Subject: Re: Hand Quilting again
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 08:55:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1


Joe said:


....All I meant to say is that it seems to
> me that machine quilting has nearly obliterated hand quilting at
most of
> the quilt shows I attend. Yes, I can still fill the occasional hand

> quilting class. Yes, there are those of us who still love and
appreciate
> hand quilting. It is even possible that there will yet be a
resurgence of
> hand work. It is just that nearly all those quilters who have
taken up
> quiltmaking in the last dozen years or so would have no reason to
see or
> learn about hand quilting.>

Joe, as one who does hand quilting, some machine quilting and has
paid long
arm quilters to do work for me (in order to speed up projects I'd
never have
time to do) and know what you are talking about.
I did want to say that I am FOR machine and long arm machine quilting
if it
facilitates getting the work done that otherwise wouldn't get
finished. I
am for it, also, if it encourages new quilters to take up the hobby,
as I
worry that our craft may vanish in the next hundred years or so.

But, that being said, I do want to say that I still prefer hand
quilting in
terms of how it calms and mesmerizes me. I enjoy it very much and
would
hope that most quilters consider it part of their education as a
quilter to
know how to hand quilt, at least. I know a few machine quilters who
won't
even consider hand work, and they are truly missing out on something.

I've had people look at what I do and use the phrase, "I wouldn't
have the
patience". I have tried to explain to these people (who never seem
to
understand, but perhaps some of YOU all do understand?) that the work
gives
me the patience and the ability to relax. Without the stress
reliever of my
work, I would not be a very happy person. We quilters "in the know"
call it
"quilt therapy", and I'd rather buy thread and fabric any day than
pay a
therapist! : )

One of the reasons I wanted to address this with you all is that I
have read
several commentaries on this hand vs. machine quilting subject
recently, and
in the past. I do think that ANY quilting is good quilting and I try
not to
be a "quilting snob" saying that hand quilting is better than machine
or
anything of that nature. However, I do feel that the intensive work
of hand
quilting ought to be appreciated more at quilt shows, and perhaps
have it's
own catergory in judging. If there was a best in show category for
hand and
for machine, I would be happier. Perhaps having a category
specifically for
hand quilting would encourage more people as the work would be
getting the
respect it so deserves?

I have to admit to seeing some amazingly gorgeous and intricate long
arm
quilting lately, it's truly breathtaking. I think of how I could
write a
check for that work and have truthfully done exactly that on more
than a few
occasions. There is certainly skill in it, in terms of the planning,

placement and thread colors, etc. Yet, I created a whole cloth quilt
that
is queen size and completely hand quilted. It took me seven YEARS to

complete it vs. a long arm quilt of that size maybe taking seven
HOURS.
Whose work is "better"? Well that is a hard thing to say. Each
quilt looks
great, would win a best in show ribbon (mine did) and deserve to win.
But,
the seven years that I chose to spend curled up with a hoop, as time
permitted me, ought to have some kind of recognition, shouldn't it?

Or, would the machine quilters scoff at my efforts and think of me as
a
relic from the past? I'm Amish trained and I do still revert to some
of the
old ways when I am quilting. My original quilt teacher that taught
me the
basics firmly believed that all quilters should start with basic
Amish
methonds, using pencils to mark 1/4" seams on template cut pieces of
fabric.
Speed methods, such as rotary cutters and things like that, were
introduced
later. We were even taught to hand piece our blocks and were not
allowed to
introduce machine sewing until she was sure we were quite good at
what we
were doing. I think back to my teacher and I am so thankful that I
truly
learned all the basics before moving on to the shortcuts that I am
grateful
to know, now, and use all the time. I can still work with just the
absolute
basics that some quilters wouldn't even begin to know.

At any rate, it's all quilt history when you think about it.
Quilting has
to move ahead with the times. People like me are not common, in this

"industry". I often thing that it's the "industry" that drives the
trends
in quilting as well. The advertising we see in quilt magazines is
geared
towards the fast and easy methods, the machines and the like. How
many ads
for template plastic have you all seen lately? How many ads for
betweens
and needles vs. long arm and fancy machines that do just about
anything but
wash your dishes for you.
So, I guess we have to accept that quilting is changing, but I still
love my
hand quilting and don't plan on giving it up any time really soon.

One more thing, on an entirely different subject. I attended a
Sewing Expo
in Worcester MA yesterday at the DCU center (formerly the Centrum,
follow
signs off exit 18 of Rte. 290) and it was fabulous. If any of you
are near
by, this expo is going on all day today as well as all day tomorrow.
There
is a $10.00 admission fee. The N.E. Quilt museum has a display of
quilts
on loan there and the vendors are fabulous. There is a vintage
button, and
a vintage/new bead vendor that are just fabous. All day, there are
fashion
shows and demos. I saw a pattern making demo and two fashion shows
while I
was there. I can't even confess what I spent, but could have spent
tons
more. The show is sewing, but has quilting as well as many other
specialties, including yarn and purse making, etc. Most of the major
sewing
machine companies are represented and many specialty items are
available.
Quite worth your time if you live close enough.

Linda Heminway
Plaistow NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Calling all toile lovers
From: ginghamfrontiernet.net
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2008 22:17:50 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

I hope the third time is the charm in getting this posted.
During the coverlet/quilt connection discussion, Trish Herr admitted
to being an 'avowed coverlet lover/freak/collector/researcher'. That
=20
prompted me to disclose my current love affair with a recently
acquired copperplate toile quilt. This is my first toile piece and
I'm hooked. Please have a look and let me know if you have any
information about the toile (or the quilt). I have posted two scans =20
of the quilt under the heading 'flying geese copperplate toile quilt'
on my blog
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

There is also a picture of a section of the quilt on the second photo

on my blog with the sneak preview quilts.

There is a whole cloth quilt in the Shelburne Museum made out of the
same bird toile and pictured in the Art of the Needle.

Thanks for looking and please leave a comment. Everyone who leaves a

comment in the next month will be entered into a drawing to win a fat
quarter of reproduction fabric or vintage fabric. Yes, free fabric
for viewing antique quilts.

Sandra Starley
Professional Quilt Appraiser
and Artist
Moab, Utah
my antique and vintage quilts
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com









----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: FVF part 2
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 09:45:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

