Subject: quilt vs covrlet From: "Pepper Cory" 

Fact is, terminolgy, is spite of the best efforst of quilterly scholarship, is rather blurry. Quilt implies, through long historical usage, the cutting up or laying on of fabrics before quilting the three layers of top, batting, backing. Here in the US, coverlet is used primarily for the woven coverlet and secondarily applied to quilts, usually of the wholecloth variety. Didn't the Wilson sisters of Indiana (first quarter 20th century) use the word to distingush their wholecloth offerings from common patchwork quilts? I remember the term 'modern coverlet' used in one of their ads. I may not even have their name right so I bow out to others on this list- Pepper Cory at the humid but beautiful NC coast

-- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com

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Subject: with a little help from my friends From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2008 20:51:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

When I plaintively suggested that I didn't expect any quilt adventures during my trip to SC and GA I got some wonderful suggestions from AQSG members. I tried to follow up on all of them (the Telfair Museum in Savannah closed early because of a tornado warning--wild storm). On my own I discovered a marvelous collection of Civil War flags at Fort Pulaski near Savannah. Until Teddy shared her fascination with flags I didn't appreciate their incredible variety. There was a huge painted banner showing women in classical dress with the motto "Touch Her If You Dare" signed by the artist. Xenia directed me to the Confederate Museum in Charleston operated by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Like many small historical museums they seem to have accepted just about anything offered to them over the early years. There are lots of textiles. Two dresses worn by a brother and sister in the 1860s were made from the South Carolina and national Confederate flags. There were soldier's needlecases and housewives and many pairs of knitted gloves (fashionable when kid gloves were unavailable because of the blockade). The quilts were unremarkable except for their historic associations: a silk Diamond including pieces from a regimental flag and a Crazy made from Confederate souvenirs. At Laurel's suggestion I called the curator at the Charleston Museum. She showed me the Sarah Rosenstock quilt (read about it and see pictures in Ronda McAllen's article "Jewish Baltimore Album Quilts" in Uncoverings 2006) and the amazing Battery Appliqué. The Battery piece is about 20 feet long and 2 feet wide. It is composed of early appliqués (from an unknown source) placed on a background. The figures are of ships (incredibly detailed), houses, animals, carts, people. The speculation is that the original (the fabrics look 1820s-30s) was a pictorial of Charleston harbor. I saw something similar at the New York Historical Society in Cooperstown sometime in the 1990s. Does this ring a bell with anybody? I was thrilled by the number of quilts included in the museum exhibits on the history of Charleston. If you have the catalogue of the Mosaic exhibit they did several years ago you'll find Susan Henrietta Wagner's fragment of Stars pieced on paper (p. 42) and in Chintz Quilts by Bullard and Shiell (coincidentally also on p. 42) is the exquisite crib quilt probably made for a child of Emily Ballard. On p. 40 of Chintz Quilts (fig. 37) is a picture of a quilt in the Shelburne collection. The caption reads "In this quilt, now very fragile, a spectacular pieced star is surrounded by a border of coordinated piecing. Floral appliqués fill the spaces between star points..." The Charleston Museum recently acquired what appears to be the twin of the 106" square quilt; the Charleston example is in very fine condition. So many stories so few answers! 

Georgia Bonesteel recently donated two beautiful quilts: a circa 1850 red and green Irish Chain with a chintz border and a chintz friendship quilt dated 1866. Interestingly all 9 appliqué blocks are identical but signed by different people. The chintz border of roses and lilies looks like the same fabric used on the Irish Chain. An Ohio Star with chintz sashing has a roller print (blue and white) toil of birds and vines on the back and a velvet Centennial quilt has a different floral motif embroidered in each of 30 blocks. A Blazing Stars (circa 1870) has scrappy stars containing fabrics from the 40s to the 70s on a madder red background with green sashing. 

I was fascinated by the exhibit on life during the Civil War. An ad in the Charleston Daily Courier dated Jan. 27, 1863 said "New goods received by the last steamer (Rhett Butler, no doubt) bonnets of the newest shape, silk ribbon, English crepes, alpacas, muslin, colored calico, Coats black and white spool cotton, pins, needles at Mrs. S. Watts, 196 King St." The display focusing on of women during the War noted that knitting for soldiers was a universal occupation. Some could knit a pair of socks a day. The Washington Artillery of New Orleans recognized this effort with a verse: "For all the socks the maids have made, Our thanks for all the brave, And honored be your pius trade, The soldier's sole to save." A return visit to the Museum is at the top of my list for a return visit to Charleston. Cinda planning to stay on the Eastern Shore until the middle of August

 

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Subject: quilt in movie From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2008 22:07:22 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

HI,

I am watching "My Sister Eileen" with Rosalind Russell and Janet Blair, 1942. Black & White, of course.

In a scene about 1/2 hour in, there's a scene which takes pace in the courtyard of a New York apartment complex. A lady is seen hanging out her laundry line. A great-looking Double Irish Chin (top?) is hanging over her railing.

Hope this is not a duplication. I did not get a chance to follow those several "threads" on this subject -- Quilts in Movies.

Julie Silber

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Subject: Re: quilt in movie From: KJB139aol.com Date: Wed, 2 Jul 

I have tried to access the archives before posting this but have been unsuccessful even thought I have the correct password. I don't know why. So please forgive me if this has already been discussed. I watched the movie "Crimes of the Heart" with Sissy Spacek, Jessica Lange and Diane Keaton and in their bedroom there were three beds each with quilts in different pieced patterns but all the same material...bubblegum pink, navy and white. I wondered if anyone could tell me the name of the pattern of the quilt on one of the beds that had large arrows. I looked in every book I own (I own enough to start a library) but have been unable to find that pattern.

Kathy B Massachusetts.

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Subject: Charleston panel From: Crm793aol.com Date: Wed, 2 Jul 

Cinda,

I also thought of that quilt in Cooperstown. The Charleston Panel is pictured in the fall 1984 'Lady's Circle Patchwork Quilts'. The statement with it is "....a wonderful reconstruction of what was undoubtedly once a bed quilt. Alice Logan Wright, who donated it to the Charleston Museum in 1977 says it was originally a quilt done by an elderly lady of the Logan family in Charleston, c. 1800. Subsequently Cousin Patti snipped out bits for her friends. Finally another cousin rescued the remnants and painstakingly sewed them on this panel."

Was any of this information with the quilt when you saw it?

Carolyn Miller

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Subject: Re: Charleston panel From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2008 16:59:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Sandi Fox wrote at length about the Charleston Battery Scene in Wrapped in Glory (pages 54-61). You can see pictures of the whole piece and some amazing details. The Trade and Commerce Bedcover on page 48 of the same book is the quilt I remember seeing at Cooperstown in 1996. There's a picture of it in the NY Historical Society magazine for summer 1996. Thanks to all who pointed me to Sandi Fox (her books are so-o-o wonderful). Cinda just back from Assateague where the wild ponies shared the beach with us (one of the many reasons the Eastern Shore is called "The Land of Pleasant Living")

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Subject: Re: quilt in movie From: "Jean Carlton" 

Oh Julie - how dare you? I just returned from a dermatologist who did a  little surgery above my lip (basal cell) and am bandaged up with 11  stitches and orders to be careful eating etc so as not to stretch the  stitch line.....then I read your note of the Double Irish Chin hanging  over the railing - and a great looking one at that - what a picture  that conjurs up - and I'm holding my lip trying not to laugh out loud.  Ah....tears running down my face. Thanks for the (stifled) laugh but your timing was not good! :) jean

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Subject: Re: quilt in movie From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Wed, 02 Jul 2008 15:48:25 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Julie - have seen that quilt - wondered the colors.

My favorite and wish I had a full still image is the one from "As Time Goes By" after they are married. It is seen on their bed in all the bedroom shots and I only wish I could find a still of that quilt (wait, I said that already - I love it so much I keep repeating myself.) If anyone know where I might find out the total view in still, please let me know. Leah Zieber In way too HOT Temecula

 

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Subject: Double Irish CHIN??? From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2008 21:19:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Oh MY!!!

What cool typo I made. Thank you, Jean, for catching it.

Sorry if I split your lip.

:)

Julie Silber

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Subject: For those of you who know Lynne Edwards From: "Pepper 

Hello all, It's a great feeling to be the bearer of good news-read on. Lynne Edwards from England is a well-known author and teacher, both abroad and in her homeland. Her first book was on Cathedral Window and subsequent titles are on scrap quilts and sampler quilts. She designs rulers for Creative Grid as well. Lynne was featured as one of the 99 most influential quilters in the world by Nihon Vogue and has another book coming at the end of this year. Today Lynne was honored in her own country. Please go to http://peppercory.blogspot.com <http://peppercory.blogspot.com%20>and share her accomplishment. And go ahead and send her congratulatory emails. With typical Brit modesty, she has downplayed this event. But she knew she could tell me so she called long distance last December to shout trans-Atlantically the good news and I squealed back American-style. Hip, hip, wahoo! Pepper

-- Pepper Cory 

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Subject: Busy beaver From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> 

Go to the Quilt Flap blog http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com <http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com%20>and you'll see some pioctures from the Flap. Lynn Gorges, Mz. Palampore, described it will but I need pictures! Pepper

-- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com

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Subject: Quilts on TV shows From: "Donna" <nilrapsgmail.com> Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2008 08:01:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Over the last 6 months I've been watching "Gunsmoke" from beginning to end, almost finished, along with "Bonanza". Almost every episode shows a quilt on a bed or wrapped around someone. Some appear to be new - 1960's fabric-props, but most appear to be old and some out of the 1800's, applique', crazy quilts. They are treats to look at and wonder about. They make me wonder whether they have been taken care of, thrown away or sitting in a warehouse somewhere waiting to be discovered, does anyone know more than this about them? Donna

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Subject: Re: Quilts on TV shows From: KJB139aol.com Date: Fri, 4 

If anyone is interested, on July 8 Crimes of the Heart will be on at 11:30 AM EST on showtime. The sisters each have a bubblegum pieced quilt with navy and white on their beds. One of the patterns is very unusual, take a look!

Kathy B

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Subject: Also on TV From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net> Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2008 10:23:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

While channel surfing one day last week I happened on a fascinating documentary on the DOC channel that will likely interest those who love textile history. It was titled "Nelly Don: A Stitch in Time", and was the bio of Eleanor (Nell) Donnelly Reed, Kansas City. She is the inventor of the housedress and began successfully marketing her enormously popular pink gingham design in 1916. Things grew from there, and she successfully adopted Henry Ford's assembly-line methods to production of the housedress, which was initially done in her home by seamstress family and friends. So she is also an early contributor of the piecework concept for the fashion industry. Her personal saga is also interesting and filled with dramatic people and events. I was not able to watch in its entirety, but it's worth catching when it airs again.

Her Nelly Don brand became widely known, and many early department stores had Nelly Don "boutiques" in their womenswear departments. A pioneer in labor practices, she also kept women working in her factories year-round during the Depression by designing/selling an apron that was sewn with only one continuous seam and had pockets for household supplies. She recognized that her employees may be providing the only income in their impoverished families, and dressmaking ordinarily cycled seasonally. This Handy Apron (I think it was called) kept her workers employed all year. She resisted the idea of producing fabric yard goods, but after she sold the company, that's the direction it took which contributed to its demise.

The program will air twice more this month, on the 18th and 30th. Check this link for times if you are interested. Nancy Roberts

http://www.documentarychannel.com/schedule/index.php

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Subject: Re: Also on TV From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> D

Lucky people with Dish and those who live in NYC, Nashville and Denver who can access on their local cable provider.

Nancy Roberts wrote:While channel surfing one day last week I happened on a fascinating documentary on the DOC channel that will likely interest those who love textile history. It was titled "Nelly Don: A Stitch in Time", and was the bio of Eleanor (Nell) Donnelly Reed, Kansas City. She is the inventor of the housedress and began successfully marketing her enormously popular pink gingham design in 1916. Things grew from there, and she successfully adopted Henry Ford's assembly-line methods to production of the housedress, which was initially done in her home by seamstress family and friends. So she is also an early contributor of the piecework concept for the fashion industry. Her personal saga is also interesting and filled with dramatic people and events. I was not able to watch in its entirety, but it's worth catching when it airs again.

Her Nelly Don brand became widely known, and many early department stores had Nelly Don "boutiques" in their womenswear departments. A pioneer in labor practices, she also kept women working in her factories year-round during the Depression by designing/selling an apron that was sewn with only one continuous seam and had pockets for household supplies. She recognized that her employees may be providing the only income in their impoverished families, and dressmaking ordinarily cycled seasonally. This Handy Apron (I think it was called) kept her workers employed all year. She resisted the idea of producing fabric yard goods, but after she sold the company, that's the direction it took which contributed to its demise.

The program will air twice more this month, on the 18th and 30th. Check this link for times if you are interested. Nancy Roberts

http://www.documentarychannel.com/schedule/index.php > >

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Subject: clearing out - items for sale From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2008 10:59:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I am moving QUICK by the end of the month. Yikes! I have a few things I no longer want.

Blanket Statements #75 - 77. Pay Priority Mail packet ($4+) and they're yours.

Reprint of Sunbonnet Babies by Bertha Corbett (1900) - green cover, reprint from Groves Publishing. $5, plus $2 postage

What's on the Air? by Bertha Corbett (reprint of the 1928 story) by Groves. $5, plus $2 postage

Spiral Bound Books of the Kansas City Star patterns, published by the Groves. There are 10 volumes, plus the alphabetical index. Today's retail is about $16. Each one I will sell for $8, plus $2 postage.

These are photocopied from the newspaper patterns. Includes the original text. Each book includes about 100 or so patterns. Arranged by year:

Alphabetical Index (spiral binding is off - only $5) Volume 1 (spiral binding is off - only $5): 1928 - 1930 Volume 2: 1931 - 1932 Volume 3: 1933 -1934 Volume 4: 1935 - 1936 Volume 5: 1937 - 1938 Volume 6: 1939 - 1941 Volume 7: 1942 - 1944 Volume 8: 1945 - 1948 Volume 9: 1949 - 1954 Volume 10: 1955 - 1961

If you take them all, I'll pay shipping: $80 for all

-- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil Quilt Workshops & Programs http://www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: Quilts in Movies From: <gpconklincharter.net> Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2008 8:11:25 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

I don't think The Tall Men has been mentioned here, it is a Clark Gable and Jane Russell -- Western movie. I watched it several years ago with my hubby. He loves westerns. Gable and his partner are heading west going to look for gold and they find a wagon train being attacked by Indians, Gable charges in on his steed and swoops up Jane Russell and saves her....but not before she grabs her red and green applique quilt, I think it was a 4 block.

The quilt is Jane's only possession saved and it shows up just about every stop they make along the way, even used on the buckboard. Russell and Gable are at odds during the last half of the movie. But the best part is the ending, he grabs her quilt and throws it on the ground and calls her to his side where they ...ahh.. sit and ... spoon. Great scenery.

Hubby loved the cattle drive scenes and bar room brawls. I was thrilled to see how often they showed the quilt. Always on Russell's bed where ever she stayed. This might be a Venus and Mars thing...one movie and we each came away from the movie with totally different memories. This would be a great movie to show at a retreat in the late evening hours.

Pam O'Fallon, IL

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Subject: RE: Quilts in Movies From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2008 12:08:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

If anyone has a subscription to Netflix 'The Tall Men' is available for instant watch or on DVD. Thank you so much Pam for the suggestion of a good movie to watch while I work in my studio today.

Greta

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Subject: KC Star patterns are gone From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2008 13:17:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Just to let you know, the Star patterns are already spoken for.

Still have these booklets by Bertha Corbett and the 4 Blanket Statements. -- Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil Quilt Workshops & Programs http://www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: RE: Quilts in Movies/The Tall Men From: "Donna" <nilrapsgmail.com> Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2008 17:04:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

This quilt definitely play a character in the movie. Donna

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Subject: Re: Also on TV From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net> Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2008 22:47:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Thank you for posting this program. It is interesting to me because I also do costuming mainly for the 19C but I am also slipping into the early 20th C also. Can't wait to watch it. I hope I can remember to set the dvr. My schedule stops on the 13th. I guess it is only for two weeks at a time. Debbie Hill-Russell russhillbeecreek.net ----- 

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Subject: Looking for Jane Clark Stapel From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2008 13:38:56 -0400 

Hello all, Could you please contact me off-list if you know how to contact Jane Clark Stapel , the feedsack expert? Many thanks and please use this email address below: pepcorygmail.com Pepper

-- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com 

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 05, 2008 From: Susan Riley 

To all-if you google Nelly Don, there is an entire web site devoted to her with a fashion show of her garments, ads for the Handy Dandy Printed Apron ($6.50 for a dozen!) and a blog with memories. I could not get the movie clip to play, but book & DVD are available for purchase. Susan Riley, Hingham MA

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Subject: Nelly Don From: Gloria hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2008 10:41:19 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

I was raised around Kansas City, so Nelly Don was a household name for my mom. I enjoyed looking at the clothing clips and think if I every lose this last 10 pounds, I might try making some of those designs. My mom's favorite was the seersuker suits.

http://www.nellydon.com/fashion.html

Gloria Hanrahan

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Subject: RE: Marking on white From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2008 13:42:45 -0700 

Happy 4th weekend -

Have not really done a lot of hand quilting on white fabric before -  wonder if the wise women of this list could make some suggestions for  the best way to mark for hand quilting on white (off-white) fabric?  (Cross hatching and fan quilting will be the pattern of choice.)

Appreciate your comments... Leah Zieber

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Subject: RE: Marking on white From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2008 18:07:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

This is what I do. Not everyone may agree with me, but so far it's worked:

Non-geometric motifs are marked very lightly with a lead pencil. I fill in straight lines, such as diamond quilting for backgrounds, with masking tape in whatever width I prefer, and quilt along the tape lines. I remove the tape as I go, which amuses the cats no end....

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Nelly Don From: Judy White <whitey06029sbcglobal.net>

I too grew up in Kansas City and my mother worked at Nelly Don. She worked in what someone called the "big" plant. She began part time just to have something to do when I began high school and liked it so well, she stayed quite a while. Once in a while I would go down to the plant to pick her up and go inside and visit with women I knew and walk around the shop floor and look at the various finished dresses and watch them move around sort of like at the dry cleaners. It was the first factory of any kind that I had ever been in. Mother worked in the office doing what was then called "key punch" work which was very noisy along with all the other noise and her office was right out on the factory floor as I remember. I never met Nell Donnelly, but our neighbor who suggested mother apply for the job was Nell's personal secretary. Since I read Gloria's post, I ordered the book online and can't wait for it to get here. Thanks for bringing back some old memories.

Judy White now in Ct

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Subject: RE: Marking on white From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2008 16:49:39 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Leah, On any color fabric, for hand quilting, myA0preference to mark crosshatch  gridsA0is a hera marker. It leaves no marks behind after quilting. If you  make a mistake, it will disappear with water. The hera is great for straigh t lines, and easy to mark with a plastic ruler. For fan quilting, a hard te mplate is helpful to guide the hera; a cup or plate. The hera I prefer is without the pointed end--easier to use. Some people li ke the pointed end for other uses. Usually, I mark before basting the quilt, but it can also be done after bas ting. If you find it is difficult to see, simply change the angle of light. Barbara Burnham

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Subject: A "thank you" and a question From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com> Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2008 22:56:43 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 9

Many thanks to those who responded to my question re: restoration of "sheepskin," which I shall now and evermore refer to as "vellum." I have passed the numerous responses onto my inquiring friend, who, could not believe that people who didn't know him or his family would take time to offer helpful suggestions. The kindness of this group extends far beyond each of our computer screens.

I have just started a project using 4 large Pomegranate or Love Apple patches, circa 1870. I started wondering if that block was found in one geographic area more than others. Was there a preferred block placement....stems together, heads together, all upright? I started going through books until my sewing room floor was littered but never found any solid answers. I didn't find info in the state documentation books I expected to see them in. Would someone be able to point me in the right direction to read up on this patch?

Nanch Hahn, in warm and muggy Maryland