yet more depth to our knowledge of the culture the Tennessee Valley area of Alabama and reminded me why it is good for this conference to move about in the South.  Before enjoying a barbecue dinner, members of the conference were invited to a wine party at the home of Dale Rhodes. Northeasterners were particularly interested to drive up to the Rhodes home and discover it was a replica of Hawthorne House of Seven Gables. All were comforted by the wine and cheese straws and the hospitality.  Honoree Bets Ramsey discussion of the Southern Quilt Symposium opened the second day meetings. The Symposium, long associated with the Hunter Museum in Chattanooga, was seminal, and those of us who because of family responsibilities or jobs had been unable to attend the annual gatherings were perhaps the most eager members of the audience. I suspect most of the scholarship about southern quilts now in print in some way grew out of the Symposium. It is impossible to overestimate its importance. Bets noted the Symposium was born in an era when the Smithsonian Museum was still sending quilts to dry cleaners. The displays of quilts, especially of nineteenth-century quilts, stimulated artists in the South as they would stimulate artists across the nation. Herself an artist, Bets observed that at these meetings, There was an energy to be caught. Sally Garoutte, Michael James, Hazel Carter, Nancilu Burdick=AD=ADit seems that everybody in the new quilt study world took part in these yearly gatherings. The joy of the experiences was clear as Bets recalled Laurel Horton auctioning off rags, the elegant Ester Burnside dressed in a quilted garment and doing a strip tease, the minister wife who had never before attended a non-ministerial conference. (Bless her heart) Bets Ramsey is a joy and opened up lots of doors to joy for others.  Two presentations dovetailed to create a rich whole =AD Lynn Gorges=B9 discussion of Palampores in the South and Merikay Waldvogel discussion of chintz appliqu=E9 in the region. The combined effect of Merikay and Lynn presentations was nothing short of stunning. Just to be able to see all that Lynn had to show (and she kept reminding me that she didn get to show everything she=B9d brought!), to have enough representatives to provide a broad context for these pieces, to learn how the appliqu=E9d pieces were made, to see surviving chintz units that were marketed, and to see fraternal twin appliqu=E9d chintz quilts =AD what a privilege. Merikay did a fine job of organizing the process by which the chintz wonders were made, classifying the major elements from which they were made, separating British from American examples, and tracing extant examples in the South. Her own appliqu=E9d chintz quilt was exceptional. The two presentations were visual feasts. They also made clear that palampores and pieced and appliqu=E9d chintz quilts were not restricted to the coastal cities of the South like Charleston and Savannah or Tidewater Virginia. For instance, a number came out of the historically important region of Mecklenberg County, NC (Charlotte), a home of rising Scots-Irish families like the Polks, Jacksons, and Overtons. In fact, the earliest U.S. dated example (1832) was found in Charlotte. This was simply one of those confluences that comes along maybe once and you=B9re glad to have been there to see it.  The Show and Tell should have had its own quarter-day, I think. We saw many interesting quilts that raised lots of questions=8Bat least for me. Lynn G. had lots more to show and even more to tell, including her NC Quilts. At long last I got to meet Kathy Sullivan and bring her well-trained eyes to bear on a set of quilts featuring small-blocks or circles with tiny pieced stars framed in those classic NC colors---teal/oxblood/cheddar. Their colors place them in the NC tradition, but their patterns are not the large appliqu=E9s generally seen in NC and TX. Though some derived from families with NC origins, the quilts themselves came from Ky and just across the river, in southern Ohio and Indiana. I=B9ve always thought they were moving to Southern Illinois and that they had been in Kentucky a while, perhaps had been made there. Kathy mulled the matter overnight and reported she thought they probably originated in Ky and crossed the Ohio. Lorie Stubbs showed a quilt that had as its center a chintz appliqu=E9 identical to one shown by Lynn and Merikay. It that kind of give-and-take that makes this part of a conference so important. In fact, I don think we saw an ordinary quilt. I leave it to others to note their favorites at Show and Tell, but it was a particularly good session, held after supper on Friday. Some teasers.  I think everyone present was revitalized by this gathering. I keep saying that there remains so very much to be studied in the quilts of this region, and the conference reminded me there is much more than even I had estimated. It was a good weekend.  Now, Lynn, I=B9ve posted my say. I hope others who were in attendance will add their comments and questions.  I wish all of you could see my azaleas! This is the best time to be in Louisiana.  Gaye Ingram     ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: March 29, 2008 From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2008 23:38:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2 I plan to review "Childhood Treasures: Doll Quilts" as soon as I can get a hold of the book since I have a special section on children's quilts with some book reviews at http://www.womenfolk.com/baby_quilts/quilt-books.htm I haven't found many books on the topic. If anyone knows of more books please let me know. I'm even interested in those that are out of print. Judy Breneman ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: qhl digest: March 29, 2008 From: Connie Chunn <conniesminishotmail.com> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 07:13:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3 --_8c65aada-e87f-483a-8b45-7708aa1eafce_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Barb, Thanks for posting the pictures from the Lancaster quilt show. It almost felt as if I had been there, especially when I saw two pictures of my miniature quilt "Spiderweb Shirts"! Connie Chunn in rainy St. Louis > I've made a photo web album of the Poole's Forge quilts and several from the > Heritage Quilt Show. Here is the link for anyone interested: > http://picasaweb.google.com/barb.vedder/LancasterShow2008?authkey=3DFptDeXBaFCQ  > Barb Vedder > New Jersey _________________________________________________________________ In a rush? Get real-time answers with Windows Live Messenger. http://www.windowslive.com/messenger/overview.html?ocid=3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_Refresh_realtime_042008--_8c65aada-e87f-483a-8b45-7708aa1eafce_-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Treasures of Childhood From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2008 17:59:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4 I can't say what the story is about Amazon and this new book, but I was at a grand opening event at the new International Quilt Study Center and Museum just last night and I was told by Mary Ghormley, who co-authored the book with Marikay and whose quilts are featured in the book, that the gift shop at the IQSC just received a shipment this week and she had a chance to actually see the book on the shelf. FYI, I have it on back order with Amazon and I haven't gotten a message yet regarding its status. I'm going to check on my order right now. Thanks for the update. Hope my information helps. Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treasures of Childhood Book From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 08:58:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5 Hi Barb. I just wanted to thank you for taking the time to create and share your photo web album. It was wonderful and particularly special to folks like me that just don't have the travelling funds to make it to so many of these fabulous shows. Thanks again. Best regards, Sharron................. ........in dreary Spring, TX where the temperature is right but it wants to rain.

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Subject: Re: THE SOUTHERN QUILT CONFERENCE#2 (l o n g) From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 10:34:15 EDT X-Message-Number: 6 -------------------------------1206887655 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Dear Gaye, Thank you for sharing your take on the Southern Quilt Conference. This Texan wanted to be there, but had another obligation. Your description of the presentations and quilts makes me wish I could have been in two places at once. Sigh.....Maybe in two years when the conference is held again. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth **************Create a Home Theater Like the Pros. Watch the video on AOL Home. (http://home.aol.com/diy/home-improvement-eric-stromer?video=15&ncid=aolhom00030000000001) -------------------------------1206887655-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: TSA Symposium, Honolulu From: Loretta Woodard <Lwoodardhawaii.edu> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 07:59:43 -1000 X-Message-Number: 7 --Apple-Mail-1-959517046 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed; delsp=yes Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit For those who are interested: Registration Opens for International Textile Symposium Exhibitions, Marketplace, Symposium--ALL Open to Public Honolulu, HI. Public registration opens April 1, 2008 for the 11th Textile Society of America (TSA) Biennial Symposium set for September 24 through 27, 2008 at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel. Textiles as Cultural Expressions is the theme for the major international arts event being coordinated by Tom Klobe, Director Emeritus of the University of Hawaii Art Gallery; and Reiko Brandon, renowned fiber artist and former Curator of Textiles at the Honolulu Academy of Arts. The conference is open to the public with prior registration. You need not be a member of TSA to attend the symposium. Complete program and registration information is currently available online at www.textilesociety.org <http://www.textilesociety.org> . Even if you're not interested in attending the symposium, this will be a rare opportunity to see textile art of all kinds on display at local galleries and museums throughout Honolulu. They've managed to pull in an amazing number of participants exhibiting everything from Mughal carpets, Asian and Indonesian textiles, to contemporary fiber arts, traditional Hawaiian quilts, and Hawaiian tapa, and weaving, etc. --Apple-Mail-1-959517046-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: check out the hilarious eBay description! From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 10:58:11 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8 For a hearty chuckle, check out the hilarious last line of this eBay description: http://cgi.ebay.com/antique-1880s-blocks-hexagonal_W0QQitemZ250230982834QQih Z015QQcategoryZ14279QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem Or go to eBay.com, click on SEARCH, and paste in #250230982834 That's history! :) Julie Silber ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: check out the hilarious eBay description! From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 11:40:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9 And I am sure they have the proper documentation! GGGGGGGGGGGGG Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen  ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Poole Forge and Heritage quilt shows From: <parsnips1verizon.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 14:28:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10 Barb, Can you tell us anything about the piece with the "Great Wave at Kanazawa" print? Thanks, Pat Roth, in sunny S. NJ, where spring is bustin' out all over ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: check out the hilarious eBay description! From: <charter.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 12:14:55 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11 *DIES* This is comedy gold! Lisa Evans ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: check out the hilarious eBay description! From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 12:55:55 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 12 Don't be silly, she is talking about her NEIGHBOR, Ben. Y'all thought she was talking about the one born in 1706, right? Seriously, though, the Ben Franklin born in 1706 died in 1790, and did travel to Europe. Is it possible he brought home something that could be called a quilt? I know I am stretching here, but I am trying to give the seller the benefit of the doubt. Kris ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: check out the hilarious eBay description! From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 15:10:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13 This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------=_NextPart_000_0015_01C89278.2E1925F0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Good grief! -----Original Message----- From: Kay Sorensen [mailto:kaykaysorensen.com] Sent: Sunday, March 30, 2008 1:40 PM To: Quilt History List

