Subject: on the road with Hazel and Bunnie (long)
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2008 11:59:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Julie Hardy coined the term "Quilt Nirvana" to describe a road trip
which includes only quilts, quilt people, quilt talk and good food (with the
occasional historic house tour thrown in). Hazel Carter and Bunnie Jordan
organized such an event in Lancaster, PA for The Dating Club this week.
More than 20 of us met at the home of a very generous collector and spent
the afternoon looking at her quilts.
We started with the Lancaster County Amish examples: a red Center
Diamond with classic feather quilting in the border, a Sunshine and Shadows
with the border quilted with roses, a Center Diamond with the center formed
by Sunshine and Shadows, an example from the dawn of Amish quiltmaking a
soft brown rectangle with a blue border (wool/silk blend) dated 1875 with
the center quilted in blocks (divided into squares by quilting with
different motifs quilted in each one), Crazy blocks dated 1933 with salmon
pink and purple borders. There were Bars, Split Bars and Feathered Diamonds
in combinations of turquoise and magenta, red and green, green, magenta and
blue. It was dazzling. A brown, blue and peach Log Cabin had a single log
which was a print (was the quiltmaker slyly defying the bishop?). A purple,
coral and bright blue Irish Chain had an inner border of Flying Geese.
We even saw an Amish appliqué: I think the quiltmaker was trying to
combine Prince's Feather and Tulips. It's green and brick on a beige
background with a blue border. I suspect it wasn't flaunted around the
neighborhood, but that lady wanted to appliqué.
We saw very rare Amish crib quilts: a 9-Patch in purple and green on
brown with an olive border; a Lone Star, a Center Square in maroon, blue and
black; pink Baskets on maroon with green setting blocks. Beware: newly made
(from old fabrics) Amish crib quilts are being offered for sale.
There was even more Amish before we moved on to "English" quilts: an
1850s Album from southern Lancaster Co. (remember we are very near the
Maryland border); a Lone Star from York Co. in red, green and yellow with
President's Wreath appliqués between the rays of the star and a triple
diamond border (too much is never enough for the PA Germans); Sophia Pyle's
1848 Friendship Album made by her mother; an exquisite chintz appliqué from
Philadelphia made by Margaret Boggs, niece of Betsy Ross, (this beauty is
128" square); an ethereal pale blue 18th century Quaker silk quilt with a
wool back; a PA German 9-Patch signed Barbara Schenk and dated 1814 with a
border of a delicate trailing vine on a brown ground; a wholecloth wool from
Lebanon Co, circa 1800, something rarely found in SEPA.
The rarities just kept coming. A medallion with a John Hewson print in
the center was found in a Texas flea market. A palimpore with a bird chintz
border was unlike any I've seen. The Tree of Life was very stylized and
attenuated, the colors very intense, almost somber. A wholecloth Palm Tree
and Brides chintz from Boston (c. 1810) looked like it was made yesterday;
it's 125" square.
I have to control myself or I'll be here all day. We saw Joseph's Coat,
so-called if there's a multicolored border; if there's no border it's a
Rainbow, Eagles, c. 1870, in a repeat block set (the 16" blocks had stars
at the intersections and no borders); a four block Eagle on yellow dated
1926; Bowmansville Star (the single giant star made from small squares). My
absolute favorite was a Mennonite sampler, the small blocks (think Dear
Jane) contorted into diamond shapes on a pumpkin background. These PA
quilters were free spirits, witness the Chopped-off Lone Star (she really
didn't consider how big the star would be so she just ended it when she
reached the desired size finished with a border of partial stars).
There was lots of super baby quilts. How delightful is a Prince's
Feather of red and yellow plumes and hearts on a purple background or a
Double Feathered Star in Turkey red and chrome yellow on a glazed blue
background or a Mennonite Wreath of Hearts. Other small things included
doll quilts, pot holders, pockets, roll ups and a symphony of pieced
pillowcases and bags (both PA German specialties). The variety of
pillowcases was astounding: pieced, appliqué, wholecloth, a few quilted
(most not), cheater cloth, pairs, singles, bolsters. A fair number of the
bags are dated (interesting and very helpful). I loved a small bag dated
1869 with a chunky round flower in the center and tulips in the corners.
One of the most surprising pieces with a hand towel decorated with
appliqués, Lily and Tulip; all the other examples I've ever seen are
embroidered.
Whenever I could tear myself away from the quilts I wandered around the
house looking at the embroideries: show pieces from the Moravian school in
Lititz designed to show that Daddy was getting his money's worth. There
were even fraktur to make me completely happy. All this and it was only Act
I.
On Thursday we visited the Lancaster Quilt Museum where selections from
the former Esprit Collection hand in the main gallery. The smaller exhibit
is hooked rugs, antique and contemporary. It's delightful. The star of
that show is a 23" long stair runner (2004) which shows a rainbow as you
ascend the stairs and scenes from Noah's ark on the descent in lovely bright
colors--truly amazing!
If you are anywhere in the Mid-Atlantic in the next 6 month go to the
Heritage Center Museum in downtown Lancaster to see Patchwork Politics: from
George to George W. The exhibit includes quilts, clothing, and memorabilia
made to commemorate America's Presidential campaigns. The Garfield-Arthur
Lone Star has bandana portraits of the candidates between the legs of the
star. The star is scrappy, many different prints of the same color are used
in the rows. It produces a great effect (made me want to try it even though
I've sworn off diamonds--at least the fabric kind). Among a collection of
album blocks from the 1840's (wonderful that they stayed together in their
unassembled state) is one that has the name POLK and an eagle with stars,
oak leaves and an unknown mammal (some said it was a dog, I think it's a
lion) appliquéd.
There's a textile memorializing "Our Martyred Presidents," a curtain
made from Teddy Bear and Possum (an unflattering reference to William Howard
Taft) from the 1912 election, a case full of suffrage souvenirs and an Equal
Suffrage quilt top made from embroidered pillowcases, circa 1918 (there are
several WWI references).
There are two contemporary quilts designed by Edward Lyons and made by
Fran Soika. "" shows former presidents crying over the ill-fated
presidency. Clinton Wins" is absolutely hilarious. There are multiple
references to Bill's (pre-heart surgery) addiction to McDonalds, a
saxophone, portraits of Socks the cat, Buddy the dog, Hillary, Al and Tipper
all against a rainbow arc background.
A quilt made entirely of ribbons from the 1880 campaign has a beautiful
tatted edge. The ribbons are arranged in shimmering zigzags of color, think
bargello designs. I've never seen anything like it. I know several quilts
made from ribbons from fairs or conventions but this one is in a different
league entirely. It's a thing of beauty. A Feathered Star composed of 9
very large blocks in a single deep blue print and white had a Henry Clay
(1844) bandana as the centerpiece of the center star.
The exhibit will be up until Dec. 31st. I'm already thinking about a return
visit.
We had a little show and tell at the hotel on Wednesday night. We had
lots of good food. In addition to sharing her collections are hostess gave
us delicious goodies to keep up our strength. I always complain about the
food in Lancaster County. As on the Eastern Shore there's a tendency to
equate lots with good. I'm beginning to think I just didn't know where to
go because we had two great lunches and a delicious dinner without a single
encounter with the word Dutch.
I'm off tomorrow to Charleston, Savannah and the SC beach. I'm not
expecting to have any textile adventures, but who knows.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: on the road with Hazel and Bunnie (long)
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2008 15:19:12 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2


>
> I'm off tomorrow to Charleston, Savannah and the SC beach. I'm not
> expecting to have any textile adventures, but who knows.
> Cinda on the Eastern Shore

Cinda deah, if you expect no textile adventures, that's what you will get.
You will miss a lot of if you miss the Charleston Museum. Savannah and
surrounding area also has some good collections. See the samplers at
Charleston Museum, too. If you could drag yourself from the beach, you
should see Augusta and Columbia, SC. Bet Lynn Gorges and Pepper Cory could
suggest some by-ways in NC.

gaye



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: on the road with Hazel and Bunnie (long)
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2008 17:01:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Sometimes even I "dance with the guy what brung me." This definitely
cuts down on my time for textile adventures.
Cinda heading South



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Madison-Bouckville
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2008 17:34:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Has anyone been to the big August antique fair in Madison-Bouckville,
NY?
Cinda on the Eastern Shore making more summer plans
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: on the road--patchwork politics exhibit
From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net>
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2008 03:20:01 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Thanks for mentioning the exhibit, I looked it up and found this
recent article about the exhibit with a couple of photos including the
Clinton Wins quilt designed by Edward Larson.

http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/4/222690

By the way, there is a good article on Ed Larson in the June 2008
issue of Quilters Newsletter magazine (5 page article showing 10 of
this quilts).


Sandra Starley
AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Social intolerance from our past
From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsscharp.org>
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2008 09:38:58 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Sue Reich mentioned that German Catholics in PA were not allowed to
join the Girl Scouts or YMCA because those were Protestant
organizations. I wonder if that was regional thing, or perhaps
dependant upon the local bishop/archbishop? I was in the brownies and
Girl Scounts from 1957 to 1963, all at Catholic schools in Kansas City,
a suburb of Chicago, and Indianapolis.
I do however remember that the YMCA was Protestant and thus something we
were not supposed to participate in.
I also remember a young (about 8 yo) friend in Kansas City (1958) who
quickly covered up some Hanakah decorations when I asked what they
were. She apparently had been taught, from an early age, not to talk
about it. It was many years later before I understood why.
And another memory of two school friends,13 years old, in England,
saying they hated Jews. Coming from the Midwest, I didn't know why, and
I wondered how they could tell who was a Jew.
It is interesting to see the way people's ideas develop...
Laura, in Seattle


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Social intolerance from our past
From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2008 11:23:07 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

It was the same way at the same time inNew Jersey. I still laugh at myse
lf when, as a littlekid, I thoughtif Itouched a 'black Protestant'
thatthe blackwould rub off on my hand. Yet, I also recall family sto
ries of a job-huntinguncle who told of signs in store windows that read:
'Irish and Catholics need not apply.' However,they saw no contradict
ions in not allowing us to socialize with anyone but Catholics. 0AMary Ann
e0AFrom: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsscharp.org>0ASue Reich mentioned th
at German Catholics in PA were not allowed to join the Girl Scouts or YM
CA because those were Protestant organizations. I wonder if that was reg
ional thing, or perhaps 0Adependant upon the local bishop/archbishop?
0A0A0A0A


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Social intolerance from our past
From: alanalanrkelchner.com
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2008 14:51:03 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

Or my grandmother who always had the AA doll on the table at the front
door. Cute little souvenir doll, she always kept me horrified with it.
She always gently referred to it as her n----- baby. I was a child and
had beeen taught that the "n" word was mean. It took me a while to
understand that her usage was benign in intent.

Alan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Social intolerance from our past
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2008 15:48:28 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4


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Coming from New Jersey I too remember things about races and religions. When I asked my mother one day why our Aunt Annie went to the Catholic church and we didn't, she just answered 'cause we lived closer to the Methodist church than they did' - I never questioned religions again - at least not till I met a Jewish boy in high school and had to pass as a Jewish girl just so I could go to the prom with him. (My name Miriam Esther was close enough for them and I lied and told them my last name was Jacobsen (not the very German Wiebe that is really was). Still hear from this boy (56 years later!).
Mitz from Vermont where storms are becoming a daily event.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: palamporeaol.com

Just want to know how all of you mid-westerners are fairing.?Hope you are all fine and not having to deal with the flooding or the tornadoes. What an awful time your area of the country has had!!!!!? If you need info about washing flooded textiles please go on my website --- www.textilepreservation.com?--- and?click on?the side bar about washing quilts. I wrote that up back when there wasn't much on the Internet when eastern NC and VA were flooded by Hurricane Floyd. Now there is a great deal of info out there, but unfortunately many just start tossing before they read a thing. I have a friend who helped with cleaning out houses during Floyd and she said that many perfectly fine things were thrown out that could have been saved. (--- dishes, pots and pans, china, silver, etc. that could have been washed and saved---) If anyone contacts you about quilts get them to at least photograph quilts if they have to be tossed because of contaminants. Later they can be reproduced.?
My friend saved?military medals that?were on the verge of being tossed. She took them home and washed?and dried them. When she returned them to the elderly gentleman he cried.?
?My heart aches for all of the many who have been affected. Know that many of us of thinking of your part of the country!
Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

----------MB_8CA9E156DC9905F_B88_321C_FWM-M42.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2008 17:44:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

I second Lynn's concerns and hopes for a brighter future for our friends in
the Midwest. Lynn, what a great idea to pass this information on. Thanks.

Best regards,
Sharron..................
............in hot and humid Spring, TX..............


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Madison-Bouckville
From: Judy Roche <judyqrocheclan.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2008 18:19:45 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Yup..............go!
Judy Roche in rainy Maine
On Jun 14, 2008, at 5:34 PM, Lucinda Cawley wrote:


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Disaster recovery resources
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>


Good afternoon, fellow QHLers and QuiltArters - Please excuse any duplicate
emails but I wanted to bring to everyone's attention the following website
of the Heritage Emergency National Task Force:



http://www.heritagepreservation.org/programs/TFHurricanePub.htm



There is loads of information and contacts. Please share this website!

Regards,

Meg

. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____

Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney

Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice

Professional Associate, AIC

mgmooneymoonware.net




------_NextPart_000_0067_01C8CFD0.30CB0DA0--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2008 17:11:17 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 9

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I am in the heart of Southwestern Wisconsin, we are fine here, but all around us there has been flooding, friends have lost their houses, farmers have lost their crops, etc. Iowa is in awful shape too. I think so far 7 counties in Wisconsin have qualified for Disaster Aid, and they are still accessing damage in other counties, some of these counties and towns are going thru this for the 2nd-3rd time in 2 years, last year 2 towns nearly washed away and they both got hit hard again this time around. It is devestating to see your friends and neighbors suffer from things they have no control over and what is worse is a big portion of them don't have flood insurance because they weren't considered in a flood zone, so that may hurt them in the disaster aid area too. DOUBLE WHAMMY when what they really need is help. Jeanne

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Social intolerance from our past
From: AG32040aol.com

I think talking about the social intolerance of the past (and the present) is
a good thing.The Tony winning musical South Pacific has a song in it about
intolerance "You Have to Be Taught"by seven or eight.Children hear what their
parents and their friends teach them and say to each other.
We must learn from the past ,so we don't forget to make the future
better.
Amy in hot and sticky Miami


**************

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: [Quiltart] Disaster recovery resources
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>


Hi again, all! Just a quick clarification about the website I mentioned.
Even though the word 'hurricane' is part of the website address, it isn't
just for those who live in hurricane-affected areas. It covers disaster
recovery from ALL sorts of harm, including soot, fire and flood.

Regards,

Meg

. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____

Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney

Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice

Professional Associate, AIC

mgmooneymoonware.net

_____

.will send it to everyone I know who lives in Hurricane zones..


Margaret Geiss-Mooney <mgmooneymoonware.net> wrote:

Good afternoon, fellow QHLers and QuiltArters - Please excuse any duplicate
emails but I wanted to bring to everyone's attention the following website
of the Heritage Emergency National Task Force:



http://www.heritagepreservation.org/programs/TFHurricanePub.htm



There is loads of information and contacts. Please share this website!

Regards,

Meg



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: prejudice and floods
From: "cjsp70" <cjsp70insightbb.com>

I too was not allowed to join the YWCA because it was Protestant also
couldn't sing Away in the Manger because it was written by Martin
Luther. Times have changed and we now sing that beautiful lullaby every
Christmas and I swim regularly at the Y. It's good for my ol' arthritic
knees. Wonder how much God shakes His head at the silly ways we try to
divide His world. In Evansville we are downstream from all the worst of
the rain but many of the farmers in central and southern Indiana have
lost their crops, homes, barns etc. Keep them in your thoughts. Bless
you. Pat Sauer, Evansville, IN


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Holding on thru the Kansas Tornadoes
From: rgnixonoct.net
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 02:21:25 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

We haven't had the extreme rain this time but I can surely sympathize with
those of you who have. We sandbagged during the Flood of '93 and kept a
constant watch on the water. It was sad to pack a few clothes, important
papers, etc. into a car and drive away. Our house did not take on water
but several of our friends lost everything and had to leave by boat. We
remember the anguish from so many days of watching and waiting. Please
know you are all in our thoughts and prayers.
Our vigil this round is with tornadoes and hailstorms. Thankfully we've
made it through in good health with only minor damage to property.
The EF4 that hit Manhattan last week went right over our daughter's house.
She was huddled way down in the stairwell closet with her husband and
son. The tornado lifted about 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile from their house.
A lady from our church lives in Chapman and lost her house. It's gone.
They had the 1/2 mile wide EF3.
A few weeks ago the news said the state had over 90 tornadoes in a three
day period. I do believe we've had at least that many since, too.
Hailstones the size of softballs have killed livestock and pets here. I
run for the basement when the hail hits.
We keep an eye on the doplar radar and telephone one another to sound the
alert. Our little place is way out where nowhere meets the sky but the
storms seem to find the way.
We have it easy compared to those of you in the floods. My heart goes out
to you all.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Holding on thru the Kansas Tornadoes
From: rgnixonoct.net
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 02:23:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Forgot to sign my name--

Gloria Nixon
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Social intolerance from our past
From: adamroni <adamroninetvision.net.il>
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 09:21:53 +0200
X-Message-Number: 3


And another memory of two school friends,13 years old, in England,
saying they hated Jews. Coming from the Midwest, I didn't know why, and
I wondered how they could tell who was a Jew.
It is interesting to see the way people's ideas develop...
Laura, in Seattle


14 years ago I was absolutely horrified when my then 4 year old daughter and
her friends, who were playing in the local park one day, refused to play
with two Ethiopean little girls who were playing nearby. When asked why, she
and her friends said "Because they are brown." I talked to her about
discrimination right there and then, and have kept a watchful eye ever
since, with all three of my kids - but I have never forgotten the shock of
finding out that my own kid contracted this sort of prejudice.
I don't know whether any of you have ever seen it, but the PBS documentary
"A Class Divided", or "Blue Eyes vs. Brown Eyes" (the Jane Elliott
experiment) is probably the most telling, moving and amazing film I have
ever seen about prejudices and how easily and readily they are formed and
embraced by people - especially young persons. (I recorded it and made my
two older kids watch it when they were old enough to understand it). The
past is not as distant as we think...

Here are the relevant links:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/divided/etc/script.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/divided/etc/crusade.html
http://dycsprogram.tripod.com/BlueEyesVsBrownEyes.doc

Ady in Israel



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Madison-Bouckville
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 05:35:09 -0400

I hav e NOT been to the fair, BUT lived in that area (Hamilton) for many years before the fair became what it is today. I have friends from there and they never miss it! It is a beautiful spot (course my husband's family just about settled that whole area) so I am partial. It is a great place to see what some areas are doing with wind power also - there is a large number of wind turbines around the area. Go for it.
Mitzi from Vermont where the storms seem to be never ending this week.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Holding on thru the Kansas Tornadoes
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 05:28:14 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

It does make me think of how early settlers must have felt when they were
confronted with their first tornade and no warning. What courage it must
have taken to remain after such an event. Pioneers were surely hardy stock!
At first, I wondered why we didn't see quilts with tornado emphasis or a
hailstorm quilt and such and then I realized that there would have been no
spare time or thought for that, just the consuming task of rebuilding and
replanting. Does anyone have a quilt or any info on such a quilt? Would be
interesting to know about it.
Marcia Kaylakie in Austin, TX where we have already had over 12 days of 100
degrees or more and over 1 month of record breaking high heat and no rain to
speak of, and summer hasn't started yet.....



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Holding on thru the Kansas Tornadoes
From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 01:38:22 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Gosh I know how bad it has all been. Last year we had about 45" of rain
in about that many days and now we are so dry you can't stand it.
Having this type of weather as we are is not that uncommon except the
severity of it is more so.
I have been watching the Green Chanel and they have a documentry on
Greensburg, KS. My Lord I did nt think a house could really be lifted
right up straight till I saw it on film. They are trying to biuld back
the town and do it as green as possible. I am looking forward to the
conclusion so to see what did really happen.
I hope and pray all those affected by this bad weather that there will
be a turn around soon.
Debbie Russell
russhillbeecreek.net




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Holding on thru the Kansas Tornadoes
From: AG32040aol.com
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 08:40:55 EDT
X-Message-Number: 7


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After herricane Andrew many south Florida quilters made quilts based on their
experiences during and after the storm.This was very cathartic for them.
Amy G.



**************
Gas prices getting you down? Search AOL Autos for
fuel-efficient used cars.
(http://autos.aol.com/used?ncidaolaut00050000000007)

--part1_c43.35e63890.35890ad7_boundary--


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Subject: Re: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: hknight453aol.com
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 09:34:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

I had a house fire with resultant water damage. To save pots and
pans, cultery, dishes, etc, wash them in hot water with a 10% standard
household bleach solution( 1 part regular strength bleach, 10 parts
water as hot as you can stand it.). That will kill germs, and clean
things up. Wear something you don't care about, and rubber gloves.
For caked grunge on surfaces that can take it, use Brillo or SOS. I
saved a KitchenAid stand mixer that way. I would NOT recommend mixing
bleach with anything but Dawn or Ivory liquid. I would not recommend
this treatment for electroplate or sterling silver. I can't imagine
how hard it is to have the house flooded, left full of mud, muck, and
snakes. We are all praying for you.

Heather

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 08:36:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

I live in Cedar Falls, in NE Iowa. I was told to evacuate
my office last Tuesday... we were only given a short time
to take out 'essentials' and told that it was possible that
the levee on the river might not hold! I was glad I just
had office items & some personal items to move... many
retail stores (a Hallmark store, a wedding dress store,
a chocolate & wine store moved 1500 bottles of wine!)
did their best to load their entire inventory into trucks
to get it out of the flood's way. We were very lucky here,
although the river crested here 25 ft. above normal...
10 ft. above the highest crest ever, our levee did hold
and after almost a week, we are now allowed back in to
the downtown area. Areas north of the river had excessive
flooding and homes and businesses are just now getting to
see what is left. Towns down river have not been so lucky,
with levees breaking & unbelievable flooding. I know of
several museums that have been hit, and the University of
Iowa campus. I had an e-mail from our foreign exchange
student from Siberia yesterday... news of the flooding has
reached that far! I sent the information from Lynn and Meg
to the TV station in Cedar Rapids, IA, a city which was hit
very hard with the flood. They have had great coverage,
and I thought this might be a venue that would post the
info or even do a story on it. They are just starting a
very long term clean up and recovery process. Thank you
for sharing this information! This has been in incredible
year for weather... we have had more than double our
normal precipitation, starting with the winter that seemed
like it would never end, which went right into 'monsoon'
rains. My basement at home flooded twice in April, after
5" rains that came 1 week apart. We had never had water
in the basement in 28 years! On May 25th, and EF5 tornado
went just 2 1/2 miles north of us... destroying many homes
and taking lives. Our quilt guild had a collection last
night for personal items needed by people from Parkersburg,
Iowa, which lost 350 homes plus the high school and many
businesses, in the tornado. Some of these people bought
homes in the next town over... and 2 weeks later, have
been flooded out of those homes! But Iowans have a very
resilient spirit (from those persistent enough to homestead
where the weather changes every hour :) and everyone is
pulling together to put things back to rights.
Thanks for your concern & prayers!
Karan





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Holding on thru the Kansas Tornadoes
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 09:18:14 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Gloria, where are you exactly? I was born and raised in Junction City and
moved to TX when I was 22. I remember the tornadoes clearly. I spent two
years in Winfield, KS which made JC look tame with all the tornadoes that
came through. My biggest concern living in the Houston area is that we
don't have any cellars here - too close to water level. My husband always
tells me to get in the dry creek that runs through our property. Ick!

My thoughts and prayers go out to all of you.

Best regards,
Sharron.................
..........in hot and humid Spring, TX...............

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Holding on thru the Kansas Tornadoes
From: rgnixonoct.net
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 12:24:09 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

Hi Sharon,
The closest town to us is Paxico, KS, population 211. It's hard to call
it a town as there is no grocery store, convenience store, general store,
or the like.
We're about halfway between Manhattan and Topeka.
We were watching your home town of Junction City on the news as one of the
tornadoes formed. The weatherman said for everyone in Junction to hurry
to their basements because radar showed heavy debris in the air. It
turned out to be from the houses in Chapman. As it crossed I-70 just west
of Junction, radar confirmed it was a half-mile wide tornado. If you have
relatives and friends in JC, I surely hope they are all ok.
I was in Manhattan about five hours before the tornado hit and didn't like
the looks of the sky. It was filled with monstrous orange thunderheads.
I took that as my signal to hightail it home.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Social Intolerance from our past
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>


I've enjoyed reading everyones childhood experiences of tolerance - or lack
thereof. Some of you may think of me as a stereotypical narrow minded hic
k from the deep south, but you'd be incorrect in that assumption. Surprise
!!! I grew up as a military dependent in many states. Most of my early ch
ildhood was spent in Austria and Okinawa with side trips to Japan, Hong Kon
g, Midway, Germany and more. My first word was "Nein!" One thing that liv
ing on a military base teaches you is that RANK is not created equal - but
races are. My friends were any and all races, and any bi-racial combinatio
n you could think of. It was great - we were all just kids. It was a grea
t way to grow up, and served me well when I finally did settle in a redneck
community during the crucial mid-60's when racial tensions were so high.
My best friend at work was an African American, and she and I could not eve
n go the movies together. She would have to use a side door and sit in the
balcony - and being white, I would not be allowed to go there. And this w
as in 1968!!! It was a horrible time. I may suffer from personality defi
ciencies, but bigotry is not one of my faults. Thank God and the U.S. Army
. Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com"I've always wanted to be somebody,but n
ow I see I should have been more specific."Lily Tomlin
_________________________________________________________________
Earn cashback on your purchases with Live Search - the search that pays you
back!
http://search.live.com/cashback/?&pkw3Dform3DMIJAAF/publ3DHMTGL/crea3De
arncashback

--_995663a7-22a7-4a8c-8f37-c4a90e805aba_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Social Intolerance from our past
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 22:34:01 +0100
X-Message-Number: 13

In my middle-class English upbringing I'd have to admit that bigotry/
racism/intolerance didn't really appear over my horizon until I was
much older, left home and started mixing in different circles. Which,
now I know that this was the time of the terrible bigotry against the
West Indian immigrants in London, is a disgrace in itself. Living
comfortably only 50 miles out of town, I knew nothing of it.

Instead, our particular national disgrace was, I suppose, the hangover
of our Victorian Religious Imperialism. Innocently, in Sunday School,
I used to sing a missionary song with the apalling first line 'over
the sea there are little brown children...(who don't know about the
Lord Jesus).....'. And discussing this only recently with a friend,
she recalled that in her Sunday School they took money each week to
donate to missionary work among the 'little yellow children'.

It makes me shudder now I think of it....

Sally Ward
Still remembering the book in which we stuck our weekly 'attendance
stamps'. There was a dated space for each stamp with the motto:
'Every stamp says 'duty done', every blank cries Shame!'


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: social intolerance from our past
From: carylschuetzcomcast.net
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 21:50:21 +0000
X-Message-Number: 14

As a Catholic child growing up in Massachusetts, which was 80% Catholic (and
still is as far as I know), I attended the Y, where I learned to swim and also
took a babysitting course, with first aid, etc.


The Girl Scouts was also open to me, but I did not join due to other activities.

As being one of the "majority," I never felt discrimination growing up. My best
friend in middle school was African American.


My husband's great uncle came to the US from Ireland, settled in Alabama, where he was hanged by the Klan, because he was Catholic.

Caryl Schuetz

--
Caryl Schuetz
www.quiltvalues.com

>
>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: But is it a quilt?
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>


I had another look at the coverlet - thanks for the link. I did see it
in person - where was I? Hartford CT ? AQSG seminar?
The silk coverlet is composed of blocks but is in the medallion style -
(vs. 'repeat blocks' as seen later).
While I mention medallion I have a question. I read somewhere in my
pile of things that some feel there is a distinction between medallion
style and Framed quilts. I wish I could find my source again - do you
folks in England see the two styles as distinct enough to have separate
names?
jean



I suppose you *could* argue that this is block construction, but there

is no sashing nor borders. The important part of your statement is
*quilts as we know them today*.
------_NextPart_000_00C7_01C8D0AF.77C60720--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 21:18:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 16

This message is from Marilyn Woodin, who has been having
trouble posting to QHL:

Cedar Falls, Waterloo, Cedar Rapids, Iowa City--all Iowa Cities that
have been flooded out. Small towns- Palo, Waverly, Vinton and on and
on--all facing water after tornados. There is water enough to
evacuate thousands of people, who may never get their homes
back.--Basements caving in--houses filthy with everything a river can
collect while it rolls along, and museums, including the wonderful
Czech museum, and Czech village in Cedar Rapids with water almost to
rooftops--some over rooftops. The African American museum in Cedar
Rapids is almost destroyed, if not destroyed. Cattle stand in the
fields with no food because their owners can't get to them.
Interstates closed because of collapsing roads--all of this in Iowa--
part of the "corn belt"-- part of the bread basket of the world.
Wisconsin has even lost a lake. This is called the "500 year flood".
We are the New Orleans of the 2008 and those of us in other small
towns of Iowa, mourn the losses and hope we can help some way. They
too all suffer from the "flood zone" effect and I am sure ask where to
go from here.

So qhl friends-- support the midwest with your prayers and your notes
of encouragement and ya' know the very old "brother can you spare a
dime" might be a good call. I will tell you, from standing by and
watching, the Red Cross is in there helping with all it has--so
----SISTERS--" can you spare a dime?" Give to the Red Cross and
quilts might be needed after folks get their homes and lives back--I
fear that will be a long time.

Marilyn Woodin--Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum--Kalona, Iowa--18
miles from the University in Iowa City that has 13 damaged buildings
Marilyn Woodin [woodinkctc.net]


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: But is it a quilt?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 08:50:13 +0100
X-Message-Number: 1

Good question, one I've sometime pondered and not found a clear answer
to.

I *think* that UK researchers actually coined this term relatively
recently. The first time I saw the label on a quilt I asked the
person sitting with the exhibition about it and she didn't know either
- actually suggested it might be because it was exhibited on an old
'frame' bed (wrong!).

I think of it as a design distinction, but one which is quite hard to
pin down. 'Medallion' quilts seem to have a complete concept, if you
see what I mean. Rather like the medallion style of a Persian carpet
where there is an important centre motif which is related to the
subsequent borders. Whereas a 'frame' quilt seems a little more
accidental in design - the maker perhaps just started with a piece of
hexagon work or a simple patchwork design and just kept adding more
and more repeated borders until she got to the size she wanted. Which
is not to say that there wasn't an overall design concept, just that
it was a slightly different one.

Not sure if that makes sense, and definitely not sure if it it the
right answer, its just the only one I've been able to find. I'd be
more than happy to stand corrected.

Sally Ward



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Advice sought - totally not quilt related.
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 09:44:45 +0100
X-Message-Number: 2

Please excuse a non-list related request, but if I can't ask my US
friends who can I ask <G>.

My 25 year old DD is talking of a solo visit to New York in the next
few weeks. Interested in Art and Fashion, she wants to grab some
holiday and visit the usual suspects before starting a new job. She's
travelled Europe alone, lives in London alone, and yet...a mother
worries <G>. If anyone has advice on places to visit, and/or things
to do and not to do, I'd be really grateful to hear from you off-list.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Madison Bouckville
From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 09:41:25 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

This antiques event is a premier one and draws visitors from all over each
summer in August. I would definitely recommend attending. As a former
resident of the area, upstate Central New York, I often say there is no
place prettier in July and August. Madison and Bouckville are two very small
rural communities that lie along US Route 20 in dairy and veg-crops areas.
The corridor has become an antique-lovers paradise with many multi-dealer
stores along the route in addition to the main event--the Madison-Bouckville
Outdoor show (they have a helpful website with lots of details). If you
attend, and are driving from the Syracuse, Albany, or Utica areas, plan
some time to "wander" your way along Route 20 and visit the shops that call
your name. It's a lovely, historic area and is the route of The Cherry
Valley Turnpike, or Great Western Turnpike- one of the first toll roads or
turnpikes, begun in 1799 from Albany. History buffs, you are going to love
it. Some other scenic sights are the many beautiful stonework homes and
buildings that were built by masons during the era of canal building in the
1800s. Check out some of the small local museums along the way if you have
time...there is a great car museum in Norwich (Rte. 12 between Binghamton
and Utica), the Rexford Museum a half block from there that has a few quilts
displayed; the Erie Canal Museum near Rome. So much to see and soak in on
your way to M-B.

Think "Houston for quilt lovers" and go bigger for this event. In addition
to the Outdoor Show, various "renegade" (I think that's the term used)
antique shows have sprung up satellite fashion all around the M-B one. They
are not sanctioned by the main event, but they pop up anyway and add even
more options for shopping. Also think "hot, outdoors, pastures". The event
is set up on acres of former farm land, and it can get hot and muggy in
August. One year it rained quite heavily during the event and tractors were
needed to tow cars out of the "parking lot" which is a large field. But the
event is very well organized, with shuttles to transport you and save your
feet for the show, shipping vendors to facilitate getting large items to
your home, and much more. I believe the organizers offer a catalog so you
can plan your route through the aisles of tents and know which vendors
specialize in quilts or other types of antiques.

Because the event is located in a fairly rural area, you may be somewhat
limited on dining and accomodations that are close to the show. There are
some nice restaurants such as The Landmark in an old stone inn (Bouckville),
but crowds will be large. Nearby cities include Syracuse, Utica, Oneida, and
Rome and some smaller communities like Hamilton, Norwich, Vernon, Canastota.
Save room in the car for fresh vegetables... lots of roadside stands with
wonderful produce this time of year.

Plan lots of time... the show itself is gigantic, and adding any of the
other things will require even more time. But very worthwhile. Do go--Enjoy
your visit! Nancy Roberts



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 09:51:45 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks, Karan, for passing along Marilyn's update. You bet, our prayers are
with the folks in Iowa and the entire Mississippi valley.

Are you and the Quilt Museum out of harm's way?

Dale Drake
from Martinsville, Indiana, where we're still pulling out drywall and soggy
furniture from our own floods ...
and our hands are burned raw from the pine sol/bleach solution ...
and we're on a first name basis with our FEMA inspector ...
and the Indiana branch of the Red Cross is out of money ...


Marilyn said:
So qhl friends-- support the midwest with your prayers and your notes
of encouragement and ya' know the very old "brother can you spare a
dime" might be a good call. I will tell you, from standing by and
watching, the Red Cross is in there helping with all it has--so
----SISTERS--" can you spare a dime?" Give to the Red Cross and
quilts might be needed after folks get their homes and lives back--I
fear that will be a long time.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: If sheepskin is a fiber....
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 10:06:01 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

If sheepskin is considered a fiber, by any stretch, then maybe this is textile/quilt related. But since we are such a broad-range, knowledgable bunch, I thought I would give QHL a try....

A friend here in the Washington, DC area is searching for a place to start with this dilemma. A distant grandfather's 100+ year old college diploma is on actual sheepskin, which is extremely fragile. The college is interested in adding this to their archives if the family can somehow stabilize the material. Where would anyone suggest they start to find someone who conserves something on sheepskin? So far, talking to local framers have given them no leads. Any ideas?

Nancy Hahn


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Madison Bouckville
From: DDBSTUFFaol.com
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 08:12:07 EDT
X-Message-Number: 6

Lucinda;

Madison Bouckville is like a smaller version of the Brimfield Market which
is held 3 times a year, May, July and September.

If you have not been there, you should go at least once. It is huge and
takes up the entire town. There are fields that open on different days so get a
schedule if you decide to go. I suggest going for the first two days, Tuesday
and Wednesday but Thursday can be good as well. If you Google it, you find a
couple of web sites that will help you plan your trip.

Madison is smaller but started out the same way. Originally, there was one
large fenced in show but than town people in the surrounding area started to
rent out space in the yards and fields and now it is quite large. Years ago,
I used to set up there but gave it up a number of years ago. Recently, have
been hearing good things about it for buying and selling.

Thanks;

Darwin D. Bearley
PO Box 22228
Akron, Ohio 44302

"To the world you are nothing; to a rescued dog or cat, you are the world"




**************Gas prices getting you down? Search AOL Autos for
fuel-efficient used cars. (http://autos.aol.com/used?ncidaolaut00050000000007)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Madison-Bouckville
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 07:52:31 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

I live commuting distance of that show - and my Quilt Shop is right
on Rte 20:-)) If y'all decide to go, please stop and see me. If you
need a place to stay, I do have some empty beds and I might even be
convinced to make you breakfast. If I have to. (just kidding!)

Kris in Esperance, NY


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Manhattan Kansas challenges
From: Carol Elmore <c-elmorecox.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 11:55:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8


--
Carol Elmore
AQS Certified Appraiser
Manhattan, KS

Manhattan, Kansas, has become quite a challenging environment lately. In Dec., 2007 we had a major ice storm, in May we had a major hailstorm (some hailstones were as large as softballs), and now we've had a tornado. The last tornado was in 1966 and supposedly went right through my backyard. This time it missed us but did destroy or damage the homes of several people from my local quilt guild. We also had a major flood in 2003. Life on the prairie can be dramatic although usually very peaceful. Kansas State University had over $20,000,000 worth of damage. Engineering, meat science, and the building housing the nuclear reactor had the most damage. The tornado missed the College of Veterinary Medicine where I work by less than 1/2 mile.

This might be a good time to consider consulting your nearest quilt appraiser and having your quilts appraised. Diaster seems to be in the air and as the old phrase goes--Better be safe than sorry.

Carol


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: If sheepskin is a fiber....
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 10:55:05 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Nancy, a museum should be able to help you. Certainly the Smithsonian have
conservators on staff that you can reach by phone. If you'd like to try --
send your email to TEXCONSSI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU. This is a group of textile
conservators and I see emails all the time discussing unusual items.

Best regards,
Sharron........................
..............in hot and humid Spring, TX....................

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: <parsnips1verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 14:51:37 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

Good afternoon,
FYI - Farm Aid is soliciting funds for the farmer victims of these storms.
www.farmaid.org

Pat Roth
in springlike S. NJ

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: KKK, Eleanor Roosevelt, and our prejudices
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 17:00:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11


Well, have I ever been shocked to learn of prejudices I never knew existed!
And in places I wouldn't have thought they would thrive. In Vermont. And in
the pious plains. And in New Jersey? Who would have guessed that in Indiana
little Catholic children would not have been singing "Away in the Manger" at
Christmastime because Martin Luther wrote it? The mind just reels.

I was most particularly surprised to hear my cosmopolitan friend Teddy use
the epithet "redneck"---right in the act of rising above racial prejudice
<g>.

I've been reading these confessions while putting the last touches (I hope)
on my pitiful block for the British Quilt History list "challenge." The
fleur de lis has finally left the map of Louisiana (After all, Britain spent
the better part of its adolescence and young adulthood fighting France.).
The Spanish emblem went very early (There was that coming-of-age sea
skirmish in 1588 and while "we" won, did I really want to suggest old
enmities?). The thought of the thistle and Celtic cross died before it
materialized (It might be Great Britain, but it has its sometimes hostile
divisions. But oh, that thistle was tempting!). And that sea of U.S. Flags?
Was that a bit much? (I read those Brit newspapers and The Guardian!) In
short, I've just been racked with awareness of prejudices.

Seeing others struggle and struggling myself with efforts at
broad-mindedness, I remembered a child in the Solid Democratic South who
once looked scornfully across a dining room table at her father, who was
about to ruin the family's reputation by voting for a Republican, and
announced "Well, I have an open mind!" Emphasis on "I." To which her father
replied, "Well, just be sure it's not so open your brains spill out."

And so I thought it might be good if somebody put in a good word for
prejudice. Which, properly placed, can stop our brains from spilling out.

I doubt any civilization or nation or culture/people without prejudices and
biases has ever occupied the face of this earth . Maybe no nation should
want to live without them or could live without them.

For instance, we in U.S. have gone on record as regarding as "self-evident"
that every human being is born with certain political rights that cannot be
separated innate: they are his because he is a human being, a creature of a
"[Great] Creator," and government's business is simply to assure those
rights are protected. The assumptions about the origin of those rights as
well as about the list of rights themselves are "first principles." They are
a priori assumptions, stated as the grounds for a revolution and then stated
again as the basis for government in the nation that revolution produced.
They do not have to be "proved." They are, then, pre-judgments, high-minded
but prejudices. And they are peculiar to a given nation. Not all nations or
peoples share them.

One cannot reason without some shared assumptions, some first principles.
And I believe most nations over time have recognized this.

Our nation was an aggregate of people from different origins and cultures,
and having no long thread of shared law, we had to reason ours out, put it
in words. Luckily we had the literary genius of Thomas Jefferson and the
combined reasoning and vocabulary of Christianity and Classical Greek and
Roman political thought on which to draw. So the words themselves set a
lofty standard.

Then, years and a Civil War later, along came Emma Lazarus with her little
poem about America's inviting the "huddled masses" of the prejudice-ridden
Old World to our shiny new shores, And we just fell head over heels in love
with the idea of being free of prejudice. We recited Ms. Lazarus' words in
our separate Irish and Italian Catholic schools and our racially segregated
and exclusively this or that schools, sang "My country 'tis of the," and
didn't even notice the irony. We are an idealistic people.

But we are no more tolerant of those who do not share our first principles
than a nation should be. Every president in the second half of the 20th
century has affirmed our commitment to the establishment of "human rights"
(i.e., those stated in OUR constitution) in nations that are independent
governments that never asked for our opinion, just our money. Of course, it
makes survival sense not to share our wealth and advantages with nations
committed to beliefs inimical to our own. It's a sign of good mental health.

And so, I suspect, it is with individuals.

So maybe our lapses are just natural, things we are better for. Maybe we
should admit that groups of people are held together by shared beliefs and
that in our nation, there are lots of different groups of people---even
beyond families and communities. Our great strength might be our
variousness, our different ways of looking at the world. Marilyn Woodin
wrote me of the destruction of many of the holdings of the Czech Museum in
Iowa and of the still-close Czech community surrounding it. I have hoped the
two will be restored. For some reason their restoration has acquired special
meaning for me. They are a distinctive unit in the whole that is the United
States. And I think such units are precious.

Children might be better Christians or Jews or Muslims or Hindi in the long
run for having mastered the articles of their parents' faith before they are
exposed to different ones. At age seven or eight, the human being hasn't
developed the skills needed to discriminate well. He is still learning to
reason, and he needs something to rest his reasoning on. No one can think
without some starting place. While Rogers and Hammerstein reminded us "we
have got to be taught to hate," we have also got to be taught to love. And
in the case of Catholic kids--German, Irish, Italian-- we must assume that
sooner or later, they must grapple with the overriding Christian eleventh
commandment--that we must love our neighbors as we love ourselves because we
we share the same spirit.

We can do that and still have biases. But those biases cannot deny that
political equality established by our law and, for many of us, amplified by
our faiths. The particular usages of a cultural group seen in things as
diverse as language, color preferences, music, cooking, and so forth hold us
together in love generally. They come about from a long shared history and
are inevitable and probably helpful.

So long as they don't teach us that people who look or speak differently
from us are substantially different from us, so long as they leave intact
the recognition that beneath all the differences we are alike as human
beings, I think we're okay.

The thing that has led to havoc in modern times is reason detached from all
else. If we have no moral or spiritual constraints on reason, we can justify
anything at all. And that's what we saw in the great totalitarian movements
of the 20th century. Reason simply dehumanized whole groups of people,
treated them as one-dimensional-- Jews or Georgians or relatives to former
aristocracies, etc.---instead of complex human beings.

I find it heartening that many folks decidedly unCzech in heritage care
deeply about the survival of a Czech community in Iowa.

Besides, we should remember that when we fret over feeling superior to
another group, we often forget they might be feeling superior to us. In the
aftermath of Hurricane Katrina I met a feisty black woman from Marigny
district of N.O. in a local shelter. She insisted she not be called by her
last name, but by her initial. I was to call her Mrs. B. She was adamant
about that. When I got to know her better, I asked her why she preferred
this. Now this woman was what we in the South call a "real lady." She was
gray-black and sat and walked like she had a rod in her spine. In her
eighties. A believer in cooked starch and aprons. No hints of racial
mixture. If she had told me she was the Queen of Sheba, I would curtsied.
But she was away from home and in a place where she was not known. And she
did not want any of these new folks thinking that at some long distant time
her blood had been tainted by even one drop of that running in the veins of
the Governor of Louisiana, with whom she shared a maiden name. That would be
the white Governor of Louisiana. In Mrs. B's mind, that woman had behaved
stupidly and irresponsibly and made us all look bad. And she did not want
anybody, anywhere thinking she and the governor were of the same family.
("Brains matter," she said and noted that while the governor and a Louisiana
senator were discussing what kind of clothes would look good on television,
"folks were floating around dead.") Made perfect sense to me, but I suspect
most people would have imagined the bias to have been the other way around.

Incidentally, on the segment of "The American Experience" about Eleanor
Roosevelt that ran Monday, the KKK raised its head. When Ms. R was going to
visit some miners who were at the Campbell School in East TN, a cross was
burned and she received numerous threats on her life if she proceeded. The
Secret Service and FBI in general said it could not possibly defend her if
she chose to go to rural East TN. So she went alone, met at the Nashville
airport by an elderly woman. The two of them drove through the night to East
TN. And made it.

Gaye Ingram





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: parchment/vellum (was RE: If sheepskin is a fiber)
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 16:02:05 -0700
X-Message-Number: 12

Good afternoon, fellow QHLers - If you are actually talking about animal
"parchment" or "vellum", then a textile conservator would not be of much
assistance. You need to consult with a conservator who is experienced
working with parchment/vellum (usually manuscript conservators). I recommend
that you get in touch with Abigail Quandt, Senior Conservator of Manuscripts
& Rare Books, at the Walters Art Gallery located in Baltimore, MD. She is
one of the few with experience with parchment/vellum (most recently with the
Archimedes Codex).

Parchment/vellum is extremely sensitive to moisture. Because of the inherent
qualities and chemistry of parchment/vellum, it is very likely that there is
no way to safely 'stabilize' the diploma other than having a custom-made
archival tray made for it and keeping it in an extremely stable and
controlled environment.

And don't forget the free on-line referral service available to search for
conservators nationally:

http://www.aic-faic.org/guide/form.html

Regards,
Meg
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______
Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice
Professional Associate, AIC
mgmooneymoonware.net

...a museum should be able to help you. Certainly the Smithsonian have
conservators on staff that you can reach by phone. If you'd like to try --
send your email to TEXCONSSI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU. This is a group of textile
conservators and I see emails all the time discussing unusual items. ....

...A friend here in the Washington, DC area is searching for a place to
start
with this dilemma. A distant grandfather's 100+ year old college diploma is
on actual sheepskin, which is extremely fragile. The college is interested
in adding this to their archives if the family can somehow stabilize the
material. Where would anyone suggest they start to find someone who
conserves something on sheepskin? So far, talking to local framers have
given them no leads. ....



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: If sheepskin is a fiber....
From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 19:41:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

I would contact a local museum or historical society, a rare book dealer, or
the rare book room at your local college for a referral to a document
restorer or historic bookbinder. This sounds like antique vellum, which is
eminently restorable; I recently handled a 500 year old book written on
vellum that was in excellent condition and still very legible.

Good luck!

Lisa Evans





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 18, 2008
From: "Hiranya Loder" <Hiranya.Loderling.mq.edu.au>
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008 14:10:03 +1000
X-Message-Number: 1


Hi There,
I am away on leave from the 19th June to the 30th of June. I will attend
to all emails on my return.
Regards,
Hiranya : >

>>> qhl 06/19/08 14:01 >>>

QHL Digest for Wednesday, June 18, 2008.

1. Re: But is it a quilt?
2. Advice sought - totally not quilt related.
3. Madison Bouckville
4. Re: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
5. If sheepskin is a fiber....
6. Re: Madison Bouckville
7. Madison-Bouckville
8. Manhattan Kansas challenges
9. RE: If sheepskin is a fiber....
10. RE: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
11. KKK, Eleanor Roosevelt, and our prejudices
12. parchment/vellum (was RE: If sheepskin is a fiber)
13. Re: If sheepskin is a fiber....

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: But is it a quilt?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 08:50:13 +0100
X-Message-Number: 1

Good question, one I've sometime pondered and not found a clear answer
to.

I *think* that UK researchers actually coined this term relatively
recently. The first time I saw the label on a quilt I asked the
person sitting with the exhibition about it and she didn't know either
- actually suggested it might be because it was exhibited on an old
'frame' bed (wrong!).

I think of it as a design distinction, but one which is quite hard to
pin down. 'Medallion' quilts seem to have a complete concept, if you
see what I mean. Rather like the medallion style of a Persian carpet
where there is an important centre motif which is related to the
subsequent borders. Whereas a 'frame' quilt seems a little more
accidental in design - the maker perhaps just started with a piece of
hexagon work or a simple patchwork design and just kept adding more
and more repeated borders until she got to the size she wanted. Which
is not to say that there wasn't an overall design concept, just that
it was a slightly different one.

Not sure if that makes sense, and definitely not sure if it it the
right answer, its just the only one I've been able to find. I'd be
more than happy to stand corrected.

Sally Ward



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Advice sought - totally not quilt related.
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 09:44:45 +0100
X-Message-Number: 2

Please excuse a non-list related request, but if I can't ask my US
friends who can I ask <G>.

My 25 year old DD is talking of a solo visit to New York in the next
few weeks. Interested in Art and Fashion, she wants to grab some
holiday and visit the usual suspects before starting a new job. She's
travelled Europe alone, lives in London alone, and yet...a mother
worries <G>. If anyone has advice on places to visit, and/or things
to do and not to do, I'd be really grateful to hear from you off-list.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Madison Bouckville
From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 09:41:25 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

This antiques event is a premier one and draws visitors from all over
each
summer in August. I would definitely recommend attending. As a former
resident of the area, upstate Central New York, I often say there is no
place prettier in July and August. Madison and Bouckville are two very
small
rural communities that lie along US Route 20 in dairy and veg-crops
areas.
The corridor has become an antique-lovers paradise with many multi-dealer

stores along the route in addition to the main event--the Madison-Bouckvill
e
Outdoor show (they have a helpful website with lots of details). If you
attend, and are driving from the Syracuse, Albany, or Utica areas,
plan
some time to "wander" your way along Route 20 and visit the shops that
call
your name. It's a lovely, historic area and is the route of The Cherry
Valley Turnpike, or Great Western Turnpike- one of the first toll roads
or
turnpikes, begun in 1799 from Albany. History buffs, you are going to
love
it. Some other scenic sights are the many beautiful stonework homes and
buildings that were built by masons during the era of canal building in
the
1800s. Check out some of the small local museums along the way if you
have
time...there is a great car museum in Norwich (Rte. 12 between Binghamton

and Utica), the Rexford Museum a half block from there that has a few
quilts
displayed; the Erie Canal Museum near Rome. So much to see and soak in
on
your way to M-B.

Think "Houston for quilt lovers" and go bigger for this event. In
addition
to the Outdoor Show, various "renegade" (I think that's the term used)
antique shows have sprung up satellite fashion all around the M-B one.
They
are not sanctioned by the main event, but they pop up anyway and add
even
more options for shopping. Also think "hot, outdoors, pastures". The
event
is set up on acres of former farm land, and it can get hot and muggy in
August. One year it rained quite heavily during the event and tractors
were
needed to tow cars out of the "parking lot" which is a large field. But
the
event is very well organized, with shuttles to transport you and save
your
feet for the show, shipping vendors to facilitate getting large items
to
your home, and much more. I believe the organizers offer a catalog so
you
can plan your route through the aisles of tents and know which vendors
specialize in quilts or other types of antiques.

Because the event is located in a fairly rural area, you may be somewhat

limited on dining and accomodations that are close to the show. There
are
some nice restaurants such as The Landmark in an old stone inn (Bouckville)
,
but crowds will be large. Nearby cities include Syracuse, Utica, Oneida,
and
Rome and some smaller communities like Hamilton, Norwich, Vernon,
Canastota.
Save room in the car for fresh vegetables... lots of roadside stands
with
wonderful produce this time of year.

Plan lots of time... the show itself is gigantic, and adding any of the
other things will require even more time. But very worthwhile. Do
go--Enjoy
your visit! Nancy Roberts



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 09:51:45 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks, Karan, for passing along Marilyn's update. You bet, our prayers
are
with the folks in Iowa and the entire Mississippi valley.

Are you and the Quilt Museum out of harm's way?

Dale Drake
from Martinsville, Indiana, where we're still pulling out drywall and
soggy
furniture from our own floods ...
and our hands are burned raw from the pine sol/bleach solution ...
and we're on a first name basis with our FEMA inspector ...
and the Indiana branch of the Red Cross is out of money ...


Marilyn said:
So qhl friends-- support the midwest with your prayers and your notes
of encouragement and ya' know the very old "brother can you spare a
dime" might be a good call. I will tell you, from standing by and
watching, the Red Cross is in there helping with all it has--so
----SISTERS--" can you spare a dime?" Give to the Red Cross and
quilts might be needed after folks get their homes and lives back--I
fear that will be a long time.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: If sheepskin is a fiber....
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 10:06:01 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

If sheepskin is considered a fiber, by any stretch, then maybe this is
textile/quilt related. But since we are such a broad-range, knowledgable
bunch, I thought I would give QHL a try....

A friend here in the Washington, DC area is searching for a place to start
with this dilemma. A distant grandfather's 100+ year old college diploma
is on actual sheepskin, which is extremely fragile. The college is
interested in adding this to their archives if the family can somehow
stabilize the material. Where would anyone suggest they start to find
someone who conserves something on sheepskin? So far, talking to local
framers have given them no leads. Any ideas?

Nancy Hahn


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Madison Bouckville
From: DDBSTUFFaol.com
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 08:12:07 EDT
X-Message-Number: 6

Lucinda;

Madison Bouckville is like a smaller version of the Brimfield Market
which
is held 3 times a year, May, July and September.

If you have not been there, you should go at least once. It is huge
and
takes up the entire town. There are fields that open on different days so
get a
schedule if you decide to go. I suggest going for the first two days,
Tuesday
and Wednesday but Thursday can be good as well. If you Google it, you
find a
couple of web sites that will help you plan your trip.

Madison is smaller but started out the same way. Originally, there was
one
large fenced in show but than town people in the surrounding area started
to
rent out space in the yards and fields and now it is quite large. Years
ago,
I used to set up there but gave it up a number of years ago. Recently,
have
been hearing good things about it for buying and selling.

Thanks;

Darwin D. Bearley
PO Box 22228
Akron, Ohio 44302

"To the world you are nothing; to a rescued dog or cat, you are the
world"




**************Gas prices getting you down? Search AOL Autos for
fuel-efficient used cars. (http://autos.aol.com/used?ncid3Daolaut0005
0000000007)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Madison-Bouckville
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 07:52:31 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

I live commuting distance of that show - and my Quilt Shop is right
on Rte 20:-)) If y'all decide to go, please stop and see me. If you
need a place to stay, I do have some empty beds and I might even be
convinced to make you breakfast. If I have to. (just kidding!)

Kris in Esperance, NY


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Manhattan Kansas challenges
From: Carol Elmore <c-elmorecox.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 11:55:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8


--
Carol Elmore
AQS Certified Appraiser
Manhattan, KS

Manhattan, Kansas, has become quite a challenging environment lately. In
Dec., 2007 we had a major ice storm, in May we had a major hailstorm (some
hailstones were as large as softballs), and now we've had a tornado. The
last tornado was in 1966 and supposedly went right through my backyard.
This time it missed us but did destroy or damage the homes of several
people from my local quilt guild. We also had a major flood in 2003.
Life on the prairie can be dramatic although usually very peaceful.
Kansas State University had over $20,000,000 worth of damage. Engineering,
meat science, and the building housing the nuclear reactor had the most
damage. The tornado missed the College of Veterinary Medicine where I
work by less than 1/2 mile.

This might be a good time to consider consulting your nearest quilt
appraiser and having your quilts appraised. Diaster seems to be in the
air and as the old phrase goes--Better be safe than sorry.

Carol


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: If sheepskin is a fiber....
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 10:55:05 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Nancy, a museum should be able to help you. Certainly the Smithsonian
have
conservators on staff that you can reach by phone. If you'd like to try
--
send your email to TEXCONSSI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU. This is a group of textile
conservators and I see emails all the time discussing unusual items.

Best regards,
Sharron........................
..............in hot and humid Spring, TX....................

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: flood/tornadoes --- hard times
From: <parsnips1verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 14:51:37 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

Good afternoon,
FYI - Farm Aid is soliciting funds for the farmer victims of these
storms.
www.farmaid.org

Pat Roth
in springlike S. NJ

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: KKK, Eleanor Roosevelt, and our prejudices
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 17:00:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11


Well, have I ever been shocked to learn of prejudices I never knew
existed!
And in places I wouldn't have thought they would thrive. In Vermont. And
in
the pious plains. And in New Jersey? Who would have guessed that in
Indiana
little Catholic children would not have been singing "Away in the Manger"
at
Christmastime because Martin Luther wrote it? The mind just reels.

I was most particularly surprised to hear my cosmopolitan friend Teddy use
the epithet "redneck"---right in the act of rising above racial prejudice
<g>.

I've been reading these confessions while putting the last touches (I
hope)
on my pitiful block for the British Quilt History list "challenge." The
fleur de lis has finally left the map of Louisiana (After all, Britain
spent
the better part of its adolescence and young adulthood fighting France.).
The Spanish emblem went very early (There was that coming-of-age sea
skirmish in 1588 and while "we" won, did I really want to suggest old
enmities?). The thought of the thistle and Celtic cross died before it
materialized (It might be Great Britain, but it has its sometimes hostile
divisions. But oh, that thistle was tempting!). And that sea of U.S.
Flags?
Was that a bit much? (I read those Brit newspapers and The Guardian!) In
short, I've just been racked with awareness of prejudices.

Seeing others struggle and struggling myself with efforts at
broad-mindedness, I remembered a child in the Solid Democratic South who
once looked scornfully across a dining room table at her father, who was
about to ruin the family's reputation by voting for a Republican, and
announced "Well, I have an open mind!" Emphasis on "I." To which her
father
replied, "Well, just be sure it's not so open your brains spill out."

And so I thought it might be good if somebody put in a good word for
prejudice. Which, properly placed, can stop our brains from spilling out.

I doubt any civilization or nation or culture/people without prejudices
and
biases has ever occupied the face of this earth . Maybe no nation should
want to live without them or could live without them.

For instance, we in U.S. have gone on record as regarding as "self-evident"

that every human being is born with certain political rights that cannot
be
separated innate: they are his because he is a human being, a creature of
a
"[Great] Creator," and government's business is simply to assure those
rights are protected. The assumptions about the origin of those rights as
well as about the list of rights themselves are "first principles." They
are
a priori assumptions, stated as the grounds for a revolution and then
stated
again as the basis for government in the nation that revolution produced.
They do not have to be "proved." They are, then, pre-judgments, high-minded

but prejudices. And they are peculiar to a given nation. Not all nations
or
peoples share them.

One cannot reason without some shared assumptions, some first principles.
And I believe most nations over time have recognized this.

Our nation was an aggregate of people from different origins and cultures,
and having no long thread of shared law, we had to reason ours out, put it
in words. Luckily we had the literary genius of Thomas Jefferson and the
combined reasoning and vocabulary of Christianity and Classical Greek and
Roman political thought on which to draw. So the words themselves set a
lofty standard.

Then, years and a Civil War later, along came Emma Lazarus with her little
poem about America's inviting the "huddled masses" of the prejudice-ridden
Old World to our shiny new shores, And we just fell head over heels in
love
with the idea of being free of prejudice. We recited Ms. Lazarus' words in
our separate Irish and Italian Catholic schools and our racially segregated

and exclusively this or that schools, sang "My country 'tis of the," and
didn't even notice the irony. We are an idealistic people.

But we are no more tolerant of those who do not share our first principles
than a nation should be. Every president in the second half of the 20th
century has affirmed our commitment to the establishment of "human rights"
(i.e., those stated in OUR constitution) in nations that are independent
governments that never asked for our opinion, just our money. Of course,
it
makes survival sense not to share our wealth and advantages with nations
committed to beliefs inimical to our own. It's a sign of good mental
health.

And so, I suspect, it is with individuals.

So maybe our lapses are just natural, things we are better for. Maybe we
should admit that groups of people are held together by shared beliefs and
that in our nation, there are lots of different groups of people---even
beyond families and communities. Our great strength might be our
variousness, our different ways of looking at the world. Marilyn Woodin
wrote me of the destruction of many of the holdings of the Czech Museum in
Iowa and of the still-close Czech community surrounding it. I have hoped
the
two will be restored. For some reason their restoration has acquired
special
meaning for me. They are a distinctive unit in the whole that is the
United
States. And I think such units are precious.

Children might be better Christians or Jews or Muslims or Hindi in the
long
run for having mastered the articles of their parents' faith before they
are
exposed to different ones. At age seven or eight, the human being hasn't
developed the skills needed to discriminate well. He is still learning to
reason, and he needs something to rest his reasoning on. No one can think
without some starting place. While Rogers and Hammerstein reminded us "we
have got to be taught to hate," we have also got to be taught to love. And
in the case of Catholic kids--German, Irish, Italian-- we must assume that
sooner or later, they must grapple with the overriding Christian eleventh
commandment--that we must love our neighbors as we love ourselves because
we
we share the same spirit.

We can do that and still have biases. But those biases cannot deny that
political equality established by our law and, for many of us, amplified
by
our faiths. The particular usages of a cultural group seen in things as
diverse as language, color preferences, music, cooking, and so forth hold
us
together in love generally. They come about from a long shared history and
are inevitable and probably helpful.

So long as they don't teach us that people who look or speak differently
from us are substantially different from us, so long as they leave intact
the recognition that beneath all the differences we are alike as human
beings, I think we're okay.

The thing that has led to havoc in modern times is reason detached from
all
else. If we have no moral or spiritual constraints on reason, we can
justify
anything at all. And that's what we saw in the great totalitarian
movements
of the 20th century. Reason simply dehumanized whole groups of people,
treated them as one-dimensional-- Jews or Georgians or relatives to former
aristocracies, etc.---instead of complex human beings.

I find it heartening that many folks decidedly unCzech in heritage care
deeply about the survival of a Czech community in Iowa.

Besides, we should remember that when we fret over feeling superior to
another group, we often forget they might be feeling superior to us. In
the
aftermath of Hurricane Katrina I met a feisty black woman from Marigny
district of N.O. in a local shelter. She insisted she not be called by her
last name, but by her initial. I was to call her Mrs. B. She was adamant
about that. When I got to know her better, I asked her why she preferred
this. Now this woman was what we in the South call a "real lady." She was
gray-black and sat and walked like she had a rod in her spine. In her
eighties. A believer in cooked starch and aprons. No hints of racial
mixture. If she had told me she was the Queen of Sheba, I would curtsied.
But she was away from home and in a place where she was not known. And she
did not want any of these new folks thinking that at some long distant
time
her blood had been tainted by even one drop of that running in the veins
of
the Governor of Louisiana, with whom she shared a maiden name. That would
be
the white Governor of Louisiana. In Mrs. B's mind, that woman had behaved
stupidly and irresponsibly and made us all look bad. And she did not want
anybody, anywhere thinking she and the governor were of the same family.
("Brains matter," she said and noted that while the governor and a
Louisiana
senator were discussing what kind of clothes would look good on television,

"folks were floating around dead.") Made perfect sense to me, but I
suspect
most people would have imagined the bias to have been the other way
around.

Incidentally, on the segment of "The American Experience" about Eleanor
Roosevelt that ran Monday, the KKK raised its head. When Ms. R was going
to
visit some miners who were at the Campbell School in East TN, a cross was
burned and she received numerous threats on her life if she proceeded. The
Secret Service and FBI in general said it could not possibly defend her if
she chose to go to rural East TN. So she went alone, met at the Nashville
airport by an elderly woman. The two of them drove through the night to
East
TN. And made it.

Gaye Ingram





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: parchment/vellum (was RE: If sheepskin is a fiber)
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 16:02:05 -0700
X-Message-Number: 12

Good afternoon, fellow QHLers - If you are actually talking about animal
"parchment" or "vellum", then a textile conservator would not be of much
assistance. You need to consult with a conservator who is experienced
working with parchment/vellum (usually manuscript conservators). I
recommend
that you get in touch with Abigail Quandt, Senior Conservator of Manuscript
s
& Rare Books, at the Walters Art Gallery located in Baltimore, MD. She is
one of the few with experience with parchment/vellum (most recently with
the
Archimedes Codex).

Parchment/vellum is extremely sensitive to moisture. Because of the
inherent
qualities and chemistry of parchment/vellum, it is very likely that there
is
no way to safely 'stabilize' the diploma other than having a custom-made
archival tray made for it and keeping it in an extremely stable and
controlled environment.

And don't forget the free on-line referral service available to search for
conservators nationally:

http://www.aic-faic.org/guide/form.html

Regards,
Meg
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______
Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice
Professional Associate, AIC
mgmooneymoonware.net

...a museum should be able to help you. Certainly the Smithsonian have
conservators on staff that you can reach by phone. If you'd like to try
--
send your email to TEXCONSSI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU. This is a group of textile
conservators and I see emails all the time discussing unusual items. ....

...A friend here in the Washington, DC area is searching for a place to
start
with this dilemma. A distant grandfather's 100+ year old college diploma
is
on actual sheepskin, which is extremely fragile. The college is interested

in adding this to their archives if the family can somehow stabilize the
material. Where would anyone suggest they start to find someone who
conserves something on sheepskin? So far, talking to local framers have
given them no leads. ....



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: If sheepskin is a fiber....
From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 19:41:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

I would contact a local museum or historical society, a rare book dealer,
or
the rare book room at your local college for a referral to a document
restorer or historic bookbinder. This sounds like antique vellum, which
is
eminently restorable; I recently handled a 500 year old book written on
vellum that was in excellent condition and still very legible.

Good luck!

Lisa Evans


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: mystery quilt pattern...
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 21:29:47 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi,

I call upon all you true Smartie-Pantses to help me find the name of a
fantastically complex and wonderful pieced quilt pattern.

I have posted a couple of photos on the e-Board and will look forward to
another mystery solved by QHL!

Thanks a lot,

Julie Silber
quiltcomplexhughes.net



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mystery Quilt Pattern for Julie
From: rgnixonoct.net
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008 01:15:59 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi Julie,
I believe it's called Spinning Triangles. You can find it in the Rehmel
book, #3478. It's also in the old book "The Romance of the Patchwork
Quilt in America" by Hall and Kretsinger, page 70, block 11.
Your maker chose to use a variety of prints instead of just a few. It is
so beautiful! I'm envious and hope that's ok.
From the prairie where storms dance all around but nothing has
hit.....yet,
Gloria Nixon
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NYC garment district guide
From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2008 23:37:10 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

For Sally's daughter and anyone traveling to New York City, Paula
Nadelstern has compiled a guide on her website:

http://www.paulanadelstern.com/fabric/guides/index.php

She's listed fabric, bead, button, trim and ribbon stores along with
places to eat and even a condensed 3 hour tour. Looks like lots of
useful information.

Sandra Starley
AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser
Moab, Utah
my antique and vintage quilts
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com








----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NYC garment district guide
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008 10:52:08 +0100
X-Message-Number: 5

Wow, thanks Sandra. What an amazing resource. Now I'm wishing I
could fit in her carry-on bag <G>

Sally Ward



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NYC textile things
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008 11:33:55 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

--0-564643450-1213900435:66168
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Sally Ward asked about what to see in NYC visit-- at the Cooper Hewit
t (Fifth Ave at 90th St), the Rococo show hasa very fewfabulous early
textiles, and (surprising to me) some incredible curvalinear 18th century
furniture and accessories. When I had my shop in the Manhattan Art & Antiqu
es Center, I was surrounded by (faux I am sure) so much gilded, ormolu moun
ted fancy French stuff that it was overwhelming; it's quite different to se
e the real things at the Museumand learn about the style.

In the Cooper Hewitt basement there is a not-to-be-missed small exhibition
of swatches and textile merchandising through the ages. Some incredible ear
ly early textile sample books, swatch cards, informative stuff about how an
d where th growing textile industry developed marketing tools.

At the Metropolitan Museum, the clothing exhibition about superhero action
movie costumesis also surprisinglydroll and interesting, especially t
o see how contemporary designers emulated superhero costume elements. Absol
utely worth seeing.

The Folk Art Museums two locations (53rd Street next to MOMA; Lincoln Squar
e)has art on canvas, but no quilts on display

The relocated Crafts Museum at Columbus Circle will be opening soon, not su
re when.

The NY Historical Society (Central Park West-77th St) has a fabulous middle
eastern textile show up.

Laura Fisher








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Subject: Re: NYC textile things
From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008 11:48:04 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

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Hi Laura,

Thanks!...my daughters and I have 3 days already scheduled during the summe
r to go into NYC: one to see the new Kit American Girl movie, another to
the Mus of Nat Hist (older daughter went with school, but missed seeing th
e Star of India, so I'll take her to see it), and another to the MET. We
've been to the MET several times before, but always skipped the Greek/Roma
n exhibit...little girls tend to get red in the face when a naked rear end
is put in front of them. But I think they are getting old enough to hand
le it...it is always one of my favorite halls. We'll be sure to hit the
Superheroes exhibit there. I love their special exhibits. Years ago w
e went to the Candace Wheeler exhibit, and last year was it, to the Toile e
xhibit...and the Matisse and his Textiles exhibit. Love them!

So, now to try to fit in the Cooper Hewitt...

My best,
Dana






Material Pleasures, LLC
Antique and VintageTextiles - Wrap Yourself in History
www.materialpleasures.com

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Subject: Re: Mystery Quilt Pattern for Julie
From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008 13:37:49 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

Good Afternoon All,
I too found the block identified as Spinning Triangles, Brackman #
2754. Brackman gives Capper's as the source of the pattern. Her
illustration shows 4 rows of triangles and your version has 5 ( an over
acheiver!) Great Quilt!

Regards,
Julia Zgliniec - in hot 100 degrees and rising at 1 pm. Poway, CA


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Subject: Re: NYC textile things
From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008 17:13:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

If you have never been there, The Cloisters in New York City is a wonderful
place to visit. They have the unicorn tapestries, which are absolutely
incredible. Plus, the location is lovely and secluded right in the center
of the city and a view to die for.