Subject: Suggested reading From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> 

I enjoyed the thread we had going last summer about recommended books to read and had the opportunity to read several. My local public library has an Adult Summer Reading Club which I join every year. (Shades of Summer Reading Clubs when I was a kid!), Anyway, I wondered if any of you had some good suggestions of Quilt or Quilt History related books to add to my reading list for this summer? Thanks, Judy Knorr

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Subject: Re: Suggested reading From: Judy Schwender <

A New Order of Things: How the Textile Industry Transformed New England, Paul E. Rivard. Dartmouth: University of New England Press, 2002. 

Madder Red: A History of Luxury and Trade, Robert Chenciner. RoutledgeCurzon, 2000. 

A Perfect Red: Empire, Espionage, and the Quest for the Color of Desire, Amy Butler Greenfield. New York : HarperCollins, 2005. 

Woven Cargoes : Indian Textiles in the East, John Guy. New York : Thames and Hudson, 1998.

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Subject: Re: Suggested reading From: MargaretFaheyaol.com Date:

As per recommendation as a source for understanding the south (as opposed to a Gone With the Wind mentality) I just finished reading H.W. Brands Andrew Jackson. It is very well done, readable and informative. I was woefully uninformed about that era. Also rather astonished by how foolhardy ( a nice word for stupid) men were at the time. Various forms of fighting??? Huh??? The banking practices are all too familiar. As are the political practices. I'm not sure I feel so enlightened about southern culture. Is it the distance felt from other areas of the country? the later time period of settlement? the differences in concern due to source of income? depth of the anti north feelings? It is certainly a book which can provoke discussion. I do feel the author's admiration of his subject, which is a bit nervous-making. But how could one be otherwise given the immersion an author must make in another's life?

Well, let's hear from others on this topic please. Thanks.

Margaret

and what book tells of the woman's point of view at that time. 1780 - 1840

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Subject: new quilt history website From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2008 10:40:58 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Hi All, FYI

Sue Wildemuth has put together a rather unique quilt history website! www.illinoisquilthistory.com 

What makes it unique is that she has focused all of the info on = Illinois' quilt and pattern history and how to do research on and in Illinois. She provides many links and addresses for researchers there or at a = distance, such as newspapers, genealogical links, and city and state offices.

There is more much info on the website, such as a section on quilt = related ephemera, another passion of Sue's. Her graphics are terrific - the web pages look like a quilted page in a photo album.

Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD New Pathways into Quilt History www.antiquequiltdating.com www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com =A0

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Subject: fan marking From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com> Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2008 13:09:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Leah, this isn't an answer to what to mark with, but this is how I mark fans, my favorite pattern to mark and quilt. I took a strip of plastic template material, a firmer kind. I punched a small hole every inch, with a special small hole punch. I place the first hole at the corner and place a stylus in it with the quilt on a carpet. Then I put a hard lead pencil in the next hole and swing it in an arc, move to the next hole and swing it back. When I have the first fan marked, usually five lines, I put the stylus at the edge of the last line and repeat. I usually mark from opposite corners into the center and where the rows meet is roughly a diagonal. I'm left-handed and I'm guessing my idea of direction follows. I work the fans left to right. It would be fun to study old quilts and see if one can see a trend, i.e. more right-handed ones than left. Have fun, Jean in MN

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Subject: love apple From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com> Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2008 13:01:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Nancy, I searched the Quilt Index and found several examples, but none were four blocks. In most cases, the blocks faced the same way, but in a few, they pointed in by row, meaning one or two rows on the left faced right, and vv, i.e.. head to head. Jean in MN

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Subject: mystery pattern? From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net> 

OK, I figured out how to post a photo on the vintage photos eBoard (see it at "pattern ID help?") -- if anyone could help me out, I would really appreciate it.

I need help identifying a pattern: The quilt is c. 1970-1980 (my guess) and the piecing would give most quilters a migraine <g>. The border alone would take forever.

Perhaps this was in a magazine around that time? Quilt originated in New England. Thanks for any suggestions.

Neva Neva Hart, AQS Appraiser in Virginia Member: PAAQT, AQSG, SAQA www.quiltappraisers.org

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Subject: how to post on eBoard? From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net> Date: Mon, 07 Jul 2008 14:18:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Sorry to bother you about this -- instructions please to post a photo on Vintage photos? thank you very much!

Neva Neva Hart, AQS Appraiser in Virginia Member: PAAQT, AQSG, SAQA www.quiltappraisers.org Phone 540-427-0184

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Subject: Re: how to post on eBoard? From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2008 13:39:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

Neva (et al)

This information is on the subscribe page at http://quilthistory.com

While I am thinking of it, can those of you with old photos go in and remove them? More room for everyone else:-))

Kris

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Subject: Re: Suggested reading From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2008 21:30:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

I second A Perfect Red. It's very readable and has a ton of great information on cochineal, my all-time favorite natural dye.

Lisa Evans

 

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Subject: Re: new quilt history website From: rgnixonoct.net Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2008 00:26:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Sue Wildemuth's website is fantastic! I've spent almost two hours there, enjoyed every minute of it, and still have more goodies to read tomorrow. It's tucked safely in my favorites file right next to the Iowa Illinois Quilt Study Group.