Subject: [qhl] RE: check out the hilarious eBay description! And I am sure they have the proper documentation! GGGGGGGGGGGGG Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen --

 

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Subject: RE: Treasures of Childhood From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 16:39:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14 The International Quilt Study Center had a supply, as one might expect, at the grand opening of the new IQSC building this weekend. Xenia ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: check out the hilarious eBay description! From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 14:07:23 -0700 X-Message-Number: 15 And if I am ever being tried by a jury for anything, I would hope you are the jury foreman Kris! Kay Sorensen

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Subject: RE: check out the hilarious eBay description From: "MARIE SARCHIAPONE" <mariesarchiaponeverizon.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 17:17:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 16 This melds with Lincoln Not Exactly. Picture this person as a volunteer at museum. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: check out the hilarious eBay description! From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 18:51:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 17 Oh, Ben Franklin certainly could have had one or more quilts. He might even have had one using hexagonal patchwork and/or paper piecing. Is anyone aware of any references to Franklin, his son William Temple Franklin, or his wife Deborah owning/making a quilt? The younger Franklin was a Royalist and emigrated to England during the Revolution, so it's quite possible that he, at least, owned a fashionable new bedcovering worked in hexagons.... Lisa Evans ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: check out the hilarious eBay description From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 19:09:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 18 Actually, this is just the odd kind of comment that you might have heard in a living museum - I wonder if someone made that comment to her somewhere along the line and she is just repeating it? When you break it down, it's possible that it is true. Ben Franklin *could* have brought home a Mosaic quilt in which one of the hexagons was pieced. Improbable but remotely possible. I would like to know her source. My gut reaction is the she is remembering a comment made about a quilt belonging to someone else. Kris --- MARIE SARCHIAPONE <mariesarchiaponeverizon.net> wrote: > > This melds with Lincoln Not Exactly. > > Picture this person as a volunteer at museum. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: check out the hilarious eBay description From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 22:18:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 19 Or she is like my husband who when I catch him exagerating the truth, just grins and says, "Well, it makes a good story." Shari in NC ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ben and the hexagon blocks From: Gloria hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2008 19:57:21 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1 This eBay seller is from Soldotna, Alaska. Not too many fans of older quilts or vintage fabrics up here, although there are a few of us. Even with those who like the older quilts, we still have lots of stories of great-great-great grandma who made that double wedding ring in the 1880's and owned a dress from every one of those fabrics! No living museums either, so maybe she heard something long ago in the lower 48. I've found people are pretty set in their regional descriptions/names of fabrics, blocks and quilts. I'm just looking for the mid 1800 fabrics she thinks she sees in her other listings as well. Gloria Hanrahan ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: dumb question From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 05:55:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2 This is a multipart message in MIME format. ------=_NextPart_000_0017_01C892F3.C66A1B90 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Re: the thread about the "Ben Franklin" hexagon quilt. I followed the link to eBay to see what the hubbub was about and just as I hit the keyboard had this thought: what if my "hitting" on this link *encourages* this person? Or reinforces her belief (that her quilt is special)? My dumb question is, do views (not bids or searches) of an eBay link count, does the seller know how many people "view," and have I inadvertently committed positive reinforcement? Andi in Keota, Iowa ------=_NextPart_000_0017_01C892F3.C66A1B90-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: IQSG grand opening - long From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 07:36:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3 --Apple-Mail-2-1022911120 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed As the Lincoln (Nebraska) papers said, the wait is over! The new International Quilt Study Center building, called "Quilt House," is open to the public, and a grand building it is, too! Prior to the pubic grand opening on Sunday, a few hundred of us were invited for various celebratory events on Friday and Saturday. The building, first of all, is not a museum, which may fly in the face of some expectations. it is instead part classroom, part research center, part gallery, part conservation and storage facility, and all drama in its clean lines, soaring spaces, and environmentally responsible (Silver-level certification) construction. The Sara and Byron Dillow Conservation Lab, a state-of-the-art facility adjacent to the huge storage space with its compact rolling shelving, brings poignantly to mind the recent and untimely death of Sara, whose absence from the grand opening was marked by her many friends. Some of us were treated to a viewing of several of her chintz quilts in the lab that bears her name. There are triple galleries with flexible