Subject: RE: sufferage patterns From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2008 15:11:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Lynn, and list The suffrage colors were: white with gold and purple. The Sewell Belmont house in Washington DC has all the pageant/tableaux/parade costumes worn by the ladies when they were active in getting the vote in the 19teens.

I restored a fabulous banner in those colors that belongs to the League of Women Voters here in DC. It had been carried on marches and parades in the 1909 -1914 period. Whenever I catalogue - or see - a hat from that period, all I can think of is: Votes for Women!

Newbie

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Subject: FW: RE: Civil War From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2008 14:48:18 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I meant, "date no earlier than 1880s" - sorry for any confusion.

Leah Zieber

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Subject: RE: Civil War From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net>

Hi - Wonder if the collective brain could answer a quick question -

Were Log Cabin Courthouse Steps quilts made during the civil war (1861?) and if so is there a reference I could look at on the subject - I have looked through my books and the ones I find date no later than the early 1880s.

Appreciate the help

Leah Zieber

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Subject: Sanitary Commission Quilts From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2008 19:00:56 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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I am making my versions of the six known Sanitary Commission Civil War soldiers' quilts; however, I can't find my photo of one of the quilts. Can't remember what book I saw it in.

(It's Hell getting old!)

What I remember about it is that it had the first verse of the Star Spangled Banner written on the center panel; which I believe had two crossed flags and an eagle and the words "Union Forever".

It is not the Rally Round the Flag boys quilt from Virginia Gunn's article; but from another book.

Please help!!! Thanks, Don Beld

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Subject: Seven Sisters Quilt Pattern From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2008 18:57:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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I just acquired a late 1800's Seven Sisters Quilt. I have always heard that this is the quilt associated with the Confederacy. Can anyone tell me why? What are the Seven Sisters.

Thanks, Don Beld

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Subject: yet another anachronistic quilt sighting From: andi0613iowatelecom.net Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2008 16:34:27 -0500 (CDT) X-Message-Number: 6

In "The Gorgeous Hussy," a movie starring Lionel Barrymore and Joan Crawford about President Andrew Jackson's friendship with Peggy Eaton -- and lots of flack about his marriage or lack thereof to Rachel, part of the setting is in 1828. During this portion of the movie, in multiple scenes they show a Grandmother's Hexagon Flower Garden. I happen to own one made by one of my great, great grandmothers in the 1930s. I'm sure she would have voted for Ol' Hickory had she been of voting age back then and women had had the right to vote, but that quilt is way out of place.

Andi in Keota, Iowa ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: yet another anachronistic quilt sighting From: "Judy Grow" <judygrowpatmedia.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 2008 01:28:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Andi,

It depends -- what were the fabrics like? Were they 1930's prints or 1830's prints? I own one from the earlier 30's or '40's. I'll send you a jpg privately.

Judy Grow

President Andrew Jackson's friendship with Peggy Eaton -- > and lots of flack about his marriage or lack thereof to Rachel, part of > the setting is in 1828. During this portion of the movie, in multiple > scenes they show a Grandmother's Hexagon Flower Garden

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Subject: Re: yet another anachronistic quilt sighting From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 2008 07:47:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Also, I'm all but certain that there were silk Grandmother's Flower Gardens (or something very) close in the middle of the 19th century.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: Seven Sisters Quilt Pattern From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>

Don:

I too had that question and found the answer on Terry Clothier Thompson's web site, http://www.terrythompson.com/civil1.html:

"The first seven states to secede the union were called the "Seven Sisters". These seven star clusters appeared on the first Confederate

flag and still retain the quilt name of "Seven Sisters"."

I love the pattern - a great one for us hand piecers!20

Dale Drake Martinsville, Indiana

Don said: >I just acquired a late 1800's Seven Sisters Quilt. I have always heard that this is the quilt associated with the Confederacy. Can anyone tell me why? What are the Seven Sisters.

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Subject: Silk industry From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 2008 09:08:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I'm reading old lists because I've been in Texas a week. Just wanted to add that when i was in Patterson, NJ a few years back, I was told the town had many mulberry trees, had a silk industry in late 18th century. Pat

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Subject: Re: Silk industry From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

Pat -- Paterson was one of manyl commercial silk centers. However, this country was never successful in culivating silk; too labor intensive,

not a stable, dependable climate and the most important thing, it takes generations to train in sericulture. It is a very tedious, slow and expensive operation.

This country found it much more profitable to import silk yarn and became the largest manufacturer of silk in the early part of thC. Helwig Silk Dye Co. was known for its silk thread and the first to import the new tin weighting process from Germany; in fact, had several of its staff train with the inventor in Germany around 1896-7.

Pat Kyser wrote:

I'm reading old lists because I've been in Texas a week. Just wanted to add that when i was in Patterson, NJ a few years back, I was told the town had many mulberry trees, had a silk industry in late 18th century.

> >

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Subject: Seven Sisters info- From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 10:27:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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I can always remember who the 'seven sisters' were because of the lyrics to the song Bonnie Blue Flag. The words were set to an Irish ditty of the day and was second in popularity only to First gallant South Carolina Nobly made the stand, Then came Alabama And took her by the hand; Next, quickly, Mississippi, Georgia, and Florida, All raised on high the Bonnie Blue flag That bears a single star. Ye men of valor gather round The banner of the right, Texas and fair Louisiana Join us in the fight; etc etc. Virginia, the apex of the struggle, didn't join the confederacy until April 1861, after the bombing of Fort Sumter and when president Lincoln called up Union troops.--

Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com peppercory.blogspot.com quiltflapper.blogspot.com Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker

3 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

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Subject: Re: Seven Sisters info- From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 10:41:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

The Seven Sisters were Confederate states? I always thought they meant the colleges (Smith, Mount Holyoke, Vassar, Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, Barnard, and Wellesley). Live and learn!

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Seven Sisters Quilt Pattern From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 07:30:01 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

Don, Terry Clothier Thompson has created a pattern called Southern Secession, and she writes:

The first seven states to secede the union were called the "Seven Sisters". These seven star clusters appeared on the first Confederate flag and still retain the quilt name of "Seven Sisters".

No affiliation, just an avid interest in the American Civil War and quilt history.

Carol Berry Merced, CA (Gateway to Yosemite)

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Subject: Re: Seven Sisters info- From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 10:59:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

We have a group of mountains around our town of Black Mountain, NC that are called the seven sisters, So I think the name Seven Sisters to applied to many situations. It is my understanding that this group of mountains was originally called the Black Brothers are they were part of the Black Mountain range, but somewhere in thelate 50's to 60's they decided to change the name because they felt it might be thought racist. Go figure. Anyway, I was happy to hear the information about the Civil War connection as I have a Seven Sisters quilt that I believe dates back to that era. I will have to get it out and take picture. Shari in NC >

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Subject: Re: yet another anachronistic quilt sighting From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 11:08:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

And earlier. We have seen them in Massachusetts and also Great Britain when we visited there a couple of years ago.

Vivien In MA ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Seven Sisters info- From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 11:13:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Lisa and All, The 'sister' collages are called the Seven Sisters. Interesting turn of a phrase. Vivien in MA ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Seven Sisters info- From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 08:19:41 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 12

A quick Google search turned up the Seven Sisters much earlier in Pleiades mythology as the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione. There is also the Pleides star cluster known as the Seven Sisters. Seems like it was adapted by the Confederacy, among others.

Mary Anne ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Seven Sisters info- From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 11:29:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Don't forget the Pleiads star cluster of Greek mythology, the seven daughters of two Greek Gods. And the skyscrapers in Moscow are collectively called the Seven Sisters. And a name given to the major oil companies.

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Subject: RE: Seven Sisters info- From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 10:23:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

The Seven Sisters are from Greek Mythology: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades_(mythology)

and also have a constellation named for them: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades_(star_cluster)

With more formal educations, and more knowledge of ancient history, Greek mythology and astronomy than most of us have now, it is not hard to see the name Seven Sisters applied to the seceding states, quilt blocks with seven groups of stars (or any group of seven). Karan from soggy Iowa

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Subject: Seven Sisters From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 11:03:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15

What is the earliest dated and/or authenticated quilt in the Seven Sisters pattern/ name?

What about the set in which the stars are set in a circle, the version more common in my area of the South?

This is a quilt that certainly was common in the South in the late 19th and early th centuries.

My own search of contemporary materials has never turned up 1860s reference, but that is not to say the pattern did not exist and was not adapted to the cause of the day. I know, of course, that does not prove the pattern was not being used then. Certainly stars (and all pointy geometrics) were and remain popular in the South.

As Joan notes, there are lots of Seven Sisters around the world, owing to those in the sky.

gaye

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Subject: Re: Seven Sisters info- From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 09:54:50 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 16

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Hi all, For our contest, "New Quilts from an Old Favorite: Seven Sisters" in 05, I put together the following for explanatory text. Judy Schwender, Curator Museum of the American Quilter's Society Paducah, KY

The Seven Sisters patchwork pattern is based on a diamond and may possibly be derived from early 19th century English paper pieced hexagons. An early American example of Seven Sisters dates from 1845, and the related Tumbling Blocks pattern appeared in Godey's Lady's Book in 1851. These diamond-based designs are frequently found in silk quilts from the late Victorian period, and a Seven Sisters mail order pattern was sold by the Ladies Art Company in 1898.

During the Depression era, mail order quilt pattern companies flourished. Mrs. Donner's Quilts published a Seven Sisters pattern and Capper's Weekly included the same construction but named it Seven Stars in a Cluster. The pattern lends itself to scrap print fabrics on a solid background in much the same way as Grandmother's Flower Garden quilts of the period are sewn.

In Greek mythology the Seven Sisters were called the Pleiades, daughters of Atlas and Hyades. In the Northern Hemisphere the star cluster known by this name is found above and to the right of the constellation Orion. The Pleiades are in the constellation Taurus, and figure in the mythology of most ancient civilizations. In the United States today the term Seven Sisters refers to the seven traditionally women's colleges that are comparable to the male Ivy League schools.

Just as those schools have changed- two of the Seven Sisters schools and all of the Ivy League colleges have become co-educational- quilt blocks may change. When challenged by the intricate construction of this design, today's quilters rose to the task. They curved seams, pieced flower diamonds, stretched shapes, made holes in their quilt, used chenille thread, and exploited the entire color palette. The Pleiades stars may have been visible since the dawn of mankind and the Seven Sisters quilt block born in the 19th century, but it has come of age in the 21st through the exceptional creativity of these quilts and quiltmakers.

--------------------------------- Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. --0-1886301533-19228890:23260--

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Subject: Re: yet another anachronistic quilt sighting From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 11:58:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 17

Several years ago I restored a wonderful cotton english paper pieced

mosaic semi-GMFG. Some of the paper was still inside. We found parts

of a letter "to Mother" dated July 11,1861 used for the foundation. Unfortunately, no other info could be found as to location of the writer or recipient of the letters. Fabrics in the quilt in the movie may have been out of date, but the

design is not.

> Also, I'm all but certain that there were silk Grandmother's Flower

> Gardens (or something very) close in the middle of the 19th century. > > Lisa Evans

Laura Syler Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles Member PAAQT Teacher, Lecturer, Judge Richardson, TX

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Subject: Re: yet another anachronistic quilt sighting From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 :58:15 +0000 X-Message-Number: 18

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I have "GMFG" quilts 1840,1830, 1790. It is one of the oldest pieced quilt patterns. Polly --NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_9261_19243495_0--

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Subject: Re: yet another anachronistic quilt sighting From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 07:55:54 +1000 X-Message-Number: 19

Perhaps we are talking here about hexagon (or mosaic) quilts. The earliest pattern published c.1830 was for a hexagon quilt and examples abound prior to that date. That said, we are talking about Hollywood in the 1930s where historical accuracy was not a strong point ;-)))

Janet O'Dell Melbourne, Australia

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Subject: RE: Silk industry From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 18:24:14 -0400 X-Message-Number:

Hi Pat,

I hope all is well with you.

Yep, Patterson, NJ had a good size industry. Looking through old census records while working on our family tree many residents jobs were identified with the silk mills. In fact, my maternal grandfather worked in the silk mills when he was young to help support his mother and younger siblings after his stepfather squandered away the family money. The family lived in Patterson, NJ area - my grandfather was born in 1892 and his father died in 1901 - I believe Grandpa was 14 or 15 when he went to work in the mills - the dates are sketchy because it was not a happy time in his life and he did not talk much about it. More research is needed . . .

Greta

-----Original Message----- From: Pat Kyser [mailto:patkyserhiwaay.net]

I'm reading old lists because I've been in Texas a week. Just wanted to add that when i was in Patterson, NJ a few years back, I was told the town had many mulberry trees, had a silk industry in late 18th century. Pat

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Subject: Re: textile towns From: "MARIE SARCHIAPONE" <mariesarchiaponeverizon.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 18:49:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 21

Cohoes and Troy, New York

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Subject: Re: Silk industry From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 :43:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 22

Sometimes useful information comes from the most unexpected sources. In my college alumnae magazine that arrived this week and I'm finally getting to read, there is a mention of silk mills --

Emanuel Epps graduated from Millersville Normal School in 1897 at the

age of 18 and became a bookkeeper at the Five Points Silk Mill in Columbia, PA.

