Subject: Re: Need help From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2008 09:13:17 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Karen, This problem is sort of like phoning the Dr. to say " I have a pain in my stomach. What can I do for it?" The Dr.s response is "I have to see you first." She needs to photograph the coverlet and send it to a pro for further discussion. I am not the pro heretofore mentioned but I have added color and evened color in pieces that have visible lighter areas for those people who couldn't/wouldn't love it like it is. If she adores it as a cherished memory then it is certainly worth the money to get a professional conservator's opinion. jt

Karen Musgrave wrote: > Lisa, > > The coverlet is between 50 and 60 years old. The section that was > damaged is about 12 inches by 12 inches. >

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Subject: Quilts for Warmth From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Mon, 09 Jun 

Gaye, I grew up in southeastern Ohio and had relatives living in western PA and northeastern West Virginia. My grandmother had lots of quilts for beds which we used when it was cold, but she also had big HEAVY wool comforters made of scraps from wool clothing and tied. They were very warm! Judy

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Subject: Subject: collar stays From: "John & Jan Meachen" <4jscharter.net> Date: Mon, 9 Jun 2008 09:29:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Could it be that the "collar stays" are corset stays? Ribbon could have been threaded thru the top openings for easy removal. Just a thought?

Jan Meachen From ain soaked but sunny today Wisconsin

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Subject: Coverlets, again From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com> Date: Mon, 9 Jun 2008 11:51:48 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Hello Suzanne and all the other knowledgable coverlet folks on QHL,

I enjoyed all the info about coverlets written and shared recently, but that was at a time when I was out of town. Now back home, I have unearthed a coverlet book that I'm hoping someone can shed some light on. I have 4 large soft-covered books, Parts 1-4 of "A Book of Patterns for Hand-Weaving by John Landes from Drawings in the Pennsylvania Museum." These were printed in 1925, "with threading drafts and notes by Mary Meigs Atwater." The four volumes are the drawings of a John Landes who was thought to be a professional weaver of the Revolutionary period. The foreward notes say his original patterns are in the Frishmuth Collection of the Pennsylvania Museum.

The only thing I have found in my searches are that this collection of drawings were republished in 1977. Does anyone have any further info they could share with me?

Nancy Hahn Bowie, Maryland

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Subject: RE: Subject: collar stays From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Mon, 9 Jun 

That's a great thought. I don't know how long corset stays were, but that certainly is something to consider.

Thanks, Vivien In hot, hot MA

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Subject: Re: Need help From: "Karen Musgrave" <KarenMusgravesbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 9 Jun 2008 11:49:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

If you read my original post, I was asking for someone in the Gainesville, Florida area for her to see. I don't know anyone. Thanks, Karen

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Subject: Re: Coverlets, again From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 9 

Maybe you could try contacting this person: Beatrice Hulsberg Acting Senior Curator Community and Domestic Life Collection Pennsylvania State Museum bhulsbergstate.pa.us

Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com> wrote: Hello Suzanne and all the other knowledgable coverlet folks on QHL,

I enjoyed all the info about coverlets written and shared recently, but that was at a time when I was out of town. Now back home, I have unearthed a coverlet book that I'm hoping someone can shed some light on. I have 4 large soft-covered books, Parts 1-4 of "A Book of Patterns for Hand-Weaving by John Landes from Drawings in the Pennsylvania Museum." These were printed in 1925, "with threading drafts and notes by Mary Meigs Atwater." The four volumes are the drawings of a John Landes who was thought to be a professional weaver of the Revolutionary period. The foreward notes say his original patterns are in the Frishmuth Collection of the Pennsylvania Museum.

The only thing I have found in my searches are that this collection of drawings were republished in 1977. Does anyone have any further info they could share with me?

Nancy Hahn Bowie, Maryland

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: sister3603yahoo.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442697Glyris.quiltropolis.com

--0-1071968623-1213031429=:85818--

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Subject: Re: Coverlets, again From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2008 12:53:27 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

Nancy, Landes was a weaver. This is a good book for weavers who want to reproduce early patterns & woven coverlet collectors alike who, because of the dreaded "coverlet illness", have to buy every book with the word coverlet in it. I am one of those sad cases and fortunately the medical community can't cure it. Although there is nothing like having bound pages in-hand, the book has been digitized on a few sites. One I sent to the list before but they have added new content. http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books.html

http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books.html Paul and Nancy Hahn wrote: > Hello Suzanne and all the other knowledgable coverlet folks on QHL, > > I enjoyed all the info about coverlets written and shared recently, but that was at a time when I was out of town. Now back home, I have unearthed a coverlet book that I'm hoping someone can shed some light on. I have 4 large soft-covered books, Parts 1-4 of "A Book of Patterns for Hand-Weaving by John Landes from Drawings in the Pennsylvania Museum."

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Subject: RE: Subject: collar stays From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Mon, 9 Jun 2008 14:54:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

About Vivian's unknown 6" stays. I think Vivian said they were in pairs. Could they be for the very high turtleneck shirtwaists that women wore at the turn of the century? It would only take two, one at either side seam to hold one of those collars upright, uptight.

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Subject: RE: Subject: collar stays From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Mon, 9 Jun 2008 12:07:39 -0700 X-Message-Number: 10

As Judy Grow said, "Could they be for the very high turtleneck shirtwaists that women wore at the turn of the century? It would only take two, one at either side seam to hold one of those collars upright, uptight."

See: http://www.threshpublications.com/romine.html second row, picture on the left of my grandmother, Myrta, with a high neck shirtwaist (perhaps held upright by stays).

Christine Thresh on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog

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Subject: RE: Subject: collar stays From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Mon, 9 Jun 2008 16:52:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Judy and All,

Please reread my first email. There are two different stays, not a pair. If they were used for ladies high colors, all I can say is...those poor ladies. One false move and they have a mettle stay imbedded in their throats. What an awful thought.

Thanks everyone for your ideas. Vivien

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Subject: Subject: collar stays From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 09 Jun 

Vivian -- Would it be possible to post stays to eboard; it would lessen a lot of speculation if we could see them to get a better idea of what they look like. There were various stays which were inserted in early 1900s waist band cinchers [sp??]. Some were about 6" as I recall from ads.

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Subject: Women's high collars From: "Karey Bresenhan" <KareyBquilts.com> Date: Mon, 9 Jun 2008 23:34:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Back in the old days when the dinosaurs roamed the land and I was young and slender, I used to enjoy wearing vintage white lacy dresses to opening night of Festival. (Do you have ANY idea how little those women's waists were!) I remember one of those dresses so well. It was gorgeous, probably 1900-1910, thin white cotton like voile with pleats and tucks and lace of all kinds, and the construction literally forced you to have good posture. If you slumped just a little, then your waist would expand and you'd start to hear the dreaded popping of stitches. If you didn't hold your head up at a pretty haughty angle, then the boning that kept the collar up under your chin would "remind" you in a not-so-gentle way to hold that head up! But I never saw metal boning up under the chin.

When we did the Texas Quilt Search, I remember a gorgeous Prairie Flower coming in in Corpus Christi that had been marked, according to the family, with a metal corset stay. They were about 1/4" wide and about 10" long. The turn-of-the-centry corsets came to just under the bosom and extended slightly below the waist. However, in the 40s my East Texas grandmother wore a corset to end all corsets, and I remember Mama talking about "vanity, thy name is ...." Mama told me about the corsets. They extended from under the bosom to all the way down to the small of the back, and she said they were contraptions of metal stays, lacing, rubber, elastic that looked like instruments of torture.

Karey Bresenhan Director, International Quilt Festival--Houston, Chicago, Long Beach

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Subject: Women's high collars From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 10 Jun 

This site might be of interest to this bone and stay subject http://tinyurl.com/3m7dw7

When I mentioned waist cinchers yesterday I think I meant waist stays. This was a graduated crinoline belt with pockets containing stay or bones for shaping. It was worn in the early 1900s over blouse at the waist as a way to both keep blouse in place and to add flare to skirt so it wouldn't droop or lay flat. Stays were about 4" in front graduating to about 6" or longer at sides and back. Somewhere I have a Warren Featherbone packed away.

Hoping that Vivian can post to Eboard.

Karey Bresenhan wrote:

Back in the old days when the dinosaurs roamed the land and I was young and slender, I used to enjoy wearing vintage white lacy dresses to opening night of Festival. (Do you have ANY idea how little those women's waists were!) I remember one of those dresses so well. It was gorgeous, probably 1900-1910, thin white cotton like voile with pleats and tucks and lace of all kinds, and the construction literally forced you to have good posture. If you slumped just a little, then your waist would expand and you'd start to hear the dreaded popping of stitches. If you didn't hold your head up at a pretty haughty angle, then the boning that kept the collar up under your chin would "remind" you in a not-so-gentle way to hold that head up! But I never saw metal boning up under the chin.

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Subject: Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum From: "Catherine Litwinow" <

Begin forwarded message: The Kalona Quilt and Textile museum in Kalona, Iowa has opened a new quilt gallery in it's expansion of the main building. The building will house an Amish quilt gallery and an "English" quilt gallery along with a glass display, including the rare Iowa City and Keota glass collection of 100 pieces.

The Amish gallery, in it's present display, has 23 full size, crib size, and hired man size quilts along with 20 crib size quilts placed on a quilt frame. This display will be changed every 6 months showing the wide collection of Midwestern Amish quilts.

In the "English" gallery at the present time are 1820-1890 quilts owned by the museum including 2 Broderie Perse quilts.

I am assuming most people know that anyone who is not Amish is called "English" by the Amish--if not, you have a new piece of history.

The museum, inside the Kalona Historical Village of 13 buildings, is open all year and in the summer hours are 9:30 to 4 weekdays, closed Sunday, with admission to the quilt galleries of $4.00 and for a guided village tour $7.00. For more information call 319-656-3232 the museum or 319-656-2555 for the curator, Marilyn Woodin. The museum does = have guided tours for buses also.

The Iowa Illinois Quilt Study Group will meet at the Kalona Quilt and = Textile Museums August 2, 2008. Study Topic is Log Cabins. For = registration materials send a self addressed stamped envelop to Juanita Seward: P.O. 105, Wellman, IA 52356. Phone: (319) 646-2437

------=_NextPart_000_0017_01C8CADF.97DEADD0--

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Subject: RE: Women's high collars From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2008 09:05:22 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Of course I remember Karey! I also was there at Festival when the dinosaurs roamed the land. Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen

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Subject: Stays: Mystery Solved From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2008 16:02:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

 Hello All,  Thanks to Joan Kiplinger and her incredible knowledge, the mystery of the metal 'stays' has been solved. I posted a photo and description to eboard, (with her help) and she immediately identified and referenced them. They are bodkins. Examples of them can be found in Helen Thompson's book Sewing Tools & Trinkets.  Thank you Joan.  Vivien in MA ...where it is in the high 90's and muggy

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Subject: woven coverlets by the yard From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2008 16:11:45 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Hi All-

There is terrific article in Uncoverings 1994 about coverlets made at = the turn of the 20th century in western VA and southern Appalachia. = Kathleen Curtis Wilson's research paper includes two ads about woven coverlet material sold off the bolt for home furnishings and clothing. The ads = date in the 1930s. The title of her article is "Weaving Cloth and Marketing Nostalgia Clinch Valley Blanket Mills, 1890-1950, Cedar Bluff, = Virginia."

If you have heard of Nancy Harlow Coverlets, they made them to be sold = to gift shops and by mail order, and named for the owners wife. There was = no Nancy Harlow. This reminds me of the "pennames" quilt pattern makers = used for various marketing venues.

Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD New Pathways into Quilt History www.antiquequiltdating.com www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com =A0

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Subject: Re: Coverlets again From: Trishherraol.com Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2008 22:09:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 8

Nancy,

The original of the John Landes pattern book is at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

I would suspect there are not many copies of your edition of that reprint that have survived. You have a gem!

Trish Herr.

-------------------------------------------

In a message dated 6/10/2008 12:15:30 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

Subject: Coverlets, again From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com> Date: Mon, 9 Jun 2008 11:51:48 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Hello Suzanne and all the other knowledgable coverlet folks on QHL,

I enjoyed all the info about coverlets written and shared recently, but that was at a time when I was out of town. Now back home, I have unearthed a coverlet book that I'm hoping someone can shed some light on. I have 4 large soft-covered books, Parts 1-4 of "A Book of Patterns for Hand-Weaving by John Landes from Drawings in the Pennsylvania Museum." These were printed in 1925, "with threading drafts and notes by Mary Meigs Atwater." The four volumes are the drawings of a John Landes who was thought to be a professional weaver of the Revolutionary period. The foreward notes say his original patterns are in the Frishmuth Collection of the Pennsylvania Museum.

The only thing I have found in my searches are that this collection of drawings were republished in 1977. Does anyone have any further info they could share with me?

Nancy Hahn Bowie, Maryland

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fw: collar stays From: jeancarltoncomcast.net Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2008 18:56:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Testing - I replied (below) but never saw the post. Glad the mystery is solved - internet and posting photos is great! jean

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Subject: kkk quilt From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 11 Jun 2008 13:51:06 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

--0-405054861-1213217466=:27546 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

I would like to share photos of my KKK quilt but thought that I would ask first. I don't want to offend anyone. So what do you think?

--0-405054861-1213217466=:27546--

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Subject: Re: kkk quilt From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 11 Jun 2008 15:46:37 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Donna,

Why not put it in the gallery and we can go look at it - or not, as we choose. It may be odd, but you can't learn about history by just studying the non controversial part.

Kris

--- Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com> wrote:

> I would like to share photos of my KKK quilt but thought that I > would ask first. I don't want to offend anyone. So what do you > think?

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Subject: RE: kkk quilt From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Wed, 11 Jun 2008 17:42:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

No matter what my personal opinion is of a group, I always want to see a quilt. OK by me!

Best regards, Sharron.................. ........in hot hot hot Spring, TX...................

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Subject: KKK Quilt From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 11 

I have gone ahead and posted The photo of my KKK Quilt. Hope you all enjoy seeing it. Donna

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Subject: Early American Life magazine From: Jo Morton <joquiltsmac.com> Date: Wed, 11 Jun 2008 20:04:22 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

There is a really nice article about the early stenciled quilts in the August 2008 issue. Thought you would enjoy reading it. Best, Jo in Nebraska

Jo Morton joquiltsmac.com www.jomortonquilts.com Andover Fabrics Designer

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Subject: Fw: Quilt from Dubois, Pennsylvania From: "Lisa Evans" 

I just received a request from a couple in Ohio. They own a quilt = attributed to Eva Heiges of Dubois, Pennsylvania, in the 1930's. Has = anyone ever heard of this quiltmaker? They attached some pictures as = wel.

Thanks in advance for your help. This isn't my period or my area, so = any assistance the list can offer will be greatly appreciated.

Lisa Evans ------=_NextPart_001_0027_01C8CC5C.554E46F0--

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Subject: Re: KKK Quilt From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2008 08:40:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

OK, Donna, now that Pandora's box is open, what can you tell us about the interesting KKK quilt? I have seen 2 others purporting to be Klan quilts, but the provenance was sketchy and ran to things like "the white fabric is from a Klan robe, so the quilt is a Klan quilt..." Obviously, some secrecy about objects like this exists in families, but we know there was a time in the 1920s and '30s when Klan membership was openly professed, and members were everywhere in public office etc.

I am happy to discuss this as an historical object in private, if this line of inquiry is offensive to anyone. NAYY

Xenia

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Subject: Re: KKK Quilt From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2008 09:24:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

This is an amazing document. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: KKK Quilt From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 

Ok. Here is what I know. My mother gave me the quilt from her cedar chest. She grew up in a coal mining patch in SW Pa. She remembers her parents having klan clothing. She also remembers that when the quilt was washed or aired in was taken to the farm to hang on the line. The afrm is very private. She also says that she remembers the klan to have taken care of things like men that didn't take care of their families, or drank, beat their wife or kids,things of that nature.Not against any one group or religion. My mother is 77.I would put the quilt in the 1920-30. It was not made from their clothing but was in existance at the same time. Donna

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Subject: Re: KKK Quilt From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2008 10:10:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Donna, should you ever wish to place it in a museum, I would highly recommend the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh -- they interpret the heritage of western PA. This has such superb provenance. The Klan was involved in different activities depending on the region they were in. Not to condone any of them, just to provide some context. For example, in Berks County PA their targets were Roman Catholic immigrants. I think one has to look beyond what we know and accept, and see these organizations as powerfully Protestant groups with wide reaching agendas. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: KKK Quilt From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2008 

Just to add my 2 cents - even Vermont (yes, lilly white Vermont) had KKKs - It shocked me when I learned of that too but the Museum in the state capitol - Montpelier - has some of their clothing in its displays. That was in the 1930s.... Mitzi from Northern Vermont

In a message dated 06/12/08 09:56:38 Eastern Daylight Time, candaceschwenkfelder.com writes: Donna, should you ever wish to place it in a museum, I would highly recommend the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh -- they interpret the heritage of western PA. This has such superb provenance. The Klan was involved in different activities depending on the region they were in. Not to condone any of them, just to provide some context. For example, in Berks County PA their targets were Roman Catholic immigrants. I think one has to look beyond what we know and accept, and see these organizations as powerfully Protestant groups with wide reaching agendas. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: KKK Quilt From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2008 10:38:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Interesting quilt, Donna. When I look at it, my first impression is that this is made during that time period when KKK did not bring to mind negative connotations. I can't remember my history well enough to remember when exactly that was, but I do remember reading that the KKK began as a more benevolent group than what they've become. Does your Mother know who made it?

Best regards, Sharron................ ....in a soon to be miserably hot day in Spring, TX.............

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Subject: Re: KKK Quilt From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 

Either her mother or her aunt. She had an Aunt that was in bed with sugar for 30 years. All she did was make tops and quilts. I am luck enough to have been given at least 30 of them. Another quilt from that same time frame that she did is scrappy but full of red crosses.I will try to post it. Donna

Sharron <quiltnsharroncharter.net> wrote: Interesting quilt, Donna. When I look at it, my first impression is that this is made during that time period when KKK did not bring to mind negative connotations. I can't remember my history well enough to remember when exactly that was, but I do remember reading that the KKK began as a more benevolent group than what they've become. Does your Mother know who made it?

Best regards, Sharron................ ....in a soon to be miserably hot day in Spring, TX.............

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Subject: Re kkk quilt From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2008 21:22:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Interesting quilt, Donna---made more so by provenance.

Someone remarked the quilt was probably made at some time when the KKK did not have negative connotations.

I don't think there was such a time after Reconstruction---and Reconstruction occurred only in the former states of the Confederacy.

The South was in anarchy, and federal troops were not always interested in protecting their former enemies. Nor were there enough of them to protect white or black in a deeply rural world so grievously poverty-stricken and without any viable infrastructure. Even a cursory reading of letters and diaries of that time suggest the fears that gripped white southerners living in regions where they were outnumbered by out-of-work former slaves sometimes 20 or 30 to 1. So I think the KKK got what respectability it got from being a rural police force at a time when the land was occupied by Union--i.e., "foreign"-- forces.

But in many families there are stories about the bully-boy nature of members even in that time. One that was told in my father's family was about a rather cowardly member of a prominent local family who joined the Klan to prove his "manhood." I guess he got his sheet or uniform or gear. He had to have it cut down because of his small statue, and such a poor horseman was he that he kept falling off his horse when out "on a mission." Even in the Klan he was only a wannabe bully and was laughed at about town and the community. His relatives finally just got tired of his foolishness and invited two of my kinsmen and another friend to join them in suggesting to him the error of his ways. Dressed all in black and speaking with a Negro dialect, they hijacked him one night when he was headed out for a KKK gathering. They took him to an isolated area near a creek, tied his hands behind his back, put a noose around his neck, connected the other end to a big tree limb that hung out over the water, and drove his horse into the creek with rider trying to direct him to "back up." The limb was broken and ready to fall, the noose was just wrapped around it a couple of times and could be counted on not to hold. But of course the Southern Ichabod did not know that. In the story the man went to his grave believing he had been attacked by black people. Of course, his version of his escape and the attackers' versions differed considerably about the manliness of his reaction. The part that of the story that is still told well in my family is his directing his horse to "back up." The man's descendents still are ribbed by their other relatives.

While that might seem an isolated anecdote, I don't think it was, judging from the attitude of others I've encountered. While illiterate governors and authorities were appalling, farming people who had to get back on their feet financially needed a workforce. And that workforce was black. Peaceful coexistence was to their interest.

I recently read a book about a racial battle that is often said to have ended Reconstruction. It is called "Colfax" and is named for the town in Central Louisiana that was the site of the event. I recognized every surname of the leaders. I had heard them spoken with opproprium all my life.

In the South, the KKK was a racial institution, whatever was said about religion.

I've heard those stories about the Klan helping widows whose mortgages were being foreclosed during the Depression years, but I don't think it gave the organization respectability. The Masonic Lodge and Knights of Columbus did the same thing, as did Protestant churches---without masks. This is simply the personal impression I got, living in Central Louisiana. Maybe KKK members were regarded differently in other parts of the South. Yet, when it comes to tacky, we seem to be able to hold our own. And we had enough people across the state who had sympathies with David Duke to put him in a runoff for governor, though it should be noted that there were 12 candidates in the race. Sort of a free for all.

I know the KKK was strong enough in the South in the thirties that FDR had to deal with them---or thought he had to deal with them, something that irritated his wife for years to come. Yet that does not mean members were admired or emulated, just that they had a strong lobby.

What accounts for KKK membership in Indiana and Ohio areas, where I would suppose there was not a large Negro population to resent? Is it only in industrialized areas?

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: Re kkk quilt From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2008 22:39:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

The 1920's KKK was also anti-Semitic, anti-Catholic, and anti-feminist as well as being anti-black. I'm sure that the combination accounts for its popularity in the Midwest.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: Re kkk quilt From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2008 22:47:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Sorry, that wasn't phrased well...:(

What I meant was that the 1920's Klan put itself forward as a bastion of 100% Americanism, which was a coded way of saying "white Anglo-Saxon Protestant traditional values." There was much social upheaval back then, and a lot of otherwise sane, responsible, people likely were ready to overlike the less pleasant aspects of the Klan in favor of its message of defending "the real America" against social change and foreign ideas.

I meant no disrespect to the Midwest (I grew up there and still remember it fondly), but I'm sure glad that the Klan was dead when I was a kid....

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: Re kkk quilt From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 06:30:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I have to say that I am truly enjoying this thread of conversation tied into the KKK quilt.

Growing up in the north, Massachusetts and New Hampshire to be specific, my only knowledge of KKK was from Gone With The Wind and perhaps a brief history reference in my school years that I have forgotten. To some of you, it's family and community history, and the information is truly fascinating.

I looked up KKK yesterday on line, after Sharron asked about a time when the clan was not so controversial and had respectability, and was amazed to see they really do still exist and that they are supposedly giving a message of love and not hate, along with "white pride". I think they are aiming for that non-controversial and respectable thing nowadays. I wouldn't surprise me to see some kind of KKK quilt still being made, to be honest, based on their web site.

It led me to wonder. If a site exists for KKK, in 2008, does one exist for Black Panthers? Why, yes, it is so. Interestingly enough, black pride and white pride are still very much alive and well on line. I didn't take the time to spend hours of research on either group, as I was kind of saddened to see that they exist. Both, on line, have the guise of appearing to be benevolent organizations now, but one does wonder.

So, getting back to quilting and how it is tied into political references at times, I wonder if there is a Blank Panther or Black pride quilt out there?

I was surprised to find both of these organization still very much alive and well in the USA. I would have liked to have found references to them as "in the past" vs. current and very active on line web sites and membership. You learn something new every day....

Happy Quilting and learning to all!

Linda Heminway In beautiful New Hampshire

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Subject: The good news about the article in TIME magazage... From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 05:11:19 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

is that the only myth it doesn't perpetuate is the one about the UGRR and quilts. We've made progress!

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,834142,00.html?promoid=googlep

Kris

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Subject: RE: The good news about the article in TIME magazine... From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 08:57:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I don't know about everyone else but quilting HELPS me to have 'steady nerves and a (sometimes) pleasant temperament.' My dexterity with either hand has never been 'equal' (thank goodness as my right and left hands usually have different jobs) and I've credited my art training and education (which started with my artist mother) for my sense of line and form. I doubt I will EVER achieve 'Job's patience' or have 'time galore.'

I would like to meet the 'nimble-thimbled women' who had ALL of those qualities already intact when they discovered quilting.

As for me - if I am to be a 'good quilter' I'm going to have to search for some of that 'time galore' so I can do more quilting in hopes of achieving what I was supposed to have started with!

I am grateful to see a date of August 6, 1965 on the article! Perhaps its time for an update . . . after all Time marches on.

Greta

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Subject: The good news about the article in TIME magazage... From: Joan Kiplinger 

As well as covering 1,000 years in record-breaking nanobrevity speed..

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Subject: RE: The good news about the article in TIME magazine... From: Kris Driessen 

Oh, how disappointing! I didn't notice the date:-((

Kris

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Subject: Re: Re kkk quilt From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 09:18:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Linda wrote> > was amazed to see > they really do still exist and that they are supposedly giving a message of > love and not hate, along with "white pride".

Linda, the cross that has historically been part of the post-Reconstruction KKK represents the cross and supposedly the cause of Christianity, so that's not new.

These folks parade in our Southern cities from time to time. Shreveport, LA, regularly has maybe 20 members demand demonstration rights about once a year. From televised coverage, they appear to stand on the courthouse steps all dressed up in their KKK gear and holding placards that say things like "White Pride." The Grand Wizard (!!!!) says a little something, they all holler and wave their placards, and then they go away. Nobody much even goes out to heckle them any more.

So you're not missing much. And you're certainly not missing anything about "love"---or at least not the love/charity about which Jesus spoke.

There will always be people who are marginalized economically or culturally to the extent they are thrown together. Black panthers, white panthers---frustrated folks.

LA has one parish where no one here would be surprised to see a KKK quilt, but it is fast becoming a bedroom community for Baton Rouge, so things there are likely to change too.

Gaye

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Subject: Re: Re kkk quilt From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 09:32:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

This is one of the things I love about this group --- it's a never ending learning process. After reading Gayes article and your article, I think I must have misunderstood what I had read several years ago.

I've never knowingly known anyone from either side but I knew the Klan was alive and well in Texas. When I first moved here in 1973, I remember driving by a big building in Pasadena, TX that had the sign over the door. So out in the open, I thought to myself. (I was a very young, naive girl from northeast Kansas, venturing out to the big city for the first time. I was in for many shocks.)Two years ago there was quite a tadoo about them having a march of some sort in a town near us. They had their march and the news channels were all over it.

Best regards, Sharron.................. .......where it's 82deg. at 9:30 a.m. in Spring, TX..............

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Subject: : Re kkk quilt (sort of off topic and long)] From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 10:48:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I've been "refreshing my recollection" (legalese for trying to remember what I learned) about the KKK while studying American history in college a century or so ago.

I do remember that there were two phases, for want of a better term of the KKK, the first in the South right after the Civil War which went into decline around the 1880s, and the second, which started up again in the 19 teens. Something I read in the past couple of days credited the Klan's resurrection to the movie "Birth of a Nation" which glorified the earlier Klan.

Phase 2 of the Klan was big here in Indiana as well as in other areas of the Mid-West. They were anti anyone who wasn't an Anglo-Saxon Protestant. They were anti-Catholic, anti-Immigrant, anti-Jewish as well as anti-Black. It was another era of social tensions. Blacks as well as immigrants were migrating to the North and seen as threatening jobs. I think that the Klan was also anti-union. Any time there is a great social upheaval, there are people who try to stop it.

A goodly portion of Indiana was settled from the South which may have contributed to the Klan's growth here.

A couple of stories from Indiana. The Klan burned a cross against the door of my Mom's Catholic girl's school in South Bend in the 1920s. According to my Dad, the Klan decided to march against the Catholic male students at Notre Dame sometime in the 20s. Sort of stupid to let a group of young males know you are coming to attack them. According to my Dad, the students, armed with baseball bats, met the Klan members before they ever got to the campus, and it was no contest.

Another story from my Dad. The Klan got a law passed in Oregon (which had an almost overwhelming white population) that banned children from attending anything but public schools. It was intended to be anti-Catholic, but it also affected military schools and other private schools. My Dad was a teenager in Oregon at the time and the law would have affected himself and his brothers and sisters. My grandparents were Catholic immigrants from Belgium, one of the groups that the Klan didn't like, I'm sure. Anyway, the law was challenged in court, and finally ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1925. /Pierce v. Society of Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary/, 268 U.S. 510 (1925)

One of the things that led to the decline of the Klan in Indiana was that the Grand Dragon for Indiana (D.C. Stephenson) was convicted of murdering a young woman by subjecting her to sexual brutality after which she committed suicide. It's a case that is still studied in criminal law classes in law school because of the causation factor.

Finally, when Valparaiso University came up for sale in the 1920s (it was a for-profit university at the time) the two groups that bid for it were the Klan and a group of Missouri Synod Lutherans. We're lucky that the Lutherans won the bid.

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn mary.persynvalpo.edu Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917

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Subject: Re: Re kkk quilt From: hknight453aol.com Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 12:30:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

The Klan was and still is active in New England. A few years ago, members of the KKK offered a "white supremist" day camp in northeastern CT. I had relatives in the Klan as late as the 1940 in Rhode Island.  The house they used as headquarters still stands, and is norw a florist's. The membership overlapped with the Masons.

Heather

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Subject: KKK From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 11:50:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

The Klan was alive and well in the 30s in KS. My grandmother remembers being taken to gatherings with a burning cross on Rayl's Hill just west of Hutchinson. When I was doing historic preservation research we found pictures of the Klan marching in a parade downtown and oddly as a large band on the stage of Convention Hall with their masks off. The photos were given to the local NAACP and the newspaper later ran a very careful story about the Klan in KS with the photos. Many local families after all had relatives on that stage. I've never found anyone brave enough to identify the Klan members.

About ten years ago the Klan leafleted the State Fair here in Hutchinson and Reno County is said to have the largest active Klan in KS.

For current information about the Klan go to http:// www.splcenter.org/ where you can access a map of current hate groups. If you are so inclined they always welcome new memberships and their magazine is a real eye opener.

There are several good histories of the Klan, current and previous.

Linda Laird, Continuing to duck tornados.

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Subject: Re: The good news about the article in TIME magazage... From: <charter.net> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 13:10:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Love how they *completely* ignore anything prior to the 18th century. Should I even bother wasting my time writing to them about pre-1700 quilts?

*sob*

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: The good news about the article in TIME magazage... From: <charter.net> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 13:20:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

And...like Kris, I just saw the date on the article. I still feel like writing to them to let them know how out of date it is, but it's probably a lost cause by now.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Societal intolerance from our past. From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 10:20:52 -0700 X-Message-Number: 13

The conversation about the Clan reminds me of growing up in Pittsburgh in the 50s and 60s. Societal lines of association were very clearly drawn back then. I was German Catholic, sent to a German Catholic grade school, a Catholic High School and Catholic Nursing School. I never met a Jewish person until I had Natalie Krasik, who taught me dietetics in Nursing School. I WAS 19 YEARS OLD! We had a few African-Americans in our neighborhood as the city stretched beyond to the more suburban Pittsburgh. As a child, we were not allow to have non-Catholic friends, become Girl Scouts or join the YMCA. All Protestant organizations! (I always found those associations intriguing.) Having non-Catholic friends was strongly discouraged. There was no opportunity, and it just didn't happen. (Three years ago, when my mother-in-law died at 96, I believe she never had a single non-Catholic friend.) Even within the Catholic church there were lines drawn. Our German Catholic church and grade school was 1/8 mile from the Irish Catholic church and grade school, which was 1/2 mile from the Italian Catholic church and grade school. All of the same avenue. It should be noted, however, that we didn't make attempts to destroy one another's homes or churches but there were definite lines. With the Ecumenical Council in the 60s, everything changed. By the time I was in high school, we were encouraged to seek out and experience other religious services, and reach across the aisle. We were given assignments to attend non-Catholic religious services. By the time my sisters came along 10 and 12 years later, they attended the Irish Catholic grade school 1/8 mile away. In the 70s, as a young career nurse, I moved to Cleveland, where my German Catholic last name was Jewish. At the age of three, my son's very best friend was a red-headed Jewish boy. Adam Rubin used to tell Stephen that the world began in Israel. That made me smile. sue reich

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

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Subject: Re: The good news about the article in TIME magazage... From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 10:48:40 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

I'm not sure the date on the TIME article is right - are they putting their archives on line?

But - I would be interested in hearing about quilts in the 1700's. Are they pieced quilts as we think of them (patchwork blocks) or whole cloth/palamores?

I admit, I tend to think of pieced quilts as we know them today as an American innovation. Don't hit me! I know perfectly well that there were pieced quilts in Europe early on but the block/sashing/border construction we use today was not common - was it?

Kris, hoping Lisa will be kind...

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Subject: But is it a quilt? From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2008 20:25:08 +0100 X-Message-Number: 15

The treasure of the quilt collection of the Quilters Guild of the British Isles is a patchwork coverlet, made of silk, and dated 1718. I believe it is the oldest known signed and dated patchwork coverlet in Europe. (Only two layers though, so maybe not a quilt in the truest sense)

http://www.quiltersguild.org.uk/index.php?page=25

I suppose you *could* argue that this is block construction, but there is no sashing nor borders. The important part of your statement is *quilts as we know them today*. I've always felt that while other countries may have originated styles and techniques, it was the melting pot of America that took quilting and 'ran with it', creating something quite its own, and recognisably so.

FYI, for anyone who can make it to York, England in the next three months, there is an exceedingly rare opportunity to see this coverlet on display in the newly opened HQ and Museum.

Sally Ward Also hoping Lisa will be kind.....<G>

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Subject: An article needed-please check your Uncoverings From: "Pepper Cory" 

Hello-Does anyone out there have access to Jill Sutton's article on Ruby McKim (I think it might have been Uncoverings 1996) and be willing to make me a photocopy? That issue's out of print and I'd like that to read the piece. Many thanks ahead of time- Pepper Cory email me at pepcorygmail.com before sending, OK?

-- Pepper Cory