My identical twin separated at birth Suzanne Cawley gave a talk
on
"Quilt Cousins: Woven Coverlets." For most of us this was an
entirely new
field and Suzanne gave us a great introduction. I now know the
difference
between geometric and fancy coverlets, double weave and summer and
winter.
I have a long way to go but Suzanne gave me a great introduction. I
lack
the vocabulary to describe the examples we saw, but I intend to
learn.
My presentation was "Eastern Shore and More: Quilts of Delmarva."
I had
a wonderful time gathering a selection of quilts made on the Shore in
the
19th century.
When I first moved here I thought that there would be a
recognizable
Eastern Shore style of quilt. After all the area was isolated from
the rest
of the world by the Chesapeake Bay until the first bridge was built
in the
1950s. I was wrong.
There are a few generalizations that can be made but nothing that
shouts
"Eastern Shore." Here's what I've found. Fleur de Lis friendship
quilts
were the most popular design on the Upper Shore in the 1840-50
period. Most
ES Album quilts mere made in the 1860s, after the fad had ended in
Baltimore. Many high style, elegant quilts were made pre-Civil War,
especially in Maryland. The finest of fabrics were available in
spite of
the area's isolation (most travel was by boat and there is water
everywhere.
Many 2nd and 3rd quarter quilts have blocks set on point with sashing
and
cornerstones. Lots of double and triple rodded straight lines in the
borders. From 1860 to 1920 in quilts made on the Lower Shore I see
more
orange than anywhere outside of PA. Also common in quilts of the
Lower
Shore (1860-1880) is the use of pink as a background and green for
sashing
(you'd almost think you were in central PA). After 1890 you find
lots of
shirtings.
There were shirt factories all over the Shore which employed the
wives and
daughters of
watermen and farmers.
Mary Lou McDonald spoke about the Baltimore Album quilts owned by
the
Lovely Lane Methodist Church in Baltimore. The depth of Mary Lou's
research
on the whole body of Balt. Albums is astonishing. It's fascinating
to see
the variations on theme such as woven baskets, cornucopia, crossed
branches,
bowls of fruit, etc. There are so many questions. Of course, we are
all
hoping that somewhere in a Baltimore attic is a diary that will
answer some
of these questions.
Susan McKelvey did the impossible combining two great topics.
She
discussed her specialty "Writing on Quilts" with antique examples and
then
her own contemporary interpretations. A Garfield's Monument quilt
with many
signatures was especially interesting. It's not a pattern one often
sees
and it does make a good friendship pattern. She also brought her
collection
of blue bird quilts, some appliquéd some embroidered. The perfect
visual
treat for an early spring morning.
Judi Gunter's presentation, Commemorative Textiles, was right up
my
alley. I've finally admitted that there is no more space for quilts
in our
small house, but I'm sure I can fit in lots of small, flat stuff.
Judi
talked about the commemoratives printed for
World's Fairs starting with the wonderful bandanas from the
Philadelphia
Exhibition (the one that shows all the major buildings and several
others)
continuing with the Columbian Exhibition of 1893 in Chicago, the Pan
Am in
1901 and the Lewis and Clark Centennial in St. Louis.right up to
Seattle in
1962. Eponymous Fran told us a great story about visiting the 1939
fair in
New York as a little girl.
Wars have produced a variety of fabrics: the ubiquitous
sweetheart/mother/sister pillows, a WWII doll quilts with a puppy in
uniform, a Hitler figurine with a pincushion on his rear end..
From the political realm Judi has an 1840 doll quilt with a toile
back
featuring Wm Henry Harrison (log cabin and hard cider). She showed
the
Kansas City Star Elephant and the Donkey. A clown costume from the
1920s
showed dancing elephants and donkeys (how appropriate!). There was
an Ike
dress with complimentary "I Like Ike" gloves (there were lots of
Eisenhower
textiles) and a Nixon paper dress with a frilly organdy apron, a
"Wash Away
LBJ" washcloth, a Kerry Beanie Baby and a Hillary Voo Doo doll.
There is
simply no end to the inventiveness of the partisans. I loved the
hilarious
spoof of the anti-equal rights amendment forces: a "Ladies Against
the
Women's Movement" scarf with inscriptions such as "Roses not raises,
You're
nobody until you're Mrs. somebody, Suffering not suffrage, Born to
clean,
I'd rather be ironing, Recriminalize sex"--what fun, but we must
remember
that the "antis" won. I also like the temperance ribbon inscribed
"Here we
pledge perpetual hate to all that can intoxicate."
The grand finale was "Fran's View," a discussion of the early
20th
century quilts made of "sleazy" (Fran's word) with 1/8" seams. Fran
had a
whole pile of tops made in northern Delaware. Fran is not fond of
20th
century quilts (even the great ones) but she is forgiving. As Ginny
Gunn
wrote in her article for Uncoverings 2007 women in the early 20th
century
just didn't have good fabrics to work with.
The one worry we had about having the Seminar on the Eastern
Shore was
that we can't offer the antiquing opportunities of Lancaster Co. (who
can?).
The scenery and the seafood seemed to compensate. I almost hate to
admit
that on my way home I found a scrappy 1870 Chimney Sweep with pink
and green
background and sashing. It would have fit perfectly in my
presentation. I
know I just said I have no more room for quilts (I lied).
Cinda on the Eastern Shore




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Calling all toile lovers
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 14:28:15 +0000
X-Message-Number: 4


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Great pictures. Your "Mystery Men" are Palmer Cox's Brownies I am
giving a talk this weekend about little people on quilts, Brownies,
Kewpies, Dolly Dingle and Sun Bonnet Sue. The Patriotic Heart is probably
KKK.
Polly Mello
--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_5915_1207924095_0--


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Subject: Cathedral and Hand Quilting
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 10:51:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

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If you want to be truly accurate, I don't think you can do a
Cathedral in r=
epro fabrics - unless you want to use 1950's fabrics. I dont know
the actu=
al-for-a-fact origination of the technique, but as an appraiser I
have seen=
piles and piles of those things. They all run from the 1950's
through the =
1970's, which was evidently the heyday. I think most of the people
on this=
list can verify that. But don't forget this very important point -
this i=
s 2008, and you can make any quilt you like in any fabrics you like.
So wh=
at if they weren't made in the 1900's? Who cares? You can still
produce a=
very lovely quilt. A world of choice is open to you.=20
=20
ALso, as for popularity of hand vs machine quilting, it runs in
regions her=
e in Florida. There are a number of guild shows where I appraise
mostly fu=
ll bed size, hand applique and hand quilted quilts. Magnificent
quality, b=
y the way. Yet other guilds are showing machine quilted pieces. I
am happ=
y to report that I do see much more custom quality and McTavish style
quilt=
ing now, and less of the mattress pad look.But I already know which
quilts =
I will see at various guilds. It's always interesting.=20
Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com"I've always wanted to be
somebody,but now =
I see I should have been more specific."Lily Tomlin
_________________________________________________________________
Going green? See the top 12 foods to eat organic.
http://green.msn.com/galleries/photos/photos.aspx?gid=3D164&ocid=3DT003MSN5=
1N1653A=

--_2328b154-c4fb-4cff-88d1-cb2edb37b70c_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cathedral and Hand Quilting
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 08:00:38 -0700
X-Message-Number: 6

I also have noticed a lot of hand appliqu=E9 at the shows I visit
living he=
re in FL as a snowbird.
I'm in the center of the state.
Spent last week at the Atlantic Center for the Arts at Focus on Fiber
and f=
ound many cutting edge quilters and fiber artists from the central to
south=
ern gulf area.
Kay Sorensen


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: textile towns
From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net>
Here's a question for those who study such things: What are the main
textile
towns in the US, historically? Lowell, MA, comes to mind, as does
Fall River
for the Northeast. When the mills moved south, Burlington, NC and
many
places in South Carolina come to mind. There's probably a book out
there I
could consult but the keyboard is right here and this list is so
helpful.



Andi in Keota, Iowa


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: textile towns
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 17:05:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

I think if you look way back you'd find Philadelphia in there, Andi!

18th century I mean...
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: textile towns
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

Andi -- a few places to search:

Run of the Mill by Steve Dunwell gives the history of rise and
decline
of New England textile industry and all the mill towns.

History of Cotton Mills and Cotton Mill Villages by Narvell
Strickland
taskes you on a mainly southern journey throughout the South,
particularly Missouri and Mississippi.
www.usgennet.org/usa/ms/county/attala/cottonmillhistory.html

Search for textile manufacturers associations in southern states
which
often contain mill history. Spring Industries lists its history and
mill
locations.

Candace is right on about Philadelphia, a main center of early
textile
manufacturing.

Candace Perry wrote:
> I think if you look way back you'd find Philadelphia in there,
Andi!
> 18th century I mean...
> Candace Perry
>
>
>

--------------040908060303010402030101--


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Subject: Not exactly QR, but sorta Wrong URL
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 16:54:32 -0700
X-Message-Number: 10

I put the wrong URL for my blog with the "Parrot Quilt Square"
picture.

The right URL is: http://winnowings.blogspot.com

Sorry.
Christine Thresh
on an island in the California Delta
http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Not exactly QR, but sorta
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 16:51:32 -0700
X-Message-Number: 11

I've been sorting through my fabric stash for days. I unearthed a
treasure
today. I bought it on eBay in 1999 under the title "Parrot Quilt
Square." It
is appliqued and has embroidery. It is from the 1980s. The woman who
made
it, Mary M. Davidson, was "an authority on needlework" according to
the
seller.

I posted a picture of it on my blog today:
http://winnowing.blogspot.com
(March 11, 2008).

