Subject: Political Quilts From: quiltingtrailaol.com

What are some of the best resources for learning more about "quilts/quilting and politics"??throughout the history of this country?? Thanks to all.? Ruth

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Subject: Re: Political Quilts From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Mon, 19 May 2008 08:44:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

There are several catalogs that feature political quilts, although they can be difficult to find. The Brandywine River Museum in Chadds

Ford, PA, held an exhibit in the fall of 2000 called "The Fabric of Persuasion, Two Hundred Years of Political Quilts," curated by Julie

Powell, and there was a catalog by the same title. Julie's text is detailed and informative, as she is a long-time political items collector. Julie also wrote an article based on the exhibit for Quilter's Newsletter published in April 2001(#331).

The Power of Cloth, Political Quilts 1845-1986, by Jane Benson and Nancy Olsen, is a similar publication based on an exhibit at De Anza

College, Cupertine, CA, in the spring of 1987. It also has extensive

text.

While covering a broader subject, The Bird, The Banner, and Uncle Sam, Images of America in Folk and Popular Art by Elinor Lander Horwitz (1976) has a few political quilts and textiles.

The most comprehensive volume of political textiles (not specifically

quilts) is the out of print Smithsonian publication from 1979 is Herbert Collins, Threads of History.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Political Quilts From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Mon, 19 May 2008 12:58:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Political, commemorative and patriotic all run together. I would add the following to Xenia's suggestions: All Flags Flying : American Patriotic Quilts as Expressions of Liberty by Robert Bishop and Carter Houck (1986). The second half of this book is about the quilts from the Statue of Liberty contest, but the first 59 color pictures are of patriotic, political and commemorative quilts from 1800 to the 1980s. Celebration and Remembrance: Commemorative Textiles in America 1790-1990 by Diane Fagan Affleck and Paul Hudon (1990). This catalogue of an exhibit at the Museum of American Textile History includes bandanas, ribbons, rugs, toiles. The Political and Campaign Quilt by Katy Christopherson (1984). This is a catalogue of an exhibit at the Kentucky Historical Society. Stars and Stripes: Patriotic Motifs in American Folk Art by Deborah Harding (2002). This beautiful book is a feast for the eyes. Chapter 2 is called "The Fabric of America." Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: SAGE Journals Online -- Free Online Trial to all SAGE Journals until May 31, 2008 From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Tue, 20 May 2008 09:42:34 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

FYI

https://online.sagepub.com/cgi/register?registrationFTMay2008-14

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Subject: political quilts in Florida From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net>

In the mid 1990s in Tallahassee, FL, I curated a show of 'quilts made by the families of or owned by Florida's 20th century governors.' I don't remember the exact date (sad to be losing the little grey cells) or the exact wording, and the only surviving catalog from this one-time, three-day exhibit viewed by about 1,000 people is boxed up. Blanket Statements published my article about the exhibit, "Trial by Curatorial Fire," and as that is also boxed up and the same grey cells are still malfunctioning, I don't remember the date or issue, but it was in the 1990s.

 

My point is that although mine was a solo effort (albeit with help from people who knew people, etc.), surely there have been other such lost-to-time political or quasi-political exhibits by historical societies, libraries, etc. These quilts would not be captured in the resources mentioned thus far.

 

Also, in celebration of Florida's Sesquicentennial in 1995, local guilds throughout the state created a "54-40 or Fight" quilt in red, white and blue. It was signed by every female member of the legislature, retired or active. That quilt was donated to the Florida Museum of History. The signatures included those of the first woman ever elected to the Florida legislature, and women were called off the floor to sign their names! (I had the help of some very highly placed individuals to make that happen.) The creation of that quilt led to the establishment of the Sunshine State Quilter's Association, Florida's statewide quilt guild.

 

SSQA has tried for years to computerize the paper records from the state's documentation project. None of the above would be included in those records, but you would have to know exactly what you were asking for to learn about the Sesquicentennial Quilt. To confuse things further, the local Tallahassee guild, Quilters Unlimited, created a commemorative quilt in 1995 featuring the state's seal, which is also referred to as the Sesquicentennial Quilt. It was raffled off and won by a guild member who may have donated it to the museum; not sure about that.

 

I suppose that of these, only the (legislature) Sesquicentennial Quilt would be considered "political," and, thankfully, it can be seen, but all of these quilts had some relationship to politics.

 

Andi in Keota, Iowa

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Subject: Calamanco From: "Julie Crossland" <quiltsappraisedcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 20 May 2008 18:08:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Linda, you aren't the only one that asked about the whole cloth quilt at the museum. When I was there last Friday doing Quilt Documentation several people asked about the sheen on the border sections. Shiny wool is normally calendered. Here's a definition: Calendering is another characteristic mechanical finishing treatment involving heat, pressure or moisture, or combinations of all three. Calendering is the pressing or ironing of cloth by means of heated rollers. In simple, calendaring, woven cloth is passed through rollers to flatten the warp and weft yarns in order to close the interstices between them, thereby producing a smoother, denser cloth. A slight increase in the speed of one roller over another enhances luster due to the added friction, and is known as friction calendaring. From Chemical Principles of Textile Conservation by Agnes Timar-Balazsy & Dinah Eastop

Nice to see you online.

Julie Crossland

Hudson, NH

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Subject: Calamanco From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 20 May 2008 18:55:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

To add to Julie's great definition, calendering is a generic process and seldom is the sheen it imparts to cotton fabric permanent. Some manufacturers have developed and patented calendering applications such as Waverly's Glo-Sheen or Everfast's Everglaze. On mercerized fabric,

calendering further adds luster known as satin finish and silk finish.

Julie Crossland wrote:

Linda, you aren't the only one that asked about the whole cloth quilt at the museum. When I was there last Friday doing Quilt Documentation several people asked about the sheen on the border sections. Shiny wool is normally calendered. Here's a definition: Calendering is another characteristic mechanical finishing treatment involving heat, pressure or moisture, or combinations of all three. Calendering is the pressing or ironing of cloth by means of heated rollers. In simple, calendaring, woven cloth is passed through rollers to flatten the warp and weft yarns in order to close the interstices between them, thereby producing a smoother, denser cloth. A slight increase in the speed of one roller over another enhances luster due to the added friction, and is known as friction calendaring. From Chemical Principles of Textile Conservation by Agnes Timar-Balazsy & Dinah Eastop----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Political quilts -The Bluest Eye quilt From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Tue, 20 May 2008 23:24:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Dear members,

I think there may be some misunderstanding about who made The Bluest Eye quilt hanging in Obama's office. I went to the website posted on QHL shttp://wwwbluemoonriver.blogspot.com/2008/03/tag-im-it.html to see the quilt and the maker is Susan Brubker Knapp, not Sandy Schweitzer.

Here is the quote from the bluemoonriver blog by Susan Brubakekr Knapp... <My quilt The Bluest Eye is now hanging at Barack Obama's Ohio headquarters. I met a fascinating woman and art quilt collector, Michele Hardman, at the 2007 SAQA conference, and she asked if she could exhbit the quilt at Obama's headquarters in Chicago, where she works. She hung the quilt in Ohio about a month ago when she helped open Obama's Ohio headquarters in Columbus. I love Obamas optimism, eloquence and energy .>

Just for the fun of it I emailed Susan because she has a maiden name that I have come across in my own family genealogy research. She emailed back, curious that the quilt was being discussed as a "political" quilt, saying <I don't really consider it a political quilt but rather a social commentary quilt.>

Perhaps there is another quilt by Sandy Schweitzer?

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: Political Quilts From: Trishherraol.com Date: Wed, 21 May 2008 10:16:46 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

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Since we are the subject of political quilts, just a reminder that an

exhibit on that subject will be opening at the Heritage Center Museum of Lancaster County on June 6th and run through the end of the year. It is titled

Patchwork Politics: From George to George W. Museum is located in the center of the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania on Center Square. Admission is free. Closed Sundays but open daily 9-5, and 9-8 on First Fridays. Website is: _www.lancasterheritage.com_ (http://www.lancasterheritage.com) .

Trish Herr

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Subject: Political Quilts From: quiltingtrailaol.com Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 08:40:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Xenia and Lucinda, thank you for your imput.? I'll follow up on those leads.? Andi, good to hear from you.? I was a charter member of SSQA when all of that was happening.?Ruth

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Subject: Question From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 06:29:07 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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First I don't know how to get photos to everyone unless I attach it here so that is what I am hoping to do, 2nd, this is an OLD (1910 era) family photo, and it isn't the best but it is the best I could do, can anyone tell me what quilt pattern that is that the women are holding.One of the women is my Grandmother and she died before I was born so I never got to meet her. I can't tell from the photo what that pattern is, I thought someone who was more knowledgeable than I am might be able to pull the name from somewhere. Wish the Lady on the end didn't have her quilt folded in so we could see that one too. I have never seen any quilts from that side of the family either. TIA, Jeanne

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Subject: Re: Question From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 06:50:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Jeanne,

Add it to our gallery and then invite us to go visit it. Go to http://quilthistory.com and click on gallery. The password is vintage.

Alternatively, if you have it on a photobucket or flickr page, you could give us that address.

Kris

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Subject: Question From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

Post to the eboard www.vintagepictures.eboard.com

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Subject: Re: Question From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507yahoo.com>

Check out ancestors album, should be the 1st photo. Thanks for the idea. Jeanne

http://community.webshots.com/user/luceej

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Subject: quilt - window screening

I want to know if any other people have come across this manner of hanginq quilts. The quilt had sewn onto it with monofilament ---- a piece of window screening (black plastic type found in hardware stores) cut to about 1/3 to 1/2 the size of the quilt. On top of that was a sheet of Pellon.(The Pellon was between the quilt and the screening. But of course the screening touch the quilt anyway when it was folded in a box.) They then stitched a strip of the soft part of velcro along the top. I am assuming that they put the screening and Pellon on the back of the quilt to keep it from touching the lead based paint on the wall in the historic house. Well, it wasn't a good idea. The screening and the Pellon are breaking down and feel very oily to the touch.?I think it is the petroleum in the product that is breaking down. (This was done 10 years ago.) The quilt even feels a little oily to the touch where this stuff touched it for years while being stored in an acid free box. Where did the method of hanging come from? I have never in my life heard of it. I can also vouche for the fact that rolling quilts is a bad idea. I saw many rolled quilts yesterday. The front/pieced portion of the quilts were very very very wrinkled. Any comments on dealing with brown dyes that have run on an otherwise perfect quilt??? How often should acid free boxes be replaced??Most acid-free paper needs to be replaced every 3 years. This is a very expensive proposition if boxes need to be replaced often.

Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio The Creative Caregiver New Bern, NC palamporeaol.com

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Subject: RE: quilt - window screening From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 08:07:44 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

I am very interested in this post. I have heard of Art quilters incorporating screening inside their quilts to give them body. I have considered doing this. When we had our lanai enlarged the workmen gave me several rolls of leftove r screening. One roll does have a somewhat oily feel. When I return to Florida in the fall the screen will be disposed of or give n to someone who makes tote bags with it. It will NEVER be used inside one of my quilts. Kay

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Subject: RE: Question From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 10:19:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Jeanne, see page 25 of Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns. I think the one that applies to the quilt the two ladies are holding is #135 "Fine Woven Patchwork" or "Streak of Lighting".

The other quilt is too folded for me to see the pattern.

Best regards, Sharron................ ..........in humid Spring, TX.........

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Subject: RE: quilt - window screening From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 13:30:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

If my memory is not failing too miserably I believe most AF boxes should be changed about every 10 years give-or-take a year or two.

Instead of acid-free tissue I use washed white muslin. It needs to be washed periodically, about every year or so, but that gives me a good reason and a regular schedule to pull quilts out of storage for re-folding and remembering what I have (which is a process I am working on right now). I also wrap the quilt in the washed white muslin for added protection from the AF boxes they are stored in.

I heard or read a few months ago something about Rubbermaid having boxes that are made of a type of material (poly-something or other) that is PH neutral. From what I understand if you have a particular item of theirs in mind you can call their customer service number and they will tell you the type of materials used. I have not tried it - but since I found an AF box with 'critter' damage on the outside of one corner I may consider the idea. Has anyone else heard of or tried this?

I have never heard of using screening for anything except vacuuming quilts. Thanks for sharing the warning about the very unusual hanging method. I hope the situation you found is a unique one.

Greta

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Subject: RE: quilt - window screening From: Cindy Claycamp <muddyforkfarmshotmail.com>

MFSG just visited the Indiana State Museum. Their quilts were rolled with t he top of the quilt on the outside of the roll and appeared to be in good(n ot wrinkled) condition. Cindy Claycamp>

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Subject: Identification Mystery From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 15:14:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

I have posted a photo of a piece of fabric on the E-Board under the 'Fabrics' tab entitled 'Identification Mystery.' The fabric belongs to a friend who asked me to help identify the printed image and she has given me permission to share the photo on this list in hopes the online experts can help us solve the mystery.

There are photos of President Garfield that are similar but not quite right. W.T. Sherman has also been suggested but we can't confirm that image either.

The clothing might help and I'm not sure about what seems to be a lanyard with something tucked into the jacket pocket - possibly a monocle. Are there fabrics like these of people in other countries and could this be one of them?

The clues (if you can call them that) are that the fabric was stored with a number of other late 19th century textiles and fabrics. They were discovered in New England - or the family originated there I am not exactly sure. The piece measures 32-1/2" and is approximately 1 yard long.

Obviously the person must have be notable enough to warrant the cost of printing and it seems unusual that the figure is the only image with such open space around him.

If anyone can help us solve this mystery please contact me on or off list.

Thanks!

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle maquilterepix.net

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Subject: RE: Identification Mystery From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 15:30:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

I don't think he's an American dude. He looks kinda like Prince Albert...not in a can. Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: Identification Mystery From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 23:26:14 +0100 X-Message-Number: 15

I'm not sure Prince Albert ever sported such an unkempt beard.....

This guy looks like he might have done a day's work sometime in his life.....

Sally Ward ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Great news AQS Certified From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 23 May 2008 01:06:59 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I have some great news to share with all my QHL friends. I'm now an

American Quilter's Society Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles.

I want to publicly thank Kris Driessen for this list which I've found

to be an invaluable resource in my quilt history studies. I also want to thank everyone who has so generously shared their knowledge through this list and through AQS and AQSG.

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

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Subject: Newspaper Embroidery Patterns - "Betsy Dean" From: "Louise" <ltiemannstny.rr.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2008 10:06:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hello all, has any one ever heard of, or have documentation on Betsy Dean? There are some 'transfer patterns" published of bonnet girls, fans, teapots, etc. (according to ebay listing 280228470249). I was wondering if anyone had ever seen them before. Thanks, Louise

http://www.quiltpapers.blogspot.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts at Obama's Headquarters From: OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com Date: Fri, 23 May 2008 10:04:36 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi:

I emailed Sandy Schweitzer to ask more about the quilt she has at the Obama

headquarters. I can't remember who on the QHL is doing research on current political quilts, but you could contact Sandy if you need more information. Her email is: _sandysmc.net_ (mailto:sandysmc.net) .

Kathy Kansier AQS Appraiser Ozark, Missouri

Here's Sandy's response regarding her political quilt:

Greetings, Kathy! Yes, I do have a quilt, Memorial Day, 2006 is at Obama E28099s headquarters. Michele Hardman, a PAQA member has taken quilts to be hung there. One, of Martin Luther King by Sharon Malec is also hanging at this time. I do not know what other quilts Michele has on display. My quilt is of a

reversed flag-like face with alternating red & white stripes on the left. I have inked the names of the 110th US Congress, The Cabinet, Bush and Cheney

on the white. So---Mc Cain, Clinton and ObamaE28099s names are on the qu ilt. The blue field, on the right, is pieced of letter-sized blocks, printed with opening salutations of letters to soldierE28099s families where a fatalit y has occurred. I then dyed them varying shades of blue. Two crosses, with the names of the two soldiers who died on May 26, 2006 are appliquC3A9d, their names embroidered on the crosses. At the bottom is a computer counter motif with the total fatalities to that date. It is very simple---but records facts about Iraq war. I would like to update it in some way but havenE28099t figured out what/how to do it---as yet. Our current PAQA Challenge is a 24E2809Dx24E280 9D political theme quilt. I am having much fun with it! My working title is E2809CAmerica VotesE2809D and it is part satire!

**************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch "Cooking with Tyler Florence" on AOL Food. (http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video3D4&?NCID3Daolfod00030000000002)

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Subject: Indigo Linsey Wollsey at NEQM, Teddy's quilt at Peabody From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2008 11:56:41 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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OK QHL - I am trying to send you this email again, hope it goes through the ether this time!

At the New England Quilt Museum, that fabulous indigo whole cloth with the glazed border is absolutely right, made by the same hand at the same time, and so unusual. The border is glazed while the interior is matte indigo. Quilting motifs are fabulous, and format is so unusual, framed all around with shine. AQSG experts examined it to determine whether was done in calimanco manner with hot roller to create shine, or done with combo of egg white and shellack. Only fiber analysis can provide the answer, but you can contact curator Mary Walker at curatornequiltmuseum.org if you want any more info on the exhibition, which has some wonderful material.

At the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem Mass is a wonderful informative exhibition&nbsp; called Wedded Bliss about marriage ceremonies worldwide, Don't miss it for all the wedding related textiles, not just white gowns. Much fabulous handmade textiles as bride prices and for ceremonial purposes, really a treat to see, also intriguing documentary snippets about various ethnic ceremonies. And the piece de resistance at the exhibit's end--Teddy Pruett's Divorce quilt!! Everyone gets a kick out of that..

Laura Fisher

There will be a panel discussion on collecting at the New England Quilt Museum July 19. Keep watching this column for more info.

--0-743487318-1211569001:65313--

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Subject: pattern From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2008 14:35:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Jeanne, I've always called that pattern "brick wall". Jean in MN

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Subject: RE: quilt - window screening From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2008 10:53:02 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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Hi all, Regarding finding out what something is made of, here is the process I use for finding this out. If you know the manufacturer, you can go online and sometimes find a Material Safety Data Sheet for a product. If it is not available directly from the website, you can usually contact the mfg through the website and request one. Be sure to tell them exactly what product you are referring to. I typically use the mfg's product number.

For instance, I have looked into using Sterlite's 27 quart (23" x 16 3/4" x 5 7/8") storage boxes for storing quilts here at the museum. I found that they are manufactured by United Plastics Corporation and the product number is 57028. I requested a MSDS, and got one. The material is made by Pinnacle Polymers Company. The MSDS lists the material as polypropylene copolymer. I then referred to the National Park Service's list of Conserve-O-Grams http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/publications/conserveogram/cons_toc.html and found the one I wanted:

http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/publications/conserveogram/18-02.pdf. Polypro[ylene is listed as a safer storage material. However, I still have reservations about condensation in these boxes. Thus, there is a bit of research to do, and you still have to analyze the information you get. Judy Schwender Paducah, KY

 

 

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Subject: RE: quilt - window screening From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Fri, 23 May 2008 14:30:09 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

I have also wondered abut condensation in plastic storage containers. I would guess this has to do somewhat with the storage location and it's cl imate. I have considered drilling (cutting) holes in each end near the top for ven tilation. Had anyone ever done this? Kay sorensen

-----Original Message----- From: Judy Schwender [mailto:sister3603yahoo.com] Sent: Friday, May 23, 2008 12:53 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: quilt - window screening

Hi all, Regarding finding out what something is made of, here is the process I us e for finding this out. If you know the manufacturer, you can go online and sometimes find a Mate rial Safety Data Sheet for a product. If it is not available directly from the website, you can usually contact the mfg through the website and reque st one. Be sure to tell them exactly what product you are referring to. I typically use the mfg's product number.

For instance, I have looked into using Sterlite's 27 quart (23" x 16 3/4" x 5 7/8") storage boxes for storing quilts here at the museum. I found th at they are manufactured by United Plastics Corporation and the product num ber is 57028. I requested a MSDS, and got one. The material is made by Pi nnacle Polymers Company. The MSDS lists the material as polypropylene copo lymer. I then referred to the National Park Service's list of Conserve-O-G rams http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/publications/conserveogram/cons_toc. html and found the one I wanted:

http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/publications/conserveogram/18-02.pdf.

Polypro[ylene is listed as a safer storage material. However, I still have reservations about condensation in these boxes. Thus, there is a bit of research to do, and you still have to analyze the information you get. Judy Schwender Paducah, KY

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Subject: condensation in storage boxes From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com> Date: Sat, 24 May 2008 12:41:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Dear QHLers,

In my varied positions within museum institutions across the country, I always took particular interest in the storage of objects and the preventative conservation measures used to ensure their long term safety. I agree with Judy's skepticism when she mentioned in her recent posting about the possibility of condensation in polypropylene storage boxes. As I recall, and others on this list will certainly add to, there are materials available to help control the microclimate inside storage boxes. The most obvious I can think of right now is silica gel desiccant (inside a small canister) that is placed inside storage boxes (safe for textile objects).Of course one will need to do the research (as Judy discussed) to know first – whether your particular climate warrants the use of these materials, and second –to be able to set up and monitor the microclimate once in place. Most of the necessary info. can be found in a few places on the net by just googling "desiccant & museum storage".

If "safe" plastic containers still present an issue for your particular long term storage needs, then you might want to consider the use of washed Tyvek bags (that you can sew up your self) for quilt storage. Tyvek is gas permeable, but moisture resistant (not moisture proof), and therefore could mitigate the condensation issue. It would be nice to hear from others on the list who have used Tyvek in their storage areas and specifically how.

Here are some sites that have desiccant information:

http://www.lightimpressionsdirect.com/category.action?categoryId74 desiccant containers to be used in storage boxes

http://www.archivalmethods.com/product.cfm?productid134 more desiccant containers

http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byform/mailing-lists/cdl/2007/0176.html discussion thread on use of desiccants in long term storage

http://www.jpscorner.com/Silica_Gel_Desiccant.htm silica gel products

http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/publications/conserveogram/04-04.pdf NPS conserve-o-gram on building a microclimate environment for large objects. This gives a relatively good overview of the principles involved with microclimates in general.

……......(excerpted) http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/publications/conserveogram/18-02.pdf. Polypropylene is listed as a safer storage material. However, I still have reservations about condensation in these boxes. Thus, there is a bit of research to do, and you still have to analyze the information you get. Judy Schwender Paducah, KY ……......

Martha Spark Salem, Oregon (formerly from Colorado) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Looking for an old Quilter's Newsletter From: Getfruitaol.com Date: Sun, 25 May 2008 15:50:08 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi All. I am looking to obtain a copy of Quilter's Newsletter #16. March 1971. If you are willing to part with one, please contact me off list.

Violet Vaughnes in cloudy So. Cal

**************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch "Cooking with Tyler Florence" on AOL Food. (http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video4&?NCIDaolfod00030000000002)

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Subject: RE: Looking for an old Quilter's Newsletter From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Sun, 25 May 2008 16:37:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Violet,

Contact the New England Quilt Museum Library. If anyone has one they would. They can be reached at: <NEQuiltMuseum.org>

Vivien in MA

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Subject: Re: machine quilting on a treadle From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com

Stephanie,

I'm 56 too, maybe my memory and/or eyes are wrong but I do think there is a "look" to treadle stitching!

Live and Learn, Alma

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Subject: Re: Great news AQS Certified From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 25 May 2008 16:34:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Congratulations, Sandra. I've taken the course and think a huge "hats off" is due anyone who pursues certification. I'd take the course in a heartbeat again because I learned so much and had such a good time, but certification? Completely intimidated me! So YAHOO for Sandra! Stephanie Higgins >

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Subject: One of the reasons I hate the NY Times..... From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Sun, 25 May 2008 19:50:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Judy Grow has changed email addresses and temporarily can't post to QHL, and asked me to post this for her. No, I haven't started reading the NY Times. Barb

Subject: One of the reasons I hate the NY Times,

And the NY "art" scene......

In Thursday's paper is a _full half page_ article about a 43 year old

textile designer, Richard Saja, who does "obscene" (my word) things with $200.00/yard toile. The paper of record suggests that we go shopping with him.

Oh puhleeeeze! Doesn't _everyone_ love a "well-managed slub?"

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/22/garden/22shop.html?_r1&scp1&sqsaja+toile&stnyt&orefslogin <mailbox:///C%7C/Documents%20and%20Settings/Barb/Application%20Data/Thunderbird/Profiles/5hewnn6b.default/Mail/mail.comcast.net/Inbox?number151882244>

If you follow the link to his blog and then scroll down , you'll find

lots of his over-embroidered toile. He likes clowns and werewolves.

Soooooo cute, soooo clever, soooo precious.............

Gaye, keep scrolling down to have a look at what he did for the walls of the Comander's Club in LA. Laura F. -- I bet you know Mr. Saja.

Judy Grow

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Subject: Re: One of the reasons I hate the NY Times..... From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sun, 25 May 2008 21:11:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Oh dear God. Someone please stop him. That is HORRIBLE.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Fwd: Looking for an old Quilter's Newsletter From: Getfruitaol.com Date: Sun, 25 May 2008 16:28:04 EDT X-Message-Number: 8

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I'm sorry for posting again, but the issue is #16, February 1971. Violet

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Subject: Re: condensation in storage boxes From: AG32040aol.com D

Living in Miami I would NOT use anything that is not breathable because of condensation. I keep my house air conditioned on 365 days a year,but we lose power at times.I use pillow cases,muslin,or sheets that are all white, washed and clean. Amy G. in Miami where we hope for a safe hurricane season

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Subject: Re: One of the reasons I LOVE the NY Times..... From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Sun, 25 May 2008 20:49:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

What's to be upset about? Thew guy's a little wacky, same as most artists, and he takes himself too seriously.

But his work is funny.

Lighten up, laugh!

Kim

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Subject: Re: One of the reasons I hate the NY Times..... From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 26 May 2008 10:18:42

Sorry to cross-post, but I spent a long time composing this for the VF list, dithered about sending it, then found it on QHL as well. Now I

don't feel so lonely behind the parapet....

<<

I feel a bit out of step here....I don't see what is so upsetting about this. So far as I can see he's not doing this to vintage fabrics. The more I looked at his blog, the more I liked what he's done because it makes me smile. And he does seem to have a sense of

his own ridiculousness, or at least that of his clients:

<<Statement: A few years ago, I was hired by a rather high end, psuedo-scientific

cosmetics company to design a limited edition "art box" filled w/ anti-aging unguents for their holiday season. Never one to shy away from incorporating a subversive

message into my work while shilling for THE MAN, I came up with the custom toile design of The Lost Girls inspired by JM Barrie's characters from Peter Pan: little boys dressed in animal costumes who

are afraid to grow up. The client presented the initial designs to it

largest retailer, they were horrified and I was promptly fired. Revisiting the toile later on, it occurred to me that the cosmetics metaphor can very easily be carried through to my noncommercial work

whereby embroidery is applied to a preexisting traditional print in order to make the original design more appealing, relevant and desirable to modern tastes. The stitch thus becomes a superficial application that changes the form of the whole in an attempt to first

conceal and then appeal to The Other: Pretty, Fresh, New & Young!>>

So long as he's not destroying irreplacable stuff, what harm is he doing? Isn't he actually promoting appreciation of toiles, and the use of 'real' stitch, while - as all artists/artisans must - getting a shilling out of the Man at the same time?

In 2003 UK artists (I use the term loosely) The Chapman Brothers applied their own additions to a collection of rare, mint condition Goya prints.

http://arts.guardian.co.uk/critic/feature/0,,931774,00.html

Mr Saja's efforts seem much less contentious and rather fun.

Sally Ward Busy building a parapet......

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Subject: Quilt journal article From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net>

Does anyone know if articles from The Quilt Journal are available on-line? I know someone who needs a copy of the article Jonathan Holstein wrote on the Guicciardini quilts and may have trouble scanning my copy. Thanks in advance -

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: One of the reasons I hate the NY Times..... From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Mon, 26 May 2008 10:31:42 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

I love what Mimi Kirchner is doing with toile. See these blog entries for examples and then search around for more: http://mimikirchner.com/blog/archives/2008/04/tattoo-man-red-beard/ http://mimikirchner.com/blog/archives/2008/04/tattoo-man-3c/

She embellishes toile.

Christine Thresh on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog

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Subject: Embellished toile From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Mon, 26 May 2008 15:51:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

I think I put the wrong subject line on this last time.

I love what Mimi Kirchner is doing with toile. See these blog entries for examples and then search around for more: http://mimikirchner.com/blog/archives/2008/04/tattoo-man-red-beard/ http://mimikirchner.com/blog/archives/2008/04/tattoo-man-3c/

She embellishes toile.

Christine Thresh on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog