Subject: Browns Collection of Amish Quilts From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2008 04:49:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Absolutely stunning. And to think I can view all of them at one place. They are gorgeous. Thank you for sharing that link. What a delightful way to enjoy my first cup of coffee this morning (at 4am). Debby -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil www.quilterbydesign.com Programs & Workshops

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Subject: Re: The "code" again From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2008 08:59:57 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

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If I was your neighbor, I'd come back you up with the scads of information I have collected regarding 'The Code' too. Your crap grass mention is very fitting. Mitzi from VT where it is finally getting warm, tho there is still 8-10 feet of snow in the mountains.

**************It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms and advice on AOL Money & Finance. (http://money.aol.com/tax?NCID=aolcmp00300000002850)

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: April 14, 2008 From: "Karey Bresenhan" <KareyBquilts.com> Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2008 01:57:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Re: First reproduction fabrics I began selling fabrics at Great Expectations Quilts in Houston (now closed) around 1976. One of the first lines I carried was VIP's Granny's Trunk, which consisted of reproduction fabrics based on 1875-era fabrics--lots of very dark brown, brilliant orange, dark red, gold, black, etc. RJR Fabrics produced Maggie's Drawers, probably the next year, which were in softer colors but also 19th century reproduction fabrics. And you cannot forget the "cheater" cloth produced in the 19th century which occasionally shows up on the backs of quilts or on pillowcases. (I only saw this once, but it was definitely printed patchwork, and definitely 19th century.) Most of the "cheater" cloth I am familiar with was probably from the 4th quarter of the 19th century. Karey Bresenhan

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Subject: Re: Browns Collection of Amish Quilts From: Senoperaaol.com Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2008 09:30:16 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

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Subject: another UGRR version... From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

Was channel browsing and just happened to land on Fresh Prince of Bel-Air rerun [1990-93] with a teacher's words about the underground railroad and its codes. So I stay tuned. This version has quilts replaced by gospels to guide runaway slaves. The song teacher as an example sang was something to do with drinking from the gourd which was a signal for runaways to look for Big Dipper and follow that direction. No mention of quilts; just a minute or so segment on this topic and some great gospel music.

Has anyone heard of the gospel codes? I don't recall seeing it discussed on this list though could have missed those threads.

-

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Subject: Re: another UGRR version... From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2008 11:37:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I *have* heard about musical codes, even if "Follow the Drinkin' Gourd" is questionable. "Go Down, Moses" was so notorious as an escape song that it was banned in several places. I think a couple of other spirituals were also used to signal an escape, although I can't think of their names right now.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: another UGRR version... From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2008 12:50:45 -0400

I have since learned the Drinkin Gourd lyrics were written after the Civil War by a white man and that possibly the music was also post-CWn www.followthedrinkinggourd.org

Lisa Evans wrote:

I *have* heard about musical codes, even if "Follow the Drinkin' Gourd" is questionable. "Go Down, Moses" was so notorious as an escape song

that it was banned in several places. I think a couple of other spirituals were also used to signal an escape, although I can't think of their names right now. > >

--------------070503020204090207040008--

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Subject: Re: first reproduction fabrics? From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2008 13:13:56 -0700 (PDT)

Hi all, I was working for Margo Krager when she began putting together a reproduction section within Patchworks, her shop in Bozeman, Montana. This was in 1990. The fabric line that captured her attention was "Museum Chintz" by VIP. The prints were neither museum repros or chintz, but it sold like hotcakes, and she was on her way. The first repro line I recall was Grandmother's Flower Garden, also by VIP. That would have been probably 1990 or 1991. Until full-fledged repro lines came out, Margo and I studied any and all books and pictures of antique quilts and textiles- and the real thing when we came upon it- to learn print design and color characteristics so she could buy in a pick-and-choose way to create specific time period groups. I remember when we first read Clues in the Calico we were ecstatic!

Marcus Brothers had some repro lines early in the game. And Concord and Jinny Beyer had individual patterns that worked.

Judy Schwender

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Subject: mill town thanks plus Pieces of Town info - long From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net>

Thanks to everyone who's responded, publicly and privately, to my question about textile (mill) towns. As always, the information has been vast and helpful.

 

And please forgive this broadcast message, but more people than ever from this list have inquired about subscribing to Pieces of Time: A Quilt and Textile History Magazine. As much as I enjoy corresponding with each and every inquirer, to ensure a speedy response, life dictates a group reply, and, we have changed the way we manage subscriptions. Thanks once again, Mother Kris, for allowing this type of message:

 

Pieces of Time is a publication associated with the Iowa Illinois Quilt Study Group. The magazine is self-supporting, which means we pay our highly dedicated authors who come from all over the country with nothing more than two copies for their wonderful work in bringing their enthusiasm for quilt and textile history to a new venue.

 

That said, the cost for a one year subscription (two issues, August and April) is $25; for two years (four issues), it's $50. We realize this is expensive, but we publish quilt and textile history information that is not published elsewhere. After all, there is so much to know, there's always room for more. Additional advertising would be wonderful, and we thank those of you who have advertised with us in previous issues, especially to offset the now annual increase in mailing costs and what oil prices have done to the cost of paper. A business card sized ad is $25 for one issue; $45 for two.

 

Our subscriptions begin with the August issue. If someone ordered a one-year subscription today, they would receive the August 2007 and April 2008 issues. If someone waits until August 2008 to subscribe, they would receive issues August 2008 and April 2009.

 

The only back issues still available are April 2007. These cost $12.50. The first two, April 2006 and August 2006 are out of print and already fetching $30 at auction. If you have these, consider yourself lucky. The print runs numbered 110 (I think; I'm checking with the printer to be certain).

 

To order, make out a check for the correct amount of your request payable to IIQSG. Please write your request on the memo line and include a note with your phone and email info. Send to Susan Mardock, Treasurer, IIQSG, 1339 Park View Drive, Story City, IA 50248-1816. If you have additional subscription questions, especially regarding whether or not you have renewed or need to, Susan's email is mardockmchsi.com.

 

Special note: If you recently contacted me, Andi, about your Pieces of Time subscription or renewal, I hope this QHL message answers your concern. If not, feel free to contact me again after Susan Mardock has had a chance ( a couple of weeks) to respond to you. Please remember this magazine travels slowly through the postal system, and thank you for you interest!

 

Last word: We actively seek submissions. If you're passionate about a quilt or textile history topic, please contact me, Andi Reynolds, Editor, at andi0613iowatelecom.net.

 

I appreciate the list's patience with this message.

 

Andi in Keota, Iowa ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 15, 2008 From: "Gail Hunt" <gailhuntcaregiving.org> Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2008 00:20:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Gail Hunt will be out of the Office Tuesday April 15 and Wednesday April = 16. She will be returning Thursday April 17. If you need to contact someone during this time please email Jordan Tew = at jordancaregiving.org or call 301.718.8444 Thank You

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Subject: Reproduction Fabrics From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2008 22:13:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks so much for all the interesting information on reproduction fabrics. I was given the "Rising Sun" set of fabric and it got me interested in the whole topic. You can see a picture of my fabric at http://www.womenfolk.com/quilt_notes/rising_sun.htm

Judy Breneman

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Subject: Regarding Susan B. Anthony as a quilter From: gpconklincharter.net Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2008 23:44:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Thanks Beth, a real treat to go to the web site http://www.susanbanthonyho use.org/news/quilt.html web page. It agrees with the info I found in The Quilt A History and Celebration of an American Art Form by Elise Schebler R oberts, page 81 - 83 Woman Suffrage and the Feminist Movement "Quilting and the woman suffrage movement were linked from the beginning. Susan B. Anthony ... was an accomplished quilter ... she later gave speech es for woman's suffrage at quilting bees"

The Susan B. Anthony House News release stated "Susan B. Anthony, an accom plished quilter, made the quilt in 1835. Later, as she became active in the woman suffrage movement, she went to quilting bees with her message since many women at first were afraid to attend the public meetings where Anthony and others spoke. Many women heard their first speeches in support of womans rights at quilting bees."

Betsy,

On page 82 of The Quilt A History and Celebration of an American Art Form by Elise Schebler Roberts, is a picture of the FL sesquicentennial and 75 th Anniversary of Women's suffrage quilt. Not that it represents a suffrag e quilt, but a nice honor to our foremothers.

Pam

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Subject: Pieces of Time postscript From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net>

 

Those of you who are subscribers to Pieces of Time: A Quilt and Textile History Magazine will receive the April 2008 issue in the next week. Thank you for your patience in allowing us to accurately process the subscription list.

 

We are changing how we manage subscriptions (read: putting this task in someone else's hands who won't be distracted by editorial concerns). If you are interested in subscribing to this quilt and history textile magazine, or wonder about the current state of your subscription (we are planning to enhance our service so you will know by your mailing label, just like the Big Boys do it) please contact Susan Mardock at mardockmchsi.com. She will be happy to help you (and thank you, Susan!). I remain the contact for editorial questions, including article submissions and letters to the editor (we love those!) at andi0613iowatelecom.net. If you have emailed me about any Pieces of Time question up to this morning at 10:14 CDT, I have passed it along to Susan already; you don't need to re-send to her.

 

Sorry for any confusion and that I didn't clarify this change-over in the earlier post.

 

Andi in Keota, Iowa

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Subject: Re: Granny's Trunk From: laurel <laurelkalmiaresearch.net> Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2008 14:36:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Karey Bresenhan wrote:

Re: First reproduction fabrics I began selling fabrics at Great Expectations Quilts in Houston (now closed) around 1976. One of the first lines I carried was VIP's Granny's Trunk, which consisted of reproduction fabrics based on 1875-era fabrics--lots of very dark brown, brilliant orange, dark red, gold, black, etc. RJR Fabrics produced Maggie's Drawers, probably the next year, which were in softer colors but also 19th century reproduction fabrics.

I was wondering when someone would mention those landmark VIP prints. Seems like they were the among the first 100% cotton prints available, so no wonder we were so thrilled to have them. I started my first quilt in 1975, and I remember having to go to the thrift store to find lightly worn clothing to supplement my sewing scraps. I think I bought all the colorways. Years later I found myself using a lot of those bright yellows in my quilts--they go especially well with that dull, dark red. As my stash dwindled, I started worrying that I wouldn't be able to replace the when they ran out. Do you suppose they will ever re-re-issue those particular fabrics?

Laurel Horton

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Subject: RE: Regarding Susan B. Anthony as a quilter From: Sheryl Till <sheryl.tillgmail.com> Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2008 12:57:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Supposedly, Susan B. Anthony is way back in our family tree somewhere

(as was Edgar Allen Poe lol) so this thread has been really interesting to me. I've got to remember to ask my mother if she still has the information.

-- Sheryl sctillbellsouth.net http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Feedsack_Memories http://louisianaquiltworks.com

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Subject: new book on contemporary quilts From: laurel <laurelkalmiaresearch.net> Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2008 15:49:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

I know people on this list have a wide range of interests, so I thought I would share this information about a new book from Indiana University Press. Here's the blurb:

/Contemporary Quilt Art: An Introduction and Guide/ is the story of the studio quilt, a new form of textile art that is not well known. Emerging in the late twentieth century, when professional artists began to use

the structure, materials, and techniques of the traditional craft as a medium for art, studio quilts now range from exquisitely expressive objects to social commentary.

The author presents the work of 19 of the best artists in this field as well as a guide for buyers and collectors to educational resources, the marketplace, art consultants, commissions, appraisals, insurance, display, and care of textile art. Each section of this book can be read independently. Research was carried out through interviews with artists, collectors, museum curators, gallery directors, art consultants, conservators, appraisers, and insurance agents.

Laurel Horton

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Subject: Re: new book on contemporary quilts From: Janet Price <janetkpriceyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2008 14:47:55 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Hi Laurel,

This is just a quick hello. We met during your visit to UNL a year ago and I enjoyed your lecture on the Underground Railroad myth. I hope things are going well for you and you will be able to visit the International Quilt Study Center & Museum again now that we have a beautiful building to show off our quilts!

Regards, Janet Price

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Subject: Suffrage Quilts From: freudqwestoffice.net Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2008 18:03:05 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9

Treasures in the Trunk by Mary Bywater Cross has a quilt on pages 84-85 by Abigail Scott Duniway, suffrage leader from Oregon. The quilt is labeled "This quilt was pieced in November 1869 by Abigail Scott Duniway of Oregon and was finished and quilted by her in November 1900, and donated to the First National Suffrage Bazaar in honor of Theodore Roosevelt, the first champion of the equal Suffrage movement ever elected to a National office by popular vote." The quilt was purchased by the Portland Woman's Club for the Oregon Historical Society and Abigail donated the money to the suffrage campaign of 1900.

 

After her husband was injured, she had to support the family with a milliner shop. Later, she owned and edited a newspaper for many years. It was well known that she disliked sewing. "Any fool can make a quilt."

She was the first woman to register to vote in Oregon.

 

Here's a link to a picture of the quilt

http://www.opb.org/oregonexperience/duniway/gallery.php?content=photographs <http://www.opb.org/oregonexperience/duniway/gallery.php?content=photographs &photograph=2> &photograph=2

 

Velma Freudenthal

Newport, OR ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Questions From: "Roberta (Bobbe) Benvin" <quiltsndogsaol.com> Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2008 21:24:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

On Monday, 4/14, Carol wrote "I have noticed that on a few of my newly purchased fabrics that the salvage edge of the fabric contains a copyright notice. Is there any information on what purpose this serves as far as use goes? Does it mean that if the fabric is used in a quilt that the quilt cannot be sold or a monetary benefit be made from such?"

Carol, I am attempting to answer your questions, even though there are others on this list who are more qualified. I have had two reproduction lines manufactured by P&B Textiles: "Antebellum" and "Treasures of the York County Heritage Trust". The copyright symbol indicates that the design belongs to the fabric company/designer and may not be copied by another company/designer. This would apply to original designs, but could never be enforced with antique reproductions. There is always the possibility of two different "designers" selecting a fabric that each has in a quilt belonging to each of them. Considering that it took over 2 years for my Antebellum collection to go from the submission stage to being available in quilt shops, it's quite feasible that someone else was having the same fabric reproduced. If fact, approximately 6 months after my fabric was released, the identical striped fabric appeared in a Barbara Brackman collection -- and in the same three colorways!

The date on the selvage was intended to help quilters know when a certain fabric was released, I suppose, if they needed to find more at a future time or to assist research. However, I heard that at least P&B was dropping the date because it wasn't always correct. Again, using Antebellum as an example, the selvage was printed with the intended date of release- 2004. Due to some horrific last-minute mistakes on the part of the Korean mills, it was decided to hold onto the collection until Spring Market 2005. So, it appears that my collection is a year older than it really is.

The "quilt police" would have a daunting task (to say the least) if they had to monitor all the fabrics in all of the quilts being sold or being awarded prize money!

Roberta Benvin

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 16, 2008 - Susan B. Anthony From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2008 05:57:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Nothing to do with SBA as a QUILTER, but as a QUILT. When the SBA dollar came out, the editor of Quilt World asked me to design a quilt

based on it. I said I would, if I did not have to make it. I don't know if anyone ever did make one, but the pattern was in Quilt World

Christmas Annual 1979. Pat Kyser

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Subject: Spaceman blocks From: "lenna.demarco" <lenna.demarcogcmail.maricopa.edu> Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2008 10:28:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------000606030309000407040404 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

A friend of mine recently purchased a unique little quilt off ebay and we're trying to find some background on the blocks. It's a crib size

quilt, ca 1970 that has embroidered blocks of a little spaceman. (Actually he looks abit like a Teletubbie) Each block is a different

"space" activity with an accompaning descriptive phrase - "Space Walk", "Splash Down", "Lift Off". It's obviously a design that was created when the space program was well underway. The quilt is really quirky in blocks of hot pink and bright turqoise. Scattered (and I do mean scattered) throughout the spacer (no pun intended) blocks and sashing

are various embroidered objects - guitars, fish, kittens and puppies,

flowers, bugs - no rhyme or reason (well, since it's "60s-ish, maybe it does make sense...). If anyone has any background on these blocks, I'd appreciate it. It's a strange and wonderful little quilt!

Lenna, in beautiful AZ that will soon be hot, dry and miserable until

November!!

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Subject: RE: Spaceman blocks From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2008 17:13:49 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Lenna, can you post a picture of the quilt?

Best regards, Sharron................... ........in Spring, TX where I can relate to your dread for the hot weather!

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Subject: Susan B Anthony Quilt From: <gpconklincharter.net> Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2008 3:45:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Pat,

Can you post a picture of the quilt, I checked I have 2, 1980 issues of Quilt World none earlier. Would love to see it.

Thanks, Pam ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mosaic 1890 quilts, pattern from New Orleans Expo From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2008 10:19:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

A Progress article from 1914 describes a quilt made in the postage stamp or mosaic style "It was called "The Rose Quilt" and contained 12,772 pieces. The number of stitches taken in piecing the quilt was 625,828; stitches in quilting, 178,808; total stitches, 804,636." 20

The maker Louisa McHaney was born in 1821 and made it at 69 years old, about 1890.

The current family member who owns this quilt sent pictures to me, more story and a family list of names. It was shown at the St. Louis World's Fair and the pattern came from the Cotton Fair in 1884. She, Lenn, would like to hear from any who has any info about the pattern or perhaps has a similar quilt, or made by a related member of their family through the years.

She has put her email at the bottom of the page. http://tinyurl.com/64yvz4 I hope anyone will also post what info you have to share here. Lenn is not on the list.

What appears to be speckled brown in the second photo is actually deteriorating brown sqs., and the batting is showing through. There is no binding on it and for some reason the color of the sqs. changes around the edge at the top and bottom, as seen on the first photo.

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD New Pathways into Quilt History www.antiquequiltdating.com www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com A0

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Subject: John Rice Irwin From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2008 16:47:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Once I mentioned John Rice Irwin (TN) on this list, and someone who perhaps lived in the region responded off-list, noting that he "folksied" up the quilters in his book and created some unhappiness as a result.

If that member is still on the list, would you contact me? I have several questions I'd like to ask.

Thanks, Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: Reproduction Fabrics From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com

Judy,

I too love reproduction fabrics and think we are very blessed to have so many quality reproduction fabrics to choose from now. I have collected many lines of 1800's reproductions over the past 2 yrs. and have decided to start using them in miniatures and small scale quilts with my antique quilts being my inspiration. The drafting is not as difficult as I once thought it would be and I actually consider it fun to do, almost as fun as collecting the fabrics...almost! Now, to find the time to get started! My goal is to have 2 miniatures and 2 small scale ( half the size of the antique) quilts made by this August.

Alma Moates Quilt Appraiser, Collector, Historian Florida

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Subject: Re: Reproduction Fabrics From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2008 11:09:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Alma, your miniaturization of your antique quilt collection would, IMHO make a fascinating book for the rest of us some day. Stephanie Higgins

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Subject: Re: Mosaic 1890 quilts, pattern from New Orleans Expo From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2008 11:06:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I wonder of Grace Snyder could have seen this quilt before she made her Flower Basquet.

Stephanie Higgins

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Subject: Re: Mosaic 1890 quilts, pattern from New Orleans Expo From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2008 10:17:56 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Grace Snyder's Flower Basket quilt was inspired by a dinner plate. I found the same dinner plate at a flea market after seeing her quilt in pe rson. Quiltingly, Kay ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Mosaic 1890 quilts, pattern from New Orleans Expo From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2008 13:01:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Yes, it was inspired by a dinner plate. . . made during the second world war. I just thought perhaps she got the inspiration for her masterpiece from some earlier quilt and this one certainly could have inspired another

quiltmaker.

I have a friend who collects the china that was an inspiration for this quilt and it's always fun to find a plate or a cup somewhere and add to her stash.

A few years ago I was honored to have two of Mrs. Snyder's quilts on display on stage once when I did a talk in western Nebraska. A family member brought them ( because she attends the church where I was speaking) and I felt like I was in the presence of greatness with those two amazing quilts on either side of me. It's a memory I treasure.

A few years ago I met a Nebraska woman who's mother had made her own version after seeing Mrs. Snyder's flower basket block, only this woman used one inch squares. It was still lovely and the family cherishes it.

Steph

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Subject: historical sewing stitches From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

My middle name lately seems to be a day late and a dollar short. Some

time ago there was a thread on historical sewing stitches. I totally forgot that several years I had printed out information on the subject which covers Bronze Age to medieval. Just ran across it today while going through some binders.

In case this is still of interest to anyone -- Lisa Evans, perhaps?? -- the site is http://heatherrosejones.com/archaeologicalsewing/index.html I found it quite interesting to learn this category in the evolution of sewing.

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Subject: Re: historical sewing stitches From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2008 16:41:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Thanks, Joan! I've met Heather Rose at Kalamazoo (and will be rooming with her this year, believe it or not), and the woman is a walking encyclopedia of information on costume, sewing techniques, extant garments, and the Welsh language. I hadn't checked this part out, though, and am off to do so...

*grins happily*

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: historical sewing stitches From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

How wonderful to know this researcher, Lisa..

I always think of the plight of the first sewers using bone for a needle and intestine for thread.

Lisa Evans wrote:Thanks, Joan! I've met Heather Rose at Kalamazoo (and will be rooming with her this year, believe it or not), and the woman is a walking encyclopedia of information on costume, sewing techniques, extant garments, and the Welsh language. I hadn't checked this part out, though, and am off to do so...

*grins happily* > >

--------------000904090002090201050109--

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Subject: Coming out any day now... From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net>

Medieval Clothing and Textiles 4, featuring my article on Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon's wedding quilt. This is a revised and expanded version of my presentation at the Kalamazoo International Medieval Studies Congress in 2006, with new information and a theory on the possibility that the quilt may have been a bit of peripheral evidence

during Henry's divorce suit against Catherine.

Here's the publisher's link. It should be available on Amazon.com within a few days, if it isn't already. The formal publication date was April 17th, and I'm on pins and needles waiting for my copy to arrive. http://www.boydell.co.uk/43833662.HTM

We now return to your regularly scheduled quilt history...

*goes off to make tea*

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Quilts for a cause From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2008 09:36:31 -0400

Good morning, I have been quite interested in the thread about Suffrage Quilts.

I think we may need to differentiate between quilts made to sell to raise money in support of a movement/cause and those made to "advertise" or celebrate a movement with the movement/cause as the subject of the quilt. With that thought in mind, I still have not seen any real "suffrage" quilts, but plenty of quilts made to promote temperance.

My great grandmother ( the same age and era as Anthony et al) who came from a very old and straight-laced family in Philadelphia, never participated in marches or any other overt political event in support of suffrage - but she had money and made many large contributions to the cause. She would never have thought of herself as a "suffragette", she did not wear white yellow and purple or any other form of outward trapping - yet she supported suffrage. She was not allowed to send her daughter, my grandmother, to college ("ladies" didn't go). But she did compel my grandfather to send his daughter to college (my mother), as my grandmother has died in childbirth and could not advocate for this herself.

The suffrage movement is a very complicated issue due to the extreme societal pressures brought against it.

Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Quilts rescued from dump From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2008 08:49:34 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I just ran across this blog with an article about quilts rescued from the dump: http://pennysanford.typepad.com/

Christine Thresh on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog and http://www.winnowing.com <-- website

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Subject: Re: Mosaic 1890 quilts, pattern from New Orleans Expo From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>

Interesting thought about Grace Snyder's Flower Basket made in 1942-43- it coincides with my thoughts, upon seeing it, going to Ann Orr who is said to have turned to cross stitch for her inspiration and she developed those patterns too. Then there was the craze after the turn of the century, for making postage stamp quilts that had an image, like the Matterhorn quilt in the 20th century's top 100 quilts selection. This similar patter, bought at the 1884 Fair, far precedes the Matterhorn, made in 1934. there are two other mosaic style quilts in the top 100, both dating to the 1940s. It would be wonderful to know more about this pattern that was sold at the Cotton Fair, who designed it and who manufactured it. Lenn is not certain that Louise bought it there or was there in person, she just knows that she used that pattern to make her quilt, so information is unavailable from that source.

 

Piece,

Kim

 

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD

New Pathways into Quilt History

www.antiquequiltdating.com

www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com

 

 

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Subject: Re: Quilts rescued from dump From: Sheryl Till <sheryl.tillgmail.com> Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2008 17:58:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Christine Thresh wrote: > I just ran across this blog with an article about quilts rescued from > the dump: > http://pennysanford.typepad.com/ That's a great article Christine about the quilts being rescued. I loved reading it.

Did anyone go to the link to read the newspaper article? At the bottom of a close-up of the red/white quilt is a reference to the dreaded ugrr.

-- Sheryl sctillbellsouth.net http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Feedsack_Memories http://louisianaquiltworks.com

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Subject: Re: Quilts rescued from dump From: QUILTMOOREaol.com Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 06:49:41 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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It's a wonderful quirk of timing and fate when something like that happens. When I was in the appraisal classes in Paducah a couple yrs ago a lady had an early 19th century chintz quilt rescued from a dumpster. People were cleaning out their parents' house and threw it away. It was huge-over 100" and in very good condition, considering it's age.

Nan Moore _www.mooreandmoorequilts.com_ (http://www.mooreandmoorequilts.com) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Coverlets Collection From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:45:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Back to coverlets. Windham has their new collection up at their web site. It's the second one released, inspired by coverlets from the National Museum of the Coverlet (1830-50). They are wonderful (I have

some, as I've sewn some samples for Windham for Spring Market). I recently purchased the book: American Coverlets and Their Weavers - from the McCarl collection. Absolutely marvelous. What a whole new area of quilt history for me. I cannot believe the intricate designs that these master weavers could create!

Here is the link to see the fabric swatches at the Windham site. http://www.baumtextile.com/cgi-bin/fabricshop/gallery.cgi?Category314

Debby -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil Quilt Workshops & Programs http://www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: RE: Quilts for a cause From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:48:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Newbie,

I agree with you, the Suffrage movement is a very complicated issue especially when you consider the attitudes of the time which were so different than looking at the issue from our perspectives today.

My grandmother, born in 1897 was raised in New Jersey by a mother who was also very supportive of the Suffrage movement in spite of the conservative reputation of the family. My understanding of family history is that my great grandmother, born in 1846 (who was a quilt maker) may have been far more outspoken on the subject than her daughter but we have no confirmation she participated in any other way than monetary donations and sharing her opinion in correspondence and conversations with others. That I am aware of there are no quilts surviving that supported themselves or were made to raise funds to support the issue, but my family research is ongoing.

That said, my grandmother (the youngest of 7 and a very spoiled daddy's girl/baby of the family) definitely reflected her mother's influence when raising my mother who was born in September 1919 between proposal and ratification of the 19th Amendment and later graduated from college with a Bachelor's Degree. There are no known records to indicate the family's male point of view on the subject. My grandmother often reminisced of the "great day when women received the right to vote" and made me promise as a young girl that I would exercise my right to vote every time I am afforded the opportunity.

I find it interesting as I look back at the influence these women have had on my attitudes as well.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle (Living in PA where I get to exercise my 19th Amendment right in tomorrow's primaries!)

-----Original Message----- From: Newbie Richardson [mailto:pastcraftsverizon.net]

The suffrage movement is a very complicated issue due to the extreme societal pressures brought against it.

Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Qluilts in Movies From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net>

I know we sometimes discuss this topic here and I wondered if any of you have seen the recent movie "Away From Her". The movie was made in Canada. It is about a woman who has Altzheimers and the effects of the disease on her husband. The facility where she chooses to live has quilts on the walls in many of the hallways. Interesting.

Judy Knorr

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Subject: RE: Quilts for a cause From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 11:05:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Yup. My great grandmother provided my mother with a small trust fund to ensure that "she never have to ask a man for anything"!

We are making progress though, one girl at a time. My youngest daughter, now 25, has finished her service with Americorps/Vista and is interviewing for jobs in many places. She has a very serious beau - who is in transition job wise as well. I cannot tell you the number of well intentioned notes she has gotten in the last month from her aunt, Godmother, etc. admonishing her NOT to put her own life on hold to wait for him.

In fact, she was very surprized that anyone would think she would do such a stupid thing ( before any kind of enagement) and said so. Why do they think I would do such a thing, she asked me? Beause too many women before you have, was my reply.

Best newbie

-----Original Message----- From: Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle [mailto:maquilterepix.net] Sent: Monday, April 21, 2008 9:49 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: Quilts for a cause

Newbie,

I agree with you, the Suffrage movement is a very complicated issue especially when you consider the attitudes of the time which were so different than looking at the issue from our perspectives today.

My grandmother, born in 1897 was raised in New Jersey by a mother who was also very supportive of the Suffrage movement in spite of the conservative reputation of the family. My understanding of family history is that my great grandmother, born in 1846 (who was a quilt maker) may have been far more outspoken on the subject than her daughter but we have no confirmation she participated in any other way than monetary donations and sharing her opinion in correspondence and conversations with others. That I am aware of there are no quilts surviving that supported themselves or were made to raise funds to support the issue, but my family research is ongoing.

That said, my grandmother (the youngest of 7 and a very spoiled daddy's girl/baby of the family) definitely reflected her mother's influence when raising my mother who was born in September 1919 between proposal and ratification of the 19th Amendment and later graduated from college with a Bachelor's Degree. There are no known records to indicate the family's male point of view on the subject. My grandmother often reminisced of the "great day when women received the right to vote" and made me promise as a young girl that I would exercise my right to vote every time I am afforded the opportunity.

I find it interesting as I look back at the influence these women have had on my attitudes as well.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle (Living in PA where I get to exercise my 19th Amendment right in tomorrow's primaries!) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: textile towns From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 11:24:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

In looking through family records I am reminded of the silk industry in New Jersey. In a census report for Clifton City, New Jersey there are various residents of my father's neighborhood listed whose occupations are listed as 'pattern maker', 'laborer' and 'mender' for 'textile' or 'silk mills' industries.

This information might be a duplication of something someone else posted but I thought I would pass the information along anyway.

Greta ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: John Rice Irwin From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsscharp.org> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 08:17:11 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Please say it ain't so!! I read that book 25 years ago and fell in love with the stories of quilt makers and how quilts are a part of people's lives. I have learned since that you can't believe everything, but surely not that one too. If anyone has more to share with the group,

I'd like to hear it. (Or off list if you prefer.)

Laura, in Seattle where we had snow and sun and more snow and thunder

and lighning this weekend. Snow Falling on my White Camelias and Lavendar Azaleas

>Once I mentioned John Rice Irwin (TN) on this list, and someone who perhaps >lived in the region responded off-list, noting that he "folksied" up the >quilters in his book and created some unhappiness as a result.... >

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Subject: looking for From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:24:45 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

I am looking for Darlene Christopherson, a quilt maker in Texas, use to live in the Dakotas. If someone knows her, could you please pass this message on asking her to contact me at quiltdatingjetlink.net.

Thanks so much! Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD New Pathways into Quilt History www.antiquequiltdating.com www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com A0

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Subject: RE: Quilts for a cause From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 12:14:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Newbie, We apparently had great-grannies who thought alike. My great grandmother left my grandmother a substantial trust fund (in the 40s-50s), because she believed women should always have their own money. It was then divided between my mother and my aunt, NOT my uncles (one of whom was perpetually sour grapes). Now, on my mother's death my sisters and I are beneficiaries, and fancy that, I have my own money. Great granny done good.

And your daughter should know that women still do that, always. We try to think we've come really far but... Candace Perry

her NOT to put her own life on hold to wait for him.

In fact, she was very surprized that anyone would think she would do such a stupid thing ( before any kind of enagement) and said so. Why do they think I would do such a thing, she asked me? Beause too many women before you have, was my reply.

Best newbie

-----Original Message----- From: Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle [mailto:maquilterepix.net] Sent: Monday, April 21, 2008 9:49 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: Quilts for a cause

Newbie,

I agree with you, the Suffrage movement is a very complicated issue especially when you consider the attitudes of the time which were so different than looking at the issue from our perspectives today.

My grandmother, born in 1897 was raised in New Jersey by a mother who was also very supportive of the Suffrage movement in spite of the conservative reputation of the family. My understanding of family history is that my great grandmother, born in 1846 (who was a quilt maker) may have been far more outspoken on the subject than her daughter but we have no confirmation she participated in any other way than monetary donations and sharing her opinion in correspondence and conversations with others. That I am aware of there are no quilts surviving that supported themselves or were made to raise funds to support the issue, but my family research is ongoing.

That said, my grandmother (the youngest of 7 and a very spoiled daddy's girl/baby of the family) definitely reflected her mother's influence when raising my mother who was born in September 1919 between proposal and ratification of the 19th Amendment and later graduated from college with a Bachelor's Degree. There are no known records to indicate the family's male point of view on the subject. My grandmother often reminisced of the "great day when women received the right to vote" and made me promise as a young girl that I would exercise my right to vote every time I am afforded the opportunity.

I find it interesting as I look back at the influence these women have had on my attitudes as well.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle (Living in PA where I get to exercise my 19th Amendment right in tomorrow's primaries!)

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Subject: Gee bend quilts From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 16:19:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Just saw on the news the tour John McCain is taking of Gee Bend. Bought 3 quilts and there were some very elated quilters. Nothing said or shown as to price or quilt design.

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Subject: textile towns/silk industry From: velialivehotmail.com Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 17:19:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Greta and list, There is never too much talk about the silk industry in my view of his tory of quilts or bedcovers. Thanks Greta for your interest. We here in Be lleville, Michigan are studying more silk pieces. As the mulberry trees tr y to take over our gardens we remember that they fed he silk worms with mul berry leaves and tried to or had success with silk industry. Again I ill r emind all to check out Samples book SilkQuilts. It sure opened my eyes abo ut silk in the US. Velia

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Subject: Gee's Bend Quilts & John McCain From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 03:32:03 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

--0-452016279-1208860323:25772 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Joan,

Good Morning! It would be great to see what the three designs looked like and the prices. I was able to locate a video showing the Senator holding a lovely quilt. Just posted the video on www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com.

Best, Kyra Hicks

From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2008 16:19:26 -0400

Just saw on the news the tour John McCain is taking of Gee Bend. Bought

3 quilts and there were some very elated quilters. Nothing said or shown as to price or quilt design.

--0-452016279-1208860323:25772--

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Subject: sufferage patterns From: palamporeaol.com Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 06:42:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Since there are quilt patterns that represent the Temperance Movement, where there patterns to represent the Sufferagist? I have never seen S quilts or V (vote) quilts. Did their group have a color other than their white dresses? I made a white dress (like the Sufferagist) so that I could walk in an ERA march in DC in 1978. My alarm clock didn't work and I missed the bus --- literally. I do wish I had saved that dress..... I was devasated to miss that march. I do know that a?red, white and blue patchwork?banner?with the letters?ERA were made for a speech Alan Alda gave in Raleigh, NC. I bet that got tossed. I have photos of the sign. Wonder who made it? Any of you Raleigh folks know?

Be careful of what you read and believe when doing research on the Internet. I am helping my daughter with a genealogy report for school. I did lots and lots of research on my family years ago. This week I have gone on the Internet and found some really messed up information regarding facts that are well documented. Very annoying because it is difficult to correct. Why do some people think that all Lancasters had to pass thru Lancaster, PA to get anywhere in the colonies? OK, I have vented. Off to eat breakfast. In stormy, rainy eastern NC, Lynn

Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio The Creative Caregiver New Bern, NC palamporeaol.com

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Subject: Gee's Bend Quilts & John McCain From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

Thanx for the video. Wish more quilts would have been shown individually. I have a terrible time with the community's name. Keep wanting to call it the BeeGees. :-)

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Subject: Re: Gee's Bend Quilts & John McCain From: Jccullencrewaol.com

Hi, If I heard correctly, McCain bought three quilts for $2,500 EACH. Maybe quilters should move to Gee's Bend when they're ready to sell their wares. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: suffrage patterns From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 08:58:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Re Lynn's > I made a white dress (like the Sufferagist) so that I could walk in an ERA > march in DC in 1978. My alarm clock didn't work and I missed the bus --- > literally. I do wish I had saved that dress..... I was devasated

Lynn deah, all dressed up and no where to go, eh?

I love this story!!! I can hear Norah telling her grandchildren, "Your great-grandmother was going to march in an ERA demonstration. She made herself a lovely white dress. She felt adamantly about the cause. But her alarm did not go off.

Still, she still had her white dress. And that's what counts, isn't it?"

Good intentions are wonderful. But a dress, you can lay hands on.

Laughing like a loon in looziana, Gaye

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Subject: Re: sufferage patterns From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 10:24:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Gee Lynn, I thought everything worthwhile (Lancasters included) passed through PA. (G) Cinda

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Subject: RE: Quilts for a cause From: "Betsy Lewis" <lwslewiswritingservices.com> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 10:30:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

I just want to throw out another couple of thoughts regarding this quilt that may encourage some other theories - the 1922 date is 50 years after 1872. In 1872, Susan B. Anthony challenged the right to vote in the presidential election (Ulysses S. Grant) and voted. She was later charged (and arrested) with illegal voting.

Could the initials stand for a group and not a person? Could the G initial be, in some way, related to Grant?

Betsy

-----Original Message----- From: Betsy Lewis [mailto:lwslewiswritingservices.com] Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2008 10:21 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: RE: [qhl] RE: Quilts for a cause

I have a couple of comments to make regarding the suffrage quilts thread.

I am assisting with a quilt documentation project at the Susan B. Anthony House (Rochester, NY) www.susanbanthonyhouse.org. I *believe* we have found a suffrage quilt/throw. It measures 65" x 35". I hope to research this particular quilt further and to write an article on it. However, in my mind, there are contradictions in the quilt.

When we first unboxed this quilt (it is in the House archives) we laid it out and I just kept staring at it. There was something different about this quilt but at first I couldn't put my finger on it and then I had that "Aha!" moment. It was in the colors of the quilt. They are suffrage colors: purple, green, white, gold, and black. The quilt is in the silk crazy style, constructed biscuit style with a wool batting. The quilt has condition problems. There is a prominent center block in a pinwheel or windmill pattern. I have been unable to equate any significance of this pattern to the suffrage movement, but maybe you folks can help with that. Is this pattern common with a particular state or group?

The other information on the quilt is that there is an embroidered date: 1922, and the initials of H.A.G. Of course, 1922 is two years after voting rights were granted. As of yet we have been unable to determine who the initials belong to or the significance of the date. Any thoughts? It may also be that this is not an American quilt.

In documenting these quilts (and researching the two Anthony quilts in the Rochester Museum & Science Center) I have taken photographs. I know it was requested that I post some of them. During research I have had to sign permitted use forms and so without providing my pictures, I am instead referring those interested to the institutions themselves.

At the Susan B. Anthony House (www.susanbanthonyhouse.org), please call: (585) 235-6124 and ask for Mary Ellen Sweeney. At the Rochester Museum & Science Center (www.rmsc.org), please contact Kathryn Murano, Coordinator, Collections, at (585) 271-4552, Ext. 329, or email Kathryn_muranormsc.org.

Thanks to all and I look forward to any replies.

Betsy Lewis

-----Original Message----- From: Newbie Richardson [mailto:pastcraftsverizon.net] Sent: Monday, April 21, 2008 11:06 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: Quilts for a cause

Yup. My great grandmother provided my mother with a small trust fund to ensure that "she never have to ask a man for anything"!

We are making progress though, one girl at a time. My youngest daughter, now 25, has finished her service with Americorps/Vista and is interviewing for jobs in many places. She has a very serious beau - who is in transition job wise as well. I cannot tell you the number of well intentioned notes she has gotten in the last month from her aunt, Godmother, etc. admonishing her NOT to put her own life on hold to wait for him.

In fact, she was very surprized that anyone would think she would do such a stupid thing ( before any kind of enagement) and said so. Why do they think I would do such a thing, she asked me? Beause too many women before you have, was my reply.

Best newbie

-----Original Message----- From: Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle [mailto:maquilterepix.net] Sent: Monday, April 21, 2008 9:49 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: Quilts for a cause

Newbie,

I agree with you, the Suffrage movement is a very complicated issue especially when you consider the attitudes of the time which were so different than looking at the issue from our perspectives today.

My grandmother, born in 1897 was raised in New Jersey by a mother who was also very supportive of the Suffrage movement in spite of the conservative reputation of the family. My understanding of family history is that my great grandmother, born in 1846 (who was a quilt maker) may have been far more outspoken on the subject than her daughter but we have no confirmation she participated in any other way than monetary donations and sharing her opinion in correspondence and conversations with others. That I am aware of there are no quilts surviving that supported themselves or were made to raise funds to support the issue, but my family research is ongoing.

That said, my grandmother (the youngest of 7 and a very spoiled daddy's girl/baby of the family) definitely reflected her mother's influence when raising my mother who was born in September 1919 between proposal and ratification of the 19th Amendment and later graduated from college with a Bachelor's Degree. There are no known records to indicate the family's male point of view on the subject. My grandmother often reminisced of the "great day when women received the right to vote" and made me promise as a young girl that I would exercise my right to vote every time I am afforded the opportunity.

I find it interesting as I look back at the influence these women have had on my attitudes as well.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle (Living in PA where I get to exercise my 19th Amendment right in tomorrow's primaries!) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: S quilts and V quilts. From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 7:07:29 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

The V quilts are always related to Victory quilts of WWII. I have about a dozen separate examples of V quilts. They were all made after the right to vote was granted. I collect S quilts, DAH!, because of my first name, but never thought about them in relationship to Suffrage. It is certainly a possibility. They are not common in the marketplace but they do pop up every now and then. They are generally from around the late nineteenth century - early twentieth century. The temperance patterns are most identifiable. Although, truth be told, there is no concrete documentation linking those patterns with Temperance. All of the history has been handed down word-of-mouth. Is this kind of lore as questionable as UGRR? sue reich -- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

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Subject: RE: Quilts for a cause From: "Betsy Lewis" <lwslewiswritingservices.com> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 10:21:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

I have a couple of comments to make regarding the suffrage quilts thread.

I am assisting with a quilt documentation project at the Susan B. Anthony House (Rochester, NY) www.susanbanthonyhouse.org. I *believe* we have found a suffrage quilt/throw. It measures 65" x 35". I hope to research this particular quilt further and to write an article on it. However, in my mind, there are contradictions in the quilt.

When we first unboxed this quilt (it is in the House archives) we laid it out and I just kept staring at it. There was something different about this quilt but at first I couldn't put my finger on it and then I had that "Aha!" moment. It was in the colors of the quilt. They are suffrage colors: purple, green, white, gold, and black. The quilt is in the silk crazy style, constructed biscuit style with a wool batting. The quilt has condition problems. There is a prominent center block in a pinwheel or windmill pattern. I have been unable to equate any significance of this pattern to the suffrage movement, but maybe you folks can help with that. Is this pattern common with a particular state or group?

The other information on the quilt is that there is an embroidered date: 1922, and the initials of H.A.G. Of course, 1922 is two years after voting rights were granted. As of yet we have been unable to determine who the initials belong to or the significance of the date. Any thoughts? It may also be that this is not an American quilt.

In documenting these quilts (and researching the two Anthony quilts in the Rochester Museum & Science Center) I have taken photographs. I know it was requested that I post some of them. During research I have had to sign permitted use forms and so without providing my pictures, I am instead referring those interested to the institutions themselves.

At the Susan B. Anthony House (www.susanbanthonyhouse.org), please call: (585) 235-6124 and ask for Mary Ellen Sweeney. At the Rochester Museum & Science Center (www.rmsc.org), please contact Kathryn Murano, Coordinator, Collections, at (585) 271-4552, Ext. 329, or email Kathryn_muranormsc.org.

Thanks to all and I look forward to any replies.

Betsy Lewis

-----Original Message----- From: Newbie Richardson [mailto:pastcraftsverizon.net] Sent: Monday, April 21, 2008 11:06 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: Quilts for a cause

Yup. My great grandmother provided my mother with a small trust fund to ensure that "she never have to ask a man for anything"!

We are making progress though, one girl at a time. My youngest daughter, now 25, has finished her service with Americorps/Vista and is interviewing for jobs in many places. She has a very serious beau - who is in transition job wise as well. I cannot tell you the number of well intentioned notes she has gotten in the last month from her aunt, Godmother, etc. admonishing her NOT to put her own life on hold to wait for him.

In fact, she was very surprized that anyone would think she would do such a stupid thing ( before any kind of enagement) and said so. Why do they think I would do such a thing, she asked me? Beause too many women before you have, was my reply.

Best newbie

-----Original Message----- From: Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle [mailto:maquilterepix.net] Sent: Monday, April 21, 2008 9:49 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: Quilts for a cause

Newbie,

I agree with you, the Suffrage movement is a very complicated issue especially when you consider the attitudes of the time which were so different than looking at the issue from our perspectives today.

My grandmother, born in 1897 was raised in New Jersey by a mother who was also very supportive of the Suffrage movement in spite of the conservative reputation of the family. My understanding of family history is that my great grandmother, born in 1846 (who was a quilt maker) may have been far more outspoken on the subject than her daughter but we have no confirmation she participated in any other way than monetary donations and sharing her opinion in correspondence and conversations with others. That I am aware of there are no quilts surviving that supported themselves or were made to raise funds to support the issue, but my family research is ongoing.

That said, my grandmother (the youngest of 7 and a very spoiled daddy's girl/baby of the family) definitely reflected her mother's influence when raising my mother who was born in September 1919 between proposal and ratification of the 19th Amendment and later graduated from college with a Bachelor's Degree. There are no known records to indicate the family's male point of view on the subject. My grandmother often reminisced of the "great day when women received the right to vote" and made me promise as a young girl that I would exercise my right to vote every time I am afforded the opportunity.

I find it interesting as I look back at the influence these women have had on my attitudes as well.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle (Living in PA where I get to exercise my 19th Amendment right in tomorrow's primaries!)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re ERA march From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 11:19:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Lynn, I have been thinking of making an ERA quilt. I still have all my paraphenalia from when I marched in Tallehassee - not sure of the year. We all wore white with gold and purple ribbons across our bodies. But my lasting memory of that event is standing in formation on the street ready to march and looking up the hill at the state house. For those of you who have never seen the Florida Capital I will briefly describe what I saw. There are two domed buildings, one for the house and the other for the senate. These domes are separated by a massive sphere containing offices. I remember thinking, "Oh my God, it's a giant phallic symbol. We are

doomed." And we were. Our district rep, who ran pro-ERA changed his vote to no and we lost by one vote. I think we were one of the last states needed.

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Subject: Gee's Bend Quilts and John McCain From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>

I laughed when I saw the video as it made me remember something from the

past that is a cute part of living in NH during presidential primary

season. I'll bet Senator McCain's wife had something to do with his purchase of a20 Gees Bend quilt, aside from politics. Not sure if it's a well known

fact or20 not, but Cindy McCain LOVES quilts. In 2000, when JM was running for20 president she made the bus McCain, and his entourage were on, stop and turn20 around and backtrack to stop at a local quilt shop here in NH that she20 spotted as they were driving by. She refused to go on with their plans for20 the day without going into the shop and spent AGES wandering in the shop

(for nearly an hour) and disrupted his entire campaign tour that day. She purchased a quilt from the shop to hang in their Arizona home and

just20 HAD to admire bolt after bolt of fabric while JM, media and others waiting20 impatiently for her outside. News traveled fast in the NH quilting20 community about this, I must say, and many of us NH quilters shared a20 knowing smile about the lure of quilt shops, fabric and how many of us20 wife's make our husbands wait while we shop now and again. : ) Have to admit that Cindy earned a soft spot in my heart by putting a

stop to20 a presidential campaign in order to visit The Villiage Quilter quilt

shop in20 Chester NH. Sadly, that shop closed a few years later, it was my favorite20 shop. But, it was for a good reason, the two women that owned the shop felt20 that they were devoting too much time to the shop and not enough time to

their respective children. Quilters and quilt shop owners are moms too. I thought I would share this story about Cindy McCain and I figure he

might20 make a present of that quilt to her. I didn't take note of her in the20 background while McCain held up the quilt, but I am sure that she will be20 delighted to have it as she is quite the quilt fan, obviously. Linda Heminway Plaistow NH, very glad the NH primary "season" is long over with and

looking20 forward to peace after the election, whoever wins

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Subject: What to do with fabric? From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 13:39:43 -0400

Dear List, I had a yard sale - which I advertized as having lots of great fabric - but no one came. I have done this before - once every five years or so - and usually lots of folks show up. Like many of us on the list I get stuff given to me -"here, you like this stuff". Anyway, now I have lots ( about 130 yards worth)-of lengths of great cotton fabric prints - mostly all in 2 and 3 yard cuts, as well as rolls of 1 yard plus pieces. Salvation Army does not take fabric -except on the bolt.

This would be a great donation to a quilting group who does some work for a hospital, nursing home, etc. I do not want to ship any of it - way too expensive. But if anyone knows a worthy group/cause in the Richmond,VA-Philadelphia, PA corridor, I am up and down Interstate 95 enough that I could deliver/meet someone in the next 2 months sometime.

Newbie Richardson 703-684-0863 Alexandria,VA

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Subject: Re: Gee's Bend Quilts and John McCain From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 15:00:28 EDT X-Message-Number: 13

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JM's got my vote - a quilter in the White House - can't go wrong ...... Mitzi from Summery Vermont ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gees' Bend quilts From: "Sarah Hough" <dougandsarah1gmail.com> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 15:24:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

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Maybe they should run Cindy McCain ...

Sarah (from the WARM Florida Panhandle)

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Subject: Re: Gees' Bend quilts From: RAGLADYaol.com Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 16:51:19 EDT X-Message-Number: 15

Maybe they both can stay in Arizona and Cindy can interest John in collecting quilts when he retires from the Senate. Was it said that Cindy McCain is an actual quilter or that she is just a quilt collector? With the deep money pockets that she has (her own personal wealth), John paying $2500/ea for quilts in Gees Bend is a piece of cake.

Gloria ragladyaol.com dougandsarah1gmail.com writes: Maybe they should run Cindy McCain ...

Sarah (from the WARM Florida Panhandle) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Gees' Bend quilts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 18:43:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

Was it said that Cindy McCain is > an actual quilter or that she is just a quilt collector?> My impression is that she is not a quilter but a great admirer. Perhaps quilts will adorn the walls of the White House? Linda H in NH

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Subject: Re: Gees' Bend quilts From: RAGLADYaol.com Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 20:47:26 EDT X-Message-Number: 17

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Is the McCain house white in Arizona. <grin>

Gloria ragladyaol.com ibquiltncomcast.net writes:

Perhaps quilts will adorn the walls of the White House? Linda H in NH ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Gees' Bend quilts From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 19:58:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 18

Re: Cindy McCain is > an actual quilter or that she is just a quilt collector? With the deep money > pockets that she has (her own personal wealth), John paying $2500/ea for > quilts in Gees Bend is a piece of cake.

May be a piece of cake for the McCains: but it beats woofing down Big Macs & fries at MacDonald's as a symbol. And, in my view, it beats "preaching" politics from a church pulpit.

What is that supposed to mean: "JUST a quilt collector"?!

Like all those folks crowding the Gee's Bend exhibits and many who own quilts from the Gee's Bend quiltmakers? Their motives are somehow impure?

One who loves quilts but hasn't made a quilt in a lonnng time, Gaye

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Subject: Friendship Quilters will Host Lucinda Cawley From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 10:17:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

To everyone interested:

Lucinda Cawley is scheduled to be the guest speaker at the regular meeting of the Friendship Quilters of Southern Chester County, on Monday, April 28, 2008, at 7:00 p.m. The subject of her lecture is 'Pennsylvania Quilts' which promises to be wonderful. If you have not had an opportunity to her Cinda speak and you will be in the Oxford, PA area next Monday I hope you will be able to join us. Guests are always welcome to attend.

The meeting will be held at Elk Ridge School, 200 Wickersham Road, Oxford, PA 19363. We meet in the cafeteria.

Directions to Elk Ridge School: From Route 1 in Oxford take the 472 head south through downtown Oxford. Follow Route 472-S (aka, Market Street) and turn right on 8th Street. At the stop sign turn left onto Broad Street and continue to the school parking lot.

There is also a second parking lot off of Wickersham Road in front of the school and to get to it continue on 472-S and turn right on Wickersham Road - the school will be on the right.

Please contact me if you have any questions at maquilterepix.net.

We hope to see you there!

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

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Subject: Quilting First Lady (was Gees Bend quilts and John McCain) From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsscharp.org> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 08:24:48 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I've often wondered what it would be like if an avid quilter were the

First Lady. Dos she get a sewing room in the White House with lots of shelves and a design wall? Maybe she hides fabric under the bed in the Lincoln Bedroom? Does she have her quilting friends over every Wednesday night? Does she go to quilt retreats? Can't you just see her Secret Service detail following her around at quilt shows. Will they

carry her Bernina to classes? Sorry, getting silly. Most important, would she even have TIME to quilt?? Maybe she gives it up, or maybe she never had time in the first place, being married to a Senator or Governor, etc... Just wondering. Laura in Seattle

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Subject: Re: Quilting First Lady (was Gees Bend quilts and John McCain) From: RAGLADYaol.com Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 11:38:25 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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Thanks for the giggles in your message. It was a nice day brightener. 8-)

Gloria lrobinsscharp.org writes:

I've often wondered what it would be like if an avid quilter were the First Lady. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Possible age of quilt?? From: RAGLADYaol.com Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 12:11:31 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

http://bp2.blogger.com/_DbyWt1UEo-k/SA8m9wS-TsI/AAAAAAAAAvo/bWwuBuqXIy4/s1600- h/Vintage-String-Quilt.jpg OR: http://tinyurl.com/6khk5c

An acquaintance on a quilt list purchase this quilt from Ebay last year. She was given no info/provenance on it, but now is wondering if someone could give a possible estimate on the age based on the fabrics in the quilt. I realize it's one of those "haystack" things but thought I would ask the experts. 8-)

Gloria ragladyaol.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilting First Lady (was Gees Bend quilts and John McCain) From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 10:47:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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I bet your last words are the answers. I think being married to a male politician means the woman gives up her life to the cause and doesn't have time for herself. Ugh......arden

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

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Subject: Quilting First Lady (was Gees Bend quilts and John McCain) From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 13:58:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Eleanor sure didn't !! :-)

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Subject: Re: What to do with fabric? From: "lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 12:19:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Newbie, Call the local Lutheran Church. We make quilts for missionaries and need fabric, all types. Lonnie Schlough

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Subject: Re: Quilting First Lady (was Gees Bend quilts and John McCain) From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 13:16:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I don't think it's fair to assume that a politician's wife has to give up her life. It's possible for an intelligent woman to decide that that IS her life---supporting her husband's political life, and I don't think that's always a bad thing by definition. A woman can make an intelligent decision to support her husband and to make his goals part of hers and that can bring a unity and oneness in a marriage that can be a beautiful thing.

I have had two husbands in my life and I know that both of them were better men and accomplished more because of my support. I chose to be a full time homemaker and mother. That's a worthy occupation and a worthy career and just because I may not have received the public praise for what I did

doesn't mean I was somehow "x-ed out" as a woman. I chose to make among my goals in life being at home full time to raise our kids and to support my husband in his career goals. Sure, I gave up other possible careers for the CAREER that I chose, but it was my choice made intelligently and willingly and I honestly cannot imagine anyone more fulfilling or rewarding personally.

A political wife could go through the same kind of process in her thinking and decisionmaking and I don't see a thing wrong with it.

Stephanie Higgins

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Subject: More antique quilts on the blog- From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 15:10:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

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Hello Friends, I just put up some new pics on the Quilt Flap blog-enjoy! http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com/ I'll be teaching in Denver next week-come up and say 'hi!" Pepper (who's re-packing to make it all fit in two bags)

-- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com peppercory.blogspot.com quiltflapper.blogspot.com Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker

203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

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Subject: Re: Quilting First Lady (was Gees Bend quilts and John McCain) From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 12:19:34 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

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Of course, and I'm sure there are other examples to prove me wrong.

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

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Subject: McCain's visit to Gee's Bend From: Matt Arnett <marnettearthlink.net> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 14:25:48 -0400 (GMT-04:00) X-Message-Number: 11

A few notes about Senator McCain's visit in Gee's Bend-

Cindy McCain was not with him. He purchased three quilts made by three different quiltmakers. The total for the three quilts was $14,000. He also bought several dvds and a music cd. The women presented him with one of the books, signed by a number of the women present. After his visit, he loaded a group of quiltmakers onto his bus and support vehicles and drove us to, and across on, the ferry. We ate lunch on the bank of the river and then he headed off to other stops. He was very friendly, expressed an interest in their art, and allowed us to select three quilts for him. He selected the three quilts, wrote a check, and then we were off to the ferry. Several staff members bought smaller quilts and other items available at the Collective. The women (and men) were appreciative he made a special trip to Gee's Bend, and asked him not to forget about them once he was gone. As you might expect, the area is very much a Barack and Hillary stronghold. As a matter of fact, some of the quiltmakers have been invited by the Democratic Party to be their guests at the Democratic National Convention in Denver. Details are still being worked out. Thanks, Matt

Matt Arnett Tinwood 512 Means Street Suite 305 Atlanta, GA 30318

Phone-404.607.7172 Mobile-404.234.8050

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Subject: Re: Quilting First Lady (was Gees Bend quilts and John McCain) From: "Fred and Patti Chartrand" <1chartfpcomcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 12:13:09 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

Wasn't it George Bush Sr.'s wife - her name escapes me at the moment - who was a wonderful needlewoman? I seem to remember her doing a huge needle pointed (I think) rug. There were pictures and an article in a ladies magazine about her handiwork and the rug. If I remember correctly she spent years doing it.

Patti in Vancouver Washington http://quiltingisstillmypassion.blogspot.com/

http://community.webshots.com/user/pattichartrand

 

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Subject: Re Quilting First Lady From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 15:14:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

Stephanie wrote:

" I don't think it's fair to assume that a politician's wife has to give up her life. It's possible for an intelligent woman to decide that that IS her life---supporting her husband's political life, and I don't think that's always a bad thing by definition. A woman can make an intelligent decision to support her husband and to make his goals part of hers and that can bring a unity and oneness in a marriage....."

Or a woman and a man might share goals, ideological as well as personal.

Like, say, Bill and Hillary Clinton.....

Or Dick and Lynn Cheney....

Thanks, Stephanie, for offering a thoughtful alternative viewpoint and reminding us that every person and every marriage is unique.

So much of our decision-making is subconscious anyway. We rationalize it afterwards. It just "feels right" at the time, based on values and ideas and desires that we've internalized long before.

(That's what Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken" is REALLY about, no matter what your English teacher told you: facing two seemingly equal choices and then just taking one road---and later rationalizing it, in that case with the favorite American Myth: "I did it my way.")

Re the McCains and Gee's Bend and the ladies there: certainly the visit was symbolic as well as informational. But it represented a choice that I personally believe is commendable---to affirm the value of work that is regarded as "woman's work" (as opposed to "a career") and of a community comprised largely of older women who took the opportunities offered them and made the best out of them. They have significant, representative medical needs that should be part of the decision-making when we consider government policies. Those women put a face on a lot of issues of importance. I've known several life-time politicians pretty well, and I have always been impressed with how much campaigning changes them personally, erodes the ideological lines to which they meant to hew.

Most politicians of all parties who go to that area of Alabama end up speechifying in a church in Selma, not visiting folks in one of the many rural Black Belt communities that have been decimated by big box stores and changed technologies. I suspect one learns more about "the work of the people" in such hamlets.

And who knows? I remember Jackie Kennedy's bringing class and history back to the White House and how important that seemed to a whole generation that hadn't even been able to vote for her husband. It reaffirmed the importance of beauty and preservation, gave a renewed respect to the past and its remnants, elevated taste. Should Mr. McCain be elected, maybe there WILL be quilts in the White House.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: Quilting First Lady (was Gees Bend quilts and John McCain) From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 21:58:28 +0000 X-Message-Number: 14

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George Bush Sr's wife Barbara Bush.

-------------- Original message -------------- From: "Fred and Patti Chartrand" <1chartfpcomcast.net>

> Wasn't it George Bush Sr.'s wife - her name escapes me at the moment - > who was a wonderful needlewoman? > Patti in Vancouver Washington > http://quiltingisstillmypassion.blogspot.com/ > --NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_9183_1208987908_0--

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Subject: Re: Possible age of quilt?? From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 22:04:23 +0000 X-Message-Number: 15

Gloria, 1940 date for your friend. Polly Mello > > An acquaintance on a quilt list purchase this quilt from Ebay last year. She > was given no info/provenance on it, but now is wondering if someone could > give a possible estimate on the age based on the fabrics in the quilt. > Gloria

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Subject: Re: Possible age of quilt?? From: RAGLADYaol.com Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 18:08:44 EDT X-Message-Number: 16

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Thank you for the input Polly!

Gloria

pollymellocomcast.net writes:

Gloria, 1940 date for your friend. Polly Mello ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Eastern Shore From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 21:59:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 17

The Eastern shore Quilt Study Group met last week. The topic was pink. I brought my fraktur inscribed 1852 PA German Rolling Stone with lovely pink borders (if you can picture a sophisticated double pink you'll get the idea). I had two Eastern Shore examples set on point with sashing but no cornerstones: an 1860s Evening Star and an 1870s Chimney Sweep. Both quilts are primarily pink and green. The highlight of the day appeared early in the proceedings, an 1830 Compass from Virginia. The very large blocks (about 30") are pieced in red, pink and an orange and blue print. The quilt has a marvelous chintz border and a tape binding. It's in great shape except for some shattering in the chintz. A Lone Star crib quilt from PA declared its origins in red, green, double pink, chrome yellow and double blue. There was a charming pink and white Double Irish Chain with a swag border from the 1860s. An Oak Leaf summer spread was made of various double pinks with urns in the border. One very creative member brought "quilt chunks," (bits of an old quilt incorporated beautifully into a finished piece using repro fabrics to create 4- and 9-Patch borders around the original Basket blocks. It's quite

amazing. We saw a Lancaster Co. Pinwheel with a border or Centennial cheater cloth and a Log Cabin with great gaudy prints. There was a charming pink and white Double Irish Chain with a swag border from the 1860s. A 1930s Autumn Leaves had multiple borders of a striking pink and purple print. Another 30s quilt was a Basket of Tulips with lots of detail embroidered in black. A unique child's quilt from the 1930 was divided into quadrants filled with cookie cutter-type images of bunnies, hearts, leaves, a baby doll etc. A raspberry and pink President's Wreaths with triple swag borders really gilded the lily by flaunting prairie points. There was a lovely multicolor Sweet Pea kit quilt. A real family

treasure was a Lancaster Rose appliqué from the 1930s made of the most elegant silky ivory, pink and green solids. It wasn't pink but a small quilt with a zigzag edge inscribed "The Xquisite May 1, 1930" charmed us all. It's made of tiny blue Xs on white. If only the maker had added her name. Of course, there was more, but I can't remember everything. The great thing about a study group is that new members keep coming and the regulars bring new goodies. If you can't find a group to join start your own. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: RE: What to do with fabric? From: "Tammy Fletcher" <tpfletcherearthlink.net> Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 19:25:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 18

Newbie, my name is Tammy Fletcher and I am in Alexandria too! I am a member of QU, Mount Vernon Chapter. We have a member who goes up to the Cumberland Women's Prison periodically to take quilting supplies that we do not want. She usually goes in the summer for the Cumberland show. and makes a delivery then . Anyhoo, if you would like, I can put you in contact with her this weekend. I am out of town right now and just checked my email , don't have Pat's email with me, but can get you in touch with her this weekend.

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Subject: Quilting First Lady From: "munseyjuno.com" <munseyjuno.com> Date: Thu, 24 Apr 2008 13:39:13 GMT X-Message-Number: 1

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Roselyn Carter took her sewing machine with her when she went to the Wh ite House. I don't know if she quilted or not.

And Barbara Bush sat with my mother-in-law's rug hooking group in northe rn New Hampshire during her husband's primary campaigning there. I thin k the opinion of some of the ladies was that they liked Barbara bests. Don't forget, for every married woman serving as Governor, Mayor, City C ouncilor or School Board member around this country, there is a husband supporting her efforts in the same way that Mrs. McCain is supporting Jo hn McCain. Election to public office is a family affair with even the k ids involved. Been there and done that, as a daughter and for myself as a successful candidate to office. Sandra on Cape Cod

_____________________________________________________________ Click here for great custom garage plans! http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2121/fc/Ioyw6i3mXRH2Rcjx35GmpEltRO00 kWLpBlBJafrGetPoPSXQQQbSod/

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Subject: Re: Eastern Shore From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 24 Apr 2008 10:39:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

"If you can't find a study group start your own." Great advice, but I gotta say that after ready what Lucinda reported, I think I'd rather just move to the Eastern Shore. WOW would I have loved to have been at that meeting to see all these glorious quilts. Steph Higgins (in the Midwest)

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Subject: Re: Eastern Shore From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Thu, 24 Apr 2008 12:39:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Stephanie, Feel free to join the throng of "Come Here's" moving to the Eastern Shore. It's becoming a retirement magnet for people who are tired of snow but still want four seasons. I really miss the mountains of NEPA, but flat as it is here the landscape is uniquely beautiful with water everywhere and the kind of light and sky that cry out for a paint box. Our school delays are caused by fog which you don't have to shovel. Cinda looking forward to hot, steamy summer on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: Mosaic 1890 quilts, pattern from New Orleans Expo From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Thu, 24 Apr 2008 17:10:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

During show and tell at the FVF Seminar a few weeks ago we saw a Mosaic Rose quilt dated 1888. It was a very large quilt made of (I think) one inch squares: a bouquet of red roses on a brown background. Everything, including the background, was pieced of these small squares. Cinda on the Eastern Shore