Subject: Help for Flooded Museums in Mid-West From: "Newbie 

The following was posted to Museum-L by AAM regarding help from AIC for flooded museums in the Midwest of the US.

Newbie Richardson (Via the Assoc. of Living History, Farm and Agricultural Museums (ALHFAM)

*********************

American Institute for Conservation--Collections Emergency Response Team

With support from the IMLS, the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) is offering 3 types of free assistance to cultural organizations affected by the recent floods. All of these services are available at no cost:

* Museums, libraries and archives can call AIC's 24-hour assistance number at 202-661-8068 for phone support from the Collections Emergency Response Team (CERT).

* AIC can also send in a CERT team to complete damage assessments and help with salvage organization.

* CERT members will develop a list of collections re-housing supplies needed by the institution, as well as have them ordered and delivered.

The supplies will be provided at no cost to the institution.

In 2007, AIC received funding from the Institute of Museum & Library Services (IMLS) to support an advanced training program for conservators and other museum professionals that resulted in a force of 60 "rapid responders" trained to assess damage and initiate salvage of cultural collections after a disaster has occurred. They are ready to assist.

Call AIC-CERT at 202.661.8068

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Subject: Delaware State Museum (long) From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2008 16:04:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

The Eastern Shore Quilt Study Group's second field trip to the DE State Museum in Dover was a rousing success. Ann Horsey was incredibly generous in allowing us to explore the best of the best of the Museum's collection of Delaware quilts. Our original plan was to look at late 19th and early 20th century quilts, but after Ann offered to bring out the masterpieces we didn't get much past 1860. A return visit is already in the planning stages. We arrived to find two 18th century Quaker quilted petticoats waiting for us. Both were seafoam green silk and made either in Philadelphia or Dover. The quilting designs were gloriously elaborate. Another late 18th century quilt was made of cream colored Marseille weave silk. A silk satin salmon pink petticoat (reliably dated 1825-30) raised the question "Did people dress in the fashion of the 1770s to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Revolution or, perhaps, the return of Lafayette?". Why would anyone wear a garment like this in the 1820s? Two more seafoam green petticoats were incorporated into a quilt. A quilt made of cream, sage green and dove-colored silk squares was amazingly like the Quaker wedding dress quilt in the exhibit at Winterthur last year (see Quilts in a Material World, pp. 32-35). The DE example was made in Wilmington, circa 1830, and has curious quilting: a widely spaces wave with randomly placed intricately quilted animals, birds and seashells: an owl, beaver, butterfly, seal, stag. 

A wholecloth T-shape quilt was made of the "America Presenting at the Altar of Liberty Medallions of Her Illustrious Sons. Among those sons is DE's own John Dickenson whose plantation house just outside Dover is a great window into life in the 1770s. Milton, DE which is now a sleepy backwater was once a hub of commerce (once those rivers silt up everything changes. The Museum has a whole slew of wonderful, elegant quilts made in Milton. There was a delightful Rose appliqué (inscribed 1852) made of 17 identical blocks of intertwined flowers and vine with double dogtooth sashing and a Vine and Bud border enclosed in a double dogtooth, plus quilting in a 3/*" grid. Did she forget anything? 

Mary Ellen Dukes signed her name, the date 1852 and Milton, DE on her bright as new Crossed branches with red and yellow buds and a Swag and Bud border. there's a similar border on another circa 1850 Milton quilt, a Caesar's Crown in a single red fabric. A Mariners Compass in a single Turkey red with a Swag border has feathered wreaths and a 1/4" (I'm not kidding) crosshatch background quilting. To ice the cake there are many sets of corded initials and the date 1840 and place Camden, DE. Why didn't she tell us her name! A Lone Star center is surrounded by Lemoyne Stars and finished with a border of very large blue triangles. On the back, in cross stitch is the inscription:Catharine Collins hur (sic) work. August 7, 1806" Catharine we love you! 

A Feathered Star with smallish (14"--which I think is small when we're talking about piecing such a devilishly hard block) blocks had us wondering if the now pink, blue and white color scheme was originally red, blue and white. On p. 67 of Clues in the Calico there a block dated October, 1838 which looks just like the quilt we saw. A Lemoyne Star dated 1843 has 6" pieced blocks and setting blocks of small red, blue and green leaf pattern. Like many DE quilts it has no border. One of the quilts from the Carey sisters who made quilts in the Milton area for 40 years (the Museum has about 20 of theirs) has Flying Geese blocks made of different very large scale brown prints. We had a spirited discussion about eh 1840s date. Barb Garrett and Karen Dever told us about seeing similar fabrics in an 1840s sample book at the Connecticut historical Society. 

We learn so much by getting around! There were several lovely Sunflower quilts (A DE favorite perhaps?). Rachel Denny's Sunflower, in two different browns, is signed and dated Dec. 1852. Hetty Milby Ponder (also from Milton) dated her green, pink and white Sunflower 1822. Margaret Carpenter of Lewes inscribed her name, town and the date 1845 in the center of her Delectable Mountains made in a scrumptious variety of blue and brown fondue prints. If I could have taken a quilt home this would be my choice. Our one foray into the 20th century was a coverlet made by the Greenwood Methodist Church in 1933. The design is Dresden Plates embroidered in chain stitch with 690 embroidered names. One of our members found the name of a lady she knew on the quilt. Talk about connections! 

Many, many thanks to the Study Group members who brought along items for the AQSG auctions. Cinda on the Eastern Shore grateful that Delaware is so close--not only great quilts but beaches!

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Subject: quilts at Williamsburg From: "Lucinda Cawley" 

The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum in Colonial Williamsburg recently opened an exhibit called "Seeing Stars in American Bedcovers." It will be up until June of 2009. You can get a separate admission to the Abby Aldrich and DeWitt Wallace Museums (no super expensive Colonial Williamsburg pass necessary). The best news is that there will be a quilt symposium at Williamsburg Feg. 22-23, 2009. Yippee! Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: canvas cleaning From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net> Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2008 20:16:48 -0500 

Here I am, ensconced in a weird (architecture and layout-wise) little rental house in Paducah with a charming front yard, replete with fish pond. The front porch overlooking same came with a faded-out-to-white canvas director chair with "Enjoy Coca-Cola" imprinted on the front side of the chair back band. These words remain whiter than the back or seat canvas, both of which are a very uniformly faded whatever color.

The chair back and seat are streaked with fairly light green marks I take to be mildew. I'd like to clean this chair, but I have no hose or other instrument to produce water pressure. I also don't want to try to dismantle the canvas and bring it inside for fear of not being able to replace the parts. I'm thinking there's maybe an old-reliable home cleaning solution that won't streak, but I'm at a loss for what it might be. I think this is too far gone for a sun-bleaching remedy.

This isn't an antique chair, it's just not my property and I don't want to take any chances. Plus, I have no experience at all with canvas. Any ideas?

Thanks in advance, and answering offline is great,

Andi, now in Paducah, Kentucky

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Subject: RE: Delaware State Museum (long) From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2008 

The Sunflower Quilts could also be referred to as Rising Sun.

Barbara Brackman writes in her book 'America's Printed Fabrics 1770-1890': "Many images symbolize America.... In the early days of the Republic, new citizens thought of her as a Rising Sun among nations, a model democracy that would soon ascent to the center of the international constellation."

Perhaps these quilts were so popular in Delaware particularly since they hold tight to their status as being 'The First State.' Or perhaps the quilts are somehow tied to Rising Sun, DE?

Just some thoughts I've had since seeing the wonderful quilts of DE.

Thanks Cinda for arranging such a great outing!

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle Enjoying beautiful weather in PA after many t-storms most of the night!

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Subject: New York - thanks - off topic From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2008 23:45:24 +0100 X-Message-Number: 5

A quick but very sincere thanks to all who gave me advice for DD's trip to NY. She had an absolute blast, made it to Boston too, and wants to go live there. If she does I'm definitely going as hand luggage <G>

Sally Ward

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Subject: re: Lafayette From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2008 06:07:45 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Cinda et al.:

First of all, to Cinda, thank you for your wonderful descriptions of the quilts your group saw in Delaware!

Another book on Lafayette's travels, if not already mentioned, is:

Lafayette in America in 1824 and 1825, by Auguste Lavasseur, translated by Alan R. Hoffman [Manchester, NH: Lafayette Press, 2006]

It is the journal of the day-by-day travels of Lafayette as recorded by his private secretary.

Anita

Anita B. Loscalzo 16 Ledgewood Drive Dover, MA 02030-1812 -------- email: aloscalzyahoo.com telephone: 508-785-1407 FAX: 508-785-1429

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Subject: Another bit of early patchwork? From: "Lisa Evans" 

Here's a link to the works of Barna di Siena, an early 14th century = painter who died in 1350. The painting at the bottom of the page, the = Annunciation, was painted around 1340 and is part of a fresco sequence = in the Collegiate Church in San Gimignano, a small Tuscan city. Click = on it to enlarge to see what *might* be a pieced coverlet (or something = woven in a geometric pattern) on the bed behind the Virgin Mary.

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/b/barna/index.html

Makes me wish I'd had the time to visit the church last winter....

Lisa Evans 

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Subject: Lincoln biennial - panel discussion? From: "Lisa Evans" <

I just took another look at the call for proposals for the Biennial in = Lincoln next April. I am interested in submitting a proposal for a = panel discussion on the impact of American quilting and patchwork on = native quilt traditions in other countries, especially places like Japan = and France that had established traditions prior to the 1970s American = quilt revival.

I'm looking for three or four other people to join me on this before I = submit an abstract. If anyone is interested, please e-mail me = privately at either charter.net or evanquiltgmail.com.

Thanks! I hope everyone is well despite the horrid weather most of the = country seems to be experiencing right now....

Lisa Evans Easthampton, Massachusetts (where we're currently in the midst of the monsoon season)

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Subject: Proposals sought for Eighth Underground Railroad (UGR) History Conference From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <

Good evening, QHLers - Perhaps the following solicitation for proposals is an opportunity someone can take advantage of to bring some reality to the UGRR-quilt myths?

Regards,

Meg

. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______

Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney

Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice

Professional Associate, AIC

mgmooneymoonware.net

The Underground Railroad, Its Legacies, and Our Communities

The Planning Committee of the Eighth Underground Railroad (UGR) History Conference is soliciting brief proposals for presentations, panels, and workshops that address the above theme. Proposals should be made for a 60-minute workshop session, for a poster session or exhibition, or for a cultural/artistic activity. We ask that all proposals allow for significant audience interaction. And, while we urge that proposals focus on the conference theme, we also invite proposals on other important topics concerning Underground Railroad history.

The Eighth Annual UGR History Conference will be held at College Park, Union College, Schenectady, NY, on February 27-28, 2009. It is sponsored by the Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region, Inc.

For more information, please contact us at 518-432-4432, the addresses printed below, or consult our web site at http://www.ugrworkshop.com/

Proposals should be submitted to the planning committee by September 30, 2009 at: Mail - URHPCR, PO Box 10851, Albany NY 12201 Email - urhpcrlocalnet. com <mailto:urhpcr%40localnet.com>

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Subject: Re: spray starch From: Victoria Caldwell <cobwebberieyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2008 05:11:44 -0700 

I've never commented before, but I had to this time. I've never heard of the brand mentioned here, but I will comment on what I've been doing for some time. I really dislike the spray starches I can get here in southern West Virginia, so I began making my own mix. It's half Sta-Flo Liquid Starch and half water well mixed in a pump bottle. It keeps indefinitely, and works very well. One of my friends used it one day to press a shirt and asked if I'd make up a bottle for her, and now loves it as much as I do, and made up some for her mother. Of course, it might say something that I'm in my sixties and remember my mother using Sta-Flo to starch shirts when I was a child...

Victoria

________________________________

From: Kris Driessen [mailto:krisdriessenyahoo.com] Sent: Mon 7/21/2008 4:29 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: spray starch

Well, we carry Best Press in the quilt shop. I don't think the gallon is cost effective to ship, but the bottle stuff isn't bad. Try a local quilt shop - if they don't have it, they really should.

Kris

--

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Subject: Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Lynn Miller" <lynnquiltgmail.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2008 10:22:42 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I have posted a picture of a crib quilt under Quilts on the eboard. I am trying to figure out what this alphabet is, I know it is not Latin, Greek or Hebrew. Thought maybe someone here might know.

Thanks for any help, Lynn

(Click on the picture thumbnail below)

crib quilt

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Subject: e-board From: "Donna" <nilrapsgmail.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2008 14:01:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

For the life of me I'm having a senior moment and can't remember how to get to the e-board can someone refresh my memory. Thank you, Donna

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Subject: Re: e-board From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2008 12:32:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Just go to http://quilthistory.com  and click on Gallery.

Kris

 

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Subject: RE: Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Donna" <nilrapsgmail.com> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2008 14:53:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I've spent the last couple of weeks in a home in Missouri where the father was Cherokee, with items like clocks in the Cherokee alphabet and numbers, could that be what this is? Donna

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Subject: Re: Alphabet Crib Quilt From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2008 17:41:34 -0700 

Hi there: it looks like an old German calligraphic script. The letters are fancy capitals. IMHO.....arden

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

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Subject: USPAP From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2008 21:31:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Woohoo! I just finished the 15-hour USPAP course......and passed the test! It was a miracle. 76 was passing and I made an 82 - not too bad for someone who hasn't tested since the late '60's.

For those of you aspiring to become an appraiser (like myself), if you have the opportunity to take the USPAP (Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice) course, by all means give it a shot. It's terminology is directed towards the real estate industry but isn't that hard to apply to quilts.

Best regards, Sharron............... .....in Spring, TX where not having an air conditioner is not an option!

 

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Subject: Hawaiian Quilts- seeking education, recent eBay listing From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 00:58:08 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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Good evening all,

Today was interesting for me. A Hawaiian piece ended on eBay this afternoon that I was prepared to take- but I changed my mind this morning. A year ago, I would have gone all the way- but experience is a great teacher. I really want to find a great Hawaiian piece, but I have seen so few of them that it is hard to know what I am looking at.

What I would like to ask the experts on these rare quilts are the following questions,

1. The piece I linked above seems in some photos to have the red fabric worn pretty badly in the center. I asked the seller about it and got a very vague answer ("good for its age" is the worst thing to tell me- and that is what made me decide to not bid), but I am wondering if the fabric used in these pieces has any specific deterioration issues relative to normal cotton. In other words, in a genuine Hawaiian quilt- is there more, less or the same expectation of fabric integrity based solely on the fabric itself compared to cottons- leaving aside any special allowances for the rarity of these pieces?

2. This piece has grid quilting in the border. Is that something any of you have seen before in a Hawaiian quilt?

3. This piece seems to have a pieced border. It is my impression that is quite a deviation from the norm here. Look at the closeups to see what I am talking about- especially photo #7. Is this not unusual?

4. The closeup of the flower has a straight line of quilting in direct deviation from the echo quilting in the main reverse-applique of the piece. I am guessing it is replacing a mistake at the time of making since the fabric of the added piece seems- from the photos- to have the same general color and wear of the other red fabric around it. Given how incredibly complex and "no-room-for-error" a Hawaiian quilt would seem to be given how they are constructed- are replaced pieces like this at all typical? Are they a great reducer in value?

Thanks for any thoughts you can offer. For my part, I think this went for a very low price given what it is- but I would rather wait for a really great one that I personally respond to. All the same, this piece had some technical issues- or at least I thought so- that prompted my asking you all for comments. At this point, there are few quilt patterns on my wish list, and this is the one where I have very little personal experience/research to go on in evaluating pieces that I spot for sale. So any thoughts are appreciated.

Take care,

Tom.

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Subject: What do you make of this antique quilt? From: 

Evening again all,

Here are a couple of shots of a fascinating recent find, and I have no idea what to make of it. Same for a couple of experts I showed it to. We all agree it is late 1800s, but beyond that we are stumped. The leaves are reverse-applique, but the rest is standard applique. Quilting is quite good. Based on where I got it I believe it was sourced from the East Coast- but that is all I know. Please forgive me posting links, but I have yet to master the art of posting pics to our photo board. I have never seen a pattern like this- and am eager for any thoughts.

http://members.aol.com/elpaninaro/grapequilt1.jpg

http://members.aol.com/elpaninaro/grapequilt2.jpg

Take care,

Tom.

*----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: What do you make of this antique quilt? From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 06:45:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

My initial thought is that it's from Pennsylvania, and made sometime in the mid 19th century. Beyond that, I yield to those with more expertise...

Lisa Evans.

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Subject: Re: Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 10:01:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

I think they're backward calligraphic letters. Iron-on transfers?

Dale Drake in muggy Indiana

------------------- 

Arden said: Hi there: it looks like an old German calligraphic script. The letters are fancy capitals. IMHO.....arden

Lynn said: I have posted a picture of a crib quilt under Quilts on the eboard. I am trying to figure out what this alphabet is, I know it is not Latin, Greek or Hebrew. Thought maybe someone here might know.

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Subject: RE: What do you make of this antique quilt? From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 09:42:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

There are at least 2 quilts in the collection of the International Quilt Study Center http://www.quiltstudy.org/ that have the same kind of appliqued feather design. You can find them on their webiste, by searching for 1997.007.0139 and 1997.007.0543 They were made about 1850 in the area of Baltimore, which includes the nearby parts of Pennsylvania.

Kim

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Subject: Re: Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Candace Perry" <

It's like German black type or fraktur lettering, and/or also Gothic or "olde English." Kinda funky for a children's quilt! Candace Perry 

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Subject: V&A Exhibit, London 2010 From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 17:43:45 +0100 

Get your diaries out folks, this is the latest accurate information about the plans for events to be held in conjunction with the 2010 exhibition in London, and there will definitely be a two-day academic symposium.

"The exhibition (20 March - 18 July 2010) will be supported by a varied programme of lectures, talks, workshops and events, and a two day academic conference at the V&A is planned for 11 and 12 June 2010. Further details will be available Autumn 2009 and will be made available on the Museum's website www.vam.ac.uk. "

Hope to see some of you there?

Sally Ward

--Apple-Mail-1-585540661--

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Subject: to Andi re coverlet on eboard From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 13:32:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Andi,

Maybe someone else has answered your question by now, but I happened to see the coverlet and know this type. It is a double weave (feel the two layers), made at home or by an itinerant weaver. The white blobs are called snowballs and it has a pine tree border. These motifs are quite common in double weaves. It has very pretty colors, and is a nice coverlet to have.

Barbara Woodford

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Subject: V&A quilt exhibit and symposium From: QuiltEvalsaol.com Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 15:52:34 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

The V&A has announced the seminar dates for the quilt symposium held in conjunction with their 2010 quilt exhibit - June 11 and 12, 2010. At the request of several past tour group members, as soon as I was given this information last week, I set the ball in motion for a group tour. The tour will be 12-14 days and include the V&A exhibit and seminar and possibly the V&A Indian Chintz archives. ALSO, stops will be included to see the best of British textiles including quilt and textile visits in Bath, Wales, York, Manchester, Durham and possibly more. There will be some stops not included on previous tours. Admission to the symposium will be included. Price cannot be determined until hotels open up their 2010 rates toward the end of this year.

Since the exhibit was announced 2 years ago, several ask me to hold a space for them if I take such a tour. In order to better prepare and to secure adequate reservations, I would like to have an idea of how many might be interested in joining this group. As I see it now, the tour will begin approximately June 1 and go until June 14, 2010.

Please email me off list with your interest so I can keep you updated on the progress.

Best, Deb Roberts

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Subject: Re: Alphabet Crib Quilt From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 18:09:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Has anyone figured this one out?

I learned to read German in the old fraktur script (Gothic), and I don't recognize this as being Old German or modern German. Nor Anglo-Saxon, even with the odd runes added. I've seen lots of embroidery using German dialects, but nothing that fits all of this (and there is some consistency across the Indo-European language families). E.g. Look at bottom characters in first row of blocks. And if that is an "E" in left-hand block, it's an odd "E"

It looks oriental---a Greek dialect? The accents would fit that. I even checked out the little Coptic church alphabet I could find, but no. There is reverse direction on all the "standing" letters, too. Have looked through illuminated mss. But all are not backwards, Dale---or am I missing the backwardsness?

Looks like one of those combinations that occurred when two languages met and mingled in Russia/Macedonia to Egypt.

I have seen a lot of interesting embroidery initials from the first part of 20th century, especially on household items like tray cloths, etc. And I have not seen anything like this.

Surely we have a linguist on list.

Where was quilt acquired? Provenance?

That dog and cat look tame and 40s, but that's a tough lion and pig. A "glorious pig"! The lion looks much more 19th century illustration. I think a grandma did the bottom two blocks.

You Pennsylvanians, figure this one out.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: Joan Kiplinger 

I tried holding a mirror to photo and was able to get a few letters which made more sense; a very distinct E. Could these transfers have been put on backwards???

Gaye Ingram wrote:

Has anyone figured this one out?

I learned to read German in the old fraktur script (Gothic), and I don't recognize this as being Old German or modern German. Nor Anglo-Saxon, even with the odd runes added. I've seen lots of embroidery using German dialects, but nothing that fits all of this (and there is some consistency across the Indo-European language families). E.g. Look at bottom characters in first row of blocks. And if that is an "E" in left-hand block, it's an odd "E"

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Subject: Re: What do you make of this quilt From: 

Thank you Kim and Lisa for your insight and references! This helps a great deal- especially since I was about 30 years off in my estimated date. Live and learn...

Tom.

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Subject: canvas chair update From: "Andi Reynolds" 

Thanks to everyone who contacted me off list about what to do re: cleaning a not-my-property canvas director's chair with a distinct "Drink Coca-Cola" logo intact.

Raise your hand if you are surprised that Xenia advised me to lie down and let the feeling to clean the chair pass.

Actually, that's really good advice. I either need to let this chair mosey along its current path to entropy or wade in and tackle a whole hog restoration. I didn't say, but the chair is very well made of sturdy wood that needs to be scraped, sanded, primed and repainted before rot sets in. All of the screws and nuts and bolts are in place and, happily, not rusted beyond use. The canvas is in good shape (and I do see a smidge of faded color, attesting to the guess that this canvas used to be red).

As my landlords are fascinated by my desire to maintain rather than trash their property, I'm still cogitating over whether to let this one lie (the Xenia path) or take it on (there be monsters). On the one hand, Xenia is wise. On the other hand, I'd enjoy the task and the owners would be happy with any result that doesn't involve a police call, fire engines or Serv-Pro. I am, after all, resurrecting their over-algaed goldfish pond.

Andi, now in Paducah, Kentucky

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Subject: Appliqued Red and Green Find From: "Janice" <freitascomteck.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 07:38:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Tom,

It looks mid 19th century to me too - and what a find. It is beautiful - how did you happen to run across it?

My only red and red/green examples are pretty worn, this looks to be in good condition. I keep dragging home poor injured parts, tops and pieces that need someone who cares.

Janice Marion, IN - Home of Quilters Hall of Fame

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Subject: Request for help From: Pat Cummings <patquiltersmuse.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 18:43:26 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Hello,

I'm just coming up for air. Since early March, I have been working day and night on a document about the life, quilt "charts," and writings of a woman who was New Hampshire's own early quilt historian. She worked primarily in the 1930s, and I have gathered extensive knowledge about the depth and breadth of her involvement in the quilt world.

In the process of this research, I have uncovered so much information that was new to me, the work has been a joy! I have spoken with dozens of people, accessed many documents, including her diaries, and spoken with people who knew her, although if she were living, she would be 141 years old.

The document is huge. Today, I'm up to 109 pages of text and more than 200 separate pages of quilt chart photos. The text features appropriate illustrations and photos, some old photos of her and her family, and some very old photos from her family and their dwellings in the 19th century.

I will be adding a little more to this research, e-book, that the Museum of NH History will sell as a CD-ROM beginning this autumn, from their museum store. Jim and I are not accepting a penny for the work of putting this together.

How can you help? I'm stuck on a word for fabric that I believe may be misspelled, but don't know what the right word would be: "canleteen." This fabric shows up in an inventory of an 1844 store.

I would also like a photo of Ruth Finley. I have repeatedly asked for permission to print one that is online but my pleas have been met with silence. I don't know what to make of the situation. I've contacted three different people and there is a fourth that has the "say-so," and I'm getting dead air. I'd like to add Finley's photo because she is the only person (who influenced Ellen Emeline Hardy Webster) that I am unable to represent with a photo. I hate to leave Finley out.

You have no idea how hard I have worked on this project, even through the month that my face was paralyzed because of Bell's Palsy. Thank goodness that is over. I have put in 10-14 hours, every day, looking things up, making phone calls all over the country, photo-editing, writing, revising, etc. If Jim did not cook and call me to the table, I'd look like a skeleton now, frozen in place in front of my computer. I hope that the end result is worth it. For me, I will have the satisfaction of creating a detailed document that is factually-based, and not dependent on hearsay and false assumptions. Scholarship is its own reward and I am proud of what I have accomplished.

So now, I just have to finish. I can see the finish line but it's going to be a bit of a struggle to reach it and roll beyond it. When this is done, you may hear about some lady in NH who is suffering from post-partum depression, and that will be me.

Thanks for any insight into "canleteen."

Patricia Cummings Quilter's Muse Publications 

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Subject: Re: What do you make of this antique quilt? From: judy.growcomcast.net Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 19:00:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Tom,

What a wonderful quilt! I'm in love with the no-block or medallion format, and just finished one for my red and green challenge for the AQSG seminar. My first thought when looking at your quilt was that the design could have come from a woven damask tablecloth.

Judy Grow Flemington NJ

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Subject: Request for help From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 08:40:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

 

Pat-- F. Montgomery's Textiles in America 1650-1870 lists camleteen, a mixture of wool, goat's hair, thread or cotton woven coarsely. It came in floral, stripes, checks, glazed, unglazed.

Linton's Modern Textile and Apparel Dictionary also lists camelteen which appears to be a variation on the camleteen spelling. Same fabric, a worsted to resemble cloth woven with camel hair called camlet.

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Subject: Merikay Waldvogel 2009 Quilters Hall of Fame Inductee-long From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 20:39:23 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Dear QHL members,

The Quilters Hall of Fame (TQHF) is very pleased to announce the selectio= n of internationally known quilt historian and author Merikay Waldvogel of Knoxville, Tennessee, as the 39th Honoree to be inducted July 16-19, 2009 in Marion, Indiana.

Merikay Waldvogel, one of the key players in the late 20th century quilt history revival, has served on the board of directors of both the America= n Quilt Study Group (AQSG) and The Alliance for American Quilts (AAQ). She has been a key player in building The Alliance=92s online Quilt Index. S= he has also taken key roles in the Boxes Under the Beds, Quilters Save Our Stories, and Quilt Treasures programs that are major contributions of The Alliance to the study of American cultural history. Waldvogel is a fellow of the International Quilt Study Center (IQSC) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she has worked with graduate students and has built an important database of quilt kits.

In 1983 Waldvogel began her collaboration with TQHF Honoree Bets Ramsey t= o co-direct the Quilts of Tennessee project through its mission of documenting the quilts of that state. Together they wrote the book Quilt= s of Tennessee: Images of Domestic Life Prior to 1930, and put together a traveling exhibit, one of many exhibits Waldvogel has curated over the years. They later collaborated on the book Southern Quilts: Surviving Relics of the Civil War. In 2003, Rosalind Webster Perry and Waldvogel co-edited the first book of articles about the honorees, The Quilters Hal= l of Fame.

In addition to serving quilt history organizations, Waldvogel is recognized as an expert on quilts of the twentieth century quilt revival.= =20 Her own book Soft Covers for Hard Times: Quiltmaking and the Great Depression is the key work on mid 20th century quilts and quiltmaking.=20 Her collaboration with 2001 Honoree Barbara Brackman on Patchwork Souvenirs of the 1933 World=92s Fair was a major contribution to quilt research.

Her Uncoverings articles for AQSG on Southern Linsey Quilts, the WPA Milwaukee Handicraft Project, the Anne Orr Studio of Nashville, Round Robin Pattern Collecting, and the early history of Mountain Mist patterns were all groundbreaking research. Her latest book Childhood Treasures: Doll Quilts By and For Children highlights Lincoln, Nebraska quiltmaker Mary Ghormley=92s extensive doll quilt collection.

Waldvogel has written for Quilters Newsletter Magazine, McCall=92s Quilti= ng Vintage Quilts, American Patchwork and Quilting, and Quilting Today/Traditional Quiltworks. In the Southeast, she is known for her writings about Southern women and their quilts in Appalachian Life and Smokies Life magazines. She also lectures frequently to quilt guilds, historical societies, and museums in the area.

Merikay Waldvogel is a graduate of Monmouth College in Monmouth, IL and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. She was raised in St. Louis, Missouri, but now resides in Knoxville, Tennessee.

For additional information about The Quilters Hall of Fame's Celebration, July 16-19, 2009, at which Waldvogel will be inducted, please email us at quiltershalloffamesbcglobal.net and request that your name be added to our mailing list. Registration forms will go out the first week of April 2009. Watch for future posts about our exciting slate of teachers that will appear at our special Triple Anniversary Celebration in 2009.

Karen B. Alexander President, The Quilters Hall of Fame

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Subject: Re: Andi's post on coverlet and Barbara's response From: Trishherraol.com Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 10:14:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

 

Don't want to pick a fight with Barbara. But here are my thoughts:

The motif she mentions: snowballs and pine tree border is often used in doubleweave coverlets. But to be a true doubleweave construction a piece needs to have two complete warps and 2 complete wefts that interweave with each other. As she mentions you can then pull them apart in two separate layers. Almost like having two coverlets in one.

In this particular coverlet of Andi's you cannot do that. We see these frequently here in southeastern Pa. especially Lancaster County. It has one complete warp and weft and then an extra, or supplemental weft, gives you that ribbed characteristic and is called a 4 + 1 weave but you cannot actually separate the layers in any block as it is "tied down every 4th warp thread. Does that make sense?

We have several in our collection and do see this 4 + 1 construction here all the time.

The "coverlet nerd" in southeastern Pennsylvania, Trish

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Subject: RE: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:06:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

I think it's absolutely backwards. I thought it was the photograph! It's backwards Gothic script, IMO. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re:Coverlet From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 09:00:17 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

Gotta agree with the "coverlet nerd". Jan "coverlet nerd 2"

By the way, thank you all who have joined the Sampler Consortium. We should have topped 400 members by now. I encourage your museums and needlework organizations to join as well.

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Subject: spooky quilts From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:14:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Polly Mello has revealed her true self in an article in the latest issue of Quilters Newsletter. "Quilts That Go Bump in the Night" describes Polly's interest in the weird and bizarre side of quilts and textiles. It includes lots of pictures. Polly calls herself the "Queen of Halloween." We who know and love her think she's more accurately described as the "Queen of Creepy." Polly's Halloween talk, which she sometimes gives twice a day during the season, is in great demand by quilt guilds in the Mid Atlantic. She's the only speaker on the subject of antique quilts I know of who actually has groupies. "Mello's Fellows" will hop in the car to hear the Halloween talk over and over again. They are even willing to cross the Bay Bridge for an opportunity. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: RE: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 11:09:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

> I think it's absolutely backwards. I thought it was the photograph! It's > backwards Gothic script, IMO. > Candace Perry

Does this work throughout for you? It doesn't for me: I too considered that possibility. E.g. Look at bottom characters in first row of blocks. And why rt to left?

And granted that possibility as hypothesis, what does it tell about maker? That she was illiterate? That is what I imagine.

And why this choice of letters?

Is that lion from a common pattern? Or a book? It looks older than the cutsey beribboned critters.

This is a quilt I'd like to have found.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: question From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 12:26:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

I found an apron made of cotton fabric printed with military campaign ribbons from the Spanish American War to the Army of Occupation in Germany. Does this sound familiar to anyone? Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: RE: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 12:47:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

I don't understand why they are backwards, but looking at a chart for Fraktur I have, the bottom to me on the left ( all reading left to right)is M-N-O and the right is P-Q-R. Top left is G-H-I and right (I think)is A-B-C (that one is tough). Middle left is D-E-F and once again, I think that right is J-K-L. It makes no sense at all to me...but that is what I see! Wackiness is next to godliness! Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 13:09:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

Whoops, I should add that inexplicably the right top is reading right to left. Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 13:09:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 17

Gaye:

I bet you're right - she was illiterate. Poor dear, and now we're puzzling over whatever possessed her.

Dale in Indiana

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Subject: Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Lynn Miller" <lynnquiltgmail.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 09:41:17 -0700 X-Message-Number: 18

So far the mystery of the alphabet has not been solved. But ironed on backwards does sound possible. I have been looking on this website for any hints as to what it might be but I have found nothing. I know less than nothing about other languages. So still would appreciate any more thoughts or ideas.

http://www.omniglot.com/writing/alphabets.htm

Thanks, Lynn

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Subject: RE: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Barbara Obaker" 

I agree with Candace - copy/paste the image into a picture editing program and then flip the image. The letters are upper case western/English alphabet.

Barb Gibsonia, PA

|I think it's absolutely backwards. I thought it was the photograph! It's | backwards Gothic script, IMO. | Candace Perry | |

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Subject: RE: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Donna" <

David is the negative backwards?

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Subject: RE: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: "Donna" <nilrapsgmail.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 13:26:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 21

I flipped it - it is an interesting alphabet and the fun part of history. Donna

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Subject: creepy quilts From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 14:17:26 -0500 

Add my lovely little collection of rattlesnake quilts and Polly and I = are the Snake Sisters, also bonded at the hip when it comes to our = slithery friends! Marcia Marcia Kaylakie AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX www.texasquiltappraiser.com -

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Subject: Re: Request for help From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 16:23:33 -0400 

Hi Pat - can't help you with any pictures of RF, but I give you 100% of my backing - I am sure what ever the end result of your long work is, it will be wonderful and count me in on purchasing the results. Sorry to hear you have been under the weather - hope all goes up hill from here on in. I bet you get some results with your request tho. Keep well Mitzi Oakes

In a message dated 07/29/08 08:31:03 Eastern Daylight Time, patquiltersmuse.com writes: Hello,

I'm just coming up for air. Since early March, I have been working day and night on a document about the life, quilt "charts," and writings of a woman who was New Hampshire's own early quilt historian. She worked primarily in the 1930s, and I have gathered extensive knowledge about the depth and breadth of her involvement in the quilt world.

In the process of this research, I have uncovered so much information that was new to me, the work has been a joy! I have spoken with dozens of people, accessed many documents, including her diaries, and spoken with people who knew her, although if she were living, she would be 141 years old.

The document is huge. Today, I'm up to 109 pages of text and more than 200 separate pages of quilt chart photos. The text features appropriate illustrations and photos, some old photos of her and her family, and some very old photos from her family and their dwellings in the 19th century.

I will be adding a little more to this research, e-book, that the Museum of NH History will sell as a CD-ROM beginning this autumn, from their museum store. Jim and I are not accepting a penny for the work of putting this together.

How can you help? I'm stuck on a word for fabric that I believe may be misspelled, but don't know what the right word would be: "canleteen." This fabric shows up in an inventory of an 1844 store.

I would also like a photo of Ruth Finley. I have repeatedly asked for permission to print one that is online but my pleas have been met with silence. I don't know what to make of the situation. I've contacted three different people and there is a fourth that has the "say-so," and I'm getting dead air. I'd like to add Finley's photo because she is the only person (who influenced Ellen Emeline Hardy Webster) that I am unable to represent with a photo. I hate to leave Finley out.

You have no idea how hard I have worked on this project, even through the month that my face was paralyzed because of Bell's Palsy. Thank goodness that is over. I have put in 10-14 hours, every day, looking things up, making phone calls all over the country, photo-editing, writing, revising, etc. If Jim did not cook and call me to the table, I'd look like a skeleton now, frozen in place in front of my computer. I hope that the end result is worth it. For me, I will have the satisfaction of creating a detailed document that is factually-based, and not dependent on hearsay and false assumptions. Scholarship is its own reward and I am proud of what I have accomplished.

So now, I just have to finish. I can see the finish line but it's going to be a bit of a struggle to reach it and roll beyond it. When this is done, you may hear about some lady in NH who is suffering from post-partum depression, and that will be me.

Thanks for any insight into "canleteen."

Patricia Cummings Quilter's Muse Publications --------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: toile on ebay From: "Lucinda Cawley" 

#6 in "Threads of History" "America Presenting..." Item number: 280249728479

VERY RARE and historically important, 1783, George Washington, Copper Plate Printed Textile / Toile fabric identified as Number 6 in Herbert Collins' definitive work "Threads of History". This fantastic, 18th century American Political / Historical pictorial fabric panel item measures approx. 29 1/2" x 25 1/2" and is known by the title "America Presenting at the Altar of Liberty". It features a prominent portrait of General George Washington being crowned with a laurel wreath by flying Victory who blows on a trumpet with a banner attached that reads "Washington and Independence". To the right of Washington sits Lady Liberty atop an alter which reads on the base "America Presenting at the Altar of Liberty Medallions of her Illustrious Sons".

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Subject: Re: Hawaiian Quilts- seeking education, recent eBay listing From: Loretta Woodard <lwoodardhawaii.edu> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 12:08:42 -1000 X-Message-Number: 25

Tom, I can try and answer your questions (below), although others may want to comment on the cotton fabric dyes and wear. I would say that, in part, what you are seeing in the photo is crocking, where the red dye has not evenly penetrated the yarns and is literally being rubbed off the surface through wear. At the center, the fibers seem to be breaking down and you are seeing the beginning of fabric loss. There's nothing unique in the wearing of the fabric assuming the quilt was used and not stored as a "best" quilt.

2. Hawaiian quilters also used straight-line quilting on their Hawaiian quilts through the first half of the twentieth century and also combined contour and straight-line quilting as you see on this quilt.

3 & 4. What you are seeing in the flower for sure, and most likely, also in the border, are the seams where the applique fabric was pieced before the design was cut out. Three lengths of 36" fabric, for instance, would be machine-stitched together to make one large sheet. This piece would be folded in eighths and the pattern cut from it. Fabric might also be pieced "however" in order to create a large enough piece of fabric to cut out the design. It is true that the border fabric seems to have faded slightly differently from the main body fabric but the backing fabric seems to be intact.

This pattern, by the way, is very similar to another quilt dated ca. 1900 that is pictured on page 31 in Stella M. Jones, "Hawaiian Quilts," 1973. There is no title or name for this design in the catalog.

Hope this helps.

Laurie Woodard Project Director Hawaiian Quilt Research Project

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Subject: RE: : Alphabet Crib Quilt From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 17:09:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 26

I hate to keep worrying this quilt, but.....

So is this what we've concluded: maker applied templates backwards? Decided not to include all the alphabet?

And, if so, what about the two letters at the bottoms of the first-row blocks?

What kind of hypothesis could you reasonably form re maker? Illiterate? Just didn't know the scripts?

Has anyone ever seen this particular version script? (I know there are many) Is it older than the quilt top?

Can top be confidently dated in 1940s?

And the elephant applique? Older? Or forties?

Sorry to be so inquiring, Gaye

> David is the negative backwards? Donna It's

> backwards Gothic script, IMO.

> Candace Perry

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Subject: Tom From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 17:13:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 27

Tom, Some years ago I bought a "Hawaiian quilt" at the Sandwich flea market. The pattern seemed Hawaiian enough but the quilting was all wrong. I later found out it was from Washington or Oregon. I think we have to watch out for these imitations.

Barbara Woodford

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Subject: RE: Merikay Waldvogel 2009 Quilters Hall of Fame Inductee-long From: "dawn heefner" <d.heefnergte.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 21:21:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 28

Hi Karen, Hot damn!!!!! Great choice - she was such a gem to me at my first AQSG meeting. I knew nobody, but Merikay treated me as though she'd known me all her life. She introduced me to Anita Shackelford as "her discovery" of the seminar. Should have realized that meant I'd been targeted to get in over my head in AQSG - ha! From the humid zone - about to go into our 4th heat wave of the summer - don't you miss DC's sultry summers???? Dawn

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Subject: RE: Merikay Waldvogel 2009 Quilters Hall of Fame Inductee-long From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2008 22:35:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 29

You mean Merikay *wasn't* already in the HoF? She's an absolute jewel!

Lisa Evans