Columbia is along the Susquehanna River along the western edge of Lancaster County. I haven't had time to do any research, but perhaps the date, city and company name will be helpful in your research.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: yet another anachronistic quilt sighting From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 02:07:52 +0000 X-Message-Number: 23

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Mosaic, Hexagon, Honeycomb, Grandmother's Flower Garden, Martha Washington' Garden, I even saw a person call one an oyster cracker quilt. I was using the original emailer's nomenclature. GMFG is a th century name. Many were made in the English paper piecing method in the early 19th century. And it isn't often that Hollywood gets the quilts right, but, quilters always look to see if they do. Polly Mello --NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_10340_192672_0--

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Subject: anachronistic quilt sighting From: "Lisa Erlandson" <lisalequilts.com> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 21:53:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 24

Hi Andi,

Was the quilt colored in 1930s colors? Hexagons were used very early. I own a quilt top from circa 1830 that is English paper pieced hexagons, so the pattern was around early - but mine has no "flower garden" pattern - just the hexagons in a random placement. I have seen some examples (in England) of more planned arrangements. Maybe they had the right idea, but the wrong "flavor" of quilt.

Now, another movie I need to look for to check out the quilt. . .

 

Lisa Erlandson

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Subject: The quilt exhibit at the Crawford County Historical Society From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sat, 26 Apr 08 22:09:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Will the person who posted on the upcoming quilt exhibit in Crawford County, PA, please email me privately? Thanks, sue reich -- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 26, 08 From: andi0613iowatelecom.net Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 01:34:13 -0500 (CDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Great Scott! I really thought I had come across a movie boo-boo, but it seems like it was operator error (i.e., my mistake).

Thanks to everyone who replied about early uses of the hexagon in many settings and designs. I did actually know that in one part of my brain (but not the part that was flying off at the mouth).

And here's the really embarassing part - the movie was black-and-white, so I have no idea what the fabrics were. I just made one large jump to a conclusion -- since so many quilt patterns are incorrectly portrayed in the movies and on TV, this movie was made in the 1930s, and I have a known provenance quilt from that date looking exactly like what was on the screen -- and landed flat on my you-know-what. My apologies! I appreciate being set straight, which is one big reason I love this list.

And more thanks for the continued information about mill or textile towns. So mcuh assorted knowledge so willingly shared!

Andi in Keota, Iowa

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Subject: Clothing Question From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 10:14:31 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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I recently made purchases at an estate sale including a batiste camisole that closed down the front with tiny pearl buttons and tied at the top with a ribbon run through the lace around the upper front and back of the camisole. Also purchased what I believe are called shirt waists. Two batiste "blouses" beautifully embroided in white on white, buttoned down the back with again tiny pearl buttons, full 3/4 length sleeves and a waist band around the bottom. I believe these garments date to the early th century based on the information I received at the sale. Can anyone suggest a basic text on clothing styles to help me more accurately date these garments. Thanks for your help Janet Henderson in Fort Worth ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: seven sisters From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 08:14:30 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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thanks everyone for you comments. As I remember being told, seven sisters was popular in the late 1800's in the South to by diehard Confederate quilters to show that the South would rise again; which is why so many of the quilts were made in the South. Interesting to know about the women's colleges--a Northern thing?

Also, Grandmother's Flower Garden is usually a 2-3 inch cell version of the traditional 3/4 inch hexagon from GB that came over in the early 1800's.

There is really nothing new under the sun. Best, Don

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Subject: Hexagon quilts From: QuiltEvalsaol.com Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 12:12:41 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

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Just confirming and going even further back, in England museums there are examples of early hexagon pieced quilts - even with GMFG style "flower" motifs and fussy cutting - some, from the middle of the 1700's. These do not have a "path" like many th century versions, but the paper pieced hexagons were common early on. I have a mostly silk paper pieced hexagon that includes flower motifs and a planned hexagon border, purchased in Bath on the last quilt study tour - circa date 1780. Many unfinished tops and "summer" spreads with hexagon floral motifs exist from the 1st quarter of the 19th century.

Deb Roberts _www.quiltappraiser.com_ (http://www.quiltappraiser.com) _www.worldofquiltstravel.com_ (http://www.worldofquiltstravel.com)

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Subject: upcoming auction in UK From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 13:16:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I don't think this went thru the first time -- if it did, I apologize!

http://www.bonhams.com/cgi-bin/public.sh/pubweb/publicSite.r?sContinentEUR& screenCatalogue&iSaleNo16286

Some good stuff here, including some quilts. Enjoy! Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: Silk industry From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 14:47:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

It seems to me that hereabouts in Montgomery County, PA there was an evolution in the types of industry in the small towns. I'm not positive about this, but it's my understanding that cigar factories (and cigar box factories) came first, then sometime in the s, I think, when cigars began to slowly lose their popularity, the silk mills (for silk hosiery, I do believe) moved into the old cigar factories (other textile concerns also). Numerous factories like this dot the small towns around here...now many are apartments or office buildings. I can think of three of them within walking distance from where I sit. It was a very significant part of the economy in these small towns -- people could not have survived without them. Candace Perry

-----Original Message----- From: Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle [mailto:maquilterepix.net] Sent: Saturday, April 26, 08 6:24 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: Silk industry

Hi Pat,

I hope all is well with you.

Yep, Patterson, NJ had a good size industry. Looking through old census records while working on our family tree many residents jobs were identified with the silk mills. In fact, my maternal grandfather worked in the silk mills when he was young to help support his mother and younger siblings after his stepfather squandered away the family money. The family lived in Patterson, NJ area - my grandfather was born in 1892 and his father died in 1901 - I believe Grandpa was 14 or 15 when he went to work in the mills - the dates are sketchy because it was not a happy time in his life and he did not talk much about it. More research is needed . . .

Greta ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: seven sisters From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 16:04:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

As I remember being told, seven sisters was > popular in the late 1800's in the South to by diehard Confederate quilters to > show that the South would rise again; which is why so many of the quilts were > made in the South.

Don,

Please edify whoever told you "diehard Confederate quilters" made quilts in the Seven Sisters pattern "to show the South would rise again."

Where do people get this kind of misinformation?!!

The culture of the South has always been marked by a veneration of the personal and communal past. Its being an agricultural land, peopled largely by a group that venerated both immediate and extended family and "clan," helped assure that. Then, its personal and tragic experience with history as the battleground of a terrible civil war that decimated families, communities, and economies reminded everyone daily of man's intersection with history and the way good intentions can come to bad ends in time (for most Southerners did not fight to preserve slavery, just as most Northeners did not fight to extinguish it). Having lost so many sons, husbands, fathers, and kinsmen in that war, southerners developed an elegiac mood. But generally they remained a sane.

After 1864-5, it would have taken a complete idiot to believe the Confederate South "would rise again." Not many of those survived that war.

Most people, formerly rich and formerly poor, were scrambling to find food and clothing.

Just consider Rapides Parish, Louisiana, where part of my family has lived since the late 18th century. Agriculture had flourished in this region intersected by the Red River and numerous other navigable waterways. Both large plantations and smaller family farms had been healthy. Alongside the developing plantation and commercial economies growing up along the Red River was a robust frontier economy based on timber and the self-sufficient farms that were increasing daily.

The Civil War ended all that. War losses in livestock alone precluded even minimal economic recovery. With fewer than half of the pre-war number of horses, asses, and mules left, residents could not engage profitably in timbering, construction, or plowing the barren fields. Food stocks were dangerously low. Half of all milk cows were dead or missing. Three-fourths of the the pigs and cattle were gone. Since the Scots-Irish subsistence farmers were herders, the greatest part of the population was plain hungry. The value of garden produce brought to market fell from $7,830 to $800 in 1870. Yields of corn dropped from 8,000 bushels in 1860 to 261,000 bushels in 1870. The split-rail fences that had been built over time had been used for both union and confederate campfires, for both armies had occupied the area. Smoke houses, the source of meat during the winter months, had long since been wiped out. Seed crops had been eaten by armies. Poultry was rare. Even the rare person of wealth who had preserved cash in a foreign bank or investment could not run an agricultural enterprise. Of the 15,000 African Americans who had formed the work force--albeit through enslavement--it is estimated fewer than 8,000 remained. And most of those had been so deluded by promises of instant wealth with freedom that they lived on the verge of starvation because they refused to work for their former masters.

Reconstruction only added to the sense of hopeless frustration. Most male residents were disenfranchised. Like the state, the parish was run by a military that was not terribly interested in coming to the aid of the black residents. President Grant had enough problems and recognized the nation at large did not support the kind of investment of capital and manpower needed to guarantee black or white civil rights and the Republican administrations made that known across the South by the early 1870s. The frustration and hatred shared by people black and white turned into flash fires and bitterness (Phil Sheridan, the Union General, was in charge of Louisiana and was quoted as saying the only way to stop black and white massacres was to do away with habeas corpus).

Reconstruction rested on retribution, not reconstruction. It had no Marshall Plan. It created the hopeless situation of a land governed by the illiterate and inexperienced while those with skills and leadership had no power. Nobody had a positive economic plan or a plan to rebuild an infrastructure that would facilitate some harmonious and fair economic opportunities for all. Chaos reigned everywhere.

The year following the end of the war brought a long drought to the hills north of the Red River and a monumental flood wiped out the cotton crop and cane seedlings in the alluvial plain south of the river. This pattern continued through the late 60's. Oh, and there was that cholera epidemic, too.

Now just how many quilting bees do you think were going on under such circumstances? And what kind of person of sight, hearing, and a modicum of intelligence could have seriously envisioned a resurrection of the Old Cause of states rights?

Quite possibly the Seven Sisters pattern took on the sacredness of family and land. Quite possibly it was a way of passing along a momentous event in the communal and family past. Although so far that is not proven, it makes sense. What doesn't make sense is that it arose from a dream of resurrecting a dream that had become a nightmare.

We live in an age where those in declared poverty own television sets and cell phones and live in subsidized housing. There are government provisions to preclude starvation as well as a growing number of private food providers. Cheap foreign labor makes clothing purchases possible. One may avail himself of education and training programs to prepare himself for economic viability.

Southerners post 1865 (and for a long time before that) had nothing but family and neighbors, and they were generally in the same boat.

I really hope it does not sound supercilious or condescending to observe that all of us need to be better versed in American history if we are to understand American quilts. The quilts we study are parts of that history.

One of the early interpreters of Southern history (Prof. Cash) said the most important thing to understand about the South is that it was still a pioneering section in 1860---and later. Since the history of a land is the history of individuals, I personally suggest H.W. Brands' lively biography of Andrew Jackson as a way to get a sense for the pattern of life South of the Ohio as well as of the kind of people who came and within a single generation rose to leadership. There are longer, more self-consciously scholarly biographies, but Brands is so readable. A good entry point.

Gaye Ingram

 

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Subject: Grandmother's Flower Garden From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 16:41:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Is the name Grandmother's Flower Garden specifically attached to those feedsack quilts from the 30's?

I know the older version as "Honeycomb" or "mosaic", but I don't know if associating the age with the name of the pattern is correct.

Thanks for your insights

Stephanie Higgins (Returning to see Quilts in a Material World in St. Louis for the second time soon!)

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Subject: Re: Sanitary Commission Quilts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 19:15:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Don Beld said: I am making my versions of the six known Sanitary Commission Civil War soldiers' quilts; however, I can't find my photo of one of the quilts. Can't remember what book I saw it in. What I remember about it is that it had the first verse of the Star Spangled Banner written on the center panel; which I believe had two crossed flags and an eagle and the words "Union Forever".

Don: In a few of the books that I brought away with me for the weekend, I did find one quilt that was similar to the one you described, but it is in the Barbara Brackman book, "Quilts from the Civil War". However, it is not identified as a US Sanitary Commission Quilt. It is dated, by Barbara, 1860 - 1864 and is at the Smoky Hill Museum, in Salina, Kansas. It has a center medallion with almost like a Whig Rose surrounding the embroidered words: "The Constitution & Union Forever". If you have that book, take a look at it on Page 44. Perhaps that is the quilt you are envisioning?

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: RE: sufferage patterns From: Alice McElwain <siscofayyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 18:01:22 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 11

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Newbie, you wrote the following regarding the Sewell Belmont house in DC. I will be making my first trip to DC next month and want to know any other places that might be a good source for quilt history that you might recommend. I already have the DAR Museum on my list.

Thanks, Alice in Arkansas

The suffrage colors were: white with gold and purple. The Sewell Belmont house in Washington DC has all the pageant/tableaux/parade costumes worn by the ladies when they were active in getting the vote in the 19teens.

I restored a fabulous banner in those colors that belongs to the League of Women Voters here in DC. It had been carried on marches and parades in the 1909 -1914 period. Whenever I catalogue - or see - a hat from that period, all I can think of is: Votes for Women!

Newbie

--------------------------------- Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. --0-834309865-19344482:49181--

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Subject: RE: sufferage patterns From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 19:31:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

I just have to ask - are you a relative/descendant of Mary and DeEtte McElw ain who had the shop and quilting business in Walworth, WI from 1812 until 1960? Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen

-----Original Message----- From: Alice McElwain [mailto:siscofayyahoo.com] Sent: Sunday, April 27, 08 9:01 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: sufferage patterns

Newbie, you wrote the following regarding the Sewell Belmont house in DC. I will be making my first trip to DC next month and want to know any other places that might be a good source for quilt history that you might recomme nd. I already have the DAR Museum on my list.

Thanks, Alice in Arkansas

The suffrage colors were: white with gold and purple. The Sewell Belmont house in Washington DC has all the pageant/tableaux/parade costumes worn by the ladies when they were active in getting the vote in the 19teens.

I restored a fabulous banner in those colors that belongs to the League of Women Voters here in DC. It had been carried on marches and parades in the 1909 -1914 period. Whenever I catalogue - or see - a hat from that period, all I can think of is: Votes for Women!

Newbie

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Subject: Alice McElwain From: Kaytripletaol.com Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 03:32:28 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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Or the Alice McElwain who had a quilt shop in Liberal Kansas?

Kay Triplett in hot, humid, but cloudy Lagos, Nigeria

In a message dated 4/27/08 4:10:42 P.M. Dateline Standard Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

Subject: RE: sufferage patterns From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 19:31:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

I just have to ask - are you a relative/descendant of Mary and DeEtte McElw ain who had the shop and quilting business in Walworth, WI from 1812 until 1960? Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: sufferage patterns From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 09:51:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Alice, Not much on quilts I am afraid - and NO textiles on view at Sewell-Belmont House (we did not get the grant!-but will try again we only missed it by a hair).

The National Museum of American History is closed until November - at least. Some interseting beading, etc at the

American Museum of the American Indian - a fabulous site - great food!

The Textile Museum has a wonderful - small but choice - exhibit on the history and use of indigo -www.textilemuseum.org -It is a bit of pain to get to via public transport - it is a good 15 minute walk - up hill - from Dupont Cirlc Metro. But it is great neighbohood with lots of shopping and restaurants.

If you are driving up via Interste 95, then plan to stop in Petersburg VA (2.5 hours from DC). Historic Center Hill has filled the house with clothing beautifully mounted (!) thoughout the house - c18-1900.

Or if you drive near Charlottesville, VA, Ashlawn-Highland ( Home of President James Monroe) also has a wonderful exhibit of 18th and 19th century clothing throughout the house. Both exhibts pull from Mary Doering' collection of period costume - the best private collection in the country. My business partner, Colleen Callahan did both exhibits.

Also, in Baltimore, Mount Claire has a costume exhibit on - have not seen it - but hear it is very good.

Best Newbie

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Subject: the South Will Rise Again From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Gee, Gaye, I didn't mean to upset you; nor was I suggesting that all Southerners want slavery and/or the antebellum South to return. What I was saying was just what you stated (among your other, more personal comments) that Southern Women used Seven Sisters to show their loyalty and belief in their area of the country. Sorry you took such personal exception to my comments. best, Don Beld -

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Subject: Sanitary Commission quilts From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 07:28:52 -0700 (PDT)

Thanks Linda and Kimberly (privately) but those suggestions weren't the quilt I remember. Perhaps I am getting old and senile and there really isn't a sixth.

Also, does anyone know if the Smithsonian has one? I have been told they do; but have never seen mention of it anywhere. Would love to know.

For those of you interested: I show one at the Vermont Historical Society, one at the Lincoln Shrine and the other four are in private hands. You can see two of them in Virginia Gunn's article about the Sanitary Commission in the book QUILTMAKING IN AMERICA, the curators at the Vermont HS will e-mail one a photo of theirs; and the Lincoln Shrines is available on their website. I have photos of the newly identified one that is in private, family descendant hands in Michigan (originally from Mass. Interestingly enough, the five quilts I have photos of all came from New England.

Best, Don

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Subject: RE: Clothing answer From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 09:30:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Janet and list It sounds like your camisol ( corset cover which protected the outer garments from any abrasion by the corset fabric) and your blouses date to c1905. If the blouses "plouch" ( a technical term) in the front and are short waisted in the back then they are from the "Gibson Girl" period. If the waistband is even all around with a "peplum" below then they are closer to c1900 - when the shirtwaist was in style worn with a separte skirt - the first "office" uniform for women. The bloses are usually quite small - but easily enlarged using strips of co-ordinating lace under the arms.

Two nice general guides to American women's clothing in the 19th and early th c are by Kristina Harris. She publishes through Schiffer: "Victorian and Edwardian Fashions", and "Vintage Fashions for Women 19-1940". Both of these books are in paperback and are useful because she shows you what the clothes look like today - just out of the trunk or attic. She also reproduces period images so you can see what they would have looked like over the correct period undies.

The BEST two books on the material culture of American dress are: Linda Baumgarten's "What Clothes Reveal: The Language of Clothing in Colonial and Federal America", and Joan Severa: "Dressed for the Photographer: Ordinary Americans and Fashion, 1840-1900". For an exhaustive, detailed look at women's clothing styles in the 19th century, then referr to C. Willet cunnington: "English Women's clothing in the 19th Century" - a year by year explanation of new looks, fabrics, and styles. It is an oldie but goodie and can be found very inexpensively via used book sites. It also appeared in paperback.

Best Newbie Richardson

-----Original Message----- From: JLHfwaol.com [mailto:JLHfwaol.com] Sent: Sunday, April 27, 08 10:15 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Clothing Question

I recently made purchases at an estate sale including a batiste camisole that closed down the front with tiny pearl buttons and tied at the top with a ribbon run through the lace around the upper front and back of the camisole. Also purchased what I believe are called shirt waists. Two batiste "blouses" beautifully embroided in white on white, buttoned down the back with again tiny pearl buttons, full 3/4 length sleeves and a waist band around the bottom. I believe these garments date to the early th century based on the information I received at the sale. Can anyone suggest a basic text on clothing styles to help me more accurately date these garments. Thanks for your help Janet Henderson in Fort Worth

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Subject: ?ISO-8859-1?Q?MuseuTE8xtil,Terrassa,Spain3F? From: QuiltEvalsaol.com Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 11:35:12 EDT X-Message-Number: 6

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I know there are some travelers among the group and I am wondering if anyon e on the list has heard of or been to Centre de DocumentaciF3 Museu TE8xtil of the city of Terrassa, just outside of Barcelona?

I have just received an invitation from them to bring the group from the Mediterranean Quilt and Textile Adventure to study in their research room. From my limited understanding of Spanish, from what they have said in correspondence about their sample book and document collection it looks as if they are resource similar to the textile museum in Mulhouse, but I would love anyone 's thoughts if you have been there. As in Mulhouse, I would think that the research rooms would have separate offerings from the museum floors, but I am curious about those as well.

I have accepted the invitation as I feel that it would be beneficial to do a comparative study of the things seen here with those seen in France and in England. These places are such eye-openers when it comes to dating fabrics . Many of us will never forget the day we saw the 1780 overprinted ombres in a Manchester sample book.

This trip has really turned into something wonderful for quilt and textile enthusiasts - after the visit to the textile museum in Prato, IT, as an opt ion we will also have the opportunity to go to the Academia in Florence to see their quilts which was not on the original itinerary. Jane Lury (Labors of Love) tells me that the quilts there are incredible, and more thrilling to see than 'the David'. Apparently the textiles are on the upper levels of the museum, but she gave me explicit directions on how to find them and is the one who encouraged me to add a stop onto the itinerary - thanks Jane. I have a lso added the Musee du Mode in Marseille which I have been told has a huge inventory of early printed fabrics and costumes.

For anyone who might be interested it is not too late to sign up - and Princess has recently lowered their fares on this cruise making it a real tr avel bargain. Several have signed up with their spouses, so this is turning int o a family adventure. For more information please email me privately or go to my website (_http://worldofquiltstravel.com_ (http://worldofquiltstravel.com /) ). ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: the South Will Rise Again From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 12::32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Don Belt wrote > Gee, Gaye, I didn't mean to upset you; nor was I suggesting that all Southerners want slavery and/or the antebellum South to return. What I wa s saying was just what you stated (among your other, more personal comments) that Southern Women used Seven Sisters to show their loyalty and belief in >their area of the country. Sorry you took such personal exception to my >comments. best, Don Beld

Don, I did not take your remarks re Seven Sisters personally and certainly did not mean for my reply to sound personal. I apologize if it did.

But you had noted a notion which someone had passed along to you as a real possibility and since it is a notion rather commonly existing, I addressed it, hoping you would edify your informant and that others might do the same .

My personal experience suggests that the point I wished to make---the need to master the basic facts and outlines (and sometimes the minutiae) of American history is absolutely essential if we are to interpret and pass on an understanding of the quilts that bring us together---is one that bears making.

For instance, I knew the dates, reasons, and general significance of industrial development in the Northeastern states early in the nation's history. It was not, however, until I passed abandoned textile mill after abandoned textile mill in New England, an experience that prodded me to learn more about the history of the New England textile mills that I began to appreciate--really, to understand---quilts made in that region. They had never "made sense" to me, the way so many Pennsylvania quilts, for instance , had made sense.

The South is a region that has always given rise to both stereotyping and interest. Yet its quilts are poorly understood, largely because its history is poorly understood. I thought to take one region with which I am particularly familiar as evidence of what was a generalized condition in th e South after the Civil War and to provide a basis for response to the probably off-hand view that had been passed along to you.

A natural tendency is to assume that everyone else experiences life as we ourselves experience it. But that assumption is bound to lead to error. I remember thinking, "Well, everybody knows THAT" when I first encountered Cash's reminder that the first thing to be understood about Southern histor y was that the South was a pioneering region through the first of the th century. I knew that because I knew the history of parts of my family. I didn't understand why the good history professor felt the need to emphasize it so strongly.

But everyone does not know that fact, I've learned in the years since. People who lived in, say, Carlisle, PA, will look at the South and Southern quilts through the lens of their own region without the corrective vision o f history. And naturally they will conclude that this vast section could have done a lot better than it did and does.

I just completed THE COLFAX MASSACRE by LeeAnna Keith, a book that seeks to expose the real facts of what ended up being a terrible slaughter of black men in a little town on the Red River, some miles north of where my ancestors settled and where I grew up. I had heard a version of that story all my life, but Ms. Keith puts details to the generality. Yet her book is marred badly by her agenda and her apparent ignorance of the conditions of both black and white residents of the region. She neglects to note the education levels of the newly freed black men in the state, something that made them prey to all sorts of evils. She seems to imagine that the enslave d population of the South was literate, noble in intent, and capable of immediate leadership, when probably half the free white people in that section were either barely literate or illiterate at the time. Her view is naEFve and she writes with an agenda. I really appreciate the book for the facts it clarifies and it gave me yet greater sympathy for a formerly enslaved people who were essentially "turned loose" into a world of freedom without the tools to succeed there and with promises that could only lead t o hopeless disappointment. But it didn't give me the picture of reality for which I had hoped. In her entire book, she finds no white man who behaves decently---neither northern officials or southern residents, let alone nobl y (not President Grant, Phil Sheridan, or the Supreme Court), while she sees in the black men the kind of "noble savages" of whom the French philosopher s of the early 19th-century wrote. She herself is white. And she is a historian.

So misunderstanding is not limited to ordinary people like the person whose opinion you cited, Don.

And re my post, it is just as important to understand that out of that chao s and disjunction came quilts of sundry sorts. I have said this before on thi s list, but for I'm going to say it again: Nancilu Burdick's LEGACY: THE STOR Y OF TALULA GILBERT BOTTOMS AND HER QUILTS affords important insight into wha t strikes me as an almost archetypical Southern life, CW and beyond. It probably will not help one understand parts of the mountain regions, but it certainly is a terrific way of gaining entry in the life experienced by inland subsistence farm families during the War (the family lived in the general area of the Battle of Atlanta) and afterwards. Talula is a good rol e model, too. And Nancilu captures her flaws as well as her strengths.

I tried to preclude charges of condescension in my post, but I did not thin k to include that the response was not personal to you, Don. So sorry you rea d it that way. Apologies, Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Newspaper article re quilt find From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 12:44:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Below is the text from an article in the Ashville (NC) Citizen-Times about finding an amazing quilt stash. A friend sent it to me and I'm posting it for you all. Is there anyone on the list who can verify the story?

Hope ya'll enjoy reading about it as much as I did.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE Marion innkeeper uncovers treasure trove of antique quilts Asheville Citizen-Times, July 2, 01 (Read more Accolades) By Jennifer Holmes

MARION -- When an outsider named Arthur Campbell bought the Albertus Ledbetter house in the Montford Cove-Whitehouse community, folks here

doubted he'd be able to restore it. After all, it was pretty dilapidated.

But Campbell thought he could as long as he could find well-preserved wood of the same vintage (circa 1826) to use for the siding. So when he found what was left of the old Wilkerson house -- which even he agreed was too far gone to save -- he bought it and began dismantling the quartersawed heartpine planks. As he was doing so, he found a 180-year-old blanket trunk inside the house.

When Campbell opened the trunk, he found the oldest, most-beautiful hand-stitched quilts he had ever laid eyes on. Then he found another trunkful, and a 30-gallon oil drum with more of the same.

There were 38 almost perfectly preserved quilts, and another three in

tatters. Campbell stared at the names sewn into them -- Minerva, Nora, Clara and Pearl -- and knew they must have been quilted by local women.

"We found finished quilts, unfinished quilts, quilting frames and scraps of material that were destined to become quilts but never did," Campbell said. "We think they had a quilting circle, where each one would take a square home and then they'd get together for the quilting."

Almost two years later, Campbell, his wife Zee and their 10-year-old son Cailein are operating The Cottages at Spring House Farm out of the completely restored Ledbetter house, which has been listed by the National Register of Historic Places.

And on Thursday, they held a luncheon for a few of the ladies who actually worked on the quilts.

There was Nora Harris, who grew up in Greasy Creek. She'll be 87 in August.

There was Beulah Flynn, also 87.

Sisters-in-law Faye McCurry Perkins and Paula McCurry showed up, but Perkins was quick to 'fess up that she doesn't quilt. She had, however, lived in the Ledbetter house.

At almost 75, Athala Conner Hemphill was one of the spring chickens, and often a spokeswoman for the group. At 95, it was a little too much for Nina Greenlee, who couldn't make it.

"Ladies, we have a job ahead of us," Campbell told the little assembly. The purpose of the gathering was to celebrate the almost miraculous survival of the quilts, and to learn more about them.

One by one he brought the quilts to the ladies, who held them close to their eyes and began decoding information from them.

"Notice this one says Minerva," Campbell said. "Who was Minerva?"

"Minerva Rhodes," came a chorus of responses, as if to say, "No brainer. Give us a hard one."

Pearl was Pearl Williams. LMW either stood for Lula May Wilkerson, or "Lulie Ment," which is what the wife of Permenta Wilkerson was called.

The cache of quilts was an unusual thing to find in an abandoned house, the group said. Back in the 's and '30s, when most of them were made, it was customary to give them to children or grandchildren.

The women speculated they were left behind in the Wilkerson house because the Wilkerson sisters were spinsters. Perhaps they were all being saved for the one who would marry, and nobody did.

Tea quilt, friendship quilt, family quilt, monkey wrench quilt, ocean wave quilt -- even a big Texas Lonestar quilt. Campbell kept them coming.

The backings were made of feed and flour sacks, which were also salvaged to make clothing.

"Nothing was thrown away," said Myra McCurry, who organized the event. "This is a (Scots-Irish) community."

Hemphill declared a nine-diamond quilt the oldest, saying it was well over 100 years old.

"Did you work on it?" someone teased.

"Oh no! That was well before my time," said Hemphill, swallowing the bait.

Campbell said he's not sure what he's going to do with quilts. A dozen plastic storage containers he bought for them lay fallow nearby, the object of scorn by the quilting cognoscente.

"I've been told you don't put them in plastic," he said. "Right now we're just glad they're safe."

The public is welcome to see the quilts in the Albertus Ledbetter House by visiting Spring Hill Farm.

Read today's Asheville Citizen-Times

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Subject: Re: Newspaper article re quilt find From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 14:27:52 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

Kathy, is this what you are looking for? Link below. http://www.springhousefarm.com/antique_quilts.htm

Flew to OH on American a few weeks ago for research and visiting (and

shopping). How many times can employees and pilots apologize? I've got the answer to that. Lost a piece of luggage that contained my research schedule (which they eventually did find but too late). Bumped my husband and I on the return trip because the seats they assigned us at ticketing didn't exist on the plane we were flying and I turned down the offer to strap us to the wings. The good things are that I have two tickets to fly anywhere now, dinner on them was delicious and we had safe flights. Body is home in CO, brain is still in OH.

Jan Thomas

Kathy Moore wrote:

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Subject: Re: Sanitary Commission quilts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 17:36:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Ah-ha! I have been really taking the time, throughout the weekend and today,

looking through many of my quilt history books and checking all over the Internet for US Sanitary Commission quilts of any kind. I'm fascinated by the US Sanitary Commission type of quilts. Don, if you have the book "Quilts and Quilt Makers Covering Connecticutt", please look on page 77 of this book. Photographed is "Sampler, 1864, made by members of the Sanitary Commission of Tarrytown, New York, Tarrytown New York. cotton 76 x 95". Owned by Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Crocker, Jr. (of Connecticutt, I presume). The quilt pictured is a true sampler with varied blocks, and it appears in lovely condition. There is a center medallion blocks that reads: "Tarrytown Sanitary Fair for the Benefit of Disabled Soldiers July 1864". This is technically not a real US Sanitary Commission quilt that was made to be given to soldiers in the war, but it was made to raise funds at a Sanitary Fair. Not sure if you would count this quilt as one of the surviving US Sanitary Commission Quilts or not, but it certainly has the same "spirit" and the words Sanitary Fair directly embroidered on the front of it. I love this particular book, by the way, it's one of my favorites. Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: RE: Alice McElwain From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 17:00:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Good to see your email. Hope you're doing well.

Best regards, Sharron Evans

-----Original Message----- From: Kaytripletaol.com [mailto:Kaytripletaol.com] Sent: Monday, April 28, 08 2:32 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Alice McElwain

Or the Alice McElwain who had a quilt shop in Liberal Kansas?

Kay Triplett in hot, humid, but cloudy Lagos, Nigeria

In a message dated 4/27/08 4:10:42 P.M. Dateline Standard Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

Subject: RE: sufferage patterns From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Sun, 27 Apr 08 19:31:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

I just have to ask - are you a relative/descendant of Mary and DeEtte McElw ain who had the shop and quilting business in Walworth, WI from 1812 until

1960? Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Books on Clothing From: JLHfwaol.com

Dear Newbie, Stuck my foot in my mouth didn't I? I hadn't scrolled down my whole list of new mail and missed your detailed reply to my request for books to look for. Thank you for a very complete and tempting list. Must look at the used book sites and make some selections. I also bought a man's shirt that opened in the back with 3 buttons to close it at the neckline. A fold down the front had spots for studs to be placed and cuff link button holes in the sleeve cuffs. A family laundry stamp was stamped on either side of the front on the chest. Odd place for them to be stamped. Guess he never wore it without a coat. Someone has written in old style handwriting next to one of the laundry stamps, September, 1879. Another curiosity. Best regards, Janet Henderson in Fort Worth

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Subject: sanitary fairs From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 21:57:07 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Yes, the Sanitary Fair raffle quilts are different from the soldiers quilts--they were raffled off to raise funds for the war effort and almost every fair had one or more raffle quilts. The Smithsonian has one that is a duplicate made by the same person who made the raffle quilt snd was presented to Lincoln. And the St Louis Historical Society has one that was presented to General W.T. Sherman after the war ended. The Connectictu one (which I have seen) is also a raffle quilt.

As some of you may know Linda is one of the mainstays of the Home of the Brave Quilt Project that my home quilting group and I started in Aug 04 (by the way, we are now getting requests for pre 9-11 fallen hero quilts which I am personally making as a wall hanging version of the Sanitary Commission quiilts), and Linda is in Rhode Island and yet STILL has time to do research. Bless you. best, Don

--0-26085687-19445027:56274--

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Subject: Re: Sanitary Commission quilts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 29 Apr 08 06:40:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Don Beld said: For those of you interested: I show one at the Vermont Historical Society, one at the Lincoln Shrine and the other four are in private hands. You can see two of them in Virginia Gunn's article about the Sanitary Commission in the book QUILTMAKING IN AMERICA, the curators at the Vermont HS will e-mail one a photo of theirs; and the Lincoln Shrines is available on their website. I have photos of the newly identified one that is in private, family descendant hands in Michigan (originally from Mass. Interestingly enough, the five quilts I have photos of all came from New England.

Don: I just e-mailed the Vermont Historical Society and asked them to e-mail me a photo of their SC quilt. I also was bold enough to inquire as to if they would share information about how they came into ownership of the quilt. I will share what I get, if anything. I also took a chance and e-mailed The Museum of NH History in Concord NH. I took a small, limited, tour of their museum while chaperoning a school field trip there several years ago and was fascinated with some of what they had on display. One thing that intrigued me, under glass, was an original swatch book from the Cocheco Mills with gorgeous squares of fabric. I so wanted to touch it and turn those pages to see them all. I found myself wondering what quilts they might have and if there could be anything of interest there. Linda Heminway in VERY rainy Plaistow NH

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Subject: Mills--how they work From: Margaret Keirstead <pkeirsteadmac.com> Date: Tue, 29 Apr 08 07:45:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I've enjoyed the thread on textile mills, and can't resist recommending an author who has written many children's books on How Things Work (that's actually one of his titles. I confess to turning

to the children's section in the library when I only want a little information.)

His name is David Macaulay, and his books have added a lot to my understanding of the mysteries of mechanics and physics. He has a book called Mills, which shows how the water turning the outside wheel makes the looms operate. I've driven by many old mills (now abandoned, as Gaye notes) and never understood how they work.

There's another good book for young people called Factory Girl, by Barbara Greenwood. She weaves (yes, pun intended) a fictional story

with factual information and photographs showing how children used to

work in mills to help support their families.

And thanks to all of you who recommend books; I can't get enough of them.

Peggy Keirstead on a beautiful spring day in Richardson, Texas

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Subject: RE: sufferage patterns From: Alice McElwain <siscofayyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 28 Apr 08 19:22:06 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi Kay, My husband is descended from Benjamin McElwain born: 1798 in PA and then from his son David Milton McElwain born 1826 in Ohio; then David Milton McElwain, JR born in Missouri 1876. But don't know about the McElwain you mention. I'm sure they're in the family line somewhere.

Alice in Arkansas

Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> wrote: I just have to ask - are you a relative/descendant of Mary and DeEtte McElwain who had the shop and quilting business in Walworth, WI from 1812 until 1960? Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen

-----Original Message----- From: Alice McElwain [mailto:siscofayyahoo.com] Sent: Sunday, April 27, 08 9:01 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: sufferage patterns

Newbie, you wrote the following regarding the Sewell Belmont house in DC. I will be making my first trip to DC next month and want to know any other places that might be a good source for quilt history that you might recommend. I already have the DAR Museum on my list.

Thanks, Alice in Arkansas ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Civil War Sanitary Fair Quilts From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Tue, 29 Apr 08 6::27 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Technically, the Sanitary Commission quilts in "Quilts and Quiltmakers" were fundraising quilts made during and mostly after the Civil War. The two featured in the books did not come with provenance as to how the fundraising occurred. Yes, some quilts were raffled but not all raised monies that way. Many of these quilts were made by church groups. In some churches raffles were forbidden. The recordings of church benevolent societies is another good place to look for documentation about quiltmaking during the Civil War. Here in New England, the Congregationalists were especially good at record keeping. One such accounting from a town close to me spans almost 50 years. Those pious, industrious ladies shared information about the prayer readings, the preachers they engaged (some were Temperance), the barrels they packed for missionaries, soldiers, widows and orphans, the insane, etc. This particular group changed its name 5 times over the course of 50 years to reflect their purpose. Also, there were yearly accountings of the Sanitary Commission's activities printed in small, soft cover books. We find them in the libraries here in the Northeast. Rarely, do you see mention of quilts, but it will give you a general idea of the fairs and their scope. sue reich -- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

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Subject: Mills : how they work From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 29 Apr 08 09:35:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Thanks Peggy, for the information on Macaulay. I didn't know M. had a book on mills. I have several of his "How Things Work" series, and they are remarkable. I don't know that my children ever learned a whole lot from them (except for the one on castles), but I certainly did.

In the GA QUILTS book, Vista Mahan has an interesting chapter on southern mills in which she details their architecture (modeled on Lowell, of course). She spoke on that topic at this year's Southern Quilt Conference.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: Civil War Sanitary Fair Quilts From: AG340aol.com Date: Tue, 29 Apr 08 09:57:57 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

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What was the origin of the name Sanitary Fair? Amy G.

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Subject: Re: Civil War Sanitary Fair Quilts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 29 Apr 08 12:34:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Amy asked: > What was the origin of the name Sanitary Fair? Amy G. Amy: I am no expert, but from what I have read, the word sanitary was used when the commission was involved with bandage rolling and steps to prevent

infection, lice, dysentery, etc.

It was more of a nursing group, when first started and it grew to other forms of support for soldiers and their families. The US Sanitary Commission was the predecessor of The American Red Cross.

Sanitary Fairs started up as a means of raising funds to help the military, families of injured or deceased soldiers and the like. These fairs were much like a church fair is nowadays, from what I understand. If I am inaccurate, please do feel free, anyone, to correct what I have stated. Linda Heminway Plaistow NH