Christine
on an island in the California Delta
http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilts which charm us
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 20:42:43 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
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It's difficult to beat the combination of old fabric and quilts
especially when it's Children's Quilts of the 19thC by Laurette
Carroll.
Great photos of quilts, fabrics and quilting.
http://www.fabrics.net/LauretteChildrenQuilt19thCentury.asp

--------------070909080208070000060901--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Suffrage Quilts
From: "Betsy Lewis" <lwslewiswritingservices.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2008 22:23:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

Hi, everyone - this is my first post ever! It's nice to be here. I'm
very
interested in quilt history and the people who made the quilts. I'm
currently trying to conduct some research on suffrage quilts and am
finding them difficult to locate. Do any of you know where I might
find
some - museums, collections, anything like that - and where I might
be
able to get photos or visit? I would appreciate any information. Many
thanks! Betsy (Palmyra, NY - where it is raining...)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: textile towns
From: Mitzioakesaol.com
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 03:40:25 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1


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While not so big, Winooski, Vermont was a textile town - employed
mostly
young, underage, French-Canadian girls. Mills are still there, but
are upscale
condos and retail areas now. The mills were located on the Winooski
River,
not far from its outlet in Lake Champlain.
Just thought I'd add my 2 cents on this early rainy, rainy Saturday
in
Vermont
Mitzi



**************It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms and advice on AOL Money
&
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-------------------------------1207986025--


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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 11, 2008
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 06:54:11 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2


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Joe said:....All I meant to say is that it seems to me that machine
quilting
has nearly obliterated hand quilting at most of the quilt shows I
attend. Yes,
I can still fill the occasional hand quilting class. Yes, there are
those of
us who still love and appreciate hand quilting. It is even possible
that
there will yet be a resurgence of
hand work. It is just that nearly all those quilters who have taken
up
quiltmaking in the last dozen years or so would have no reason to
see or
learn about hand quilting.

This thread is fascinating. I'm interested in the emotion that hand
quilting
generates. I'm thankful to those of you who shared your feelings.

I too have a lifelong love of hand quilting. More recently I've come
to
embrace machine quilting as well. I love many quilts that were made
in each of
these techniques, as you would love two very different children.

My own path has parallelled the journeys that some of you describe
from hand
quilting to machine quilting. I began quilting in 1969, a little
hippie
bride in a fourth floor walk-up in Newark NJ. I had fallen in love
with antique
quilts at the Newark Museum. We were poor, working in the day and
going to
college at night.

I had been sewing for a while and I had two big bags of scraps. So I
painstakingly pieced, appliqued, embroidered my first quilt, all by
hand. It took
two years.

I got pregnant and so I sewed a baby quilt in all different colors of
pastel
ginghams and quilted it with loving care. I was hooked on quilting.
After I
had the sweet baby girl, I sewed her a pink quilt. I sewed another,
and then
another. Everyone dear to me received hand pieced and hand quilted
quilts for
Christmas.

Then I began making and selling quilts at the Kutztown Folk Festival.
I made
baby quilts because they were small and used up scraps easily. I
sewed well
over 100 quilts before I got a sewing machine.

The sewing machine was a godsend. I was working fulltime, but I sewed
every
Saturday. I was thrilled by the speed. The quilt top flew together
under my
hands.

Evenings were spent hand quilting. It's such a tranquil way to end
the day.

In 2004, my company had a massive downsizing and I was let go. I
weighed my
alternatives and decided to take a leap and try my hand at a business
I could
love.

After almost a year of research, I bought a hand guided longarm
quilting
machine. I don't like the computer quilting. I didn't want a machine
to do the
quilting; I wanted one to allow ME do the quilting more easily. So I
hand guide
my machine. I quilted a bolt of muslin and more than 50 tops for
Project Linus,
and worked for months to learn this new craft before I took a
customer.

I love working on the longarm. I dance with the machine. Instead of
rocking
my hand, I rock my body.

Machine quilting is speedy compared to handwork. Freehand machine
work can be
really fast, although maybe not as fast as you would think.

Many many times, I have spent more than a week on quilting one quilt.
I can
quilt a quilt nicely in 7 hours. In 70 hours, I can quilt a memory.
Heirloom
quality longarm work is not fast. It takes time, and it shows.

Many of the heavily detailed quilts that have won recent shows
required
months and months of work at the machine. As with hand quilting,
quality machine
quilting needs to be well designed, measured, marked, and quilted
with love.

Some of these heavily quilted longarm machine quilts could stand up
on there
own, there is so much thread in them. You would be hard pressed to
find one
square inch unquilted.

When I look at them, I am reminded of how fashion changed when the
sewing
machine became available to the average American woman. Dresses had
been
relatively plain for the average woman, but with the sewing machine,
application of
trim was a matter of minutes not hours. She had time to ruch ribbons,
and add
fringes, braid, and passamenterie by the yard. She may have been
spending the
same amount of time sewing, but her output was different because of
the machine.
Same as quilters today who avail themselves of the current
technology.

I love helping people finish tops into quilts. I feel like a fary
godmother
as I watch their tops become quilts under my hand. It's the best job
I have
ever had.

Ironically perhaps, my days are spent machine quilting clients'
quilts and
many of my nights are spent quietly hand quilting my own quilts. It
uses
different muscles than machine quilting, and it is quiet. I still
find it a tranquil
way to end the day.
Bright blessings!

~Donna Laing
Bucks County PA
www.NorthStarQualityQuilting.com


**************
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Subject: Re: textile towns
From: hknight453aol.com
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 09:38:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3


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? Other important towns include Coventry, West Warwick, Warwick, and
Pawtucket in Rhode Island.? Coventry once produced more levers lace
than anywhere else in America,as well as woolens.? Changes in fashion
in the early 1970s and new Japanese machinery hurt them severely.?
West Warwick was know for Crompton corduroy and velvets, produced in
Crompton ville in West Warwick.? Arkwright Interlaken and others were
also based in the town.? Warwick was home ot the Fruit of the Loom
mills, and I've seen many local crazy quilts made from their percale
prints on muslin foundations.? And Pawtucket is the site of Slater Mill,
a venture completed by Richard Arkwright and Moses Brown.? Plans for
the machinery were smuggled out of England.
??? There's also Willamantic, Norwich, and lots of other mill towns
in New England.? I'm Rhode Island born and bred, and live in the house
wherein I was conceived. I freely admit to parochialism.
???? As for English patchwork over papers in Fall River, many English
and Scots persons skilled in textile manufacture received subsidized
passages based on working a given length of time in the company.? I
know of cases at Amoskaug (spelling?).? Fall River had more spindles
going in 1950 than anywhere else in the world.? They also
manufactured lots of men's and boys' clothing there, and you could literally buy
out the back door.
??? In most mills, one could buy remmants and scraps for nearly
nothing.? This explains why local vintage quilts use little used material.

Heather


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: textile towns
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 10:04:54 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

The ultimate test of stamina is browsing through any Davison's
Textile
Directory, 1866 through the 1960s. It is the bible of the textile
industry and lists all mills and allied plants [converters, dyers,
equipment] by category, state and town. Simply mind boggling.

There was probably not a town untouched in NE region and eventually
the
South could claim the same, even more so. For as mills either
relocated
or originated in the South, most other related industries followed to
be
near them, particularly the machine parts and repair companies and
converters. These vital services increased a town or region's economy

overnight.

hknight453aol.com wrote:

Other important towns include Coventry, West Warwick, Warwick, and
Pawtucket in Rhode Island.? Coventry once produced more levers lace
than anywhere else in America,as well as woolens.? Changes in fashion
in the early 1970s and new Japanese machinery hurt them severely.?
West Warwick was know for Crompton corduroy and velvets, produced in
Crompton ville in West Warwick.? Arkwright Interlaken and others were
also based in the town.? Warwick was home ot the Fruit of the Loom
mills, and I've seen many local crazy quilts made from their percale
prints on muslin foundations.? And Pawtucket is the site of Slater Mill,
a venture completed by Richard Arkwright and Moses Brown.? Plans for
the machinery were smuggled out of England.
??? There's also Willamantic, Norwich, and lots of other mill towns
in New England.? I'm Rhode Island born and bred, and live in the house
wherein I was conceived. I freely admit to parochialism.
???? As for English patchwork over papers in Fall River, many English
and Scots persons skilled in textile manufacture received subsidized
passages based on working a given length of time in the company.? I
know of cases at Amoskaug (spelling?).? Fall River had more spindles
going in 1950 than anywhere else in the world.? They also
manufactured lots of men's and boys' clothing there, and you could literally buy
out the back door.
??? In most mills, one could buy remmants and scraps for nearly
nothing.? This explains why local vintage quilts use little used material.



--------------020001000900020803050209--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: IA/IL Quilt Study Group
From: litwinow62msn.com
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 08:07:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Iowa/Illinois Quilt Study Group
April 5, 2008
Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum
Kalona Historical Village
"Applique Through the Centuries"

Sunshine, after a long cold snowy winter, came pouring into the new
meeting
room at the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum (KQTM).
Juanita Seward, registrar and Susan Mardock, secretary/treasurer of
IIQSG
welcomed the attendees. Museum Curator, Marilyn Woodin greeted the
gathered
quilt historians. Steve Reif spoke for the Kalona Historical Village
board
thanking the group for coming. Catherine Noll Litwinow began the
session
with acknowledging that in addition to IA/IL historians, quilt lovers
from
MN, WI, and MO were also in attendance. Long tables labeled by
quarter
centuries were piled high with "Applique Through the Centuries" the
day's
study topic.
Karan Flanscha presented a quick summary of appliqué ´echniques. One
piece
made Karan a master with the American Embroidery Guild. She made the

samples available for all to see.
We delighted in the number of early appliqué ±uilts.
Starting the quilt show was the most unusual reverse appliqué °iece
from
pre-Civil War times. Every inch of the crib quilt was filled with
stitching.
Elaborate borders with diamonds and scallops complete the quilt.
A combination of Oak Leaf and Wreath of Roses quilt dating circa
1850 was
made with early tiny red/green/yellow prints. Outstanding trapunto
quilting
filled the empty spaces.
Chris brought in a Fluer De lis. The large size suggested a 1840
date. It
was thought that the quilt likely from the New York or New Jersey
area.
Printed reds and greens on white made up the pattern. A wonderful
striped
back again 1840 completed this outstanding quilt.
Lucky owner Arene pick up a fabulous Broderie Perse at flea mark in
St.
Louis. Blocks of Hewson like chintzes were dated 1840-1880. This
piece and
two other Broderie Perse quilts from the KQTM were extra special
since Iowa
didn't joined the Union in 1846.
Jane Ellen's show stopping Princess or Prince's Feather in
red/green/white
came with complete documentation. Oral history states that it was
made in MA
in the 1830's -1940's and came across the country in a covered wagon
to
Denver, CO the 1859 gold rush. It was quilted with parallel line by
one of
the first Howe sewing machines brought to Denver!
An Iowa estate sale from South Amana, IA turned up a Pomegranate
with
Stars, folk art piece. The designs could have been leaves, bulbs, or
hearts.
Cherries on stems were another possibility. Leaves were appliqued on
the
border. It was thought the maker got tired and made fewer leaves for
each
border. Clam shell quilting completed the circa 1850 quilt.
Barbara's applique Tulip quilt came from Ohio and made circa 1850
-1870.
The red/green and white tulips were quilted with triple lines. The
unstable
green is slowly fading to beige. Four initials were found on the
quilt with
one embroidered and one quilted.
The above special early quilts gave way to quilts made a hundred
years
later. Sandy's Rose of Sharon had the unusual color scheme of
lavender and
green with yellow centers. The four block quilt was found at a
garage sale!
The purchase of the CD of the day's quilt will be worth it to see
this
wonder. There were at least eight flowers, buds and leaves around
each
center. The bright green bias vine was in contrast to the rest of the
quilt.
A darling Sun Bonnet (Dutch Doll) was found at an estate sale. The
crib
quilt was made of 30's prints with plain pastel hats of the 1930s.
Lovely
embroidery was stitched on the hats. This well loved quilt had a
newer
binding.
A multi-generational was another exceptional piece in that it was a
sampler
with signatures from South Illinois. There was the possibility that
old
blocks were finished at a later date. 1935-40 prints were used to
make
flowers such as daisies, tulips, peony, and baskets. Adding to the
mystery
was 1950 turquoise fabric along with cheddar.
Depression Era quilt experts stated Sandy's French Basket could be a
Mrs.
Danner design similar to the Marie Webster's baskets. The circa 1935
pink,
blue, and white basket was found in west Kentucky.
Yellow, green prints with solid orange were stitched into a Wind
Blown
Tulip. Some of the fabrics were id'ed as Eli Walker's. Cross hatch
and
feathered wreath quilting was done on this circa 1930 piece.
Wow-to have two magnificent Lancaster Rose Quilts that were shown
together.
One in pastel pink and green the other in yellow cotton sateen. Both
quilts
glowed from in sunshine from the new windows. The pink and green
rose could
have been a McAlen kit. The wide border was quilted feathers echoing
the
swag. Wreath and cross hatched quilting enhanced the beauty of this
rose.
The yellow rose was recognized as a Mary McElwain pattern from
Walworth, WI.
Museum quality quilted feathers only added to this most attractive
quilt.
An Ohio Rose was found in a quilt store. The pink, green, white and
yellow
fabrics from the 30's had a very thin batting. Diagonal grid quilting
was
used for this summer spread.
A Marie Webster Morning Glory pattern that appeared in the "Ladies
Home
Journal" in 1912 was next. The pink and white wedding quilt
provenance was
stitched on the border "Minnie Reinhart Smith to Weld and Gertrude
Smith
1943." The full size quilt was completed with diagonal grid and
outline
quilting.
Nancy Page's Garden Bouquet Quilt published in 1931 "Kansas City
Star"
newspaper was the next quilt. Brown vases with handles held printed
flowers
and birds. Typical Depression Era fabric was used. The border seemed
to be
quilted pumpkin seeds or possible four leaf clovers.
Next came "Magic Vine" another Nancy page pattern. Wonderful pastel
prints
were stitched in vertical vines and quilted with a cross hatches.
One lucky owner shared two Poppy quilts with the group. Two reds and
two
green fabrics were used. The crib quilt was pictures in Patsy and
Myron
Orlofsky's book. This poppy quilt pattern was printed by Home Arts
Needlecraft and later sold in the Lee Ward's catalogue. The other was
a full
size summer spread. This larger quilt contained many more Poppy
motifs. The
owner brought a photocopy from American Quilts and Coverlets by
Safford and
Bishop page 195 showing the larger quilt.
It isn't Spring until there are dogwoods-So, it's Spring! Pricilla
Dogwood
kit quilt contained pink leaves and brown stems. Embroided blossoms
and
feather quilting were featured on this welcome to spring quilt.
Designer Nancy Cabot, Brackman #17.35, had many names such as
Marigold or
Roses. Tiny prairie points were stitch around the tops of the pink
and
purple flowers. A vine border with full tulips surrounded the top.
Diagonal
and feathered wreath quilting made this "Chicago Tribune" newspaper a

treasure.
Dogwood Blossoms showed up again. This time with in a Marie Webster
style.
Medallions of purple baskets filled with pink and green flowers and
stems.
Dark leaves were also stitched. The group felt this quilt had an
Oriental
feeling.
True folk art could be seen in the "Bumble Bee" quilt. Bees flew on
blue
cotton in the center. Oversized pink flowers would provide the bees
much
nectar to take to the hives in the corners of the quilt. Clamshell
quilting
was stitched through the fat polyester bat. This quilt was just
purchased
from e-Bay in March.
Two "Farmer Boy" were made by grandmother. Each farmer carried items
that
the grandsons wanted. The boys' artistic mother sketched the designs
for
grandma to embroider. These bunk bed quilts were made in 1964 and
1965.
Butterflies flew on a crib quilt. One solid piece of pastel print
was used
then embroidered to make the wings and bodies. A 1970 date was
assigned
since the Depression Era butterflies were zigzagged to the top.
Depression Era Sun Bonnet Sues had much younger Overall Bill
brothers. The
late 60 and early 70 fabrics used for the Bills made quite the
contrast to
the pastel Sues.
Colonial Ladies with parasols were made in gold and white. Embroidery