My heartfelt thanks to Sue for the delightful research.

From Kansas where storms are rolling across the prairie,

Gloria Nixon ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: starch From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Tue, 

Question to the antique quilt folks: I am in the process of hand quilting several late 19th Century quilt tops--a couple of which need a small amount of restoration, a Sanitary Commission quilt that I am making as a "memento" from actual 1870/80's antique fabrics; and one flock of geese quilt top that I purchase.

I have begun quilting the last one as it is in the best condition and I wanted to stablized it before any damage occurred.

My questions are this. I bought it from a dealer (which means I paid top dollar) and it appears to me that it is stiffer than I normally encounter working with 19th Century fabrics.

Could it have been starched? If so, is that recommended for antique quilt tops to stabilized them? And if that is the case, what starch would you folks recommend?

thanks, Don Beld

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Subject: RE: starch From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2008 16:20:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Hi Donald. I don't know that I would recommend starching antique quilts. I've purchased antique quilt blocks that needed to be squared up and then sashing and borders attached. I've had to starch the blocks to square them up accurately. I just use the Sta-Flo starch from the grocery store - but I do mix my own. A friend of mine hates starch but has been completely won over by this new starch in the quilt shops. I think it's one of Mary Ellen's creations. I have to admit it gives a nice feel to the fabric without being all sticky. Good stuff but I don't know about the long term affect on fabric. Another friend of mine is the starch queen (Hi Lonnie, I know you're lurking!) and she washes starch out promptly from quilt blocks.

Best regards, Sharron............................ .........in 101 deg. Spring, TX............I'm melting...............

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Subject: RE: starch From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2008 15:00:56 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

I wouldn't use starch on quilts - it attracts little bugs if not washed out. We sell Best Press in the shop, which is an artificial spray sizing. I don't think sizing attracts bugs, so I would recommend that as a stiffener.

Kris

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Subject: summer reading From: mopalka <mopalkaalaska.net> Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2008 09:24:39 -0800 X-Message-Number: 5

I haven't read these as yet. Has anyone read them?

Mary Chestnut's Civil War By: Mary Chesnut (Author), C. Vann Woodward (Editor)

Sarah Morgan: The Civil War Diary Of A Southern Woman By: Charles East (Author)

 

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Subject: Summer reading From: "Lisa Evans" 

I haven't read Mary Chestnut's diary in ages, but it's a classic - I = remember when excerpts came out in American Heritage back in the 1970's. = 

I'm going on vacation in a couple of weeks and will be hauling Henry = VIII's death inventory along so I can track down every single reference = to pieced, payned, or patchwork bedding, wallhangings, or furnishings. = Yes, I'm insane, but what the heck, I'll be happy...;)

Lisa Evans ------=_

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Subject: Advice needed From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2008 19:32:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

I have been asked to work with an old "banner" from WWII. It was found in an old box among the archives of a church and they would like to preserve/display it. The fabric of the banner seems to be cotton with a border of cotton. The border has very small holes in it and the whole thing is very soiled. There are stars of blue wool felt with embroidered names on them of the men of the church that went to fight. There are gold stars put on top of the blue, if they died in the war.

My questions are to do with cleaning, although, I'm thinking that isn't really an option, because of the wool felt. The felt also obviously has/had moths or something that ate into the wool. How do I make sure they aren't still there? They don't have a big budget, so I'm wondering how many options there are.

Thanks!! Jean

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Subject: RE: Advice needed/WWII banner From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2008 17:23:01 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

Good afternoon/evening, QHLers - I would suggest getting in touch with a textile conservator for a consultation. The AIC offers a free referral service via the web:

http://www.aic-faic.org/guide/form.html 

During the consultation, the textile conservator would be able to offer advice specific to the condition of the banner and the congregation, treatment possibilities, reality checks, education of all involved as to what is really safe and practical for this particular banner. In my private practice, I've often done "cooperative conservation" projects where the trained (by me) volunteers do the treatment recommended. It's a definite win-win situation.

Where is the banner geographically speaking? Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

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Subject: RE: Advice needed From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2008 20:29:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Jean,

Believe it or not the National Park Service website offers a lot of information about storage and preservation. If you go to their website at http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/publications/conserveogram/cons_toc.html  there is a list of Conserve O Grams. Number 3/6 offers advice about freezing items to rid them of insect pests. I have used this method to be sure there were no insects in a wool quilt and I had good results.

It's a place to start with your project.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

 

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Subject: Summer reading suggestion From: janetfinleycomcast.net Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2008 06:52:01 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Oh, you're going to like this one: Song Yet Sung, by James McBride (author of The Color of Water) Penguin Books, 2008. This fictional story is about escaping slaves in the Chesapeake area just prior to the Civil War, and, yes, they use a code including the Double Wedding Ring. In the Author's Notes, he states, "I thank Jacqueline L. Tobin and Raymond G. Dobard for their groundbreaking Hidden in Plain View, which offers much for the imagination in that area. That book is required reading for anyone interested in how the Underground Railroad functioned. Some historians contend that no black codes were used in the Underground Railroad, but fortunately, musings of scholars never stopped writers from drawing plot, content, and character from disputed history to power the muscle of imaginations."

This book is my July book selection for my reading group. Any suggestions as to what I say to the group? Can anyone e-mail me privately the list of suggestions Barbara Brackman had published as a guide to counteract this false theory?

Thanks,

Janet

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Subject: Re: Advice needed From: hknight453aol.com Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2008 10:06:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

To kill the moths, put the whole thing loosely wrapped in 100% cotton muslin that has been washed, but not an old sheet. Then, place the bundle ina chest freezer for two weeks. The moth larvae, if any are still living, will be frozen to death. Perhaps vacumn through screening? I'm no expert, but was able to rescue many of my DB and DSIL's woolen items this way after moths invaded.

Heather

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Subject: Re: Advice needed From: Judy Schwender

Hi all, There is one other requirement for this procedure. The freezer needs to be a model that is NOT frost-free. The required temperature level is -20 Centigrade (-5 Fahrenheit). The conserve o gram goes on to say that 6-10 days at -20C is sufficient, but that two cycles of 48 hour exposures at a minimum of -20C constitutes a lethal exposure. "Ensure that the freezer does not have a frost-free feature. A frost-free freezer allows the internal temperature to rise periodically to remove any accumulated ice crystals. The cyclic heating will also allow the objects to warm up, destroying the effectiveness of the freezing process. However, a frost-free unit can be used in an emergency."

There are directions for how to prepare the object for the process and how it's all done. You want to avoid condensation when the object is brought back to room temperature. So sealing in an airtight polyethylene bag and getting all the air out of the bag is important. Maybe this is one instance when one of those space-saver bags might be OK for a textile.

Anyway, you can download it yourself (we all should!) It's Number 3/6 An Insect Pest Control Procedure: The Freezing Process. Judy Schwender

--0-2061713804-1215614938=:91523--

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Subject: : Advice needed From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> 

Judy -- some of this has been revised as acceptable by conservationists and was posted on the vintage fabric list. For those who don't have that frost free option, turn up freezer to coldest temp. Wrap item in plastic, freeze for 10 days. Remove for 5 days, then freeze again for 5 days. I just tried this on wool gabardine. Works fine as far as I can tell.

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Subject: Re: : Advice needed From: Judy Schwender 

Excellent!

Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> wrote: Judy -- some of this has been revised as acceptable by conservationists and was posted on the vintage fabric list. For those who don't have that frost free option, turn up freezer to coldest temp. Wrap item in plastic, freeze for 10 days. Remove for 5 days, then freeze again for 5 days. I just tried this on wool gabardine. Works fine as far as I can tell.

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Subject: Re: : Advice needed (freezing textiles protocol) From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2008 11:52:34 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Good afternoon, QHLers - Do both! Meaning wrap the textile to be frozen first with a clean piece of fabric/sheeting and THEN wrap in the polyethylene sheeting/bag. Tape up all seams completely if using PE sheeting. Suck out as much air as possible from the polyethylene sheeting/bag before applying that last piece of tape. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net 

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Subject: Advice needed (freezing textiles protocol) From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2008 16:50:23 -0400 X

Here's the complete directions which I couldn't locate at the time of first post: This was message posted on VF list byKay if I recall correctly, and I did get my days reversed. Sorry. Some days the little grey cells seem to be in a frozen state. :-)

Plain old household freezer, nothing special -10oF/-25oC is a good temperature to shoot for. If it's up around 0oF/-18oC, go for 10 days or a couple of weeks.

Place specimens in sealed plastic bag, hold at temperature for about a week, remove from freezer (still in sealed bag) and hold at room temperature about 10 days, then refreeze 3-5 days.

The reason for the second freeze is to try to get eggs to hatch in the room temperature holding phase, and then kill them in the second freeze as insect eggs are pretty impervious to cold.

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Subject: Worldcat book lists From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2008 16:39:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Way cool! Thank you, Mary Persyn, for alerting us to this. I had no idea you could go directly to Worldcat.

All you researchers out there need to know about this. You don't have to go the public or local university library now, you can search from your own computer anywhere you are!

Ain't technology grand???

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: personal library booklist From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2008 16:28:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Given previous discussions about how to keep track of your personal library, I want to let you all know about a great online service I've found. It's not expensive and it is so easy and quick to use, I can't believe it.

All you have to do is enter the ISBN number and the program pulls the book up on the screen and you can add it or not, as you choose. You can enter your books a lot of other ways, too.

Check it out. Go to http://www.collectorz.com and download a trial subscription (at no cost). Then enter a couple of your own books.

Best wishes, Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: DDT - NQR From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> 

I peaked at the list of NPS conserve-o-grams after Greta posted the site=2C= and the one on DDT caught my eye. It was very enlightening=2C and I now f= eel as if I have an excuse for anything stupid that I do or say. It is a m= iracle my children were born healthy!! When I was a child=2C living on Oki= nawa=2C we turned up with head lice fairly regularly. The treatment was to= spray our hair until saturared=2C with DDT from an olive drab spray can=2C= then wrap our head in a towel for a few hours. According to the website= =2C DDT is absorbed into the skin and is responsible for all sorts of horro= rs. Horrors=2C indeed!! ANd my Georgia born grandmother gave me kerosene = in a spoon of sugar for colds. Is it not a wonder we survive childhood at = all??? Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com "I always try to balance the light with th= e heavy - a fewtears of human spirit in with the sequins and the fringes."B= ette Midler  ___________________

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Subject: Re: DDT - NQR From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 00:25:57 +0100 X-Message-Number: 13

> grandmother gave me kerosene in a spoon of sugar for colds.

So - who's going to make the quilt depicting you as a fire-breathing infant, Teddy?<G>

Sally Ward (with wonderful pictures in her head)

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Subject: Re: DDT - NQR From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2008 20:41:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

DDT *directly on the scalp*????? Dear God, I'm amazed your kids don't have three heads apiece...*shudders*

Lisa Evans

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Subject: bizarre stuff From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2008 20:48:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

The image of Teddy as a firebreathing infant conjured up by Sally Ward reminded me of one of the weirder things I've seen lately. The James Monroe Museum in Fredericksburg, VA has a disinterment ribbon worn by those (apparently a fairly large number of voyeurs) who attended the disinterment of our 5th president's remains which were moved from New York City to Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond in 1858. Monroe died in 1830. For connoisseurs of cemeteries, Hollywood is one of the most lugubriously Victorian. It's filled with sad monuments, sadder epitaphs, John Tyler, Jefferson Davis many Civil War generals and on and on. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Re: DDT - NQR] From: Mary Persyn <Mary.Persynvalpo.edu> Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2008 20:23:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 16

My Mom said that her mother gave her kerosene with sugar for sore throats. Mom lived to be 86, but she always blamed the kerosene for her

stomach troubles. This was in South Bend Indiana.

Mary

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Subject: Re: DDT - NQR] From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2008 22:14:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 17

My Iowa Grandmother used to make a salve of turpentine and lard that she put on cuts. Hurt like the devil. Shari in NC

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Subject: Suggested Reading From: <gpconklincharter.net> Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2008 20:54:42 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Judy,

I'm reading "Engines of Change: The American Industrial Revolution 1790-1860", It's an oldie...1986, Published by the Smithsonian. It is worth a trip to the Library. funny, 5 years ago I would not have given it a second look.

Kimberly Wulfert's article in Folk Art Magazine "The Man of Many Vases..John Hewson Calico Printer " sparked my interest in the time period. Also, recommend her article, the real gems are in her Notes... It is worth ordering the Fall 2007 magazine from the American folk Art Museum.

Pam O'Fallon, IL

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Subject: DDT From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 05:33:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

When Teddy brought up DDT and childhood, I thought she was going to talk about how kids (at least in my NC neighborhood) used to run directly behind the mosquito-fogging trucks in the summer inhaling who-knows-what every chance we got.

Andi, now in Paducah, KY

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Subject: DDT From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Thu, 10 

Ditto snitching ice chips from the dirty floor of the truck while ice man delivered ice on his route. Sanitation at its worst and every mother warned about not eating these filthy coated germy pieces of ice. But on a hot summer's day....................

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Subject: Re: DDT From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 10:44:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

I'm part of the Sister Study (looking for causes of breast cancer). One of the hundreds of questions they ask is whether, as a child, you ever ran behind the insecticide spraying truck. Since I grew up in the mountains of Northeastern PA I was not presented with that temptation. Cinda on the Eastern Shore where the fogging truck comes at dusk several times each summer. Everyone stays inside in the AC.

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Subject: RE: starch From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 09:53:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Don and list The stiffness may be from lack of moisture - which makes the fabrics "crispy". I suppose some one could have starched the fabric at some point - but not a good thing as it tends to attract critters. The stiffness could also be from the sizing or other finishing used on fabrics. Can you tell if it has been washed?

The problem with quilting older fabrics is that the fibers have lost much of their elasticity and thus the tension of the thread on the brittle fibers cause the quilting line to tear in a short time ( within 5 years). I say this as a point of information - not as any kind of judgement.

You might try hydrating the tops. Hydrating frequently makes the fabric supple enough to take aneedle and thread. It is a simple proceedure: Layout on a surface large enough to hold it fully supported. Arrange shallow bowls of water around the item. Cover the whole with a piece of painters' plastic drop cloth (or garbage bag cut up for a smaller object) Keep the plastic from touching the object - I use candle sticks as up rights! - while ensuring that the plastic surrounds the object and no outside air can get in. Leave it in place and let the natural evaporation of the water do its magic.

It should take about a day - check it periodically to be sure no condensation appears on the plastic. You want the chamber to be about 70-80% relative humidity. This really does wonders for brittle fibers. (This is the same idea as leaving your houseplants in the shower covered by a drycleaner bag when you leave town for two or three weeks).

Best Newbie Richardson

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Subject: e-dress From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 11:44:12 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi all;

Does anyone have Joyce Fisher's e-dress? I tried contacting her at the last one I had, the same one listed in the AQSG directory and it came back "No Such Address".

Jan

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Subject: NQR but you guys were talking about it first..... From:

When one of us kids had a chest cold, my mother would haul out a jar of a noxious home-made greenish/black salve. It was her own concoction made from cooking down Dock Weed. You got a hand towel on your chest first and then a generous 'goop' of Dock Weed salve followed by another towel. It was like being buried in swamp mud. After you survived that, a mustard plaster was almost a relief. I was also dosed with a crunchy Old Crow whiskey and hard rock candy cocktail until she realized that I had strep throat and tonsillitis. There was truly a reason I would start running when I saw her coming with the whiskey bottle! Mom was an herbalist and a very tough lady. She believed going to the hospital was necessary if she couldn't stitch it up herself and blood was spurting. Not an herbalist myself, I will take a pill at the slightest ache. Pepper

-- Pepper Cory www.peppercory.com peppercory.blogspot.com quiltflapper.blogspot.com Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 09, 2008 From: Karen Ruebusch <kkruebuschearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 14:49:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

What is the URL address to download the instructions on pest control?

Karen

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Subject: RE: URL for NPS Conserve O Grams From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 12:45:20 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9

Good afternoon, QHLers - Here's the link to the Table of Contents of the NPS Conserve O Grams series:

http://tinyurl.com/5n84ph

Just scroll down to Section 3 to get to the 'Freezing Process' one. Also check out Section 21. Disaster Response & Recovery. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

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Subject: RE: Marking on white From: "Jean Carlton" <

First reminder is to mark as lightly as possible -(guess why I mention = that first!) You DO need to see it but I mark lightly and then as I get to the area = - if it's a bit hard to see, I re-mark by dragging the needle itself = along the line just a few inches ahead of where I'm going. Works great. I have tried various pencils and recently heard of a new one - It's = called General's Sketch & Wash USA #588 All Surface Graphite - it does = not give a super fine line but you can resharpen frequently. I did a = test on white with it, a mechanical pencil I got at a quilt shop, the = Verithin brand pencils I get at art stores ( I use metallic silver) and = the black mechanical pencil called the Ultimate Marking Pencil which I = have liked using for it's fine line. -.I tried light, medium and heavy lines and then washed. The Generals = came out completely. All are quite good when marked lightly - and I = find that the depression of the actual quilting line hides a faint line = anyway. A local quilt shop carries the Generals but I also found it at art = stores and recently in the art supplies section of JoAnn's - where you = may have a coupon. Trial and error over time - there are always new ideas and each quilter = has her favorite. As an aside, I read somewhere that one should quilt just along the side = of the marked line rather than right on top of it - the thread can pick = up the graphite and make it harder to remove. Jean

------=_NextPart_000_00D9_01C8E2B4.2077C550--

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Subject: Books From: Susan Riley <blackeyedsewsanyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 16:06:08 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 11

Margaret & all-for a woman's point of view for the 1760's in Boston/Cape Cod Bound is the newest from Sally Gunning about colonial indenture's cruelties and woman's plight during this era.(4.08) The setting is Satucket Village, now Brewster on Cape Cod. I read this first and went back to read Widow's War about lawful rights to=A0 the standard "widow's third." The characters are continued in Bound but the 2 do not need to be read in order. I learned quite a lot a= bout a woman's standing in the community during this era of beginning troub= les with the mother country. Aside from the laws & their unfairness, the issue of taxation of dress goods was most interesting creating a need for spinning a= gain. Susan Riley, Hingham MA

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Subject: Re: Re kkk quilt From: MargaretFaheyaol.com Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 19:49:23 EDT X-Message-Number: 12

My dad's folks were in Michigan farming outside a small town. My grandmother wrote letters to the editor in the local paper condemning the KKK in that area. They were anti catholic. They rode out to the farm and tried to terrorize her, but it would have taken more than that it seems. Before long the head of the KKK ran off with the pastor's wife and the money in the treasury. It seemed to end their era in that section of Mich.

Margaret in upstate NY on a lovely summer evening

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Subject: Conserve O Gram / Question? From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 20:10:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

The link to the list of Conserve O Grams is http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/publications/conserveogram/cons_toc.html

The headings include: Museum Collection Preservation; Security, Fire and Curatorial Safety; Agents of Deterioration (which is the section 3/6 that covers freezing for pest control); Museum Collections Storage; Ethnographic Objects; Archeological Objects; Furniture and Wooden Objects; Ceramic, Glass and Plastic Objects; Leather and Skin Objects; Metal Objects; Natural History Specimens; Paintings; Paper Objects; Photographs; Stone Objects; Textile Objects; Packing and Shipping Museum Objects; Museum Exhibits; Archival and Manuscript Collections and Rare Books; Facility Specifications for Museum and Archive Collections; Disaster Response and Recovery.

So far every one I've read has been interesting - I knew about DDT's use for insect control but I had no idea it was used to sterilize hospital instruments.

However, out of all of the useful information I could not find the answer to a current dilemma: After loaning one of my quilt documentation books to a trusted friend it finally came home today - unfortunately it reeks of a smell I can only describe as that disgusting odor in motel rooms that allow smoking. My daughter was thumbing through the book this evening on our way to make our weekly extortion payment to the oil companies. With all the windows in the car wide open the smell still wafted by.

Does anyone have any suggestions for ridding a valued book of cigarette smells?

Greta

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Subject: RE: ridding cigarette smells (was: Conserve O Gram / Question?) From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 17:56:05 -0700 X-Message-Number: 15

Good evening, QHLers - I would recommend obtaining MicroChamber interleaving paper from Conservation Resources. Here is a link to the product:

http://tinyurl.com/nk6dq 

For less than $30, you'll get enough interleaving paper to do the job. You must be patient of course. You wrap the book (interleaving pages would probably be a good idea) and then put the wrapped book in a relatively air-tight container (such as one of those extra-large Ziploc bags or a Rubbermaid container). Leave alone inside your house for a week or so. Take out book, unwrap and sniff. If it still smells, discard that batch of interleaving paper and re-wrap/interleaf pages again with a new batch of the MicroChamber interleaving paper and repeat.

My experience with smoke-damaged textiles and books has been just amazing. Really works well. Plus no chance of getting kitty litter, charcoal or soap (folk remedies) on the book. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

 

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Subject: RE: Marking on white From: KJB139aol.com Date: Fri, 11 

I, too, like the Generals Sketch and Wash and have been using them for a few years now with no problem. I even goofed and ironed something that I had marked but the marking came out in the wash with no problem. They are fairly economical to buy as well and I love the little sharpener that comes with each set of two pencils. I have found them at Michaels Arts and Crafts so you could also use a coupon.

Kathy B

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Subject: The Sister Study (NQR) From: "Lucinda Cawley" 

The Sister Study exams the role of the environmnet, heredity and lifestyle in the development of breast cancer. The goal is to involve 50,000 women from all walks of life who have a blood sister (full or half sister, living or dead) diagnosed with breast cancer. Study participants themselves CANNOT have ever been diagnosed with breast cancer. This project is longitudinal and will monitor participants for 10 years through periodic health updates. Enrollment depends on your age, race, income, education, location, etc.; the goal is a diverse population. There is a considerable time commitment at the beginning (3 hours of phone interviews, lots of forms to fill out, an in-home visit by a study examiner). Much less time is required after the initial enrollment. The website is www.sisterstudy.org. The phone # is 1-877-474-7837. My sister Dodo told me about the project before she died. I like that idea that I can still do something for her. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Removal of smoke odors = Odor Eaters From: lfrihartcox.net Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 11:07:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Our quilt guild received an entry that reeked of cigarette smoke. Rather than disqualify the quilt, one of the members bought Odor Eaters = and cut one into narrow strips. She placed the quilt in a black trash bag and tied the Odor Eater strip into the top of the bag so that it = would not touch the quilt. When she opened the bag, the odor was gone. This odor removal method has been used with success numerous times. I = would suggest checking the bag every 12 hours or so to avoid moisture build-up. This method of removing smoke odor has to be considered unorthodox, but it works.

Linda Frihart

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Subject: RE: Removal of smoke odors = Odor Eaters From:  

Good morning, QHLers - Makes sense since OdorEaters insoles have activated charcoal incorporated as part of their construction. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

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Subject: more Hewson From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <

Hi Pam,

Yesterday you mentioned my Hewson article in FOLK ART Magazine. It so happens that the next aspect of my research to be published is around the corner. It will be in The Magazine ANTIQUES, in their August issue, which comes out August 1.

The information in this article is not a repeat. It introduces new research only and for the first time anywhere, including some of the photographs. I've been investigating this aspect for nearly 5 years. I hope you will enjoy it too. I have more in the works.

Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD

New Pathways into Quilt History

www.antiquequiltdating.com

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Subject: Framed quilts defined From: louise-b <vlbequetmcmsys.com> Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 19:33:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

I don't remember if someone did define framed quilts but in the Jan/Feb 98 issue, p. 10, of Sew Many Quilts, Janet Rae was quoted as saying in Quilt Treasures of Great Britain that the center part was a fairly small unit with many borders around it. The Medallion quilt has a major center design, often set on point, that covers a large portion of the bed and usually has two or three borders.

Interesting difference!

Louise Bequette - in mid-Missouri

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Subject: sister study From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com> Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 15:51:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Cinda, I too am part of the Sister Study but I don't remember that particular question. Maybe it only followed if you said you grew up in a particular place or environment which Long Island didn't fit? They did have lots of strange questions, and the ones I remember are detailed questions about cosmetic use at certain ages, and hair treatments, ditto. I hope your sister's a survivor of breast cancer, as mine is. Our other sister's also in the study. A very worthwhile project. Jean in MN

 

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Subject: RE: Marking on white From: KJB139aol.com Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 09:40:56 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

I, too, like the Generals Sketch and Wash and have been using them for a few years now with no problem. I even goofed and ironed something that I had marked but the marking came out in the wash with no problem. They are fairly economical to buy as well and I love the little sharpener that comes with each set of two pencils. I have found them at Michaels Arts and Crafts so you could also use a coupon.

Kathy B

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Sister Study (NQR) From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 12:39:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

The Sister Study exams the role of the environmnet, heredity and lifestyle in the development of breast cancer. The goal is to involve 50,000 women from all walks of life who have a blood sister (full or half sister, living or dead) diagnosed with breast cancer. Study participants themselves CANNOT have ever been diagnosed with breast cancer. This project is longitudinal and will monitor participants for 10 years through periodic health updates. Enrollment depends on your age, race, income, education, location, etc.; the goal is a diverse population. There is a considerable time commitment at the beginning (3 hours of phone interviews, lots of forms to fill out, an in-home visit by a study examiner). Much less time is required after the initial enrollment. The website is www.sisterstudy.org. The phone # is 1-877-474-7837. My sister Dodo told me about the project before she died. I like that idea that I can still do something for her. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Removal of smoke odors = Odor Eaters From: lfrihartcox.net Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 11:07:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Our quilt guild received an entry that reeked of cigarette smoke. Rather than disqualify the quilt, one of the members bought Odor Eaters = and cut one into narrow strips. She placed the quilt in a black trash bag and tied the Odor Eater strip into the top of the bag so that it = would not touch the quilt. When she opened the bag, the odor was gone. This odor removal method has been used with success numerous times. I = would suggest checking the bag every 12 hours or so to avoid moisture build-up. This method of removing smoke odor has to be considered unorthodox, but it works.

Linda Frihart

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Removal of smoke odors = Odor Eaters From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 11:02:56 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Good morning, QHLers - Makes sense since OdorEaters insoles have activated charcoal incorporated as part of their construction. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: more Hewson From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" 

Hi Pam,

Yesterday you mentioned my Hewson article in FOLK ART Magazine. It so happens that the next aspect of my research to be published is around the corner. It will be in The Magazine ANTIQUES, in their August issue, which comes out August 1.

The information in this article is not a repeat. It introduces new research only and for the first time anywhere, including some of the photographs. I've been investigating this aspect for nearly 5 years. I hope you will enjoy it too. I have more in the works.

Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD

New Pathways into Quilt History

www.antiquequiltdating.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Framed quilts defined From: louise-b <vlbequetmcmsys.com> Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 19:33:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

I don't remember if someone did define framed quilts but in the Jan/Feb 98 issue, p. 10, of Sew Many Quilts, Janet Rae was quoted as saying in Quilt Treasures of Great Britain that the center part was a fairly small unit with many borders around it. The Medallion quilt has a major center design, often set on point, that covers a large portion of the bed and usually has two or three borders.

Interesting difference!

Louise Bequette - in mid-Missouri

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: sister study From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com> Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 15:51:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Cinda, I too am part of the Sister Study but I don't remember that particular question. Maybe it only followed if you said you grew up in a particular place or environment which Long Island didn't fit? They did have lots of strange questions, and the ones I remember are detailed questions about cosmetic use at certain ages, and hair treatments, ditto. I hope your sister's a survivor of breast cancer, as mine is. Our other sister's also in the study. A very worthwhile project. Jean in MN

 

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Subject: RE: Previous post. From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 07:20:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

Hi Lisa. Did the cloth of honor really exist? or was it just the artist's addition to the painting? and if this is a dumb question, my apologies. Best regards, Sharron............................ ..............in waaayyy too hot Spring, TX............................ -

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Subject: RE: Previous post. From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 09:45:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

That's what I'm trying to determine. There's a cluster of paintings, almost all of them by Florentine artists, that show cloths of honor with geometric patterning that looks astonishingly like pieced work. There's also a surviving cloth of honor from late 14th century Hungary that is pieced.

The evidence is so scanty that I hesitate to say that yes, there's a good chance that these textiles were pieced. But it's definitely a possibility. E-mail me privately if you want more links and I'll show you what I've found.

Lisa

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Subject: framed central medallions From: "Newbie Richardson" <

Jean and list, It maybe that we will need to specify whether a framed medallion quilt is British or American in order to "frame" the discussion ( sorry couldn't resist.). As Jean correctly pointed out, the British quilt making tradition has taken the concept of frames to the "N"th degree! I have seen them with as many as 17 or 19 (depending on where you start) frames.

Newbie Richardson

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Subject: RE: Previous post. From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 10:14:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

What we need is a genuine art historian with an expertise in textiles and clothing. I will email a colleague the link and your posts and see if he responds.

Newbie

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Subject: Summer Reading From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 12:23:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Thanks to all of you for your great suggestions for reading this summer. I have a list of all of them and am checking availability at my library. Should be an interesting Reading Club this summer if I get through most of these. Judy Knorr

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Subject: Re: Summer Reading From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 10:16:32 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

One of the best books I've read about textiles is *Women's Work: the first 20,000 years* I did a review on my blog in 2007: http://winnowings.blogspot.com/2007/02/womens-work.html 

Christine Thresh on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com

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Subject: Pomegranate From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 14:33:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Responding a week late to Nancy Hahn's question about Pom/Love Apple blocks. I have a circa 1870 example from south central PA (probably Dauphin County). There are 36 10-1/2" blocks. 16 are arranged to give the appearance of a 4 block center. The remaining 20 blocks are set facing in alternating directions as a border. The appliques (done by machine) are pink, yellow and green on brown, yellow and beige floral print background. I'll try to post a picture. Cinda on the Eastern Shore timidly approaching technology

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Subject: I did it!!!!! From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 15:27:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Checkout my Pomegranate quilt on the eboard. Cinda proud of herself on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Cinda and technology From: "Jean Carlton"

Yea! Cinda - RAh! RAh! rah! Glad you have mastered this - Though I do hope your verbal descriptions = don't go by the wayside..... jean

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Subject: rooms for seminar From: deedadikatt.net Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 20:12:42 +0000 X-Message-Number: 10

Hi all, Sorry for the blank messages. Don't know about such things. I am sending this as plain text as Kris suggested. At this point there are rooms available for every day of the seminar. If you were quoted a higher rate earlier in the week, call back and request the lower rate. Those of you who haven't registered for the AQSG seminar, do it now both for the seminar itself and the hotel. The study centers and tours are being assigned this week with the registrations already received. You should have your schedules in about 2 weeks. The city of Columbus is hosting several big events the weekend of the seminar and the hotel is getting requests for rooms. PLEASE call the hotel for your reservation soon!!!

We will have 8 tours and 16 study centers and over 400 quilts to see at Quilts of the Midwest: Creations of Art and Utility. Come join the fun. Dee and Molly, local co-chairs -- 614-861-0478 Web site: deedadik.home.att.net

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Subject: Re: Cinda and technology From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 17:01:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Thanks Jean. Encouragement always appreciated. C.

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Subject: RE: Previous post. From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 18:25:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

It's funny how things happen. I went to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston today to see a new exhibit "In the Forest of Fountainebleau: Painters and Photographers from Corot to Monet". I have to admit, after the first dozen pictures of the forest, I was tired of trees.

But, as I was leaving, there was a room full of what appeared to be Catholic statues and paintings. One of the paintings was in the mode of the "Maestro delle Immagini Dominicane." There were three panes and a lot of gold leaf. I didn't get a chance to really look at it (as I was being pulled out the door by my friend) but it reminded me of your website link. I came home to try and find more information on it online at the museums website but there's nothing on it. Rats!

Anyway, it was fun to see something that was familiar.

Best regards, Sharron

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Subject: RE: Previous post. From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 18:28:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

OH, I guess your link didn't have just three panels. What I say merely resembled what you were showing us on the link.

Yes, send me more links.

Best regards, Sharron

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Subject: RE: Previous post. From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 23:44:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

Here are some links. I apologize for the length....

Lisa Evans

Attributed to Cimabue, Madonna and Child with SS John the Baptist and Peter, c. 1290.

http://www.nga.gov/cgi-bin/pinfo?Object=41402+0+none 

Taddeo Gaddi, The Marriage of the Virgin (right-hand scene), 1328-1330. The textile hanging behind the Virgin was first tentatively identified as pieced by Willow Soltow in the early 1990s. I've seen it from a distance of about three feet, and it certainly looks pieced to me, not woven.

http://www.wga.hu/art/g/gaddi/taddeo/croce/3life_v.jpg 

Salon of the Parrots, from the Palazzo Davanzati (late 14th century). http://www.museumsinflorence.com/foto/palazzo%20davanzati/palazzo-davanzati-4.jpg 

http://www.museumsinflorence.com/foto/palazzo%20davanzati/davanzati-8.jpg 

http://www.polomuseale.firenze.it/english/immagini/musei/banner/29.jpg 

Annuciation, by Bernardo Daddi (first quarter of the 14th century)

http://cartelen.louvre.fr/pub/fr/image/1358_p0003581.001.jpg 

Details from the Coronation of the Virgin, by the Master of the Dominican Effigies, early 14th century.

http://www.polomuseale.firenze.it/xlimage/1890/xlimg.php? 

http://www.polomuseale.firenze.it/xlimage/1890/xlimg.php? 

The Annunciation, by Taddeo Gaddi, early 14th century (details)

http://www.polomuseale.firenze.it/xlimage/1890-fullscreen/  http://www.polomuseale.firenze.it/xlimage/1890-fullscreen/ 

 

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Subject: RE: Previous post. From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2008 10:30:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Here's an off-the-wall thought. In so many of the paintings, where the fabric is attached to the top of the walls, the heaviness of the wallhanging makes a "scallop" as it hangs from the nail. I wonder if that's where the idea of finishing a quilt with scallops came from. It's scary how my mind works sometimes.

Fabulous pictures. Thank you for sharing these websites with me. I'm insanely jealous that you've seen some of these things close up and in person.

Best regards, Sharron

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Subject: summer reading From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2008 14:14:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I second Christine Thresh's comments. Women's Work... is at the very top of my list of good and very readable and interesting textile-related books. You won't be sorry you read it, even though you won't be able to put it down until you've finished it.

Happy reading,

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE