Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 26, 2008 from Shelly Zegart From: zegrtquiltaol.com

The Quilt Journal:An International Review, produced by The Kentucky Quilt project between 1992-1995,? is in the queue to be available on the Quilt Index before the end of the year.I do have hard copies? available for sale. There were five single issues and one double issue produced ? An article list and price list will be posted on the listerve in the next few days..

oes anyone know if articles from The Quilt Journal are available = on-line? I know someone who needs a copy of the article Jonathan = Holstein wrote on the Guicciardini quilts and may have trouble scanning = my copy. Thanks in advance -

Lisa Evans

NOTICE:I will be doing quilt appraisals at the Riverside Museum in Riverside California on Sat May 31 at 10:a.m. and will be giving a talk titled Myth and Methodology: Shelly Zegart Unpicks African American Quilt Scholarship at 2:p.m. the same day . These programs accompany a quilt exhibition titled Quilt Stories currently on view at the museum

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Subject: coverlet photos From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net>

I just posted several photos of a neighbor's coverlet to the eBoard under the general tab with the label "coverlet" (the ol' muse is really working hard this morning). A stiff paper label states that it is linen and wool and came from Pennsylvania in 1850. Except for worn fringe all around and one edge that has been bound in cotton, and one small patched place that may have been a tear or hole, this is in great shape - no stains, no discoloration, no other signs of wear. It has been stored for many years in a cedar chest (no discernible odor). We talked about how not to do that anymore. The goal for this piece is to keep it in the family and pass it along to as many generations as possible. Any information about pattern and origin would be appreciated.

 

Thanks,

 

Andi in Keota, Iowa

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Subject: When From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Tue, 27 May 2008 18:54:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Could someone tell me when the blue felt tip marking pen that can be washed away with water - when did it come on the market? 1980's?

What would someone have used to mark a quilt in the early 1900's that would have been blue (and didn't wash out very well)?

Thanks for your help.

Best regards, Sharron.............. .....in Spring, TX where a big-ass storm is rolling through right now!!!

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Subject: Re: When From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 27 May 2008 19:12:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

A blue pencil, maybe?

Lisa Evans

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Subject: looking for Debra Wagner From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> Date: Tue, 27 May 2008 16:15:45 -0700 X

Hi-

Can anyone put me in touch with Debra Wagner, the quilter and machine quilter and author of how-to make quilts books?

I'm on digest and would appreciate your answer offline.

Thank you so much!

Kim

 

 

 

 

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD

New Pathways into Quilt History

www.antiquequiltdating.com

www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com

www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com

 

 

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Subject: Art News Funny From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Tue, 27 May 2008 20:01:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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Hi all - I was on my way from FL to NC when I got the note that my Fracture= d Wedding Ring Quilt was mentioned in Art News magazine. Of course, I was = thrilled - when I left Waynesville NC on my way to Athens, TN, I was actual= ly able to find a copy of the magazine. WHen I found the mention, I laughe= d out loud. Far from being a wondrous affirmation, it was a picture of th= e LABEL fer pete's sake!! With all info front and center - my name, addres= s, phone, etc........which means that 1. SOmeone can call and offer me an = obscene amount of money for the quilt. or 2. SOmeone suffering horrible = pain from a recent divorce will arrive at my doorstep, brow furrowed and c= hainsaw in hand. Oye vay.

Actually, the quilt is receiving some great attention. On the Peabody webs= ite, PEM.org, there is a slide show with 14 of the 130 objects featured. T= he quilt was chosen for the slide show, and I've received a couple of calls= from Mass telling me the quilt is on a commercial. I say all that to say = this - how FANTASTIC to see that quilts/fiber are getting such recognition = in an exhibit along with Picasso, Chagall, and others. Too bad everybody t= hinks I'm a guy. Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com"I've always wanted to be= somebody,but now I see I should have been more specific."Lily Tomlin _________________________________________________________________ Keep your kids safer online with Windows Live Family Safety. http://www.windowslive.com/family_safety/overview.html?ocid=3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_= Refresh_family_safety_052008=

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Subject: Re: When From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Tue, 27 May 2008 19:10:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

That's a thought. The stains remind me of blue carbon paper.

Thanks and best regards, Sharron

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Subject: Identification needed From: Getfruitaol.com

I have posted photos on the Eboard under Quilts of 3 characters I saw recently in a quilt. Would appreciate if anyone can identify the source and date of these.

Violet

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Subject: Unlocking photos posted on Eboard From: Getfruitaol.com Date: Tue, 27 May 2008 14:12:15 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

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I have posted 3 photos of quilt blocks under the Quilt heading on the eBoard, but they can't be opened without MY password (not vintage as the password). How can I make these photos and my question accessible to the list?

Violet

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Subject: european study opportunities From: QuiltEvalsaol.com Date: Tue, 27 May 2008 23:34:34 EDT X-Message-Number: 10

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Hello all - -

There are still a few openings (less than 5) for a truly wonderful study opportunity this summer. The Mediterranean Cruise and Quilt/Textile Study Adventure promises to be a very memorable journey and with current trends in pricing perhaps quite a bargain, considering the pricing on this tour was established over a year ago when the euro and dollar were much better friends.

For your review, I have included websites and info for the shore excursion options where there are incredible opportunities to see quilts and/or textiles.

1. Barcelona - Centre de Documentacio i Museu Textil: _http://www.cdmt.es/principaleng.htm_ (http://www.cdmt.es/principaleng.htm) - you will be fascinated by the organization of their images: go to the button on the bottom of the far left "Textilteca on line". An incredible museum for anyone studying comparative printed fabrics of the 17-19th centuries. They have promised to open the doors to their archives to this group.

2. Museum of Provencial Life (Chateau Gombert) _http://www.musee-provencal.fr/lemusee.htm_ (http://www.musee-provencal.fr/lemusee.htm) This museum has a collection of 100s of quilted petticoats - jupon, as well as many costume pieces, broderie de Marseille (boutis) and pique (quilts). see also some pages from the catalog of their jupon and pique exhibit at : _http://www.musee-provencal.fr/documents/Catalogue_boutis.pdf_ (http://www.musee-provencal.fr/documents/Catalogue_boutis.pdf)

3. The Musee de Vieux Marseille - collection of 17th and 18th century

Indiennes and broderie de Marseille. (no official website)

4. The Textile Museum of Prato Italy _http://www.po-net.prato.it/tessuto/home_e.htm_ (http://www.po-net.prato.it/tessuto/home_e.htm) . Prato was THE world's wool manufacturer; at one time boasting over 1000 wool mills, some printed some not.

5. Historic Textile and Spice Markets in Istanbul, optional stop at the textile museum under the Blue Mosque.

6. Silk Museum of Lake Como _http://www.museosetacomo.com/english.htm_ (http://www.museosetacomo.com/english.htm)

Due to time constraints, the following museum is not on the official

itinerary but a group trip will be offered to the Zucchi Museum in Milan. _http://www.zucchicollection.org/pages/past_intro.php_ (http://www.zucchicollection.org/pages/past_intro.php)

Ports of call include Barcelona, Marseille, Florence/Prato, Rome, Naples, Mykonos, Istanbul, Kusadasi, Athens and Venice....those on the textile tour will then go to Lake Como for 2 additional days.

For further information please refer to the website at _www.worldofquiltstravel.com_ (http://www.worldofquiltstravel.com)

All the best for a happy and safe summer - Deb Roberts

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Subject: Quilt Identification McCall's Fruit Orchard Kids From: rgnixonoct.net Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 00:51:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Violet, What an adorable quilt! Here's a website, that calls them the Fruit Orchard Kids from McCall's, dated June 15, 1940: http://pinksandneedles.blogspot.com/ She says there are five different kids: Stella Strawberry, Billy Banana, Charlie Cherry, Lee Lemon and Penny Pineapple. She shows one made as a small stuffed toy. Here's another website with your kids: http://www.sewingpalette.com/toys/ragdolls.html

Gloria

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Subject: Blue quilt markings From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 07:28:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I have a quilt circa 1880 with the blue markings and they look like a

carpenter's blue chalk snap line, to me.

Jean

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Subject: Early blue marking pencil From: 4jscharter.net Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 07:22:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

> What would someone have used to mark a quilt in the early 1900's that > would have been blue (and didn't wash out very well)?

I have a pencil - Clark's Indelible Pencil that once contained a blue

marking substance and was patented in 1859. . It is my understanding that it was used to mark fabric and linens for identification and maybe a similiar item was used or misused to mark a quilt. It was promoted as an easy way to write on fabric vs. the old ink bottle and pen technique and easily used "by anyone who could write". I got my informiation on this site. http://tinyurl.com/3gwvv7 Jan Meachen

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 27, 2008 From: Trishherraol.com Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 08:51:04 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

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Very typical of handwoven coverlets being produced by professional men weavers in the Lancaster Co. area of Pa. in the early 19th c. This is a complex weave sometimes referred to as a 4 + 1 weave structure requiring a large sized loom with multiple shafts or harnesses to weave. I have seen very similar pieces as far as pattern and color in this Lancaster area. One I remember having noted initials and a cross stitched date in the 1820s on the border of one.

Although the note is correct about that part, the content of the piece is almost certainly white cotton and colored wool. Linen as a warp in these types of coverlets is extremely rare. This one looks cotton. The top applied cotton fabric hem appears original too.

Neat piece! Trish Herr

I

-------------------------------------

I just posted several photos of a neighbor's coverlet to the eBoard under the general tab with the label "coverlet" (the ol' muse is really working hard this morning). A stiff paper label states that it is linen and wool and came from Pennsylvania in 1850. Except for worn fringe all around and one edge that has been bound in cotton, and one small patched place that may have been a tear or hole, this is in great shape - no stains, no discoloration, no other signs of wear. It has been stored for many years in a cedar chest (no discernible odor). We talked about how not to do that anymore. The goal for this piece is to keep it in the family and pass it along to as many generations as possible. Any information about pattern and origin would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Andi in Keota, Iowa

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Subject: blue marking- Sharron's question From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 09:10:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Your question reminds me of the time a quilt was submitted for publication along with a box full of quiting ephermera. In that box there was a round container that resembled a tin of shoe polish. Inside was a blue material, cake-like in appearance. I think there was a rag also stained with the blue, and a perforated pattern for a quilting design. It appeared that the blue material was rubbed onto the quilt top through the perforations so that dots were left on the quilt top which formed the design lines. Pardon the fuzzy recollections, but I think the solvent naptha may have been used on the rag to rub the paste, making it easy to apply through the paper pattern. The materials may have appeared in a photo in an issue of Traditional Quiltworks, early to mid-90s, along with a pattern for the quilt which was a compass design. Perhaps this was the marking material you noticed in the early 1900s quilt? The markings we saw did indeed resemble carbon paper markings and they were permanent. Nancy Roberts

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Subject: Re: blue marking- Sharron's question From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 13:49:52 +0000 X-Message-Number: 6

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Nancy, What you saw was probably pounce. 1880 redwork patterns were prickings on white paper and you would pounce the blue powder on to transfer the pattern for sewing. I have several of these early patterns and they also had the blue powder still with them as you describe. Polly Mello --NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_29243_1211982592_0--

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Subject: blue From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 09:41:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I seem to recall owning a set of Grandmother Clarks--or maybe it was Dexters-- quilting designs (printed on paper that was perforated following the curves of the feathered designs) once that had a packet of blue powder in it. Since the packet was a paper envelop and thin paper at that, I got tired of blue powder seeping out and about and I tossed it. This was before I knew much about quilt history or that anyone anywhere would have any interest in it. I regret it now and I just looked and can't find the patterns either. They're still here somewhere in the "walk-in" closet that you can't walk in at the moment. Sigh.

Stephanie Higgins

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Subject: Quilt Books for Sale From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 09:18:15 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

Hello All,

Our bookshelves are bulging .. and we have lots of duplicate quilt history books. So, we're offering a buncha these books for sale. Many are rare, out-of-print, or both. A FEW are very rare (and expensive). All are in Excellent Condition.

Among them are several volumes of AQSG "Uncoverings," a dozen or so "Quilt Engagement Calendars," and ALL 5 volumes of the "Quilt Digests":

"UNCOVERINGS": 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2007

"QUILT ENGAGEMENT CALENDARS": 1975, 1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 2001

"QUILT DIGEST": Volumes, 1 - 5, 1983 - 1987

You can contact us directly at quiltcomplexhughes.net I'll take messages in the order they arrive in my e-mailbox.

Thanks, Julie Silber

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Subject: Kalona Quilt & Textile Museum news From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 1

The Kalona Quilt and Textile museum in Kalona, Iowa has opened a new quilt gallery in its expansion of the main building. The building now

houses an Amish quilt gallery and an "English" quilt gallery along with a glass display, including the rare Iowa City and Keota glass collection of 100 pieces.

The Amish gallery, in its present display, has 23 full size, crib size, and hired man size quilts along with 20 crib size quilts placed

on a quilt frame. This display will be changed every 6 months showing

the wide collection of Midwestern Amish quilts.

In the "English" gallery at the present time are 1820-1890 quilts owned by the museum, including two Broderie Perse quilts.

I am assuming most people know that anyone who is not Amish is called

"English" by the Amish--if not, you have a new piece of history.

The museum, inside the Kalona Historical Village of 13 buildings, is open all year and in the summer hours are 9:30 to 4 weekdays, closed Sunday, with admission to the quilt galleries of $4.00 and for a guided village tour $7.00. For more information call 319-656-3232 the

museum or 319-656-2555 for the curator. The museum does have guided tours for buses also.

 

Marilyn Woodin

 

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Subject: Stolen Tribute Quilt Top From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 16:49:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

I know many members of this list travel and/or make quilts for soldiers for various projects like Quilts of Valor and Home of the Brave.

Below is a link to an article that appeared in the May 27, 2008 edition of the Lancaster New Era (PA) newspaper that is a lesson/reminder to be careful what we put in checked luggage . . .

In short, Lynda Houck embroidered 24 squares for a quilt top that she intended to give to a friend and fellow Army Reservist, Kathy Brill, who is on active duty in Iraq. She took the blocks on a trip to visit her mother so that her mother could help her sew them together. Upon her return to Philadelphia International Airport a "thief emptied everything from her suitcase except her socks, underwear, hairbrush, toothbrush and an unfinished cross-stitch of "The Last Supper.""

You can read the entire article and see a photo of a similar embroidered block like the ones that were lost at http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/4/222066

The link above - I hope it works (if not go to www.LancasterOnline.com and search for an article entitled 'Stolen Tribute' written by Cindy Stauffer - email cstaufferLNPnews.com).

Let's all keep our eyes open for this special quilt and spread the word.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

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Subject: blue markings From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 15:56:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Sharon Evans asked about blue marking on a quilt from the early 1900s. I've wondered some times if they didn't use powdered blueing. I learned to add it to starch which I made on the stove top many years ago to starch cotton and linen items I wanted to iron very crisply.

I know, what was I thinking???? All I can say is, it was in another lifetime!

The IQSC has a quilt of that vintage with very heavy blue marks on it that someone suggested might have been a grease pencil or a wax crayon.

Two possibilities...but who knows?

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: RE: Quilt Books for Sale From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 17:55:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Julie, I'm interested in the Quilt Digest, all 5 volumes if someone hasn't beaten me to it. Let me know.

Thanks and best regards, Sharron Evans Spring, TX

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Subject: Blue marking From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 19:19:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Thank you to everyone who responded to my question of the blue quilt marks on a 1900 quilt. I received a lot of very interesting information and a great deal to think about.

Best regards, Sharron............... .......in Spring, TX where it's just hot! ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Stolen Tribute Quilt Top From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Wed, 28 May 2008 18:40:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

What heartbreaking news. I hope someone will keep us updated if the quilt is returned to Lynda.

Best wishes, Sharron................ ..........in Spring, TX

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Subject: Fruit Orchard Kids From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Thu, 29 May 2008 04:06:32 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

http://www.sewingpalette.com/toys/ragdolls.html Gloria mentioned has original vintage patterns for sale and said they'll have the quilt posted soon.

I also found a person selling photocopies of all sort of patterns on

ebay including the Fruit orchard kids quilt item number 120244128465

and also the dolls. To see go to ebay and enter the number or fruit orchard kids in the search box. The applique quilt has 6 kids (Albert Apple is added) while the doll pattern has the 5 kids Gloria listed.

Sandra Starley AQS certified quilt appraiser http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: Great news AQS certified From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Thu, 29 May 2008 04:33:24 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Stephanie (and everyone else who has been so supportive),

Thank you.

I too recommend the 3 day training classes and want to thank Bobbie Aug and Gerald Roy for their expert tutelage.

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

------------------------------- Subject: Re: Great news AQS Certified From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 25 May 2008 16:34:52 -0500

Congratulations, Sandra. I've taken the course and think a huge "hats off" is due anyone who pursues certification. I'd take the course in a heartbeat again because I learned so much and had such a good time, but certification? Completely intimidated me! So YAHOO for Sandra! Stephanie Higgins

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Subject: QUilts for Soldiers From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Thu, 29 May 2008 10:41:57 -0400 

G'mornin' yall. I am asking this question on behalf of a friend and a quil= t guild. They are interested in making quilts for the returning wounded so= ldiers, much on the order of Quilts of Valor. After looking into shipping = and handling problems, they would prefer to be able to hand deliver quilts = to military hsopitals within a reasonable driving range. It was suggested = that they contact and deliver to the hospital chaplain. I'm only the messe= nger here, but I think my question is: How do we discern which hospitals a= re receiving wounded and would be receptive to the quilts? Is there any re= ason we can't do this individually as opposed to being part of the great QO= V whole? I'm open to ideas and suggestions. I feel like there is somethin= g we are failing to consider here, but I'm just scratching my head and wait= ing for yall to lead us in the right direction. Teddy Pruett (daughter of l= ife-long soldier who is still soldierly at 91)www.teddypruett.com"I've alwa= ys wanted to be somebody,but now I see I should have been more specific."Li= ly Tomlin

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