Subject: Sanitary Comission purpose From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:33:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

>>Sanitary Fairs started up as a means of raising funds to help the >>military, families of injured or deceased soldiers and the like. <<

I had the impression that prevention of deaths from disease and injury was a major purpose of the Sanitary Commission. It was known that many soldier's died of illnesses or infection from injuries. Warm blankets or quilts became a part of this.

Judy Breneman

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Subject: Re: Sanitary Comission purpose From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 30 Apr 2008 09:53:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I don't have the history book I read this in handy, but as I recall reading, neither side in the conflict expected the magnitude of wounded and dead they were faced with and there were very poor and honestly almost no plans in place for how to handle it. Wounded could lay for DAYS on the battlefield without water, suffering unimaginably before being helped.

The women stepped in to help--not without protests because in those days the idea of ladies witnessing the horrors of war was a HUGE issue. Not to

mention ladies assisting physicians with patient care. But the women persisted and filled a void and voila.....Sanitary Commission. Where the women did most of the work and the men got their names on the organizational papers and in the history books-----until now, that is :-). Those women were quiet heroines in every aspect of that word as far as I am concerned.

I remember reading one first hand account where a woman was walking a

battlefield with water and literally could barely find a place to put her foot down without stepping on a body or a body part.

Stephanie Higgins

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Subject: A good question From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>

I'm a bit perplexed by a quilt I am appraising, and I know I can find answe rs on this list. A fact that is almost amusing is that I have so much more info on this quilt than is usual, but still have a big question.

The quilt is reported to be a Temperance quilt, and certainly appears to be so. It is a double-T pattern, each block consists of the typical four "T" shapes. In this instance, it is a consistent pink T throughout, hand piec ed, with muslin. Each block is filled with inked signatures, again pretty typical for what may have been a fundraiser quilt. The client (who has giv en permission for me to discuss the quilt with the list) has been able to d o a bit of research onher own, and has found that the quilt was made in Mid dleport, NY, probably for a member of the Freeman family, who turned out to be quite prominent in the town's history - i.e. Freeman Road, etc.... All names and signatures are from Middleport or neighboring towns on Lake Onta rio or the Erie Canal. Lots of info there. The client spoke with a Middle port town historian, who is very excited about the find and has informed th e client that she has a "significant, valuable, piece of local history." Big sigh here - all the other appraisers are wincing along with me. It's n ever a good thing when well intentioned but unknowing people rave about how valuable a quilt is!!

All blocks are ink inscribed, except for the very center, which is embroide red with the legend C.T.S. '85 N.P. Seibl(Seipl?)

So, the question? I've found 23 related names and organizations for the Te mperance movement, but none fit the CTS inscription. I've even wondered if it was Christian Temperance Society, but have found nothing to substantiat e that. I'd love to hear from anyone who might clear that up or validate i t. Another interesting note about the quilt - Pam Weeks, if you are on thi s list, listen up! The quilt is made in the "potholder" style, 81 individu ally bound blocks, joined after being machine quilted. It's in wonderful c ondition.

Thanks in advance for any help. Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com"I've always wanted to be somebody,but now ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: A good question From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 1 May 2008 06:37:52 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

Teddy, have you investigated perhaps 'Catholic' or 'Canadian' Temperance Society? Not knowing your local history I don't know if either might have a connection?

Sally Ward.

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Subject: history of Sanitary Commission From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Wed, 30 Apr 2008 23:22:23 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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The U.S. Sanitary Commission was modeled on the Royal Sanitary Commission which was created during the Crimean War with the purpose of overseeing sanitary conditions in military hospital. Florence Nightengale was a major figure in the British SC.

The USSC was originally conceived by women; but in order to secure a presidential charter, the Board of Directors consisted entirely of prominent men on the East Coast--Fredrick Law Omstead (the designer of Central Park) and Henry Whitney Bellows among them. The men continued to take the credit, but it was the women who really preformed the miracles and chief among them were Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell and Dorothea Dix. They trained women to work along side the doctors in the military hospitals and organized groups of women--frequently called Ladies Aide Societies--on the home front to help make bandages, clothes and ultimately quilts for the military hospitals.

Clara Barton was one of the nurses sent to the front and from her experiences started the Red Cross after the war.

Sanitary Fairs were organized across the North to raise funds to support both the Sanitary Commission efforts--as the nurses were paid a very small stipend (women didn't work for money in those days); and to buy materials, i.e. fabric, food, shoes, etc. for the troops.

Some consider the Ladies Aide Society as the breedinground for the WCTU and the Suffragette movements and ultimately the Women movements that followed.

An outstanding book on this issue was written by Judith Ann Giesberg called CIVIL WAR SISTERHOOD, The U.S. Sanitary Commission and Women's Politics in Transition.

Personally, I consider the effort by North women to be the first, and largest, philanthropic movement in the history of man. It is well worth the study.

Best, Don Beld

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Subject: a question on coverlets From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Thu, 1 May 2008 17:17:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Can anyone tell me if the book Hand-woven Coverlets in the Newark Museum, by Margaret E. White, and published in 1947 by the Newark Museum is a good resource?

I've read through it and have some questions about the statements and

assumptions given in the book. I need to bone up on woven coverlets and want to be sure I don't fall for false information.

Any suggestions as to reliable resources?

Thanks,

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Re: a question on coverlets From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 2 May 2008 08:06:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Kathy and others: Coverlets seem to be attracting more attention lately, and the interest is well deserved. There are several titles

providing good information on coverlets; these are on my bookshelf (by no means an exhaustive list):

Heirlooms from Old Looms, A Catalogue of Coverlets owned by the Colonial Coverlet Guild of America and its Members (Chicago: Privately Printed, 1940). OOP, with descriptive essay and lots of b/

w pictures, divided by weave types.

Rabb, Kate Milner. Indiana Coverlets and Coverlet Weavers. Indiana

Historical Society Publications Vol. 8, No. 8 (Indianapolis, 1928) -

OOP; prefatory to:

Montgomery, Pauline. Indiana Coverlet Weavers and Their Coverlets.

Indianapolis: Hoosier Heritage Press, 1974. also OOP, but the model

for coverlet research.

Wilson, Kathleen Curtis. Textile Art from Southern Appalachia: the

quiet work of women. Johnson City, TN: The Overmountain Press, 2001. Exhibit catalog from an exhibit at the American textile History Museum, Lowell, MA; includes biographies of some women who wove geometric coverlets.

Shaeffer, Margaret W. M. Made in New York State: Handwoven Coverlets 1820-1860. Watertown, NY: Jefferson County Historical Society, 1985. An exhibit catalog on jacquard coverlets with essays

by Virginia Parslow Partridge and Rita J. Adrosko.

Glick, Nancy Iona, and Katherine H. Molumby. Illinois Jacquard Coverlets and Weavers, End of a Legacy. Peoria, IL: Lakeview Museum

of Arts and Sciences, 1999. Illinois coverlets, weaver biographies,

and a checklist of weavers with identifying corner blocks.

Wass, Jan Tauer. Weaver's Choice, Patterns in American Coverlets. Springfield, IL: Illinois State Museum, 1988. From geometrics to jacquards, with good essays.

Gehret, Ellen J., and Alan G. Keyser. The Homespun Textile Tradition

of the Pennsylvania Germans. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1976. An exhibit catalog of the works of spinners, weavers and dyers at the Pennsylvania Farm Museum,

Landis Valley; includes some geometric coverlets.

Ventre, Melinda. Warm and Wonderful, the Jacquard Coverlet. New York: Hirschl & Adler Folk, 1988. An exhibit catalog with accompanying essay.

Hall, Eliza Calvert. The Book of Handwoven Coverlets. New York: Dover Publications, 1988; rev. reprint of the 1912 edition. Early research, mostly on geometrics.

Shein, Joseph D., and Melinda Zonger. Coverlets and the Spirit of America. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2002. The Shein collection of coverlets, great color work.

Anderson, Clarita S. Weaving a Legacy, the Don and Jean Stuck Coverlet Collection. Columbus, OH: Columbus Museum of Art, 1995. Biographies and illustrations of coverlets from the collection, and others.

Heisey, John W. A Checklist of American Coverlet Weavers. Williamsburg, VA: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1978. The only compilation of information on jacquard coverlet weavers nationwide until the publication of the next entry:

Anderson, Clarita S. American Coverlets and Their Weavers. Williamsburg, VA: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, and Ohio University Press, Athens, 2002. Coverlets from the collection of Foster and Muriel McCarl, and a dictionary of more than 700 coverlet

weavers.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Sanitary Comission purpose From: AG32040aol.com Date: Thu, 1 May 2008 15:41:39 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

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Thanks to everyone for the information about the Sanitary Comission.I wasn't sure about its' Red Cross connection . Amy G.

************** Wondering what's for Dinner Tonight? Get new twists on family favorites at AOL Food.

(http://food.aol.com/dinner-tonight?NCIDaolfod00030000000001)

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 01, 2008 From: Trishherraol.com Date: Fri, 2 May 2008 10:47:09 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi Kathy,

The Newark Museum book is a resource worth having because it shows coverlets in that collection that are not pictured anywhere else. Of course it is black and white, but at least is a record.

As for technical information, it is way out of date and explanations of weave structure are misleading. Also there is much in structure, style, regional differences not dealt with at all.

The more recent works on Jacquard or Figured and Fancy Weave coverlets, as the more pictorial coverlets are called, has been updated from the old "A Checklist of American Coverlet Weavers" with "American Coverlets and Their Weavers" published by Williamsburg and written by Clarita Anderson.

As for the geometric handwoven coverlets there is no one book that does justice to this complex field. These include the simplest plain woven blankets to the most complex handwoven patterns requiring many shafts or harnesses done by professional weavers on big old room sized looms in North America in the early 1800s.

My favorite book on the overall subject of handwoven coverlets is still Burnham and Burnham "Keep Me Warm One Night: Early Handweaving in Eastern Canada," from Royal Ontario Museum. I believe it is out of print, but worth getting and having until someone else with the Burnhams' expertise, time, and funding does this for US coverlets.

There are numerous books and catalogues on small museum collections around the country, but they vary greatly in accuracy and inclusiveness. Hope this helps, Trish Herr

In a message dated 5/2/2008 12:16:44 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

Can anyone tell me if the book Hand-woven Coverlets in the Newark Museum, by

Margaret E. White, and published in 1947 by the Newark Museum is a good resource?

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Subject: First Ladies who sew(ed)-Rosalynn Carter From: Matt Arnett <marnettearthlink.net> Date: Fri, 2 May 2008 11:00:32 -0400 (GMT-04:00) X-Message-Number: 4

A few weeks ago, during the conversations about Cindy McCain, someone mentioned that they thought Rosalynn Carter took a sewing machine with her to the White House. I thought I might shed a little light on her sewing. Growing up, Ms. Carter's mom made quilts. Though she never made quilts herself, she did sew most of her own clothes growing up. As a matter of fact, she sewed her own clothes until she no longer had to do so. When she became First Lady the only sewing she did was making doll clothes for her daughter's dolls.

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Subject: handwoven coverlets From: Polly Greene <pjgreeneeastlink.ca> Date: Fri, 02 May 2008 14:04:28 -0300 X-Message-Number: 5

I agree that "Keep Me Warm One Night" by Burnham and Burnham, The Royal Ontario Museum is a very complete book on coverlets and coverlet weaving as done in Eastern Canada. Many of the professional

weavers who were pushed into Canada by the industrial revolution are mentioned in this book. There is also a great explanation of the weave structure of the various types of woven coverlet. I have woven

several coverlets in various styles and this book was my bible for understanding how to reproduce these coverlets.

Polly Greene in Nova Scotia

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Subject: Spanish cope. From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Fri, 2 May 2008 23:13:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I don't know which of these lists discussed this recently, so please forgive the repetition and use of bandwidth...

But I seem to recall that someone was asking about a 13th century Spanish vestment that had been identified in 3DThe Patchwork Pilgrimage3D as pieced work. I was doing some last-minute research on a project tonight and was looking through a book on Spanish textiles of the Middle Ages -

And there was the vestment, "Don Sancho's chasuble," clearly identified as *woven,* not pieced. There was even a paragraph in the text of the book (Spanish Silk Textiles, by Florence May, published by the Hispanic Society of North America) discussing woven heraldic textiles, including the chasuble.

So - it looks like this one is not pieced, but woven. Sorry :(

Lisa Evans

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Subject: a question on coverlets From: "Sally Ambrose" <sallytelevar.com> Date: Sat, 3 May 2008 07:15:10 -0700 X-Message-

Kathy, Another source to add to your bookshelves is Bress, Helene The Coverlet Book Vol. 1 & 2. Flower Valley Press, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland 2003. Vol. one, ISBN 1-886388-50-4, Vol. two, ISBN 1-886388-50-2, and the set ISBN 1-886388-52-0. It is loaded with images Of coverlets their basic construction techniques, and a multitude of other information. I can not Attest to it's total accuracy as far as technical information nor completeness of addressing regional styles And geometric patterns. It is, however, a daunting in its scope of work and presentation. It is also Expensive and heavy in weight. I purchased my volumes from the printer several years ago. Sally Ambrose

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Subject: Unknown block From: KennaleeMaol.com Date: Sun, 4 May 2008 00:55:29 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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Hello - Can anyone tell me the name of the flower block I posted tonight on the eBoard? It is from a summer spread. Thanks, Kennalee in SoCal. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Unknown block From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 4 May 2008 07:30:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I didn't find that exact block, but it sure looks like those complex

designs from Old Chelsea Station (Brooks/Wheeler) from newspaper syndications. Those designers never saw an inset seam they didn't like!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 03, 2008 From: Trishherraol.com Date: Sun, 4 May 2008 10:22:14 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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The Bress books are a source focusing specifically for geometric designs and particularly for handweavers who wish to weave these structures.

I agree with Xenia that coverlets seem to be coming into the limelight, are, as yet, under priced and not as well understood by the general collecting population.

In a message dated 5/4/2008 12:08:27 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

QHL Digest for Saturday, May 03, 2008.

1. a question on coverlets

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Subject: a question on coverlets From: "Sally Ambrose" <sallytelevar.com> Date: Sat, 3 May 2008 07:15:10 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

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Kathy, Another source to add to your bookshelves is Bress, Helene The Coverlet Book Vol. 1 & 2. Flower Valley Press, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland 2003. Vol. one, ISBN 1-886388-50-4, Vol. two, ISBN 1-886388-50-2, and the set ISBN 1-886388-52-0. It is loaded with images Of coverlets their basic construction techniques, and a multitude of other information. I can not Attest to it's total accuracy as far as technical information nor completeness of addressing regional styles And geometric patterns. It is, however, a daunting in its scope of work and presentation. It is also Expensive and heavy in weight. I purchased my volumes from the printer several years ago. Sally Ambrose ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Unknown block From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Sun, 4 May 2008 09:31:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I don't recognize it, but I think it looks more like a cotton boll than a flower.

Kim

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Subject: Re: Unknown block From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Sun, 4 May 2008 15:57:10 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

Kennalee,

When I first saw it I thought it was "King David's Crown" with a stem

added...after searching 3 books I think it's pretty close. In Barbara Brackman's "Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns", on pg.437,no.3649 one very close to yours (minus the stem) is listed as "King David's Crown-Clara Stone". If you have the book, see if it doesn't come close. Thanks for sharing the picture-beautiful block!

Alma Moates Florida

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Subject: Re: Unknown block From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Sun, 04 May 2008 16:27:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

It looks to me like a variation of Full Blown Tulip -- up-dated as Xenia said with more of those 1930s curved and set in seams and a stem in place of one of the points. The best picture I could find on the internet is marginal at best, but hopefully shows the similarity --

http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/collections_1998.053.040.html

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Leigh Fellner From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sun, 4 May 2008 17:28:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Leigh Fellner, please contact me off list. I have a couple of questions for you related to a research project I am working on.

Thanks, Kathy Moore ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: unknown block From: KennaleeMaol.com Date: Mon, 5 May 2008 00:59:59 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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Thanks for all the input on my unknown (to me!) block. I had searched the Brackman book without seeing the King David's Crown. It had to have been a challenge to the piecer as it definitely does not lay flat. Must be why they made a summer spread out of it. Kennalee in SoCal

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Subject: Unknown Block From: rgnixonoct.net Date: Mon, 5 May 2008 01:07:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

It looks like Harrison Rose. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Unknown Block From: rgnixonoct.net Date: Mon, 5 May 2008 01:58:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Am I looking at it incorrectly? My eyesight isn't the best but I'm counting eight "points" on King David's Crown, #3649 Brackman Encyclopedia. The pic of the block on the EBoard has seven. Harrison Rose has 7 points plus the little white triangle pieces missing on King David's Crown. Here are the references for that pattern: Khin's Collector's Dictionary of Quilt Names, Page 313 Brackman's Encyclopedia of Applique, 31.26 Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America, pages 114 and 115 It looks like she left off some of the leaves. A good night's rest might improve these old eyes and brain. I'm so tired, the only descriptions I can think of are points and little triangles. Don't tell on me, ya'll! ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: unknown block From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 5 May 2008 10:29:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks, Kennalee, for posting this interesting block.

I agree that it looks like King David's Crown with a stem added. It's like Brackman's #3649 with some triangles added around the center. Very nice, but not one I'd care to piece for a whole quilt.

I think that hand piecing in the 30s was a prelude to the Ruth McDowell school of piecing. You can inset anything! Seam allowances in the 30s were less than 1/4". They're more like 3/16". How was that determined? It runs pretty consistent with tops from the 30s that I own. Seam lines do not appear to be marked on the patches of these tops, either. They are all hand pieced.

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have made a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org

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Subject: Giggle for the day From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>

Dear list, This is too good not to share. I just got off the phone with the curator of a major costume/quilt/textile collection. She had just spoken with a dealer who had - he said- a Baltimore Album quilt. He told her that it needed to be "brightened up" and did she have any information about using ether to whiten up old quilts!

She advised against it.

I have to tell you, the vision of his standing over the quilt with a bottle of chloroform and cotton balls attempting to "brighten" the colors is just too much to bear. I howled with laughter - and should all of us!

I doubt he will jeopardize his investment in such a foolhardy manner.

Newbie Richardson

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Subject: Re: Unknown block From: Getfruitaol.com

I believe I found the block in a quilt in Worth Doing Twice, a book by Patricia J. Morris & Jeannette T. Muir on pages 32 and 33. The authors call it Harrison Rose- and identify it as a Mountain Mist pattern. I hope this helps. Violet Vaughnes, AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser California

In a message dated 5/3/2008 10:00:56 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, KennaleeMaol.com writes:

Hello - Can anyone tell me the name of the flower block I posted tonight on

the eBoard? It is from a summer spread. Thanks, Kennalee in SoCal.

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Subject: baltimore album owner From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 5 May 2008 08:58:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Ether!!!

Darwin was right.

Susan

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Subject: Re: Unknown block From: RAGLADYaol.com Date: Mon, 5 May 2008 12:13:04 EDT X-Message-Number: 8

http://thehenryford.artehouse.com/perl/magnify_popup.pl?imageID14872&staticIm ageC&alt0 Harrison Rose quilt by Susan McCord... This is a variation of the block, which looks to be the same, but done as a full floral design.

http://happyinquilting.blogspot.com/2008/01/harrison-rose.html From a quilt kit - lovely in the fabrics shown

Gloria ragladyaol.com

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Subject: Re: baltimore album owner From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 5 May 2008 10:39:34 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

Forgive my ignorance, but why would anyone think chloroform fumes whiten and brighten? (Do they? I've actually never tried it...) Even if they did, and even if you could buy chloroform over the counter, how would you apply it without anaesthetizing yourself?

Picture the headline, "Local man K.O.'d by quilt"

Almost completely unrelated comment: a couple of years ago, a local man who was estranged from his wife entered her home when she was sleeping and put a rag soaked with Chloroform over her mouth. He wanted to keep her asleep while he robbed the home and he did - permanently. He was eventually convicted of murder.

Kris

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Subject: Re: Giggle for the day From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 5 May 2008 11:54:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Maybe he has a "chamber" in which he can "gas" the quilt. . . . . . Stephanie Higgins (who just read The Devil in the White City and has an overactive imagination).

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Subject: Re: baltimore album owner From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Mon, 05 May 2008 17:41:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

As one curator friend of mine retorted: "I would have told him to knock himself out!'

-----Original Message----- From: Kris Driessen [mailto:krisdriessenyahoo.com] Sent: Monday, May 05, 2008 1:40 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: baltimore album owner

Forgive my ignorance, but why would anyone think chloroform fumes whiten and brighten? (Do they? I've actually never tried it...) Even if they did, and even if you could buy chloroform over the counter, how would you apply it without anaesthetizing yourself?

Picture the headline, "Local man K.O.'d by quilt"

Almost completely unrelated comment: a couple of years ago, a local man who was estranged from his wife entered her home when she was sleeping and put a rag soaked with Chloroform over her mouth. He wanted to keep her asleep while he robbed the home and he did - permanently. He was eventually convicted of murder.

Kris

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Subject: Ether this or that- From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Tue, 6 May 2008 09:56:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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I have a handwritten medicinal 'reciept' from a great-grandmother who was the wife of a cowboy. The long list of ingredients is amazing and ends with '3 drp. spirit of ether.' This was only to be administered only when a person was in extreme pain from a wound, broken limb etc. There's also a PS-"do this In *Good Air and not closed room as will* *caus fainting.*" Obviously the voice of experience! Pepper

-- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com peppercory.blogspot.com quiltflapper.blogspot.com Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker

203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

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Subject: May Basket quilt alert From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Tue, 6 May 2008 12:04:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Hello friends-Just back from teaching in Denver where it rained, snowed, blew dust, and had sunshine all in the same weekend. The Mancuso-organized show had some great quilts (difficult to judge) and enthusiastic, through small in number, folks taking classes. Have just put up a new blog post for basket-theme quilt lovers-enjoy. http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com May I take a poll of this list? Some friends and I were wondering: would there be enough interest to organize and put up a blog totally about handwork techniques? We (people who teach hand techniques) would all be co-writers of the blog. Subjects covered: hand quilting, piecing, applique, embroidery, finishing techniques etc. Thought about adding a section called Hands On and taking readers' questions. Does this sound appealing? If so, please email me off-list and give comments and suggestions. pepcorygmail.com

Trivia for the day: did you know that on May 6,1626, Manhattan Island was bought by a Dutchman named Manuit for $24 in beads and trinkets? From the gorgeous NC coast- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com peppercory.blogspot.com quiltflapper.blogspot.com Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker

203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

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Subject: unknown block From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Tue, 6 May 2008 16:24:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I've looked in the book, Quilts from the Henry Ford, by Fons and Porter, and they show a quilt on page 146 which is called "Reel Variation." The quilt is said to have been made in Bucks County, PA, around 1846, "possibly by

Quakers". It looks quite a bit like the "unknown block" posted on the

E-board but it lacks some of the extra points. The thing I notice is that the four outer points connect to the points of the central square, but the Harrison Rose on the McCord quilt doesn't have that element. These were all appliqued, of course.

It looks like someone was creatively mixing several closely similar pattern elements into an new and innovative design that could be pieced rather than appliqued. I love it when that happens!

Just another possibility to add to the mix.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: "unknown block" From: Judy White <whitey06029sbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 7 May 2008 04:36:20 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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There are many similar blocks, Kathy. However, on pages 255 and 56 of Yvonne Khin's "Collector's Dictionary of Names and Patterns" you will find The Sunflower, Whirling Wheel, Grecian Star and on p. 255 there is a block attributed to Laura Wheeler called the Friendship Ring. Your block looks like a copy of The Friendship Ring that someone has made their own by cutting the inner circle into three parts and using different fabrics and putting a stem onto the outer circle and making the entire ring into a flower - sort of clever. Because the prints are all so busy, it's really difficut to see exactly what has been done to the inner circle. Out of all the patterns I named, The Friendship Ring is the only one where the background fabric has seams coming from the corners to the block as the block in your picture. Hope this helps.

Judy White

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Subject: grosgrain ribbon From: palamporeaol.com Date: Wed, 07 May 2008 07:42:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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I need your help. Will y'all please search your scrap drawers/boxes, etc.????? I need an 8-10 inch length of navy blue grosgrain ribbon. Here is the catch ---- it needs to be 1-7/8 inch or 2 inches wide. Apparently in the early 20th century that was rather common. Unfortunately it isn't today. I can only find 1 1/2 inch & 2 1/4 inch wide. They just won't work. I am using this on a military type medal. The ribbon on it is fraying and is stained. I have searched pretty hard on the internet, but found nothing. Then I thought of all of fellow sewers!

Please call me (252-638-4913)?or email quickly if you have some. I will pay you and send big hugs as well. Thanks! Lynn

Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio The Creative Caregiver New Bern, NC palamporeaol.com

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Subject: Unknown quilt block From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Mon, 5 May 2008 22:26:23 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

The photo of the Unknown block reminds me of a dandelion gone-to-seed in full glory -- if only she had chosen radiant 'shades' of white and pale pale greens or yellows! Anyone else see the similarity to the dandelion-gone-to-seed in this pattern? This is where a Scherenschnitte pattern could really shine as a dandelion gone to seed!

Karen Alexander in the San Juan islands where we have just had our FIRST two days in a row of warm-enough-to-be-called-spring weather, in spite of the fact that flower s have been braving the cold and even snow for several months.

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Subject: Re: grosgrain ribbon From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 7 May 2008 08:23:59 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hello all, Offray makes most of the ribbon on the market, and they don't have 1-7/8 inch or 2 inches wide product in their retail lines. However, they likely sell odd sizes in their manufactuing division (probably to the military.) You should contact them through their website and see if they have any suggestions: http://www.offray.com/guest.html. Wrights also makes OTC ribbon, contact them at helpwrights.com. Wrights® - West Warren, MA 01092 1-877-597-4448. I also checked Test Fabrics for something you could dye, but they don't have wide widths. The awards/trophy places online don't have the size you need. Judy Schwender

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Subject: coverlets From: "stonhavn" <stonhavnhughes.net> Date: Wed, 7 May 2008 16:17:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Hello...I began to weave back in 1972 and became enamoured with coverlet weaving, spending a great deal of time investigating the early written drafts of weavers from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The most famous of the itinerant weavers was William Henry Harrison Rose from Rhode Island otherwise known as Weaver Rose. The coverlets are constructed in Overshot, woven on a four harness loom. There are many wonderful books that would be on the shelves of a coverlet weaver, among them, The Shuttlecraft Book of American Hand-Weaving by Mary Meigs Atwater, A Book of Hand-Woven Coverlets by Eliza Calvert Hall, Heirlooms from Old Looms by The Colonial Coverlet Guild of America, Of Coverlets, The Legacies The Weavers by Wilson and Kennedy, "Keep Me Warm One Night" by Burnham and Burnham and The Handweaver's Source Book by Marguerite Davison.

Rose Lea Alboum West Halifax Vermont ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: coverlets From: hknight453aol.com Date: Thu, 08 May 2008 12:06:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

On Saturday May 10, the Oliver Watson House at the UNiversity of RI campus will be open for viewing. According to a Providence Journal article, "Though the house has many period furnishings, it is unclear whether any are original to the house. But upstairs, in what might have been a bedroom, there sits a loom that once belonged to Quaker Billy Rose, a South County weaver." I found this pertinent, and thought I would share this.

Heather

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Subject: applique vines From: joejoethequilter.com Date: Fri, 09 May 2008 04:29:46 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

I think that most of the 19th century appliqued vines I have seen on red, green and white quilts were made of bias. I have, however, run across so me early quilts from time to time that have very fine reverse applique vi nes. If you look long enough you will see almost anything. But I believe the majority of them are indeed cut on the bias. Joe Cunningham

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Subject: quilt lecture From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com> Date: Thu, 8 May 2008 19:44:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

My brother in Shenandoah Valley sent me this link about a quilt history lecture related to Willa Cather and Quaker quilts. He's always trying to lure me there. http://www.nvdaily.com/news/299779503613216.bsp

Jean in MN

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Subject: stems? From: "mary voss" <maryjvosssbcglobal.net> Date: Sat, 10 May 2008 00:53:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

BlankI just took a look at my 1860s red and green applique quilt with a magnifying glass and discovered that the curved stems are cut from the flat cloth - they are not bias. The grain line starts straight up from the urn and then turns into bias as it curves. Hope this helps. - Mary from Holland, MI where the tulips are in full bloom.

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Subject: RE: 19th Century vine borders From: velialivehotmail.com Date: Fri, 9 May 2008 07:50:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

A good example of strips for vines are the Susan McCord quilts from Greenfi eldVillage in Dearborn,Michigan. The little black leaflet has nice enlarged pictures of those vines. (QuiltsFromTheHenryFord, Fons/Porter directions i s to cut green bias.) After helping with the exhibit in the eighties I was amazed at the way those strips were cut on straight grain and appliqued wit hout wrinkles. The group studied several points about the work discussing w hether Susan had help with design, quilting, cutting etc. Quite interesting to study the grain. That pink she used was is in a 1895 quilt brought in M onday for appraisal. The pink binding is straight grain like the green vine s in Susans piece. Velia

_________________________________________________________________ Stay in touch when you're away with Windows Live Messenger. http://www.windowslive.com/messenger/overview.html?ocid3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_Refr esh_messenger_052008

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Subject: Re: 19th Century vine borders From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 9 May 2008 05:57:30 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Dale, I'm not an expert, just a collector. But I don't think you can say there is a rule. It would most likely have depended on the fabric available as well as the skills of the appliquer. I have 3 red/green/yellow quilts vintage 1840-50. One is a red/green Lily Basket with an applique border of a gently curving vine. The vine is cut on the straight of grain and very nicely eased, even around the corners; a very finely made, high quality quilt. The second quilt, an Oak Leaf & Reel, has a vine border with all true bias vines and stems. The third quilt, dated 1848, has 25 complex red and green applique blocks (likely stitched by more than one person). But not a vine border. Most stems are on bias, but there are also straight stems eased around tight curves, and some vary as if cut out as a shape (beginning on the bias, changing to straight of grain). So, to answer your question: 'I sure would assume that the normal sane quiltmaker' of today, given enough fabric, would use bias, because it is much easier, and certainly valid historically. Barbara Burnham Ellicott City, MD

Dale Drake <ddrakeccrtc.com> wrote: All:

Did 19th Century quiltmakers cut bias strips to make the central vines in vine borders? I'm working on a red/green study quilt for this year's AQSG Seminar and want to replicate a border. I sure would assume that the normal sane quiltmaker wouldn't waste fabric by cutting those vines out of a flat piece of fabric - nor could she turn those corners with straight-grain strips. But before actually cutting the strips, I thought I'd ask the

experts.

Dale Drake in Indiana

--------------------------------- Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. --0-1408654953-1210337850:32854--

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Subject: Re: 19th Century vine borders From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Fri, 9 May 2008 10:58:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Thanks all! The answers were very enlightening. And it was reassuring to know that bias vines weren't unheard of in this time period. Unfortunately the source quilt is now unavailable and I just didn't think to note that detail down when I was examinng it, so I think I'll take Barbara's advice!

Dale

> So, to answer your question: 'I sure would assume that the normal sane > quiltmaker' of today, given enough fabric, would use bias, because it is > much easier, and certainly valid historically. > Barbara Burnham > Ellicott City, MD

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Subject: Re:Vine Borders From: Lloyd E Miller <lemillernycap.rr.com> Date: Fri, 9 May 2008 16:33:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Dale, I have four 19th c. quilts with vine borders, two from mid-century, two a bit later. All have the vine cut from "flat" fabric in 18" to 22" lengths which are then seamed together. This is not to say that

it could not have been done some other way, but this is what I am seeing. If the pieces were cut out echoing the curves, it would seem

there might not be all that much waste, certainly not more than there

would be cutting out the swags for the popular 19th c. swag borders.

Additionally I have among a collection of cardboard quilt design templates that probably date to around 1870 -1880 one of a vine, this

one about 12 " long.

Good luck with your project.

Linda Miller in Upstate NY

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Subject: Re:Vine Borders From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Fri, 9 May 2008 20:50:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Thanks! It appears that more quiltmakers that I would have thought did indeed cut those vines out of flat fabric. Others tortured straight grain strips around the curves. And some used bias. I'm comfortable now doing it the easy way - bias strips for me!

Dale

Linda said: > I have four 19th c. quilts with vine borders, two from mid-century, two a bit later. All have the vine cut from "flat" fabric in 18" to 22" lengths which are then seamed together. This is not to say that it could not have been done some other way, but this is what I am seeing. If the pieces were cut out echoing the curves, it would seem there might not be all that much waste, certainly not more than there would be cutting out the swags for the popular 19th c. swag borders. Additionally I have among a collection of cardboard quilt design templates that probably date to around 1870 -1880 one of a vine, this one about 12 " long.

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Subject: Quaker Quilts in VA From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sat, 10 May 2008 10:32:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

There is something special about Virginia. I say this grudgingly since my allegiance is to PA and MD, but it's hard to argue against the charms of a state that includes Jamestown, the first English settlement in America (as William Byrd said "In the beginning, all America was Virginia"), Colonial Williamsburg, Skyline Drive, the birthplaces of eight US presidents, Old Town Alexandria, Civil War battlefields at practically every turn and on and on. A spur of the moment trip to Lynchburg gave me the chance to stop at the VA Quilt Museum in Harrisonburg to see an exhibit of Quaker quilts curated by Mary Robare who presented her research on two Quaker quilts at the AQSG Seminar in Lowell last fall. Mary has written a full color catalogue which is available at the museum shop or from Hillside Studios (hillsidestudioscomcast.net) No affiliation, I just want you all to have a chance to share the goodies. What a treat to find pictures! The quilts, many of which are inscribed, reveal the interaction between Quaker communities in Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania. I was interested to see Apple Pie Ridge Star blocks in several of the quilts. This paper- cut version of the Fleur de Lis is pictured several times in Quilts of Virginia (Schiffer, 2006). The Quaker Valley quilt, circa 1850, is discussed at length in the catalogue. One of the inscribed names is that of Mary Payne, a former slave. The story of Mary's life is harrowing. Not all the quilts are in the catalogue. One of my favorites was Mary Lea Stabler's 1842 wedding quilt. The Split Square blocks are surrounded by a zigzag border of an orange, red and brown strip. It's a feast of fabrics in pristine condition. The maker of two of the quilts was Lucinda Buckingham Russell. I always identify with anyone who shares my first name. Needless to say, Lucinda was a talented quilter (G). Besides the quilts there are garments: a pale green silk wedding dress from the mid-1840s worn again in the 1920s by a descendent of the original bride; a sweet white muslin baby dress displayed next to a daguerreotype of the baby wearing the dress; a boy's dress from the 1840s in a marvelous blue, green and brown fondue stripe. Quilts from the Museum's permanent collection are also on display. There's an 1856 Wreath of Roses with a tulip border hanging next to a

reproduction which is the Museum's raffle quilt for this year. My favorite is a Double 9-Patch made of diamond shaped pieces (1860-70) with a chrome yellow print sashing (PA influence, perhaps). I loved the quilter's bag containing sample blocks (1850-60): Maple Leaf, Caesar's Crown, Pomegranate, etc. If you will be in the DC area in the next few months this is a wonderful day trip (130 miles). Considering the abundance of attractions in the Shenandoah Valley you can easily spend several days exploring. The Museum is closed Tues. and Wed.; phone # is 540-433-3818. Cinda on the rainy Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: Woven Coverlets and family traditions and stories From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Sat, 10 May 2008 14:38:45 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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With all the books being mentioned on coverlets, I'd like to add to the discussion on sources. All the books that have been sent to the list are very good

references. However, please understand that especially in the early-mid twentieth century several were written when the history of our country was romanticized to death, including weaving and quilting history. My assessment of that is that family stories were attached to them (usually through faulty memory, I think), carried on as fact and accepted as truth by most of the authors. We can point out information that is now known to be incorrect in many of them. They are excellent to have for the pictures as Trish pointed out but as with all research one must verify, document and vet your resources.

Even today, some want to steadfastly cling to myths and stories, almost as if they are badges of honor. I, however gently, explain to a woman that her 1940s pre-printed cross-stitch sampler did not come over on the Mayflower with her Hungarian antecedents and she gets angry. I understand disappointment but anger... It was explained to her that she should consult others. Is it a comfort thing or that it would be worth way less money or does she just /want/ to believe it? Do appraisers run into this? My personal feeling is that family traditions and stories

can be held in a special place in your heart (and on paper, please) but I mean, it is what it is, good or bad.

Jan

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Subject: ca.1930 machine quilted Sunbonnet Sue From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Sat, 10 May 2008 20:24:46 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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Hello,

Have any of you come across a 1930's quilt machine quilted with a vine and floral design? I have permission from my client to discuss this with the group. The quilt is a Sunbonnet Sue applique' quilt made from multi-prints and the quilting is a vine (3 leaf) and floral (7 pedals) design that I believe was marked using one of the applique patterns printed in the newspapers during this time. The quilting is excellent, an overall vine and floral quilting design with clamshells in the border and mitered corners. The quilt was made for this lady and she received it in the 30's, when a small child, from her Grandmother-the maker. I've seen machine quilted quilts from this era before but nothing like this. The blocks were hand appliqued and pieced together by hand. My client states her grandmother was having trouble doing handwork in her later years and believes she used her machine for quilting to make it easier on her hands.

The pattern is not the "Magic Vine" pattern but does run vertically. The stitches look like those made with my treadle machine and the client said her grandmother had a treadle. The quilt has been used throughout the years showing some wear but not as much as one would expect. It is in much better condition than others I have seen. This "Sue" is not your everyday Sunbonnet Sue quilt!

I would love to hear from anyone who may know the quilting pattern.

Best regards and Happy Mother's Day!

Alma Moates Florida ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Family stories vs physical evidence From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Sat, 10 May 2008 18:34:16 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Dear QHL, Jan has asked if appraisers run into issues with clients when the physical object does not match the family stories.

Yes! It happens frequently.

There are always kinds ways of explaining to the client why their family treasure is younger perhaps than what has been passed down with the object. I usually try to involve the client in what I am looking at,

for example sharing a peek through my pick glass helps them "see" the

weave or stitching. Having a fabric dating guide with images of fabrics from a time frame helps them see that the same fabrics are in their quilt.

Being sensitive and diplomatic goes a long way towards getting the client to accept my opinion. If they do not - of course they may get a second opinion!!! I have only ever had 1 client leave in a huff. ( There may be more that I don't know about - or got mad later ) Most people

are willing to look at the evidence and consider how it may or may not match the family stories.

Sometime in the next two weeks, a client is bringing me his 400 year old family quilt for a consultation. I can hardly wait to see this one!

Regards, Julia Zgliniec, Appraiser, certified by AQS

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 10, 2008 From: Trishherraol.com Date: Sun, 11 May 2008 11:38:35 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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I totally agree with Jan's comments about the myths that surround coverlets. I think more so than quilts because few people, other than professional Jacquard coverlet weavers signed anything or attached a note of the period, like one sees on quilts. Even more so are the hooked and hand sewn rugs that I have recently been working with.

That said, when one is lucky enough to live in this area of Pa. and some other eastern early settlements where family has remained in one spot, there are some 18th c. houses still owned by the original settling families. These are often a goldmine of information for documenters of all kinds of "old stuff."

Trish

 

In a message dated 5/11/2008 12:14:29 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

With all the books being mentioned on coverlets, I'd like to add to the discussion on sources. All the books that have been sent to the list are very good references. However, please understand that especially in the early-mid twentieth century several were written when the history of our country was romanticized to death, including weaving and quilting history. My assessment of that is that family stories were attached to them (usually through faulty memory, I think), carried on as fact and accepted as truth by most of the authors. We can point out information that is now known to be incorrect in many of them. They are excellent to have for the pictures as Trish pointed out but as with all research one must verify, document and vet your resources.

Even today, some want to steadfastly cling to myths and stories, almost as if they are badges of honor. I, however gently, explain to a woman that her 1940s pre-printed cross-stitch sampler did not come over on the Mayflower with her Hungarian antecedents and she gets angry. I understand disappointment but anger... It was explained to her that she should consult others. Is it a comfort thing or that it would be worth way less money or does she just /want/ to believe it? Do appraisers run into this? My personal feeling is that family traditions and stories can be held in a special place in your heart (and on paper, please) but I mean, it is what it is, good or bad.

Jan

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Subject: a day in DC From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sun, 11 May 2008 15:26:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

On the way home from the Shenandoah Valley we popped into the DAR to checkout "Telling Their Stories: Samplers and Silk Needlework" which will be up until August 30. The exhibit focuses on how the handwork of girls and young women relate to the changes in American society during the 19th

century. The samplers are not necessarily the finest in the collection; they were chosen because they have strong family history which tells a story. The geographic representation reaches from New England to Mississippi with a number of examples brought from England. The timeline stretches from the late 18th century up to the 3rd quarter of the 19th. There is a fascinating collection of work tables and sewing tools too. My favorite object was a "printwork" embroidery executed in monochrome (shades of gray) to resemble a print. It was from the Litchfield Female Academy which we learned about at AQSG in Connecticut. I also loved the needlework picture hanging next to the print which inspired it "A View Near Exeter" and a needlework picture of the Westown School. I'm curious about two samplers from Indiana (both beautifully executed) made by grown women (ages 41 and 26). Of course, at the DAR you know you'll always see quilts. Those currently on display compliment the sampler exhibit. An 1820 whitework from CT has motifs that are straight from the sampler vocabulary: blower basket, grapes, cornucopia of roses, rose vine. It is stipple quilted 1/8 apart. To see this beauty backlit takes your breath away. A candlewick counterpane from South Carolina dated 1802 has a large (unidentified) building in the center surrounded by large scale, primitive floral motifs. An embroidered linen scripture quilt from the late 19th century reminds us of the verses found on samplers. An 1850 Prince's Feather (red and green, of course) has 2 separate swag borders, one inside the other. This is something I've never seen before. A President's Wreath, circa 1870, has an amazing pieced sashing of gently curving red and green strips. The red has faded to brown; the dark blue green and orange make me think South Carolina. The quilt has a triple swag border (brown, green, orange) and 1/8" echo quilting. Our next stop was the Museum of the American Indian which has the best food in the Smithsonian system (also the most expensive, but my buffalo chili taco was delicious). "Identity by Design: Tradition, Change and Celebration in Native Women's Dresses" is on view until the end of the year. It is so engrossing that John, who usually wanders off when I spend huge amounts of time staring at textiles in museums, stayed right with me. Not only are the garments amazingly beautiful, they are all displayed in free standing cases which allow you to see the dresses in the round. The oldest dresses were from the 1830s, the newest contemporary costumes made for powwows. I was absolutely captivated by three painted dresses from the 1890 Ghost Dance era. This exhibit is an emotional as well as an

aesthetic experience. The icing on the cake is that we parked on the street right outside both the DAR and the Indian Museum. This is absolutely

unheard of in DC, one of the most parking challenged cities I visit. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Need help with Nancy Cabot pattern From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Sun, 11 May 2008 18:55:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

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Hello Friends-I am researching a Drunkard's Path variation called The Road Home. Brackman says it is a Nancy Cabot pattern. Does anyone on the list who is a Nancy Cabot collector or scholar know when the pattern appeared, how it was described, and the arrangement (set) of the very large block in a quilt? I would appreciate any information. Please email me off-list at pepcorygmail.com. Many thanks ahead of time for your help- Pepper Cory in the tornado-prone NC coast

-- Pepper Cory ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Toile Print From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 13:26:39 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

I gave a mini Dating Lecture at the Schenectady County Historical Association this past weekend. (They have a lot of treasures they are putting out on display for the next two months, should you find yourself in the Schenectady NY area.)

Anyway, on the back of what I believe is a very early four poster quilt is a charming toile print of a farmer coming home to his family. I am not a toile person and I didn't have any books with me, so I couldn't tell the curator much.

If you *are* a toile or old fabric person, would you mind taking a field trip to our gallery and looking at it? Go to http://quilthistory.com, click on Gallery then click on Fabrics. It's the last one on the right.

Thanks!

Kris

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Subject: Special signature quilt to be auctioned at TQHF From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Sun, 11 May 2008 09:45:29 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Dear QHL members,

The Quilters Hall of Fame 2008 Celebration honoring Helen Kelley of Minneapolis, Minnesota is in high gear. The registration is now in the mail. The registration packet is now available on the TQHF website as a pdf file as well. Helen92s special induction lecture and her workshop ...Another Look At Color, as well as her exhibit ...Storylines of My Heart, will be a special treat for attendees this year.

In addition, once again we have tried to prepare a cross section of other choices from the traditional85Eleanor Burns92 Stars All Around; to art quilts85.Beth Wheeler and Lorie Marquette92s Altered Photo Artistry.... to quilt history workshops85Beverly Dunivent of Tacoma, WA...Dating Old Qui lt Tops... and AQSG member Rosie Werner of Minneapolis, MN...Identifying and Dating Old Quilt Kits, plus Rosie92s lecture The Designs of Ruby McKim. Beverly Dunivent will also be curating this year92s invitational exhibit American Quilts: A Retrospective 1850-1950.

One of the highlights of this year92s Live Auction will be a signature quilt celebrating Jinny Avery92s induction into TQHF in 2006 with TQHF Marie Webster House appliquE9d in the center. The quilt was made by TQHF member Sue Jones of Waynesboro, VA. Sue has quilted musical scores in the outer most border to salute Jinny Avery92s other great talent as a jazz pianist. Five Honoree92s were present at Jinny92s induction... Georgia Bonesteel, Yvonne Porcella, Bets Ramsey, Donna Wilder and of course Jinny herself! To set-off each of their names, Sue did a photo transfer of the Honoree Medallion to fabric and appliquE9d a medallion by each of their signatures. Among other notable signatures on the quilt are TQHF founder Hazel Carter92s as well as that of Rosalind Webster Perry, granddaughter of Marie Webster. The back of the quilt contains four large panels of photo-transfer collages of people and events that Sue snapped throughout Celebration that year, including several shots of the special exhibit of Jinny Avery92s fabulous wearable art garments.

Come visit us and check out our NEW Community Room! We even have a quilt on a frame for visitors to put stitches into. When completed it will be raffled or auctioned. You can reach the Community Room Schedule by clicking on the word Exhibits on the Home page. The link to the Community Room will be in the upper right hand corner of the next page. TQHF is now offering monthly lectures and workshops and soon hope to offer something weekly!

Hope to see some of you in Marion this summer!

Karen Alexander President of TQHF www.quiltershalloffame.net

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Subject: machine quilting on a treadle From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 14:09:29 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

i have seen other comments like this before,

Subject: ca.1930 machine quilted Sunbonnet Sue From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com My client states her grandmother was having trouble doing handwork in her later years and believes she used her machine for quilting to make it easier on her hands. <snip> The stitches look like those made with my treadle machine and the client said her grandmother had a treadle. Alma Moates

i have been doing repairs on vintage and antique machines for several years and the "experts" in that group are always trying to figure out why one feels they can look at stitches and determine that they were made by a treadle. the mechanics of a sewing machine, the part that makes the stitches, are identical whether that machine is people powered or electric. as a matter of fact, many treadles were converted as homes were electified. now i am going to say that the timeframe before electricity would be a factor, but without offending anyone, can i ask just what it is that you look for to determine that a treadle machine was used?

thanx so much, patti

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Subject: machine versus hand From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net>

I am interested in the threads about the machine pieced and machine quilted quilts. When I began to make quilts in the 1970's it wasn't a "quilt" unless it was hand pieced. If there were quilts that were made by machine (I think during the Civil War) and now they are being found in the 1930's, where did the hand pieced philosophy come about? I was doing a demonstration 2 weekends ago and someone commented that my machine pieced quilts (even though we were hand quilting) weren't really quilts.

Brenda Applegate - ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Toile Print From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 15:17:50 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Dear Kris and All, The toile you have posted is used on the covers of the text: Siegele, Starr 2004. Toiles for All Seasons French and English Printed Textiles. Bunker Hill Publishing, Charlestown, MA and the Allentown Art Museum.

on page 4 " Manuf. unknown, The Four Seasons, after 1793 ( the full repeat is pictured), England. This design is adapted from Spring and Summer, painted by Charles Catton II ( 1756-1819) and Autumn and Winter painted by Richard Corbould (1757-1831) from their engraved illustrations by Francis Chesham ( 1749-1806)for James Thomspn, The Seasons ( Perth, Scotland: R Morrison and son 1793).

What a fun textile to see, Regards, Julia Zgliniec

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Subject: Re: machine versus hand From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 18:18:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Well, I think it came from women who thought their way was the best way and anything else was just not. . . . good enough. Not "real". Not "authentic."

Some folks are suspicious about anything new that changes the way things are done. . . and maybe that's where it got started.

Sort of the way I feel when real pie makers compliment my pies (which I make with store bought crust). Like I'm a "poser" because I didn't really do it all "by hand."

Some folks just have the mindset that "if it's new and it's easier. . . then it can't be as good," and some folks feel that there is more virtue in taking more time to do something.

Since beginning to read pioneer women's papers I've come to believe that many of them (maybe most) would think I was NUTS for hand-sewing when I have a Bernina.

So my tendency to think "my way is better" (which happens to be by hand) has faded, both with my findings among pioneer women's opinions, and in the realization that life is too short and I'm too old to get it all done by hand.

And, after 56 years I am finally beginning to realize that MY way isn't always the BEST way. It's been a real struggle to admit it, too, because I'm an opinionated old broad.

Stephanie Higgins

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Subject: Re: machine quilting on a treadle From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 19:41:40 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

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No offense taken...as I said to another lady, I could be completely wrong, I am NO EXPERT on machines and their stitches. I just merely was curious to the pattern I mentioned, that was the purpose of the email. I'll keep it to "just the facts" and no speculations in the future. The "look" I've noted on this quilt and the few quilts my aunt quilted on her treadle could have more to do with the heavy thread used and not the machine. I stand corrected.

Always learning,

Alma Moates Pensacola, Florida ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Avery Signature Quilt now in the QHL Gallery From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 15:53:31 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

I posted two photos of the Avery 2006 Signature Quilt that will be auctioned on July 18 in Marion, IN, during The Quilters Hall of Fame Live auction for all to see.

Just go to http://www.quilthistory.com/ and click on Gallery on the left-hand side of the page.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: machine quilting on a treadle From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 18:11:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I learned to sew on a treadle sewing machine (My junior high school had a row of them under the windows in the home ec classroom). To get even stitches I think it required an even pace in the pedaling. So when I see machine quilting that has lots of tiny stitches in an inch and then markedly fewer not far away, I tend to think "treadle machine--uneven pace." But that's my memory of it, and that was junior high and I'm 56 years old. . . so maybe my memory is wrong. Stephanie Higgins

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Subject: Re: machine quilting on a treadle From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 18:24:05 -0700 X-Message-Number: 10

I've sewn on a treadle machine. The stitches are nice and even no matter if going fast or slow. Perhaps if one were doing free motion quilting with the feed dogs lowered (or covered) there could be a difference in stitch length (just as there is on an electric machine today).

The mechanism for forming stitches is the very same as it is today.

Christine on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog and http://www.winnowing.com <-- website

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Subject: Re: Family stories vs physical evidence From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 22:17:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

*Four hundred years old??????* That would make it one of the oldest quilts on record! Did he describe it at all?

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Starting with hand piecing and moving on From: Jackie Joy <joysbeesyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 12 May 2008 20:29:42 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 12

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Back in 1978, whe I was first introduced to "real" quilting (this is not counting the nine patch thing I started with scraps from clothing I made for my daughter: kettle cloth, corduroy, etc.), it was hand piecing. You made templates, traced around the templates with a pencil, cut the patches out with scissors, marked a 1/4 inch seam allowance, and sewed by hand. And then quilted by hand. In a frame.

In retrospect, this was probably part of my continuing revolt against the increasingly "plastic" world, as I saw it. Remember, I graduated from college in 1968. Natural fibers were again appreciated, and mashed potatoes no longer came out of a box. Remember the Foxfire books? And Mother Earth News? I believe the preference for the perceived old ways was a rejection of the contemporary state of things then, without much relation to the historical reality.

I use all the tools now available to make quilts now. I machine piece, applique, and quilt. But I can still eyeball a perfect 1/4 inch seam allowance.

Jackie in Reno ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Teddy Pruett in ArtNews Magazine! From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 00:40:46 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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Hey everyone,

I have been away for a bit so apologies if someone already posted this- but Teddy I just spotted your quilt in ArtNews magazine! Congrats! Do you by chance have photos online of the entire piece? I would love to see it. And I would be eager for more info on the fabric panel shown with the couple fighting.

May 2008 issue, page 48, for anyone interested.

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Subject: PBS series on German Immigrants/US From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 00:27:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Tonight I watched the second installment in a PBS series on German immigration/immigrants in America. Both have been interesting, enlightening. Tonight's series was about immigrants to Texas in 1840's and just later---New Braunfel, Comfort, Fredericksburg, etc. Visiting the hill country now, I've always envisioned the area having been easily settled and peacefully prospering, very much a part, while apart from, Anglo-Texas. I was disabused.

Those areas were surrounded by cotton farms, but the Germans opposed slavery and refused to join the Confederate military forces. Many sought to flee to Mexico and then catch a ship to the north, where they would join Union forces. Some were simply pacifists. Many were hunted down by the Texas Rangers and executed as traitors.

One man who had managed to cross the Rio Grand wrote his wife a letter in which he told her to sell everything, "even your sewing machine," and leave.

It raised a question, however---the narrator said that because the Germans would not use slave labor, many turned to cattle ranching. She suggested they were the first cattle ranchers in Texas.

I don't believe that is true. The Spanish had cattle in the 15th century, both in Texas (Mexico) and in East Florida. When the British got East and West Florida in a treaty, the feral cattle were eventually rounded up and "ranched" there. Charles Simon, an Alabama agriculturist who has a "hobby herd" of these cattle, has written several articles on the subject and the breed's association with Scots-Irish, whose heritage as herders was ancient. They were small, long-horned cattle--speedy runners. In time they were bred with Anglo varieties in Southeast, and I thought Anglo-Americans who went to Texas to farm cotton took some some of this stock with them and that the earliest herds were from this stock. There were also feral Spanish cattle in Texas.

The first cattle drives were to New Orleans, along The Atascosito-Opelousas Road, an east-west Indian trail in Southwest Louisiana and Southeast Texas. Part of the trail crossed waterways, which the cattle had to do. But I think those began in the 1830s. Bill Jones has a book on the Louisiana cowboys of SW LA that is has beautiful photography and that is well written and documented. I recommend it for folks interested in such.

The Goodnight-Loving trail rides came considerably later and most assembled in panhandle, I think. Several years ago I traced the Goodnight-Loving trail from Texas north for several hundred miles. I got educated on the major trails, players, KS, barbed wire (or, as we say down here, "bob wire" as in, "Be careful when you cross that bob wire fence, hon: you don't want to tear your dress.").

BTW, am I the only one on this list who thought that in the phrase "Goodnight-Loving Trail," "Goodnight" was an adjective, not a proper noun? I thought that until my trail education. I imagined lots of Miss Kittys along the way.

Anyway, aside from the cattle part, the series strikes me as sound history and interesting history. I recommend it.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: machine versus hand From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 00:40:39 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

I thought the Colonial Revival had a lot to do with this attitude. They idealized going back to handcrafts during that period. Doing something by hand would have been considered far superior to using the sewing machine.

This kind of touches on the Colonial Revival. http://www.womenfolk.com/quilting_history/depressionera.htm

Judy Breneman

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Subject: Re: Starting with hand piecing and moving on From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 09:00:23 +0100 X-Message-Number: 4

Here in the UK, 'real patchwork', to the general public, means the traditional tack-it-over-papers method. (I can't even just say 'paper piecing' any more because the modern machine method of paper piecing

has purloined the phrase.) I remember my surprise years ago when my

son bought me some 'orphan' blocks over the internet and I first saw

hexagons hand-sewn with ordinary seams. (Big respect to that maker!)

If I ever run into anyone who knows nothing of quilting, tacking over

papers is what they expect me to be doing. (That is if they don't look puzzled and wonder why I spend my time making duvets, colloquially known as continental quilts)

I'm not aware of great snobbery here about hand or machine piecing, probably because quilting in the UK today pretty much owes its style

to the transatlantic effect of the American revival. Ask your average quilter here what a traditional quilt is and they will likely start naming American block quilt styles, and expect them to be machine sewn.

Most of the debate/discussion/heated disagreement I hear at the moment is over hand versus machine quilting being appropriate, and then of course the extension of domestic machine versus domestic machine with

BSR versus longarm professional.

From time to time machine quilted vintage quilts do turn up, but rarely are they very skilful. What always seems odd to me is when I

see beautiful hand quilted North Country specimens which have been finished around the needleturn edge with two lines of sometimes erratic machine stitching. (Erratic because it is a difficult thing

to control a knife edge over wadding through a machine, I've tried).

Who knows why they did it? Maybe because it was stronger than hand stitches, maybe because they couldn't face the lengths of straight stitch, maybe because there was one machine in the village/street which they were 'allowed' to borrow and the machine stitching actually lent kudos?

Sally Ward

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Subject: re: toile From: "MARIE SARCHIAPONE" <mariesarchiaponeverizon.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 08:54:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Does anyone know the source of a black on cream toile featuring the Brooklyn Bridge? It is modern, I believe. It was featured in a quilt show in Albany, NY last fall.

Marie

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Subject: Re: PBS series on German Immigrants/US From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 10:07:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Thanks to Larry McMurtry I did know that Goodnight-Loving were two proper names. However, they do conjure up some delightfully improper

images. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: PBS series on German Immigrants/US From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 14:38:36 +0000 X-Message-Number: 7

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As a registered nurse, one of the doctors that I worked with came back from a medical conference and knowing that I am from Texas, he told me about meeting a Dr Goodnight to see how I would respond. I said like the Texas cattle trail. She was a desendant of Goodnight of the Goodnight-Loving cattle trail fame. Polly Mello Cold and clear in Maryland but always yearning for Texas. --NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_9583_1210689516_0--

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Subject: The Age Old Debate . . . From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 10:43:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

"I believe the preference for the perceived old ways was a rejection of the contemporary state of things then, without much relation to the historical reality." Jackie in Reno

"I thought the Colonial Revival had a lot to do with this attitude. They idealized going back to handcrafts during that period. Doing something by hand would have been considered far superior to using the sewing machine." Judy Breneman

"And, after 56 years I am finally beginning to realize that MY way isn't always the BEST way. It's been a real struggle to admit it, too, because I'm an opinionated old broad." Stephanie Higgins

I think the above statements are among the most correct I have seen on this subject. 'Perceived' ways of doing things are often based on current trends throughout time whether we are talking about the 19th, 20th or 21st century.

Can we honestly assume that quilt makers before us were any more or less human than we are today? Aren't we also influenced by what is considered popular and/or the correct method of doing things? Didn't we all at some point want to try out every technique or gadget that was new on the market only to abandon many of them for our preferred methods? Don't those among us who strive for an accurate 1/4" seam squirm just a little when we see another quilt made with a technique that does not require such accuracy but gets beautiful results just the same?

With the increasing availability of the home sewing machine in the 19th century, sewing with a machine was considered the wave of the future, a trend driven by advertising and editors of many popular publications until 'trendsetters' decided handwork was better. What exactly drove their decisions? Fear that progress was moving too fast? Did they suddenly develop a greater appreciation for time?

OR, could it be that trends turned back to hand work when it was realized that learning to use the sewing machines well was not as easy as the manufacturers wanted consumers to believe. How many 'hand quilters' have tried 'machine quilting' and decided it's more difficult than it looks and vice versa? How many hand quilters regularly read publications that focus on machine quilting and vice versa?

When you consider the difficulty of machine quilting on any machine, especially some of the early treadles, why aren't early machine-quilted quilts considered among some of the best work produced in their time? Is it possible that they were among the 'best quilts' until trendsetters said hand work was better and machine work was hidden away or declared utilitarian?

One thing I have learned time and again is that where history is concerned the more I learn the less sure I am of anything, especially in how history relates to textiles - most especially quilts.

As for how we do things today and who decides what methods are correct? IMHO it should be the quilt maker who chooses whatever method offers the most satisfaction from the process and gets the quilt done.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle Where the sun is shining following a record cold day requiring the need for winter quilts in May in Lancaster County, PA

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Subject: Okay, here's one for you.... From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 10:52:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Does anyone know when "block" came into use to refer to a design unit? I assume it's 19th century but wish to be sure.\

Thanks!

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Schenectady From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 12:59:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Kris, You mentioned good things going on at the Schenectady Co. Hist. Soc. I didn't find much info on exhibits on the website. Was the "Quilts of

Schenectady" a one day only event? Cinda

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Subject: Re: Schenectady From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 13:19:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 11

It's not the best website:-)) I get the impression they just got funding to go through their treasures - they are unearthing stuff that was donated in the late 19th century and is still in it's original box. Including one of the original Howe Sewing Machines. Schenectady is a very, very old town. The stockade section (where the museum is) was founded in 1661.

Anyway, the exhibit is on from May 10 - June 28. Museum hours are 1 - 5 M-F and 10 - 2 on Saturdays. The talk I am doing this Saturday is on quilt restoration. No good stuff this weekend, it will all be stuff with boo-boos.

Kris

--- Lucinda Cawley <lrcawleycomcast.net> wrote:

> Kris, > You mentioned good things going on at the Schenectady Co. Hist. > Soc. I > didn't find much info on exhibits on the website. Was the "Quilts > of > Schenectady" a one day only event? > Cinda

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Subject: Re: PBS series on German Immigrants/US From: "Debbie" <russhillwindstream.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 12:31:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Oh nuts I wish I had know this was on PBS. I wonder if they will rerun it again. I am in Texas and do living history. In fact I live in Fredericksburg. Not sure about the Germans being the first cattle ranchers. They were mainly farmers. I will need to do some research on that myself. In fact when we do some first person Civil War events I am a German Immagrant who came to TX as a teenager in 1830. This program would be very helpful to those of us who do this type of event. Oh did they say anything about the only treating with the indians that was never broken? We just celebrated the 163rd year. I iwll see if Ican locate it again to wathc. Thanks Debbie Russell russhillktc.com ----- Original Message ----- Tonight I watched the second installment in a PBS series on German immigration/immigrants in America. Both have been interesting, enlightening. Tonight's series was about immigrants to Texas in 1840's and just later---New Braunfel, Comfort, Fredericksburg, etc. Visiting the hill country now, I've always envisioned the area having been easily settled and peacefully prospering, very much a part, while apart from, Anglo-Texas. I was disabused.

:

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Subject: Re: PBS series on German Immigrants/US From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 15:59:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

Debbie, let me know if you find it on PBS again. I wish I had seen it also.

Best regards, Sharron............ ...in rainy Spring, TX! ---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: PBS series on German Immigrants/US From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 17:02:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

> > Oh did they say anything about the only treating with the indians that > was never broken? We just celebrated the 163rd year.

Yes, in fact, a point was made of that. One film clip was taken from the annual commemoration of the groups' mutual friendship. Kind of amusing. You saw this obviously Indian man, dressed in 1850s' gear lean over to an equally obvious German man, who was not part of the re-enactment, and ask if he were going to Germany again soon. The latter said, "Yes, I go every summer for 6 weeks...." Just chatting away, Comanche and German, obviously longtime acquaintances.

Fredericksburg then and now was shown, along with the other towns. One Willie Nelson-looking fellow from the re-enactment.

I have since checked out the ranching thing, and I don't know where they came up with that. It is baseless.

Gaye

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Subject: Re: Family stories vs physical evidence From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 16:10:39 -0600 X-Message-Number: 15

Thanks Julia. I learned a long time ago to be diplomatic but every once in a while the "Oh I just can't take this question anymore" pops out.

The UGRR and quilts issue is one of those but I persevere and am surprised that I only snap at those who should know better. I hope my

lack of patience isn't because I'm get older and resent have to deal with people who really don't want to listen. "Tell me you don't believe me, if you want, but do it after you've heard my reasoning." Will we see you in Columbus?

Jan Julia Zgliniec wrote: > Dear QHL, > Jan has asked if appraisers run into issues with clients when the > physical object does not match the family stories. > > Yes! It happens frequently. > >

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Subject: Re: Family stories vs physical evidence From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 17:57:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 16

Jan Thomas wrote: > > I hope my lack of patience isn't because I'm get older and resent have to deal > with people who really don't want to listen. "

No, Jan, it is because you're getting older.

I've been waiting to hear from the member who was to be presented with the 400 year old [America?] quilt.

Gaye

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Subject: Re: Family stories vs physical evidence From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 19:49:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 17

I cannot wait to hear about the 400 year old quilt. There are a handful of very old quilts in American collections, but the oldest I'm aware of is the Lovely Lane quilt.

And Jan - you aren't the only one by any means. Maybe we should start a society? :)

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: Family stories vs physical evidence From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 17:13:09 -0700 X-Message-Number: 18

Hi All, I have not seen the quilt yet - but from the pictures - it may actually be old. Maybe not 400 but perhaps around 300. I will let you all know what I see if my client allows. Julia

>

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Subject: Re: Family stories vs physical evidence From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 20:31:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 19

300 years sounds reasonable - is it patchwork? The McGill quilt up in Montreal is from 1726 so that time frame would work.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: PBS series on German Immigrants/US From: "Debbie" <russhillwindstream.net> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 18:15:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 20

I think this was a film I worked on many years ago. The film crew was from Germany and I was hired to take them all over for one week. They did the Pow Wow that was just held for the 10th year last weekend along wiht a bunch of other things. We did a reenactment of the Masacre on

the Nuesses. It wasn' t the masacre itself but the leading up to it.

This was during the Civil War. I don't think it is going to be shown

here in TX or at least in the Austin area real soon. I think I understand where the ranching info came from. But before the Germans here did any ranching places like the George Ranch or King Ranch were in business. I still need to research that. The title is The Germans in America. Debbie Russell russhillktc.com

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Subject: Re: Family stories vs physical evidence From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Tue, 13 May 2008 17:57:23 -0700 X-Message-Number: 21

Hi Lisa, No, it is whole cloth. So that works too. I will be in touch. Julia