exhibit surfaces and subdued (but not irritatingly so) lighting, there is a "Virtual Quilt Gallery" where the holdings may be called to monitors and other, interactive electronic resources link the public and the world of quilt history and research. On the third floor is the Mary Ghormley reading room, housing Mary's library and adjacent to a space displaying some of Mary's recently donated doll quilts and doll beds. Merikay Waldvogel's hot-off-the-press Childhood Treasures, Doll Quilts By and For Children, featuring quilts from Mary's collection, was available in the gift shop. The building itself is a marvel of brick, glass, and silvered surfaces, a perfect hard-edged foil for the softer focal point of quilts. Entering the building's foyer, visitors are directed to a sweeping curve of shallow steps that lead to an immense reception hall, shaped like an ellipsis, where about 400 gathered on Friday morning to hear welcoming remarks by the chancellor and president of the University of Nebraska (neither of whom could overcome the urge to use words like "stitched" and "pins and needles" humorously in their remarks). The dean of the College of Education and Human Sciences, the mayor of Lincoln, the senior architect of the project, and the CEO of the University of Nebraska Foundation all added comments, as did Pat Crews (IQSC Director), Michael James (Chair of the Department of Textiles, Clothing & Design), and finally Robert and Ardis James, whose vision, drive, and support are directly responsible for the building and its mission. The assemblage then removed to outside, where Ardis ceremonially christened the building with a bottle of champagne; Ardis may slight, but she gave the building a fine send-off! An evening reception for donors, faculty and fellows, present and former international advisory board members, family, and other special guests on Friday evening gave those assembled an opportunity to see the inaugural quilt exhibit, called "Quilts in Common." The first of the three gallery spaces was given over to a stunning display of the works of Nancy Crow, who would give a public keynote lecture on Sunday. The second and third galleries showcased combinations of contemporary, international, and American historic quilts, linking some startling common aspects in each grouping. The exhibit was led by the extraordinary "Reconciliation Quilt," made by Lucinda Ward Honstain of Brooklyn (NY) in the aftermath of the American Civil War, and showing in pictorial vignettes the healing that was needed on the local and national stage; while much of the symbolism may be obscured by time and the subtleties of Honstain's personal experiences, the images on the quilt still draw the viewer to speculate and interpret. Two mid-19th century album appliques shared interestingly similar blocks, and one had an intricate border of appliqued feather vine in red, remarkably idiosyncratic until compared to the third quilt in the grouping, which had as its only design the same border, worked by a clearly more experienced hand. A clear connection among the makers is still being researched. Three quilts exhibited folded and cut fabric designs: a Pennsylvania Amish scherenschnitte, a Hawaiian quilt, and a Ralli quilt from Pakistan, and there were other groupings demonstrating the universality of working in cloth. The exhibit catalog is in itself remarkable; from one front cover inward one can look at the examples in galleries II and III; flip it over and read from the "other front cover" and one is treated to images of Nancy Crow's work and an essay by Michael James (contact the Center for copies, I think). Sunday was the public opening, with the lecture by Nancy Crow; other obligations took me home before that event, so I will leave it to others to give their impressions of that day, and of their experiences there. The new facility is not to be missed; it is a jewel in the crown of the University of Nebraska, and an important focus for the future of quilt scholarship. Xenia --Apple-Mail-2-1022911120-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: southern quilt conference From: palamporeaol.com Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 08:31:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4 ----------MB_8CA61423E7A91A5_F94_597E_webmail-de03.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Gaye, well done. And thanks! One correction.....Lori Stubbs had a quilt "related" very closely?to Merikay's quilt, but not to mine. At show and tell Lori brought out a broderie perse with a center medallion and a chintz border. The center was identical to that of the quilt Merikay was going to speak on the following day. How exciting! Merikay's presentation was on cut out chintz of the early 1800's. She showed many examples of its use in various forms,?and here at the conference she found another example.?What an educational presentation!? ?You can reference this type of quilt?in the NC quilt documentation book ---Chintz Applique Quilts by Ellen Fickling Eanes pages 39-62. They are also found in the Charleston Museum Chintz book ---- Fading Glories. Am I correct on the title? It is at my studio and I am at home. If my message is still full of ?????, please excuse my computer. It looks "normal" when I write and then the recipient gets the question marks in odd and inappropriate places. Only does this on my home computer. Vista's report on the mills of Georgia was most exciting since I have done preliminary research on textile mills in NC and their influence on regional quilting. I know that Marcia Kaylakie (We missed you!) has done some?research on?Texas produced plaids. Pepper Cory?owns a couple of quilts made from the plaid shirt factories in the Carteret County area. So I think we will see more and more relationship between the mills of the South and the quilts of the South. In the 1890's there was a Plaid Assoc. in NC of mill owners.(See Erma Kirkpatrick's article in Uncoverings in 1989.)?We might have to create a Southern Plaid Quilt Association or Southern Produced Textile Quilt Association. We would also add Jenna and her Colonade (Is that right?) home woven textile quilts she did a presentation on in Ruston in 2007. Way too pretty to leave out! We are still trying to figure out which mill was responsible for the teal/oxblood/cheddar orange textiles outbreak and subsequent raging popularity. Has anyone seen clothing done in these colors? It couldn't have been a color palette just for quilts. For those of you who live near Burlington, NC. This Thurs. is Uncle Ely's Quilt Day. It is an all day quilt event. I can't go. If you go, drop by?Glencoe Mill Village?near there. It is really?nice. I haven't been in the store, but they do have some textiles on exhibit --- I hear. ?http://www.presnc.org/buyproperty/central/Glencoe_Mill_Village/glencoemillvillage.html I have driven 4,000 miles in the past 3 weeks. I must stay home and get some things done in my studio. Janice Pope, if you go, please report to us on it. Barb Garrett and I bonded that weekend on the pronunciation of the word ---- LANCASTER. My maiden name is Lancaster and she lives in the Lancaster, PA area. It is pronounced with a soft AN, not a hard AN in PA and in England. Just thought I would add that as another educational factor of the weekend. And if you are in Beaufort, NC it is "Beau"fort as in boyfriend. If you are in Beaufort, SC it is "Beau"fort as in beauty. Off and running. Lynn Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio The Creative Caregiver New Bern, NC palamporeaol.com ----------MB_8CA61423E7A91A5_F94_597E_webmail-de03.sysops.aol.com-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: mill history From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 09:29:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5 This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------040509070606030205090202 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit For those researching mills of their state, don't overlook a state's textile association. For example, while researching for my vintage fabric book, I had contacted the Georgia Textile Manufacturer's Assn for some mill information. They kindly sent me a courtesy copy of For One Glorious Purpose by Jan Pogue which traces the history of mills in Georgia. A fascinating read and loaded with photos. Just a thought though I'm sure you astute researchers have already followed through with that aspect of research. palamporeaol.com wrote: Vista's report on the mills of Georgia was most exciting since I have done preliminary research on textile mills in NC and their influence on regional quilting. I know that Marcia Kaylakie (We missed you!) has done some?research on?Texas produced plaids. Pepper Cory?owns a couple of quilts made from the plaid shirt factories in the Carteret County area. So I think we will see more and more relationship between the mills of the South and the quilts of the South. > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > > --------------040509070606030205090202-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: dumb question From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 10:20:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6 --=====================_22628171==.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed Sellers can see the number of views if they use a counter for that purpose . . . otherwise, not. The number of watchers is a better prediction of interest in an item, and the seller can see that. - Judy At 06:55 AM 3/31/2008, you wrote: >My dumb question is, do >views (not bids or searches) of an eBay link count, does the seller know how >many people "view," and have I inadvertently committed positive >reinforcement? --=====================_22628171==.ALT-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: SQC omission From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 10:53:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7 In my report on SQC, I omitted a paragraph on Laurel Horton's presentation. In cutting and pasting and trying to combine the Waldvogel-Gorges' presentations, I lost a slightly more detailed paragraph than the one below. I regret the omission. That same Laurel Horton spoke not on rags, but on a group of Carolina whitework quilts. Laurel study of these is in early stages, but she provided a context and introduction to a type of quilt highly regarded in parts of the South and probably more prevalent than current scholarship suggests. She pointed out the designs used, and Barb Garrett noted that in parts of PA there were women whose specialty was marking whole-cloth quilts. As the study progresses, it will be interesting to learn more about the makers, the occasional possibilities of white-work quilts, and the geographical locations and possible similarities. Gaye ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Poole Forge From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 12:37:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8 Hi Susan - I'm just home from taking down the Poole Forge exhibit -- thank you for making the drive to see it while in PA. I saw your nice note to QHL and wanted to thank you for that also. It's a great group of people working to preserve the mansion, and I'm thrilled they invited me to help with a quilt show. I'm hoping they decide to do another. Hope you have a good spring. Barb ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Poole Forge --oops From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 12:43:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9 Oops -- Sorry about that last post -- it was to go to Susan privately. Mark it up to being brain dead and very tired -- and sick -- and I just clicked reply -- not thinking she had written to the list and I had to open a separate mote to her. But...... while I'm writing to you, I want to thank all of you who came to the Poole Forge exhibit. While I was unable to be there during the show (I work local staff at the Lancaster Quilt Show), the other ladies on the committee kept commenting today about "all the ladies who came from so far away". They think I have friends in every state, and I told them I've never checked, but I probably do <grin>. Barb in rainy southeastern PA Very tired, with a cold ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Poole Forge --oops From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 13:05:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10 Barb, What a wonderful job you did in Lancaster. We were so lucky to have you as a tour guide as well as a speaker. What a wealth of information you are and so generous with your time and knowledge. Poole Forge was such a delight and after hearing your lecture we knew exactly what we were looking at. I think that will stay with me forever. Thanks once again for your work in Lancaster. It was a delight to meet you and have a face to a name on this list. Shari Spires ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: IQSG grand opening - long From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 15:05:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11 I live in Lincoln and have been a volunteer in the past and it has been very very difficult for me to have to forego this happy time but I was unable to attend any of the opening celebrations and had to forego the "formal" training as well. I will mourn that for a while. Thanks so much, Ms. Cord, for sharing this detailed description. At www.lincolnjournalstar.com there are a few articles if you search for International Quilt Study Center and you can see some of the exhibit in photographs and listen to a short video about the center. It was the best I could do. . . but not good enough! Stephanie Higgins ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: dumb question From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 05:08:04 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 12 --0-871186870-1206965284=:57038 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Yes the seller knows how many people view their item but wouldn't it make her wonder why so many people looked but didn't bid. And you could always ask her a question. Or in fact tell her what she really has and educate her. Andi Reynolds <andi0613iowatelecom.net> wrote: Re: the thread about the "Ben Franklin" hexagon quilt. I followed the link to eBay to see what the hubbub was about and just as I hit the keyboard had this thought: what if my "hitting" on this link *encourages* this person? Or reinforces her belief (that her quilt is special)? My dumb question is, do views (not bids or searches) of an eBay link count, does the seller know how many people "view," and have I inadvertently committed positive reinforcement? Andi in Keota, Iowa

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Subject: Re: Poole Forge and Heritage quilt shows From: "Barb Vedder" <barb.veddergmail.com> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 17:04:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13 ------=_Part_7865_3904809.1206997476301 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Disposition: inline Hi Pat and all- I'm so sorry. I can't tell you anything more about it, except that it was amazing. I wish I had photographed the placard that hung next to it. To tell you the truth, the placards said nothing except the title and makers. We found the program book to be confusing and also lacking in any real info about many of the quilts. I know that parts of it were appliqu=E9d and I don't know if there was some inking. We could not get close to it and it was a smaller, very detailed piece. It was so well done, it looked like a printed panel, which I'm sure it wasn't. I looked through the program, but can't find a title that would match the quilt. It may have been part of a special exhibit, it was in that area, so the artistic titles had little to do with the subject. You can double click the photo at the web album site, and then click the magnifying icon and get a closer look. Barb V ------=_Part_7865_3904809.1206997476301-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt history in school lit program From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 14:24:59 -0700 X-Message-Number: 14 Hi All, I am thrilled for Judy Breneman, of America's Quilting History and Patches of the Past website and wanted to share the news with the greater quilt history community. Recently Judy was honored with a request from a major educational book publisher, Houghton Mifflin Company, to include one of her website articles in their 2008 supplement to their learning program for the 10th grade. The first edition is 500,000 copies, audio and print, for worldwide distribution. The article they chose is "African-American Quilting: A Long Rich Heritage," at http://www.womenfolk.com/quilting_history/afam.htm. They edited it down a bit. There is no discussion of the UGRR. For more details on Judy's experience- http://quiltersspirit.blogspot.com/ Kim Kimberly Wulfert, PhD New Pathways into Quilt History www.antiquequiltdating.com www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com =A0 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Counterpanes From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 19:24:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15 Would someone help me understand what a counterpane is? Everytime I think I understand another quilt comes along that ruins my definition. I thought a counterpane was a quilt top with backing but no batting or quilting. Now I see that's not right. Then I thought it was another name for a medallion center surrounded by more than one border. That's not right. So could someone please give me an explanation. Thank you. Best regards, Sharron........... ....in Spring, TX where it's 77 deg. and raining. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Quilt history in school lit program From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 18:28:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 16 What great news. Thanks, Judy, for your efforts. Maybe there's hope for the next generation of quilters. Best regards, Sharron............. ......in WET Spring, TX. -----Original Message----- From: Kimberly Wulfert, PhD [mailto:quiltdatingjetlink.net] Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 4:25 PM To: Quilt History List

Subject: [qhl] Quilt history in school lit program Hi All, I am thrilled for Judy Breneman, of America's Quilting History and Patches of the Past website and wanted to share the news with the greater quilt history community. Recently Judy was honored with a request from a major educational book publisher, Houghton Mifflin Company, to include one of her website articles in their 2008 supplement to their learning program for the 10th grade. The first edition is 500,000 copies, audio and print, for worldwide distribution. The article they chose is "African-American Quilting: A Long Rich Heritage," at http://www.womenfolk.com/quilting_history/afam.htm. They edited it down a bit. There is no discussion of the UGRR. For more details on Judy's experience- http://quiltersspirit.blogspot.com/ Kim Kimberly Wulfert, PhD New Pathways into Quilt History www.antiquequiltdating.com www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: not a dumb question From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 21:25:30 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1 Julie Silber Hi Andi, We eBay sellers CAN see how many people come to look at our listings. But I don't imagine the number of "hits" encourages or discourages many sellers. I think it is usually the photo that entices people to open a listing -- any information (or erroneous information) is not visible until you "get in." Also, remember that you can contact the seller with any comments or questions. A polite communication might be very useful and educational for the seller -- I know I always appreciate hearing from those watching our auctions. I have learned a lot that way. Julie Silber FROM ANDI: Re: the thread about the "Ben Franklin" hexagon quilt. I followed the link to eBay to see what the hubbub was about and just as I hit the keyboard had this thought: what if my "hitting" on this link *encourages* this person? Or reinforces her belief (that her quilt is special)? My dumb question is, do views (not bids or searches) of an eBay link count, does the seller know how many people "view," and have I inadvertently committed positive reinforcement?----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: dumb question thanks From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net> Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2008 05:07:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1 This is a multipart message in MIME format. ------=_NextPart_000_001E_01C8947F.7B69D530 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Thanks for all who enlightened me about eBay hits and views. Just when I think I'm in the 21st century I start wondering again. Andi in Keota, Iowa ------=_NextPart_000_001E_01C8947F.7B69D530-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: dumb question thanks From: velialivehotmail.com Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2008 09:32:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2 Another dumb question ? More on the counterpanes ! Someone clue us in on the 17century and todays pieces. The quilt world insists on calling a Cathedral window, crazy, bedspread etc a quilt. Some one who designs a quiltop a QUILTER. We, in the quilting world have to set the outsiders straight and speak QUILT language. It really bugs me when the quilt is being shown and the person takes credit for the real quilter. When do we become a quilter ? QUILTER : some one who quilts the sandwich ! duh? Am I alone here? _________________________________________________________________ Get in touch in an instant. Get Windows Live Messenger now. http://www.windowslive.com/messenger/overview.html?ocid=3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_Refresh_getintouch_042008----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Franklin discussion From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2008 07:24:11 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3 Sorry for the delay in joining this discussion; I was away from my computer. In my last month at the NEQM in 2007, 2 cousins, direct descendants of Ben Franklin, brought a large central portion and other fragments of an unfinished mosaic quilt top in rough condition that their great-aunt had applied to some muslin years before for me to see. According to their great-aunt, the mosaics were made by Sarah (Sally) Franklin Bache (1743-1808), Ben Franklin's daughter. The fabrics were true to the late 18th century, so the story seemed to be true. The eBay quilt story certainly doesn't! The cousins were just curious to have someone look at the top and were deciding what to do with it in the future. It will go to a museum eventually; not sure where. Anita Anita B. Loscalzo 16 Ledgewood Drive Dover, MA 02030-1812 -------- email: aloscalzyahoo.com telephone: 508-785-1407 FAX: 508-785-1429 ____________________________________________________________________________________ You rock. That's why Blockbuster's offering you one month of Blockbuster Total Access, No Cost. http://tc.deals.yahoo.com/tc/blockbuster/text5.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Franklin discussion From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2008 09:00:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4 I would be a little suspicious if they claimed to be direct descendants of Ben Franklin. BF had two sons, one died at age four. The other son (William) did have a son (William Temple) but WT had no sons, so there were no more males after that to carry the name as direct decendents. Could be just another family legend handed down...or could be true. :) :) Mary Anne --- Anita Loscalzo wrote: In my last month at the NEQM in 2007, 2 cousins, direct descendants of Ben Franklin, brought a large central portion and other fragments of an unfinished mosaic quilt top in rough condition that their great-aunt had applied to some muslin years before for me to see. According to their great-aunt, the mosaics were made by Sarah (Sally) Franklin Bache (1743-1808), Ben Franklin's daughter. The fabrics were true to the late 18th century, so the story seemed to be true.

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Subject: RE: dumb question thanks From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2008 10:35:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5 I think "quilt" and "quilter" have, for a very long time, been words that encompass a great deal. Getting the general public to use the correct terminology when discussing a "quilt" will be as difficult as the challenge we've seen with the UGRR. How many times have you heard a quilt called a "blanket". Eeoww!! As for me, I've always described myself as a "quiltmaker". If questioned, I'll breakdown the term but I'm not going to take the time to educate someone when, odds are, they won't care and will wish they hadn't asked. If they do ask, I'm more than happy to give them a lesson in Quilting 101! Best regards, Sharron........... ......in a very dreary Spring, TX........... -----

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Subject: [qhl] RE: dumb question thanks Another dumb question ? More on the counterpanes ! Someone clue us in on the 17century and todays pieces. The quilt world insists on calling a Cathedral window, crazy, bedspread etc a quilt. Some one who designs a quiltop a QUILTER. We, in the quilting world have to set the outsiders straight and speak QUILT language. It really bugs me when the quilt is being shown and the person takes credit for the real quilter. When do we become a quilter ? QUILTER : some one who quilts the sandwich ! duh? Am I alone here?

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Subject: "quilt" From: "Carroll" <rl.carrollverizon.net> Date: Wed, 02 Apr 2008 10:44:05 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6 The word "quilt" had a broader definition in the 19th. Century. For example it was also used to describe knitted and crocheted pieces. The word "quilt" was used to describe a knitted bassinet quilt (among others) illustrated in the "Dictionary of Needlework" (1882) by Caulfield and Saward. This subject was discussed briefly a while back on the BQHL, where Celia Eddy mentioned researching a book from 1854 that uses the word "quilt" for knitted and crocheted pieces. Laurette Carroll Southern California Look to the Future with Hope >>> The quilt world insists on calling a Cathedral window, crazy, bedspread >>> etc a quilt.<<<< ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Poole Forge --oops From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Wed, 02 Apr 2008 17:16:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7 Hi Shari - Thank you for your very nice note. I'm so glad you had a good time on the Poole Forge Tour -- it was a wonderful day for me. I was very pleased with how the exhibit came together and am glad so many were able to enjoy seeing the quilts. I'm glad you didn't get tired of hearing me talk -- I realized later you had quite a long day with me. I'm glad you were able to come to PA, and hope you enjoyed the entire visit. Barb Garrett ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Poole Forge --oops From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Wed, 02 Apr 2008 17:16:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8 I did it again -- I apologize -- I think I will stop hitting reply. Barb ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Franklin discussion From: <charter.net> Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2008 14:44:27 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9 What a marvelous find, Anita! You're so lucky! *envies* Lisa Evans -------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Franklin, again From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2008 05:11:30 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1 The ladies were descendants through the Bache family. Sarah Franklin Bache was Franklin's only surviving legitimate child. Anita----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: redwork From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net> Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2008 08:59:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1 This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------=_NextPart_000_0006_01C89632.32610750 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable We had a speaker at our Quilt Guild that said redwork was popular in the early 1800's. I tried to look it up in some of my books, but didn't find anything. Does anyone know of a good book for the history of redwork? I tried to look up "outline embroidery" in some of my books,but didn't have much success that way either. Is this because most of them seem to be single layers and not considered a quilt. Brenda Applegate ------=_NextPart_000_0006_01C89632.32610750-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: redwork From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2008 09:21:34 EDT X-Message-Number: 2 -------------------------------1207315294 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hi Brenda - I am a 'redwork nut' and two books I have found very interesting are: R ed and White (American Redwork Quilts and Patterns) by Deborah Harding and Redwork Renaissance by Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings (a good friend and if she doesn't know a question about redwork it need not be asked). (look into _www.alibris.com_ (http://www.alibris.com) - a used book site - you may find copies there). Mitzi from Vermont (where it is currently snowing - but this weekend has two great quilt shows scheduled, so the heck with the snow - I am on the road...) **************Planning your summer road trip? Check out AOL Travel Guides. (http://travel.aol.com/travel-guide/united-states?ncid=aoltrv00030000000016) -------------------------------1207315294-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: AQSG From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2008 10:36:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3 Don't make any plans for early Oct. because you are going to want to be in Ohio for AQSG Seminar 2008 (Oct. 2-6). Dee Dadik and Molly Butler, chairs of the local committee, have lined up an incredible menu of opportunities that will allow us to look, learn and achieve "Quilt Nirvana." The theme is "Quilts of the Midwest: Creations of Art and Utility." There will be 9 (count them-9) venues showcasing quilts of the Midwest. It's going to be fabulous! If you are not a member of AQSG you don't know what you're missing. Check it out. Cinda on the Eastern Shore looking forward to the FVF Seminar starting this afternoon right here in Oxford, MD (imagine crabcakes and quilts) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Uncle Eli's Quilting Bee From: Janice <janicepopebellsouth.net> Date: Fri, 04 Apr 2008 05:39:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4 I was able to attend Uncle Eli's again this year. This was the 77th annual meeting of this once-a-year, state wide bee. There were over 100 quilts displayed, most new, but some nice vintage ones mixed in as usual. My favorite was a string pieced Le-Moye. New this year was a display of other antique needle works...hand embroidery, buttons, a cut crystal basket full of hankerchiefs, with the caption, "Box of Kleenex from years past." The visit with friends was just what I needed, and the pot luck lunch was a real treat. I took a blackberry pie using the wild berries I picked last summer. I went by the back roads this time and it was only 38 miles from my house. Seems like much further, and another world away. This informal country event is a hit if you like to hand quilt (I sat at Sara Porreca's frame for a while and quilted), do your own hand work ( I finished the binding on a baby quilt), and chat with friends. I have made a few friends there as you do tend to see some of the same people year after year. I was saddened to learn Erma Kirkpatrick was not there due to another broken hip.(She was one of the co-authors of the _North Carolina Quilts_ Book). If you are in the area, I would recommend this event! It is always the first Thursday of April at the Eli Whitney Community Center, just off of Hwy 87, between Graham and Pittsboro, NC.