Subject: Frame quilt definition From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2008 15:54:02 +0100 

I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to ask Dorothy Osler,  author of 'Traditional British Quilts', about this discussion on the  list. I have her permission to post this:

<<I thought long and hard about this when I wrote TBQ [Traditional  British Quilts] because I drew up a classification of quilts based on =

design and what was then (early 1980s) current parlance. I had a  quandary because the US term centre medallion quilt was by then in  common use but Averil Colby had consistently used the term framed  quilt for this type of quilt. I also needed a term to define the type  of wholecloth quilt that has a large single frame, usually of chintz  and with mitred corners; these were a popular early 20th century style.

So...my solution was to use the term central medallion for quilts =

with a centre piece and a series of framed borders, consistent with  American usage, and to use the term framed quilt for a quilt with a  wholecloth centre and a single border frame. But others have not  followed this and the Colby term has remained in general use in  Britain.>>

Sally Ward

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Subject: Need help with quilt history search function From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2008 11:48:19 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I developed a search of quilt history sites a while ago but after adding the new Illinois Quilt History site it occurred to me that I may be missing some other great sites. Please scan through this list to see if you know of a site I should add then let me know. I apologize for the ads that Google puts in but they charge $100 a year for an ad free search.

You can find the search at http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/quilt-history-search.htm I use it when I am looking for quilt history information and you may find it handy for yourself as well. I want to make the search as complete as possible. Judy Breneman

illinoisquilthistory.com/ patternsfromhistory.com/ cla.purdue.edu/ straw.com louisianafolklife.org/ oldstatehouse.com/ museum.msu.edu/ dhr.dos.state.fl.us/ collections.rmsc.org/ valley.vcdh.virginia.edu/ smithsonianmag.com/ sunbonnetsue.com/ nebraskahistory.org/ mdhs.org/ museum.state.il.us/ americanhistory.si.edu/ reddawn.net/ xroads.virginia.edu/ shellyquilts.com/ sil.si.edu/ roberteshaw.com/ quiltersmuse.com/ quiltershalloffame.org/ hartcottagequilts.com/ fabrics.net/ wiquiltmuseum.com/ quiltindex.org/ historyofquilts.com/ womenfolk.com/ antiquequiltdating.com/ quiltstudy.org/ loc.gov/ammem/qlthtml/ centerforthequilt.org/ osv.org/ quiltethnic.com/ quilthistory.com/ americanhistory.si.edu/ museum.msu.edu/ quiltindex.org/ patternsfromhistory.com/ usualdays.blogspot.com/ quiltersspirit.blogspot.com/ antiquequiltdatingguides.com/

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Subject: Summer Reading - Newbie's Book From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2008 19:39:12 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

Newbie: Marla Miller's 'Needle's Eye' is online in PDF to download in full. http://scholarworks.umass.edu/umpress_tne/1/  Jan 

Newbie Richardson wrote;

I am back from protracted travels and thought I would add three titles to the great list of books already mentioned over the course of the past week. Marla R. Miller's, "The Needle's Eye: Women and Work in the Age of Revolution" Univ. Mass. Press 2006 (paperback) Through account books, diaries, and all manner of other existing records, the author reinterprets data of 18th and early 19th c records to reveal the "hidden" female economy of needlework and dressmaking in New England ( the Connecticut River Valley). Among other things she goes into great depth about "quiltings" ( mostly as they related to quilted petticoats). This thing reads like a series of connected essays and is a MUST read for any student of women's history. She is a scholar in the mold of Laurel Thatcher Ulrich - who was one of her advisors.

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Subject: Re: Frame quilt definition Dorothy Osler From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2008 21:01:13 -

How great, Sally, for you to make the contact with Dorothy and to share her current thoughts with us. The distinction between U.S. and British terminology is interesting. I tend to refer to a quilt with a central focus surrounded by frames - pieced or not - as a 'framed medallion'. To some this must seem like a pointless discussion but I am glad to have some input. Our Minnesota study group has chosen the Medallion quilt as our November topic of study and added a challenge to all members to create a medallion quilt so I have become interested in the varying terminology I see as I read, study and make my examples. Just like potato chips -I don't think I'll be able to stop at just one. Jean

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Subject: Re: Need help with quilt history search function From: rgnixonoct.net Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2008 00:18:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I don't see these on the list, Judy Anne. They're both terrific sites. Kindly, Gloria Nixon

Century of Quilts: North Dakota Quilt Project http://www.prairiepublic.org:8080/quilts/browse.htm 

Wisconsin Historical Museum Online Collections http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/museum/collections/online/  ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Frame quilt definition Dorothy Osler From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2008 09:43:02 +0100 X-Message-Number: 2

On 16 Jul 2008, at 03:01, Jean Carlton wrote:

> How great, Sally, for you to make the contact with Dorothy and to > share her current thoughts with us. > To some this must seem like a pointless discussion but I am glad to > have some input.

I am waiting with interest to see how quilt terminology (of all sorts) will be used in the labelling, guides and publications to accompany the V&A's landmark exhibition in 2010, because terms used there will undoubtedly become a future benchmark. Its all about 'common usage' really, isn't it. We could debate it here for a year and possibly (although unlikely <G>) reach a conclusion, but if one person somewhere uses a term in a widely read publication it could all change again. It is all part of the nature of language (and, dare I say, myth).

Quiltmaking and the needle arts do not contain immutable truths in the way that physics and maths do (although my DS would argue that neither do those disciplines) so its a good thing that quilters like to talk and debate and research and record. I know embroiderers who get just as exercised over the names of stitches <G>.

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 15, 2008 From: "Janice" <freitascomteck.com> Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2008 07:42:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

So glad to see a list of history sites! Just a reminder, we are gearing up and the annual quilt celebration in Marion, IN starts tomorrow morning.

There is room left in some lectures and workshops, however food events are closed to more reservations.

Bev Dunivent is here, Georgia Bonesteel will be in today, and Eleanor Burns is on the way. Have some great items in the Friday night auction.

I'm anxious to have some time to explore those history sites! I also like the tips on books to read.....my other passion in life - reading.

Janice

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Subject: Re: Pomegranate From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2008 11:32:34 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

Catching up or trying to. I have a Love Apple variant that has to be pre-1860 with 9 core blocks. The center of each block is like that of a reel with the Pom/Love Apple facing each corner of the block, off the four points of the reel. The 9 blocks, each 22" square are set off with saw tooth edges and originally had 11...yes, 11 - 2" strip borders making it 110" square. It was the first quilt I bought for the grand total of $40. Unfortunately, the faces of just the outer 8 borders were totally shredded (weird) so I cut them off, for which I could shoot myself now (I didn't even save them). Had I at least saved the white backing, I could have rebound it without it looking newly done. Miss L. Apple has resided with me for about 25 years during which time she has been frequently refolded, caressed and softly told that I love her despite a few thin areas and I'm sorry I amputated 16" off each of her sides. I don't subscribe to ageism so she is more beautiful than ever even without her binding. I'll post her pic.

Jan

Lucinda Cawley wrote:

> > Responding a week late to Nancy Hahn's question about Pom/Love > > Apple blocks. I have a circa 1870 example from south central PA > > (probably Dauphin County). There are 36 10-1/2" blocks. 16 are

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Subject: Blogs, etc are great for the quilt history search From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2008 10:33:30 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

I posted a list of sites I have on my Quilt History Search yesterday but I wanted to add that anything with quilt history information that you know is reliable is welcome. Many of you have blogs or personal sites with good info in them so let me know about those. My http://usualdays.blogspot.com/ includes clothing history, history of everyday life and other entries as well as quilt history. I don't see that as a problem as they can refine their search if they find something not quilt related.

Also did I mention that anyone is welcome to use this search? http://www.womenfolk.com/historyofquilts/quilt-historysearch.htm I just stumbled on the ability to do a search like this when I was setting up a search just for my site. I was so tired of having to wade through incorrect webpages when looking for information, especially on certain topics we know so well. ;) Hopefully we can get school teachers and students to use it.

I really do think we are making progress in educating the public. I haven't had an email from a student saying they are working on an assignment about Underground Railroad quilts for a long time.

Judy Breneman

PS Jean, I really like the 'framed medallion' term for medallion quilt. I think it makes it clearer to someone just learning about quilt styles.

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Subject: Re: Pomegranate From: arkelchneralanrkelchner.com Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2008 13:43:36 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Don't feel too badly. I did the samwe to a c1800 broderie perse, taking the boutside border down by half because it was unsalvagable (sp?). That took nerves of steel, also cutting into the same vintage chintz. I finished the job and not knowing what to do with the borders, I saved them. So maybe 10 years later I *still* have the pieces. No idea what to do with them, but I cant bear to throw them away.

I know - would anyone like to have them?

Alan gonna have to dig them out now.......

>Unfortunately, the faces of just the outer 8 borders were > totally shredded (weird) so I cut them off, > Jan >

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Subject: Peace and Plenty From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2008 21:00:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Is there a picture in the York County book of the quilt with the back that inspired the Peace and Plenty repro? Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: UGRR Novella From: Pat Cummings <patquiltersmuse.com> Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2008 09:46:28 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

A couple of weeks ago, a woman wrote to say that she was planning to write a Novella, based on the colorful quilt blocks of the Underground Railroad. She liked the story. She had also read my website's articles about the topic and agreed with me. I'd presented strong supporting evidence that quilts were not used by escaping slaves.

I wrote back to say that the legend has become more ingrained in the American psyche partially due to the "innocent" books for children that promote the myth.

Her return e-mail stated that she has changed her mind and will not continue writing the book.

Patricia Cummings Quilter's Muse Publications http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

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Subject: New Book From: blackeyedsewsanyahoo.com Date: Thu, 17 

To All-I may be retiring from the library field on 9.15 after 43 years, but old book habits die hard... Barbara Brackman has a new source book coming out on August 5th for $29.95

Making History - Quilts & Fabric from 1890-1970: 9 Reproduction Quilt Projects - Historic Notes & Photographs - Dating Your Quilts http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1571204539/quiltweb/  Susan Riley, Hingham MA

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Subject: RE: UGRR Novella From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2008 13:17:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Ya!!!! One for the good guys!

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Subject: Re: UGRR Novella From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com> Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2008 15:11:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

The truth will prevail - most of the time - thank goodness for all of you quilters who keep the truth alive. Mitzi from hot Vermont (even too hot to sew!)

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Subject: electric rotary cutter From: "Newbie Richardson" 

Good morning list, I am hoping a few of you are familiar enough with electric rotary cutters to give me a few words of wit and wisdom. I last used a stand up model 25 years ago, and all my sources for information about these units are no more. Back then I was cutting out up to 8 layers of Ultra-Suede - which was very stressful on the blades.

The list of possible brands and price points is all over the map on line. HELP!

I need a unit that can cut up to 12 layers of plain weave cotton - only straight lines. As I am only 5' tall. I guess it needs to be relatively light weight. It will probably be in operation for only a few hours a couple of times a week. I need for it to have a easy off and on switch as I will be cutting across a length of fabric and will need to stop in mid cut and walk aaround to the other side of the table. I have retracable extension cord above my cutting table, so the cord getting in the way should not an issue.

One unit that did look like it might do is the Gemsy RXM 100 - do any of you have one of these? Do you like it?

Because I live in the Washington DC area, we do not have much in the way of manufacturing suppliers for apparel - (we manufacture hot air!) so I can't go to a shop and "play" with one.

Thanks

Newbie Richardson

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Subject: RE: Removal of smoke odors Odor Eaters From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2008 10:31:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I want to report that the Odor Eater strip worked quite well. Since the book could be replaced (but who wants to spend $$$ on a second copy) I was willing to experiment. I put the Odor Easter strip wrapped in muslin with the book and a silica packet into a large re-sealable bag and left the book for most of a week. No more odor - thank goodness.

Thank you to everyone for your suggestions . . .

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle - Looking forward to visiting the quilt exhibit in Muncy, PA this weekend!

-----Original Message----- She placed the quilt in a black trash bag and tied the Odor Eater strip into the top of the bag so that it would not touch the quilt. When she opened the bag, the odor was gone.

Linda Frihart

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Subject: Re: Summer Reading - American History From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2008 10:55:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Thank you Newbie for suggesting Marla Miller's book, "The Needle's Eye," and thanks to Jan Thomas who posted the web site where the entire book could be downloaded. I've printed the entire book (2 pages to 1 sheet of paper, single sided) and have already had it spiral bound at Staples. I'm looking forward to many quiet hours of reading. Judy Grow

> Marla R. Miller's, "The Needle's Eye: Women and Work in the Age of > Revolution" Univ. Mass. Press 2006 (paperback) Through account books, > diaries, and all manner of other existing records, the author reinterprets > data of 18th and early 19th c records to reveal the "hidden" female > economy > of needlework and dressmaking in New England ( the Connecticut River > Valley). Among other things she goes into great depth about "quiltings" ( > mostly as they related to quilted petticoats).

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Subject: Re: New Book From: Judy Schwender 

Hi all, We have this in the museum gift shop. Excellent book (as all of Barbara's books are.) Judy Schwender National Quilt Museum (Museum of the American Quilter's Society) Paducah, KY

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Subject: Mexican Quilt Design Inspirations From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2008 11:36:37 -0600 I just had to share this with you all. This is a video taken by an Australian Quilter who visited a Quilt Group in Mexico City but the e-mail forwarded to me originated in OH. I'm trying to find out who she is now but if anyone knows please contact me.

Jan

http://www.thequiltshow.com/os/blog_video.php?video=pam1.html

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Subject: stain from wood From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2008 10:35:51 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

i am looking at purchasing a quilt that appears to have a stain from sitting on a wood shelf. so far i've only seen pictures, but it is an overall brownish tinge in a rectangular shape. as tho it had been folded and put on a shelf for storage.

if that is the case, is there any "tried and true" method for removing this type of stain? it is on the white background of a lone star quilt made with solid color diamonds. the quilting is beautiful and plentiful and i want to make an offer that takes into consideration the damaged area.

thank you so much. patti

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Subject: Re: stain from wood From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:08:22 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I have a quilt that has this, too, and was advised to send it to a conservator, which I will do as soon as I have the $.

Steph Higgins

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Subject: Re: Mexican Quilt Design Inspirations From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2008 15:17:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

What a beautiful little video. I had forgotton how beautiful Mexico was. I am sorry I don't know the quilter. Shari in NC

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Subject: RE: Mexican Quilt Design Inspirations From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:02:37 +1000 X-Message-Number: 9

The quilter is Pam Holland, who often teaches in the US. Here is her website FYI: http://web.mac.com/pamholland3/Pam_Holland_Designs/Welcome.html

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Yahoo! Auto Response From: akryhulrogers.com Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2008 21:08:13 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Hello, and thanks for your message. I am out of the office during the week of July 21, returning July 28. I will be pleased to respond to your message at that time.

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Subject: more books From: "Andi Reynolds" 

Review copies of the following are on my desk and look interesting:

Martha Skelton: Master Quilter of Mississippi by Mary Elizabeth Johnson, University Press of Mississippi with the Mississippi Quilt Association, 2008

http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1102

Album Quilts of Ohio's Miami Valley by Sue C. Cummings, Ohio University Press, available October 2008

This is the third title on the Ohio quilt series by OUP. The regionally identifiable quilts were made between 1888-1920. The author will be at AQSG in Columbus.

Andi, now in Paducah, KY

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Subject: The New England Quilt Museum ebay item From: "Julie Crossland" <quiltsappraisedcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2008 21:05:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Ebay item #160263044514

The New England Quilt Museum will be listing items for sale on ebay. The first item is a Japanese Quilt book. Please take a look.

Julie Crossland Hudson, NH

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Subject: stain from wood From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2008 11:49:26 -0400 

List, For years I would go down to our beach house at Easter - opening up the house as ait had been closed for the winter. My girls had white muslin nightgowns (I made smocked nightgowns - so cute!) We would get home to discover orange/rust/brown stains on the gowns - a mystery as where they came from - and totally impossible to remove, it was like the fabric had been dyed ( I even tried Rit dye remover and bleach! Nothing worked.)

I finally concluded that the stains came from wood stain that had leached out of the - old- wooden table the girls would brush against coming in and out of the dining room. I would get the same stain on my clothes at the same heigth as the stain on the girls nightgowns. It never happened during the summer or fall, just early spring when the wood had "leached" the chemical during the winter - or so we finally surmised. Not a sicentific answer - but very

So...be careful of stains from wood.

Newbie

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Subject: Re: stain from wood From: aol.com Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2008 21:12:11 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

 

Good advice! Stains like that are almost impossible to get out, especially if they've had a chance to set. Thanks, Newbie!

Lisa

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Subject: Mexican quilters From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sun, 20 Jul 

Good morning from hot Texas, The Australian quilter is Pam Holland. Another of her videos was posted on the ReproFabricLovers list yesterday featuring an extraordinary light show in Adelaide where historic buildings were bathed in William Morris designs. The site is _http://www.thequiltshow.com/os/articles_video.php?video=pam2.html_ (http://www.thequiltshow.com/os/articles_video.php?video=pam2.html) . I hope you enjoy this one as well. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth

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Subject: A Spray Starch, No Bugs Story From: blackeyedsewsanyahoo.com Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2008 05:44:47 -0700 

A little moment of humor: my friend Susan seems to only get to quilt when on vacation, a downside with a husband with a home business. In February on vacation, she went to pull out her spray starch from the suitcase and zip. Many "I know I packed it" moments then occured. This Friday (yes, July 18) she received a very formal document from The Transportation Board. Said spray starch can=A0had been removed from her suitcase with 3 paragraphs insuing as to the danger to all on board, national security etc etc. She knew her suitcases HAD been gone through but nary a note that something had been removed. Spray starch OR sizing users beware when going to workshops far away! Susan Riley, Hingham MA

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Subject: To those of you who know Teddy From: 

Teddy Pruett's brother passed away a couple days ago. He was her only sibling. Am sure she would appreciate a few kind words or card at this difficult time. I believe her snail mail address is on her website, _www.teddypruett.com_ (http://www.teddypruett.com)

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Subject: Spray starch and TSA From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2008 10:03:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Susan Riley wrote: <<A little moment of humor: my friend Susan seems to only get to quilt when on vacation, a downside with a husband with a home business. In February on vacation, she went to pull out her spray starch from the suitcase and zip. Many "I know I packed it" moments then occurred. This Friday (yes, July 18) she received a very formal document from The Transportation Board. Said spray starch can had been removed from her suitcase with 3 paragraphs ensuing as to the danger to all on board, national security etc etc. She knew her suitcases HAD been gone through but nary a note that something had been removed. Spray starch OR sizing users beware when going to workshops far away!>>

RESPONSE: My bet is that the spray starch was in a pressurized can with accelerant, and THAT is what made it dangerous. Better to make your own spray starch with diluted Argo liquid starch (available in the laundry section of the grocery store) and put it into a pump spray bottle. You could probably put enough to use into a 3-ounce bottle (allowed as a carry-on when placed in a 1-quart zipped plastic bag) or slightly larger if you put it into your checked baggage. Label it. Keep the spray bottle empty for traveling. You can always constitute the spray starch at the destination by adding water to the starch transferred to the spray bottle. Empty and toss the liquid before returning to the plane.

If you prefer spray sizing, use the Mary Ellen product, which comes in a terrific spray bottle, not a pressurized spray can. The smallest bottle, though, is too large for carry-on unless you transfer it to a smaller container. You will have to put the full-sized bottle into checked luggage, preferably wrapped in several layers of plastic bags.

I haven't tried to travel with any of the starch products. I'm thinking that it may be best to carry on small amounts and explain as you went through security what this liquid was rather than have it confiscated from checked luggage because it was a suspicious unidentifiable liquid. DON'T try to carry a pressurized can of anything in checked or carryon luggage. I think even spray deodorant is confiscated.

As an aside, I was asked in a market research about the Mary Ellen product if quilters would like to use it. I offered that yes, they would love it, but it was so expensive. I wasn't sure quilters would go for the expense. I was wrong. Many ARE willing to pay the extra to have something other than starch available for a spray bottle. And it smells nice. But we don't know yet the effect of the chemicals involved if the fabric is not washed after the quilt is made. Personally, I prefer ironing stiffness into my fabric for construction and usually intend (operative word) to wash it away once the quilt is finished. But there is something nostalgic to the scent of the Mary Ellen products.

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have made a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org

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Subject: spray starch From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2008 12:34:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I thought spray starch came in pump spray bottles these days!

Also, I am told there's something new on the market that's way better than spray starch and I know it comes in a pump bottle.

Anything with compressed air in a can is dangerous whether it's in a cargo hold or in your carry-on bag on an airplane. Matter of fact, I doubt you could get through screening if it is in your carry-on bag.

Thanks for the heads up from Susan Riley about this.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Re: spray starch From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2008 10:56:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

It's called Best Press and it is absolutely the cat's meow. I buy it by the gallon jug...

Kris

> Also, I am told there's something new on the market > that's way better than > spray starch and I know it comes in a pump bottle. >

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Subject: Re: spray starch From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com> 

Where? I have not seen it here.  Thanks Vivien in MA

________________________________

From: Kris Driessen [mailto:krisdriessenyahoo.com] Sent: Mon 7/21/2008 1:56 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: spray starch

It's called Best Press and it is absolutely the cat's meow. I buy it by the gallon jug...

Kris

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Subject: Re: spray starch From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2008 13:29:09 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Well, we carry Best Press in the shop. I don't think the gallon is cost effective to ship, but the bottle stuff isn't bad. Try a local quilt shop - if they don't have it, they really should.

Kris

--- On Mon, 7/21/08, Vivien Sayre <vsayrenesa.com> wrote:

> From: Vivien Sayre <vsayrenesa.com> > Subject: [qhl] Re: spray starch

> Where? I have not seen it here. >

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Subject: Pacific Northwest Quiltfest August 2008 From: Laura Robins-Morris <lrobinsscharp.org> Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2008 14:56:13 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

The event of the summer: the Pacific Northwest Quiltfest, in Seattle, WA August 8,9,10, 2008. 300 juried and judged quilts, the best in the Northwest (US and Canada) 5, count 'em *5*, special exhibits,

Lectures A La Carte, Workshops, Vendors galore, Gala dinner and auction, In our fabulous new location, the Washington State Convention Center.

And, new this year, a must-have photo CD of the quilts (produced by yours truly)

IT'S GOING TO BE A GREAT SHOW --- DON'T MISS IT !!!!

More info at http://www.apnq.org/ Or ask me.

Laura, in Seattle

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Subject: Ebay Item removed From: "Julie Crossland" <quiltsappraisedcomcast.net> Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2008 17:56:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Previous email "160263526364 item listed by the New England Quilt Museum is a rare, collectible, out of print book. A Joy Forever: Marie Webster's Quilt Patterns."

Ebay removed the listing for unknown reasons other than saying "all proceeds benefit the NEQM" was the problem. The funds were set to go directly into the Museum's account. I'll let you know when item (s) are relisted.

Julie Crossland

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Subject: RE: Pacific Northwest Quiltfest August 2008 From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2008 17:37:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Laura, are you going to have a cd for sale like you did last year? Keep me in mind if you do. I want to buy one. Thanks and best regards, Sharron..................... ............in hot hot hot Spring, TX.....................

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Subject: Spray sizing From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2008 

Is the Mary Ellen product a Mary Ellen Hopkins product or some other? Janet H in Fort Worth

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From: Kris Driessen [mailto:krisdriessenyahoo.com] Sent: Mon 7/21/2008 4:29 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: spray starch

Well, we carry Best Press in the shop. I don't think the gallon is cost effective to ship, but the bottle stuff isn't bad. Try a local quilt shop - if they don't have it, they really should.

Kris

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Subject: Europe Museum visits From: QuiltEvalsaol.com Date: Mon, 

 As some of you may recall earlier in the year I sent out a post regarding the France tour I was taking in the spring - in which I stated the curatorin Mulhouse who has been so kind in allowing full access by my groups into their study room with the 3,000,000 printed fabric samples is retiring.  There were some of you at that time who indicated interest in joining that  tour - which unfortunately was canceled. This curator who has been so  gracious to my groups is indeed retiring early next year, but before she leaves, she is hanging what may be considered by many to be her pi=E8ce de r=E9sistance exhibit; one of 16-19th century Indian hand painted and block printed chintzes, quilts and other printed items. 

The pieces come from the museum's vast collection, many of which were used to inspire France's own Indiennes (their versions of these same fabrics). In addition to the museum's own collection of chintzes, they will also exhibit pieces from the French East India Company, still in existence with their own very deep archives. The exhibit is saidto be incomparable to any other presentation of Indian chintz.  On December 1 of this year, I am taking a group to Mulhouse to see this  exhibit. In addition to the exhibit, we are invited to spend an additionalfull day in the study room with the thousands of sample books for our perusing. Photographs are always allowed and the study experience for dating quilts and fabrics is more than an eye-opener. 

In addition to the days spent in Mulhouse, the exhibit happens to coincide with a national exhibit of antique quilts at the Fries Museum in the Netherlands, An Moonen has spoken of it previously. Between the two lie several other museums of interest with quilts and textiles to satisfy everyone's fancy, including the Open Air Museum of Arnhem, Netherlands, which has opened its doors to allow the group extended study of their quilt, fabric and garment archives. Between the three, several other stops to see quilts and early fabrics are planned as are stops at merchantswho specialize in reproduction Dutch Chintz fabrics and another who I've been told has more than enough antique chintz fabrics and quilts stacked upon their shelves. B

eyond the quilts and fabrics - it is December and the European Christmas Markets will be open and in full swing at all of our stops.  I am in hopes that this is not my last quilt study tour to Europe, however it will be the last one with this delightful curator in Mulhouse who is so open to enthusiastic guests that she rolls out the red carpet to everyone.I cannot guarantee that the person who takes her place will be as generous with the textile treasure trove as she is and so it is my hope that as many of you who can will take advantage of this study opportunity. There is no doubt about the education it will give you as a researcher or quilt historian; you will return home with an entirely new perspective.  

For more information, please see the webpage at:  _http://worldofquiltstravel.com/Christmas.htm_ (http://worldofquiltstravel.com/Christmas.htm) 

 All the best, Deb Roberts