ruffles decorated the skirts. Double line quilting and a scalloped
border
completed this twenty-fifth wedding anniversary quilt.
A 1960's sampler was up next. Due to the lovely work the owner
compared
this sampler to the Baltimore Album quilts made one hundred plus
years ago.
One very elaborate flower block really stood out.
A sampler with fabrics ranging from the 1950s-80s was an original.
Baskets
and wreaths were appliqu餮 It was the border that stood out with
huge
triangles as well as yo-yos and ruched flowers. Some of the heart
like
shapes might have been the maker's idea of a Lancaster Rose.
A perfectly documented sampler quilt in blue and white was made for
the
owner's mother. Friends stitched and signed blocks for the quilt.
One block
was a crocheted doily. The quilt made in 1988 and was quilted in
diagonal
lines.
A fall row quilt just made represented 2008. Leaves, pumpkins, corn
and
scare crows were made of wool. The owner's sit and sew group call
them
selves the "Block Heads" had fun making wall hangings.
Blanket stitched circles covered the top of a wool quilt. The inner
glow
of wool quilts was evident.
Florence Peto's Little Garden quilt was made with Sturbridge Village

reproduction fabrics. The maker considers Ms Peto one of her role
models and
has an autographed copy of Ms Peto's book. The original tiny
9-patches and
flowers quilt can be seen in the book Enduring Grace" .
Concluding the morning's study was a Baltimore Album top work in
progress.
This red and green beauty will be one that the next generation of
quilts
will admire.

Our TA-DA moment came when Marilyn Woodin and helpers opened the
doors to
the Amish Quilt Display Gallery! How these Amish women with eighth
grade
education made magnificent works of art. The KQTM will have an Amish

display all year long. Many of the current quilts seen on display
are
pictured in "Pieces of Time: A Quilt and Textile History Magazine"
April
2008-VOl 3, #1. It was hard to leave the Amish Gallery and move to
the
English Quilt Gallery. Iowa is blessed to have Kalona Quilt and
Textile
Museum(s) available for study and exhibit.
Following lunch there were MORE quilts to see.
Tulips, a pattern from an old newspaper was found in the owner's
family.
She completed the top and made a replica pillow, in case another
family
member wants the tulips. It took some time to find the right shade of
green
for the replica. The group suggested that other family members could
make
their own quilt.
A wonderful English paper pieced Victorian Mosaic was shared. Black
and
various colored hexagons were used. The top still containing the
paper was
found at a yard sale in AZ.
From the late 1800's to 1930's showed the difference between a
Mosaic and
Grandmother's Flower Garden. Church basement green helped to date the
quilt.
A knife edge finished the quilt. The medallions were arranged in
unique Trip
Around the World setting. The quilt was a gift to the owner's mother
by a
sister in law. Mother was born in 1900 and the Sister in law 1880.
An 1880's signature Churn Dash quilt is a study project of the
owner. The
quilt contains signatures and places. Towns near Pearl City, IA are
listed.
It is not known if Pearl City is Muscatine, IA. Names of the towns
are not
on current maps and it was suggested that the communities are
unincorporated
villages. A typical 1880 indigo was used for sashing.
Hole in the Barn Door made with claret, indigo and greys dated to
the
1870s. This quilt top was bought on sale and contains many fabrics of
that
era.
A very rare "Women's Relief Corp" sampler/fund raiser quilt was made
by
Anna Crevelings Watters in CA about 1900. The WRC was an auxiliary of
the
Grand Army of the Republic. New Hampton, NJ is marked on the quilt.
Pencil
and ink signatures are found each block. The blocks were individually

stitched and put together in the "quilt as you go" style.
A Tree of Life with sashing of white stars on indigo could be a
centennial
quilt. Some of the indigos could have been dyed with a resist dye. It
was
discussed that the quilt could also be called Pine Tree or even a
Temperance
quilt. Four rows of trees make the top with two of the rows facing
the
center. The quilt has been documented for the Iowa Quilt Registry.
Ellen's Star was found in her cedar chest in Grinnell, IA. The
multi-colored Depression Era fabrics have hot pink sashing. A
wonderful
secondary design was so liked by the owner she used "QE" to draft the

pattern and ordered a bolt of pink for make her own.
A gold and soft tan stamped cross stitch quilt was found in Macon,
Co. IL.
It was thought the quilt was a Paragon kit. After quilting the quilt
the
owner noticed she failed to embroidered two of the sections which
were then
stitched and seen of the back.
A Bear quilt a little bigger than a sheet of paper was surrounded by

colorful rectangles. The fabrics were thought to be circa 1960. The
origin
of the bear-a coloring book?
The biggest quilt of the day was a Grecian Key made of indigo.
Hundreds of
signatures were inked in perfect script. An inked cartouche was
labeled
Pittsburg Academy Presbyterian Church and the date 1896. Another spot
on the
quilt was inked "Mt. Washington 1801-1896. The quilt was thought to
be a
fund raiser. The owner's family has had several projects with this
church.
A new little Saw-Tooth quilt was made in the reproduction pastels.
Leaves
and feathers are quilted in the background and the vine in the
borders has
yo-yos.
An eye popping Cheddar and Red Irish Chain ended the show and tell.
The
quilt purchased in Belleville, IL is thought to be circa 1880. This
vivid
quilt is not for the timid.

The day ended with copies of "Pieces of Time" April 2008 Vol. 3 #1.
This
excellent journal is giving quilt historians an outlet for their
research.
Magazine is subscription only. Contact Andi Reynolds:
andi0613iowatelecom.net.
A special thank you goes to Kay Michalak for the CDs of the Aug 2007
CDs.
They are $5 at the meetings and $6 by mail.

The next meeting will be August 2, 2008 with Log Cabins as the study
topic.
The annual silent fund raiser will be held that Saturday. In
addition, help
the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum by adopting an acid free box.
Future
meetings:

APRIL 4, 2009 STUDY TOPIC: CIVIL WAR

AUGUST 1, 2009 STUDY TOPIC: RED AND GREEN APPLIQUE


Submitted: Catherine Noll Litwinow
All mistakes will be blamed on the author, her penmanship, or the
incomplete
or illegible hand writing of the quilt owner's information sheets.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: textile towns
From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 12:46:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Three in my area:

Florence, a village of Northampton, Massachusetts, was a major silk
weaving/finishing area.

Easthampton, my home town, had a major dyeworks (now artists'
studios).

And a few miles south is Holyoke, where they wove silk and cotton and
had a
major cotton dyeing industry.

Lisa Evans




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: textile towns
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 14:10:33 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Andi, let me add to Joan's reference a grand book called the "History
of
American Manufactures from 1608 to 1860" by J. Leander Bishop. I
believe
it is a Google Book.
Candace


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: textile towns
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 17:09:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

I just realized that I may have confused those familiar with Davison.

Directory is still published today but as mills started closing
and/ormoving overseas in the 1970s, reading any edition then or later

would not contain the heyday of the American textile industry.

Thanx for your source Candace. It sounds familiar but will check it
out
and add it to my library..

There is an old and true saying in the textile industry that a fabric
is
made in the finishing. But in reality, it's made in the boardroom aka

follow the money. The South snagged northern business with free
land,
water, coal, railroad lines, a hungry, willing large labor force AND
low
taxes. Plus they were next to the cotton fields and sheep pastures so
to
speak.


Candace Perry wrote:

Andi, let me add to Joan's reference a grand book called the "History
of
American Manufactures from 1608 to 1860" by J. Leander Bishop. I
believe
it is a Google Book.
Candace

>
>

--------------020100080203060006070205--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Stenciled Quilts
From: StencilQuiltaol.com
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 16:32:27 EDT
X-Message-Number: 9


-------------------------------1208032347
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Does anyone have photographs of antique stenciled quilts they would
be
willing to share with me? I am trying to gather more information on
the
stenciled quilts we saw at the 2006 Old Sturbridge Village tour.
Did anyone take
photographs and are you willing to let me study them? I would also
like to hear
of any sightings of antique stenciled quilts in your quilt
adventures.
Vicki Garnas



**************It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms and advice on AOL Money
&
Finance. (http://money.aol.com/tax?NCID=aolcmp00300000002850)

-------------------------------1208032347--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Stenciled Quilts
From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 17:25:49 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

Dear Vicki,

I am the former curator of textiles at Old Sturbridge Village, and
wrote an
article on stenciled bed covers for the Magazine Antiques, using a
number of
the OSV pieces (February 2003), and have recently assisted with an
article
on stenciled bed covers that is forthcoming in Early American Life
magazine.

Is there a specific question/s I can answer for you?

Best,
Lynne

> I am trying to gather more information on the
> stenciled quilts we saw at the 2006 Old Sturbridge Village tour.
Did
> anyone take
> photographs and are you willing to let me study them?
> Vicki Garnas
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: textile towns
From: John Seater <seatermindspring.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 17:18:54 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

Providence RI & Pawtucket RI (Slater Mill), Woonsocket RI, really
just
about all of RI up to 1945. See "Down by the old mill stream: Quilts
in
Rhode Island" by Welters & Ordonez.

Susan Seater


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cathedral window
From: Velia Lauerman <velialivehotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 19:14:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12


Thank You Lisa for the wonderful information on the CathedralWindow.
Gave t=
he STOP LIGHT workshop this morning to thirty interested members.
Found thi=
s bit of info in QuiltingPatchwork & Applique Project book, Dorothea
Hall. =
=20
Mayflower or Cathedral Window patchwork combines simple
applique wi=
th folded patchwork. This ingenious tecnique is thought to have
originated=
on the Mayflower carrying pilgrims to America, were the women used
flour s=
acking to make the folded foundation blocks on which they stitched
their pr=
ecious pieces of printed and colored fabrics in such a way as to be
sparing=
(without making hems) and yet, give a bright overall efect of
colorful pat=
chwork. ETC. Interesting ahey? We are just becomming more interested
in th=
e studies but most of the group are Get It Done by Machine mostley.
Oh Well=
. I did present the Cintamini and your great info. Thanks, Velia =20

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: one more essential textile read....
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 10:31:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------000008000603050200060808
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I forgot to mention one of the most valuable textile resources ever
to
be written -- The Story of Textiles by Perry Walton, 1912. This book
gives the history of textiles from the beginning of mankind [my
choice
of word here :-) ] and covers the history of American textile
industry
from its beginnings, and probably includes every town which had a
mill
up to 1912.

Book was compiled and written for John S. Lawrence, one of Boston's
leading textile-investor families. The Walton book also seems to
appear
in bibliographies of about every textile reference written including
current ones.

--------------000008000603050200060808--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Stenciled Quilts
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 9:52:23 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Vickie,
The St Louis Art Museum currently has the Winterthur exhibit "Quilts
in a
Material World" (closes 26 May) Featured is a pieced and stenciled
quilt,
inscribed in paint Mary Ann Hoyt 1834, beautiful picture of the
quilt an
detailed info/background in the book Quilts in the Material World.

I do remember there are more stenciled quilts, I just can't recall,
and we were
not allowed to take pictures. I believe there was also a stenciled
quilt
belonging to the St Louis Art Museum. I will be going back to the
museum on May
16th to attend a lecture on "America's Quilt Heritage: A Melting Pot"
by
Patricia Cox Crews of IQSC, contact me off line and let me know
exactly what
info you would like me to gather for you. If anyone is interested,
the lecture
is at 1:30 also, later that evening there will be a Free (no
entrance fee to
the exhibit on Fridays) Gallery Talk on Americana in Quilts: The
Winterthur
Collection, by Zoe Annis Perkins, Head of Conservation, Meet at the
Information
Center at the museum, 6:00 pm

If anyone is in the Midwest and has the time to visit the St Louis
Art Museum it
is the place to go! In addition to the Winterthur collection, they
have an
exhibit in the textile gallery on Missouri Made Quilts. It focuses
on how
quilts reflect social, economic, and political change in Missouri.
Several
quilts are from the of Suellen Meyer collection. It also features
a display
of the Ladies Art Company ephemera, The Pine Burr Quilt made by Lucy
Mingo of
Gee Bend fame is on display , it was donated by Cuesta Benberry (
note it is
hanging on the second floor when you step off the elevator... it is
facing
you). There is also an exhibit " A Stitch in Time Images of
Needleworking,
1850-1920 these are prints, drawings and photographs, but
interesting to see
artists interpretations of needle women.

The web site for all the info on the museum, hours, gallery talks and
maps,
directions, hours, etc... go to
http://www.stlouis.art.museum/index.aspx?id=1
and click on the calendar.

Pam Conklin
O'Fallon, IL




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: first reproduction fabrics?
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 09:59:55 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3


When were reproduction fabrics first made? Do we know which
collection was
first? I have the impression that fabrics were reproduced some time
back.
How early? I'm also curious as to when reproduction fabrics like
those we
buy today were first produced.

Judy Breneman




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: first reproduction fabrics?
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 14:46:57 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------060906070406030900010304
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Judy -- do you refer to repros just for quilting lines or repros in
general?? Many manufacturers, especially in the home decor trade,
periodically re-issue designs, sometimes on different fabric and in
different colorway. This goes way back. I can remember buying drapery

fabric in the mid-1950s which was part of a repro series
[Waverly??]
of 1920s florals. E&W also re-issued many of its prints over a long
period of time, often with subtle variations.

I can't speak for quilting lines but I do remember in the early 70s
spotting a fabric I liked in the quilting section of a dept. store.
Selvage stated artist's name, name of design and that it was from the

Smithsonian Collection. My use was not for quilting but as it came
from
that section, perhaps that is one date that might be indicative of
repro
lines for quilts being available.

You have me curious now. I'm sure the experts on this list will clue
us in.

Judy Anne wrote:

When were reproduction fabrics first made? Do we know which
collection
was first? I have the impression that fabrics were reproduced some
time
back. How early? I'm also curious as to when reproduction fabrics
like
those we buy today were first produced.


>

--------------060906070406030900010304--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: textile towns
From: carylschuetzcomcast.net
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 20:57:31 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5


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New Bedford, MA, my hometown, was a cotton textile city.

The old mills are still there.

My grandparents immigrated to the US as teenagers and worked in the
cotton mills in New Bedford. I remember as a child going to visit my
maternal grandmother occasionally while she was at work during the
summer.
My grandmother stood all day at her job by a machine that spun cotton
into thread and onto large spools.
Very loud!

New Bedford was a major textile city of over 100,000 population at
the time. We even had a college, New Bedford Institute of Textiles &
Technology. I n more recent years, it was absorbed as a part of U of
Massachusetts.

I remember when I was a child hearing about the mills moving South,
because labor there would be cheaper and mill owners there would not
have such a high heating bill in the winter as in the North. That
move hurt the economy in the New England area. I think that occurred in
the 1950's in New Bedford.


Caryl Schuetz
Professional Association of Appraisers - Quilted Textiles
Certified by The American Quilter's Society
www.quiltvalues.com
Home of "Fabulous Tee Shirt Quilts"
P.O. Box 68827 Traders Point
Indianapolis, Indiana 46268
317-293-2466


Here's a question for those who study such things: What are the main
textile
towns in the US, historically? Lowell, MA, comes to mind, as does
Fall River
for the Northeast. When the mills moved south, Burlington, NC and
many
places in South Carolina come to mind. There's probably a book out
there I
could consult but the keyboard is right here and this list is so
helpful.

Andi in Keota, Iowa
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Subject: Re: Stenciled Quilts
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 16:53:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

There are at least 2 stenciled quilts in the Quilts in a Material
World book
and the exhibit currently at the St. Louis Art Museum. I just got
back from
it and am actually planning another 8 hour (one way) drive from my
home in
Nebraska so that I can drool yet again. This is a fabulous exhibit
and I
especially enjoyed the opportunity to see things I may never get
another
chance to see apart form a trip EAST (which would be lovely but isn't

financially feasible at the moment-I drove through St. Louis on my
way to a
family wedding in IL and on the way home treated myself to this
exhibit.).
At any rate, if you get a chance. . . . GO. The museum also has a
concurrent
exhibit of Missouri-made quilts in another gallery and a stunning new

addition to their permanent collection that looks like a quilt but is

actually liquor bottle wrapped wired together. An African artist's
creation.

I would imagine the stencilled quilts are also featured in the
WONDERFUL
WONDERFUL book by the same name

You could also search the International Quilt Study Center collection

online. I believe they have at least one.

Stephanie Higgins




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Subject: Re: Announcement of workshop in New Orleans
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 18:16:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Sheryl,
Wonderful! Colleen and I have been teaching these all day workshops
for
several years now in our Southeast region and are really pleased
that the
National Society has invited us to do this at our annual symposium.
All of
our small museum/collector clients have been positive about the
information
we give as well as the resources we can steer folk to.
If there are any specific issues you/your guild members want us to
address,
please let me know. We are also offering to advise on individual
artifacts
at the end of the workshop.

Best
Newbie Richardso
h
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Suffrage Quilts
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 17:36:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Welcome Betsy,
I don't think you will find any sufferage quilts - at least not any
from
the 19th century. There are some wonderful ones form the 1970's. The
early
sufferage movement "threw the baby out with the bath water" by
rejecting all
the womanly arts. The Temperance movement welcomed all the female
domestic
arts. Although the western states have always been more progressive
about
women's rights, so there is still a cahnce that a sufferage quilt
will turn
up.

As a new member of the list, you can search our archived discussions
- and
we had a good discussion on this topic a year or so ago.
Best
Newbold (Newbie) Richardson
The Costume and Textile Specialists
Appraisals,Conservation, and Exhibition.
Alexandria and Richmond,VA
www.costumeandtextile.net

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Suffrage Quilts
From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 18:41:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

Interesting...I heard a rumor that Susan B. Anthony was a quilter.
Has
anyone heard that, or did I dream it?

Lisa Evans


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kansas City Star Books
From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 18:55:50 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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charset="iso-8859-1"
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I have been asked to help with our guilds block lotto. We were
thinking =
that it might be fun to do a theme for next year. I do not have any
of =
the Kansas City Star books. For any of you that might have them,
would =
there be one year that would be more conducive as a starting point
for =
block lotto? =20


Brenda Applegate
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Subject: Re: one more essential textile read....
From: textiqueaol.com
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 19:28:36 -0400

This site gets more exciting each week.? The Story of Textiles by
Perry Walton is listed by author's last name under w.?
http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/boo+

Jan, in OH, sick and missing some baggage.? The American Airlines
employees had to have apologized at least 20 times before and during my
flight and then we landed and OOPS!


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Regarding Susan B. Anthony as a quilter
From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533frontiernet.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 05:49:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Lisa had asked about Susan B. Anthony being a quilt maker-and the
answer
is YES. The Genesee Valley Quilt Club in Rochester, NY made a
reproduction of the fragile and frail quilt that Susan had made-a
LeMoyne
Star quilt. Both quilts, I believe reside at the Susan B. Anthony.
You
can read a little about it at:
http://www.susanbanthonyhouse.org/news/quilt.html
There is a picture on the Genesee Valley Club's website:
http://www.gvqc.org/photo_album.html
Another interesting quilt from the western NY area-while not quite a
suffrage quilt, was one that was highlighted in the Quilt Digest 4,
in an
article by Shelley Zegart, titled Old Maid. Shelley had given a
lecture
at the Genesee Country Village Museum a few years ago in Mumford, NY
about
suffrage quilts.

When researching suffrage quilts, don’t forget to include Temperance
and
WTCU.

Regards,
Beth Davis
Rush, NY
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Questions
From: Carol's Quilt Closet <imaquilter2msn.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 09:44:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

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To the QHL community,

I feel so fortunate to have such a wonderful resource at hand. I'm
sure I =
will get more information than I need but I want to thank everyone in
advan=
ce for any assistance you might give me.=20

I have a question on the Carpenter Star pattern. Can anyone tell me
where =
and when it originated and most importantly is a history available as
to wh=
y it's called the Carpenter Star. =20

Also, I have noticed that on a few of my newly purchased fabrics that
the s=
alvage edge of the fabric contains a copyright notice. Is there any
inform=
ation on what purpose this serves as far as use goes. Does it mean
that if =
the fabric is used in a quilt that the quilt can not be sold or a
monetary =
benefit be made from such.

Thank you again,
Carol


_________________________________________________________________
Pack up or back up=96use SkyDrive to transfer files or keep extra
copies. L=
earn how.
hthttp://www.windowslive.com/skydrive/overview.html?ocid=3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_Ref=
resh_skydrive_packup_042008=

--_1396708f-5f83-4253-9536-32c5fc5eb47b_--


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Subject: Re: first reproduction fabrics?
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 07:43:17 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi all,
I was working for Margo Krager when she began putting together a
reproduction section within Patchworks, her shop in Bozeman, Montana.
This was in 1990. The fabric line that captured her attention was
"Museum Chintz" by VIP. The prints were neither museum repros or
chintz, but it sold like hotcakes, and she was on her way. The first
repro line I recall was Grandmother's Flower Garden, also by VIP. That
would have been probably 1990 or 1991. Until full-fledged repro lines
came out, Margo and I studied any and all books and pictures of
antique quilts and textiles- and the real thing when we came upon it- to
learn print design and color characteristics so she could buy in a
pick-and-choose way to create specific time period groups. I remember
when we first read Clues in the Calico we were ecstatic!

Marcus Brothers had some repro lines early in the game. And
Concord and Jinny Beyer had individual patterns that worked.

Judy Schwender



Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> wrote:
Judy -- do you refer to repros just for quilting lines or repros in

general?? Many manufacturers, especially in the home decor trade,
periodically re-issue designs, sometimes on different fabric and in
different colorway. This goes way back. I can remember buying drapery

fabric in the mid-1950s which was part of a repro series [Waverly??]
of 1920s florals. E&W also re-issued many of its prints over a long
period of time, often with subtle variations.

I can't speak for quilting lines but I do remember in the early 70s
spotting a fabric I liked in the quilting section of a dept. store.
Selvage stated artist's name, name of design and that it was from the

Smithsonian Collection. My use was not for quilting but as it came
from
that section, perhaps that is one date that might be indicative of
repro
lines for quilts being available.

You have me curious now. I'm sure the experts on this list will clue
us in.

Judy Anne wrote:

When were reproduction fabrics first made? Do we know which
collection
was first? I have the impression that fabrics were reproduced some
time
back. How early? I'm also curious as to when reproduction fabrics
like
those we buy today were first produced.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Suffrage Quilts
From: "Betsy Lewis" <lwslewiswritingservices.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 10:56:43 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks for the information. I looked through the archived articles
last
night and that was very helpful. I'll keep plugging away. The list is
also
helpful and it is pointing me to other places for research which I
greatly
appreciate.

Thanks!

Be




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Regarding Susan B. Anthony as a quilter
From: "Betsy Lewis" <lwslewiswritingservices.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 10:37:43 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Hi all - thank you for all the information, Beth, and a neighbor
besides...
:)

I'm a docent at the Susan B. Anthony House and can tell you that the
reproduction quilt that the Genesee Valley Quilt Club made of the
Anthony
LeMoyne Star quilt is fabulous. That reproduction quilt is normally
located
in the Susan B. Anthony House in Miss Anthony's study. The original
LeMoyne
Star quilt, was made, signed and dated in 1835 and currently resides
in the
Rochester Museum and Science Center (www.rmsc.org). Along with that
quilt is
the white work wedding quilt that Susan B. Anthony and Hannah Anthony
Mosher
(Susan's sister) made for Hannah's wedding. I was able to view both
of them
last week at the museum. It was quite a thrill.

The amount of effort that went into the reproduction quilt by the
Guild was
astounding. There is a notebook filled with the information for the
repro
quilt that resides in the docent/volunteer kitchen/library at the
House.

Cheers on a chilly, sunny day...
Betsy Lewis
Palmyra, NY



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: first reproduction fabrics?
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 11:22:12 -0700 (PDT)

The first repros which sold like crazy were the 30's Aunt Grace lines
designed by Judy Rothermel for Marcus Brothers. I know that I
bought them like crazy! Wasn't that around 1995-96?....arden

(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Reproduction fabrics and stenciled quilts
From: StencilQuiltaol.com
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 14:09:43 EDT
X-Message-Number: 7


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In 1975 when my husband and I bought our first house in Los Angeles,
we also
bought living room furniture at Ethan Allen. The couch and 2 chairs
were
covered in a red and green reproduction fabric produced by Waverly.
I bought
yards and yards of this fabric for matching drapes. Years later I
checked out
a book on quilting at the library(Quilts In America) and on the back
of the
book cover was our living room fabric.....it was a quilt.....a
stenciled
quilt.
The quilt is the One-Patch Stenciled Quilt 1830-1840 from the Old
Sturbridge
Village collection (pg 144). We lived with that pattern for 30
years. I
became a stenciler and quilter later and Antique stenciled quilts
kept popping
up in books I would find. Now, 33 years later I have written 2 books
on
stenciling and Antiques Stenciled quilts. Life has a funny way of
leading you on
your path. I have to admit we still have the drapes up, but re
covered the
furniture.
Thank you for the sightings of antique stenciled quilts. QUILTS
in a
MATERIAL WORLD is wonderful and I am so glad the museum included the
stenciled
quilts in the exhibit and the book.
Thank you for the help.
Vicki




**************It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms and advice on AOL Money
&
Finance. (http://money.aol.com/tax?NCID=aolcmp00300000002850)

-------------------------------1208196583--


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Subject: reproducing printed fabric
From: "Pat L. Nickols" <patlnickolsyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 12:13:31 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8

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The first pattern reproduced, that I became aware of, was Lanes Net,
first printed about 1840, then printed about 1880 and again about
1990.

The furnishing fabric companies reprint on a regular basis and will
even do runs to order. Currently the "Thistle" pattern is reproduced
for Winterthur (I don't remember the company - may have been
Brunschwig & Fils) and was available in the decorator shop.

At Musee d'Impression Sur Etoffes, Mullhouse, France last year we saw
some designs that we were told were reproduced from earlier times,
over the years a rather frequent practice they said.

Today some of us that do reproduction fabrics are doing designs from
different periods, 1800s, early 1900s, 1930s, and even feed sacks
prints (that could be from the 1950s). The 1840s reproduction lines I
have done are from my antique fabrics of that time (or earlier).

Pat L. Nickols





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Subject: Re: first reproduction fabrics?
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 13:07:07 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 9

What about Eli Walker? Wasn't that a repro fabric line?

Kris


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: It is Princess/Prince's Feather or Washington's Plume?
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 13:02:14 -0700
X-Message-Number: 10

I just came across the accounting of a 1910 exhibit of quilts made in
the early-middle nineteenth century. One of the quilts receiving
acclaim was called "Washington's Plume." In your mind's eye, what do
you see? Of course, a Princess/Prince's Feather.
This set me to wondering if we have been misnaming this pattern? It
does make more sense that those of us on this side of the Pond would
want to honor George Washington and not Prince Albert. In
Brackman's Encyclopedia of Applique, there is a Nancy Cabot, 1938,
"Washington's Feather." It looks like a variation of the other
Princess/Prince's Feather patterns.
Curious, and wondering what others think.
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com



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Subject: Re: *****SPAM***** Re: first reproduction fabrics?
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 16:38:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

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Kris -- that would be E&W which I mentioned earlier that reissed
their
lines frequently and some on an ongoing basis. Can't remember when
Ely
Walker became E&W but it seems more toward the 1950s when Burlington

acquired the company around that time.

Kris Driessen wrote:

What about Eli Walker? Wasn't that a repro fabric line?

>
>
>

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Subject: The "code" again
From: "cjsp70" <cjsp70insightbb.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 17:00:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

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Read a nice write-up about the bicentennial celebration at he Lincoln
=
Boyhood Memorial in our local paper. At least it was nice until I
found =
out that a group of quiters from Spencer County is going to display
20 =
"Underground Railroad Quilts". Our family is scheduled to participate
on =
Mother's Day weekend during the celebration. Have sent an email to
the =
memorial staff and will take some of the information with me, that I
=
have collected from the list, as I do a quilting demonstration at the
=
Farm during the celebration. UGG! This is like crab grass the roots
keep =
popping up in unexpected places. Thanks for letting me vent. Pat
Sauer
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Subject: southern quilt sashing and corners
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 18:35:55 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13


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I just had an "Ah-ha moment" that might not mean squat, but it might.
I saw a quilt in the Brown Collection that got my attention. Here is
the site --- http://www.pbase.com/brownsf/amish_quilts?
First of all it is a killer site for Amish Quilts. Then you folks who
study Southern Quilts need to go to #030 Tartan Variation. What do
you see in that quilt??The quilt?is based on an overshot coverlet
pattern. (The name alludes me and my weaving pattern books aren't here at
the house.) Then you see the checker board (16 block) and the 3
strips of fabric. A distinctive design element of many Southern Quilts is
the use of checker board corners (12 blocks/9 blocks?in the 3 strip
sashing. Wonder if that design element came from looking at woven
overshot coverlets??
I know that overshot coverlets were made all over, but there were
lots made in the mountains of NC and other southern mountain towns. Do
the overshot coverlets fit with any ethnic group more than others?
I just thought of our discussion at the Southern Conference?about how
coverlets influenced the construction of quilts, and then the
discussion on this site about the topic of woven coverlets.
The favorite colors for overshot coverlets were blue and white, red
and white,& red/green/white. Would we say that those were the favorite
quilt colors for a very long time? Did that have to do with
availability or taste? I see this 3 strip with a checker board sashing in
reds and greens mostly up to the 1870's.?In the?last quarter of the
1800's?when the ?teal/oxblood brown/orange combination became the
rage?they began to duplicate patterns that had?been done in red/green/white.
So then the sashings are the teal/brown/orange.
What do y'all think about the connection between coverlets and
Southern sashing?
Back to sewing.
Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

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Subject: RE: first reproduction fabrics
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 17:51:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 14

Aunt Gracie's was earlier than 1995. Probably 1985 or so.

Ely & Walker fabrics, available at least since 1976, couldn't really
be
called reproduction. As far as I know, they were printed from the
same
copper rollers that those same designs had been printed with 100
years
earlier.

Kim


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: first reproduction fabrics
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 19:16:37 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15

According to this website (found via google), Aunt Grace's 15th
Anniversary was in 2006, which means her first line came out in 1991.

http://www.quiltknit.com/fabrics/auntgrace_fabric2.htm

And, according to this website, Judie's 10th Anniversary book came
out
in 2001, again making the first line 1991 (math teachers always
double
check their answers <grin>)

http://www.sewrepro.com/cgi-bin/Store/store.cgi?product=1930sBooks&productid=bk_ag_scrap_10&pid=1

Barb in southeastern PA


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Subject: RE: first reproduction fabrics
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2008 17:01:58 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 16

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I wish Ely & Walker were still around. I have hung onto a pink and a
blue piece of theirs (I think) which was printed in many colors:
small little flower with a yellow center and probably a roller print.
I've been waiting for the perfect quilt to use them, but of course,
they are now odd colors which don't match the modern colorways.

(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR