Subject: quilt shop look-up From: <scrapquiltertds.net> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 5:34:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Good morning-

does anyone out there remember a site you could type in a location and there would be a list of quilt shops given in that area? I lost the site when the last computer died.

Thanks for any help, Irene in NNY

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt shop look-up From: Barbara Burnham <

Irene, Try http://www.mapmuse.com/=A0

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt shop look-up From: "deb" <debquiltingposs.com> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 07:48:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Be sure to check with the stores before depending on information off mapmuse. We moved two years ago and they still have the old information. They also have closed stores listed.

Debbie Quilting Possibilities Forked River, NJ www.quiltingpossibilities.net

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt shop look-up From: Barbara Burnham <

I agree.=A0Any web site or=A0listing service could be out of date. Barbara

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Picture of armadillo sewing basket From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 13:23:35 +0100 X-Message-Number: 5

And here's the York one...

http://www.yorkcastlemuseum.org.uk/Page/ViewCollection.aspx?CollectionId=8

Sally Ward

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Picture of armadillo sewing basket From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 13:25:12 +0100 X-Message-Number: 6

Sorry, the link goes back to the first picture on display. The armadillo is third along, with blue satin lining

Sally Ward

On 5 Aug 2008, at 13:23, Sally Ward wrote:

> And here's the York one... > > http://www.yorkcastlemuseum.org.uk/Page/ViewCollection.aspx?CollectionId=8

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Muskrat Love From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 11:19:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

I think these are in keeping with alligator purses that involve snouts and feet and tails (I once encountered an extraordinary collection of these at a small hist. soc. in western PA -- whoda thunk?) and the little fox and mink scarves that are similar. I would say they were souvenir items (the armadillos and the alligators) that were brought back from forays to FL and TX and other places where these critters lurk. It makes me want to do a weird souvenir exhibit...toothpick holders that resemble outhouses, stuffed froggies made to look like golfers... It just does not work with our 2008 sensibilities. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: more on muskrats From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 11:25:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Please note that I sign myself Cinda ON not FROM the Eastern Shore. I insist on that distinction, muskrat dinners being one reason among many. To answer Julia's questions. Yes, they really do have muskrat dinners (in mid-winter). Yes, the muskrats are wild. Yes, they are fundraisers for volunteer fire companies. No, I have never eaten muskrat, but I have asked a lot of questions. The muskrats are boiled several days ahead because the smell is so bad they need to air out the hall before the big event. Susan mentioned Fruitland, MD. Fruiltland is the next town to Salisbury where I live. I have heard muskrats called marsh rabbits. It's worth noting that a fair number of people on the Eastern Shore trap to suppliment their incomes. The state of MD pays a bounty on nutria, a muskrat-like creature imported here during the 1920s for its fur, which has wreaked havoc in the marshes by eating the roots of the all important grasses--another example of the danger of interferring humans. There are no nutria dinners. Cinda ON the Eastern Shore

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Muskrat Love From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 11:26:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Go for it Candace! I'll come to see the weird souvenirs. Cinda

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: souvenirs From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 08:30:50 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

I can suggest some weird souvenirs. Given a little time in my "scarey" basement, I may even be able to provide one or two (or more). Susan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Muskrat Love From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Tue, 05 Aug 2008 10:25:41 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

Just what I was thinking Candace. Mom owned one and I think she purchased it in Washington DC when she left home in western PA at the tender age of 17 to work for the gov. during WWll. Since I am the keeper of the old stuff in the family, she gave it to me. While creepy, it was an example. My baby sister, who has only ever adored me, freaked out. She is 10 yrs. younger and I was gone during her teenage yrs. and didn't know she had developed a curious affection for the little guy. After a few years, I decided it wasn't worth the hurt feelings so I sent it to her with care instructions. After the oddity of it was over, it went on a shelf in her damp basement and within a few months it developed some mold and cracks. One day a package arrived from her with the purse and a note with "I'm sorry" on it. I cleaned him up and he looks pretty good but still creepy. I'll post a pic. There is a faint round black stamp on the inside that seems to indicate a foreign origin but I can read Alligator.

At the Warren County OH Museum, we had many of the stoles and scarves with the little rodents hanging from them, staring at us with their beady little eyes. I suspect the critters were breeding because every time I went into the costume storage area there seemed to be more.

This brings me to a question on preserved animals. I knew a gentleman, gone about 15 yrs now at the age of 100, who hunted with Henry Ford. His home was huge and he had gigantic preserved grizzlies and every kind of wild game and dead rugs possible. Again, creepy but he kept the local taxidermist busy keeping them all clean for a lot of years. I see them in a lot of museums, some on permanent display, looking sad and dusty. What is the best way to show them, store them and still keep them free of razor sharp grit? My thought would be a very soft brush with one of the computer vacuums held underneath the brush to catch dust as you clean it off but I know some of them have crud deep down inside the fur and feathers. Would small pieces of nylon screening be OK to hold over feathers and fur to do a little deeper cleaning? it.

Candace Perry wrote: > I think these are in keeping with alligator purses that involve snouts and > feet and tails (I once encountered an extraordinary collection of these at a > >

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: cleaning fur From: judy.growcomcast.net Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 12:46:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Jan,

On one of the "Treasures of the Trust" programs on TV recently they had the same problem -- how to clean off a 5" tall stuffed bear. They carefully and closely=20 wrapped him in polyethyolene and then gave him the freezer treatment. The freeze killed all the deep lurking critters, and the polyethylene kept moisture from condensing on the fur. He came out of his treatment with a soft and glossy coat.

Judy Grow

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: September travel to DC area From: "Susan Bleimehl" <bleimehltds.net> Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2008 10:15:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

When I travel to DC to see my children who live there, I always make time to visit the Textile Museum www.textilemuseum.org. They don't have quilts, but always have interesting exhibits of textiles from all over the world. The cost is free, but a $5 donation is asked for.

Susan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Freezing procedure (was: cleaning fur) From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 10:49:54 -0700 X-Message-Number: 14

Good morning, QHLers - There are specific conditions that need to be met for the freezing procedure to be effective as a pest control treatment. I bring to your attention the National Park Service's wonderful Conserve-O-Gram series which has a Conserve-O-Gram (Number 3-6) that outlines the freezer requirements and the protective wrapping needed for the object being frozen (including objects that should NOT be frozen):

http://tinyurl.com/5rq66k

A freezer with a frost-free option isn't usable for this procedure as the thawing cycle that is part of the frost-free option warms up the interior of the freezer too much. Regards, 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: To Trish from Barbara From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 13:11:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15

Thanks, Trish, I yield to the better knowledge. I thought I saw ribbing in the photo, but since I'd never seen a single (?) weave like that in real life, discounted what my eyes saw. I'm glad to learn more every time.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Childhood Treasures Book Review From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 09:59:59 -0700 X-Message-Number: 16

Some time ago this book was discussed and I'd mentioned I was planning to review this book. I finally got to it and you will find it at http://www.womenfolk.com/baby_quilts/childhood_treasures.htm

The review is written for the general public so I want to add here that Merikay's comments on many of the individual quilts include details that will be especially interesting to quilt history buffs. In fact the entire book reflects her extensive knowledge and research.

Judy Breneman

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Muskrat Love From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com> Date: Tue, 05 Aug 2008 10:01:52 -0700 X-Message-Number: 17

Dear Jan and QHL, Jan wrote "stoles and scarves with the little rodents hanging from them, staring at us with their beady little eyes. "

For the biologically inclined, the stoles are probably minks, or martens, prized for their fur and are not rodents but carnivorous mammals of the same family as otters and weasels - a mustelid.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martens http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mink

I have loved this current "off" topic, a pleasant diversion from other things I should be doing.

Regards, Julia Zgliniec, Poway CA >

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: : Muskrat Love From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 05 Aug 2008 14:58:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 18

They could also be kolinsky [sp??], Russian for squirrel and dyed mink color, for those who couldn't afford mink. I used my mother's scarves and with alligator purse and shoes which were very reasonably priced in the 50s and Bonwit suit [sale price] I was part of the downtown scene.

Julia Zgliniec wrote:an wrote "stoles and scarves with the little rodents hanging from them, staring at us with their beady little eyes. "

For the biologically inclined, the stoles are probably minks, or martens, prized for their fur and are not rodents but carnivorous mammals of the same family as otters and weasels - a mustelid.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martens http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mink

I have loved this current "off" topic, a pleasant diversion from other things I should be doing. > > >

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: From possums to road kill From: JG Kane <jgkane84hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 20:18:03 +0000 X-Message-Number: 19

Following the theme of deceased beasties I ought to mention the roadkillsoft toys which were paraded on our U.K. TV show "Dragon's Den". Aspiring entrepreneurs seek financial backing from a panel of millionaireswho seem desperate for fame and in need of bolstering their millionaire bank accounts. A couple of inventive chaps presented their Roadkill Soft Toys last night.Suitably flat with the odd blood shot eyeball and protruding tongue they had removable entails ( of the fabric variety ). They failed to get any backing. Jill possumless but with a toy Armadillo (plump soft variety) residing in DD's bedroom.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE:From possums to road kill From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2008 14:21:17 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 20

Road kill cafe: quirky, cute

Stuffed roadkill: eeyew!

Wow. Susan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Muskrat Love From: Judy Schwender 

Re: What is the best way to show them, store them and still keep them free of razor sharp grit? My thought would be a very soft brush with one of the computer vacuums held underneath the brush to catch dust as you clean it off but I know some of them have crud deep down inside the fur and feathers. Would small pieces of nylon screening be OK to hold over feathers and fur to do a little deeper cleaning?

Hi all, Beware of cleaning taxidermy animals! They may have arsenic or other toxic chemicals used in the preparation. See below. Judy Schwender

Found at http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/waac/wn/wn18/wn18-1/wn18-107.html "In the early part of the twentieth century, lead arsenate powder was used in museums to prepare organic materials such as furs, leathers, and plant materials for exhibition. The arsenic powder acted as an insecticide and prevented the artifacts from being damaged by insect infestation. The treatment of artifacts with lead arsenate was originally used by taxidermists as a preservative and insecticide. The use of lead arsenate was discontinued during the 1930's by most of the taxidermy profession due to health concerns. Arsenic, a transition metal, is no longer used as an insecticide due to a greater awareness of its toxicity." NPS Conserv-o-gram 11/9 Handling and Care of Dry Bird and Mammal Specimens 2006: "Cotton gloves are suitable when handling recent collections but when handling older specimens, those collected before the 1970s, latex or nitrile gloves are recommended. The insides of skins of many older specimens, particularly taxidermy mounts, were treated with arsenic and other insecticides, or pesticides and fungicides i.e., mercuric chloride, that can leach through the cotton fibers, making latex and nitrile a better choice. Researchers are required to wear gloves when working in NPS collections, but for many non-NPS natural history collections there are no restrictions. If gloves are not worn, wash your hands before and after handling any specimen."

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 05, 2008 From: SandyNRHBaol.com Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2008 03:25:31 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

-------------------------------1218007531 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The Duck Neck Quilt someone mentioned is also the topic of a quilt song by Cathy Miller (singingquilter.com) The song is on her fourth quilt song CD "In the Heart of a Quilt" Here is what she has to say about it: The Duck Neck Quilt A beautiful quilt we saw in Skagway Alaska, made of approximately 150 preserved duck neck skins (with feathers still attached). It was made by Jenny Rasmusen sometime between 1905 and 1912 when she was a Swedish missionary in Yakutat Alaska. The quilt is hanging in the Skagway Museum, and I'm told that it is still supple and light and very warm (and, presumably, waterproof!). I learned a few things about the Tlingit methods of preserving bird skins (which they often used for children's clothing and for boots). 1. Quilts of Alaska: A Textile Album of the Last Frontier General Editor June E. Hall (Gastineau Channel Historical Society) ISBN 0-9704815-0-0 Her songs are absolutely great is you want to hear a bit of the song you can use this link: _http://cdbaby.com/cd/cathymiller4_ (http://cdbaby.com/cd/cathymiller4) scroll down and pick the song you want.

Maybe she will write a song about Possum Quilts. from the southern end of Illinois where we have "air you can wear" in summer Sandy Bartelsmeyer Proud to participate in the Alzheimer's Quilt Initiative! http://www.alzquilts.org/ I have made $1000 promise for Alzheimer's research. V

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt article upcoming next year From: <charter.net> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2008 9:44:32 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I just received a copy of the table of contents for Medieval Clothing and Textiles 5, the journal series from Boydell & Brewer. #5 will be published next April and contains an article that is of great importance to quilt history:

"One Quilt or Two? A Reassessment of the Guicciardini Quilts in the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Museo del Bargello," Sarah Randles

This article is the first scholarly look at the Tristan quilts, the oldest known European quilts, in almost seventy years. It is long, thorough, and very, very well argued, and I'm publicizing here so everyone is aware that it's coming.

More details on publication will be forthcoming as they become available.

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Dutch Quilts From: QuiltEvalsaol.com Date: Wed, 6 Aug 

I am so looking forward to An Moonen's book that will be coming out conjunction with the Antique Dutch Quilt exhibit at the Fries museum later this year. In doing some preliminary research for my tour to this exhibit I google'd the terms "early Dutch quilts" and surprisingly (to me) not much information is readily available in comparison to British or American counterparts.

The usual return is on PA Dutch quilts - all incredibly wonderful but with a depth of research behind them. I re-considered An Moonen's presentation at AQSG in CT (2006), recalling how interesting the quilts were, the symmetry and the differentiation of piecing styles. Bless you An, for the information you have provided is about all that is out there. Even in recalling her extensive presentations, today I wonder if I were to see an early Dutch quilt in a shop - would I recognize it for its uniqueness and historic value.

Records show that the Dutch were high volume purchasers of Indian Chintz; their clothing and home decor in the 18th and 19th centuries reflect the frequent use of these fabrics prepared in India solely for the Dutch Market. Surely the Dutch imported quilts and palampores from India as others did, but I am interested to know if the Indian chintzes might have been used in quilts that the Dutch made themselves; if so, was it cut up and pieced, used as whole cloth, or not used at all. Did they wait until they were manufacturing their own chintzes to begin to put them into quilts? An?

I wonder about the chintzes being pieced as from the images of the Dutch quilts I have seen, most are pieced, many like English quilts have center medallions. In contrast French made quilts are whole cloth, the French maintaining the whole cloth relief work and quilting motifs seen in the exquisite imported palampores. It makes me wonder between the Dutch and English, if one was an influence in style and if so, who took the lead.

I have had many respond with interest in the V&A tour in 2010, which undoubtedly will be a wonderful exhibit. However, I do hope that the Dutch Quilt exhibit is not being overshadowed by this upcoming event in England as both will have the best of what is available and will surely be wonderful shows. I am hopeful that some will take note of the opportunity the Netherlands exhibit will present for education about possible influences on global and American quilting heritage.

Deb Roberts _www.worldofquiltstravel.com_ (http://www.worldofquiltstravel.com)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 05, 2008 From: "Beth Donaldson" <

Two comments, First: Check out the Roadkill quilt in the Michigan African American quilt collection at the MSU Museum. http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/collections_1996.109.1.html. Second: I've been reading Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickens and ran across an interesting passage. Dickens was describing the lodgings (room) of a working class nurse whose taste in furnishings was rather bad. The bed was a canopy bed with no hangings. "The bed itself was decorated with a patchwork quilt of great antiquity and at the upper end, upon the side nearest to the door, hung a scanty curtain of blue check..." This book was published in 1843, the year after Dickens' first tour of America.

-- Beth Donaldson Collections Assistant Michigan State University 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Dutch Quilts From: adamroni <adamroninetvision.net.il> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2008 09:50:02 +0200 X-Message-Number: 1

"Records show that the Dutch were high volume purchasers of Indian Chintz; their clothing and home decor in the 18th and 19th centuries reflect the frequent use of these fabrics prepared in India solely for the Dutch Market. Surely the Dutch imported quilts and palampores from India as others did, but I am interested to know if the Indian chintzes might have been used in quilts that the Dutch made themselves; if so, was it cut up and pieced, used as whole cloth, or not used at all. Did they wait until they were manufacturing their own chintzes to begin to put them into quilts? An?"

An has already published two wonderful, definitive books on Dutch quilts: - Quilts - een Nederlandse traditie (Quilts, the Dutch Tradition), Nederlands Openluchtmuseum Arnhem, 1992 (bilingual English-Dutch text) - 'tis al Beddegoet, Nederlandse antieke quilts 1659-1900.

The impression I got from these books is that Dutch quilts are both pieced and wholecloth, or sometimes combining a wholecloth center (a panel of Indian Chintz) with a pieced border. The quilts in both books utilize Indian chintz both for wholecloth quilts, and in bits and pieces for pieced quilts. Quilting on the wholecloth variety is rather basic - diamonds, a square grid etc, although I noticed at least one example of fancier quilting (a central rosette, with several fan and rope design borders surrounding it) on a wholecloth (Quilts - een Nederlandse traditie, pp. 40-41). The impression I got was that these quilts were quilted in the Netherlads, from imported Indian chintzes.

The pieced quilts use rather basic shapes (half square triangles joined into pinwheel shapes, squares etc.)and rely on the wonderful prints for their beauty. There are also quite a lot of hexagon quilts, reminiscent of their English and Australian cousins. I cannot recommend these books highly enough - and I too am eagerly anticipating the new book.

Ady in Israel

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt values; need some honest thoughts From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 11:16:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Dear lovely listers: I am frustrated at another loss of a quilt at a small local country auction. I need advice! I have a very difficult time determining what I should bid, and when I should stop. I am not a good bidder -- I get carried away -- so I often leave my bids with a board member to do the dirty work for me. Last night I wanted a great late 19th century double pink, double blue, and mourning print quilt (this was a combination for some reason the PA Dutch locals liked -- if someone has thoughts on that, it would help too!) It was in a pattern I don't know the name for, but exists in a local pair of sampler quilts my museum owns. It's sort of a lattice design. I left a bid for $700 with my board member, with instruction to go to 800 if necessary. It went for $925. It was a good quilt in excellent condition. Should I have some sort of rule of thumb that says I shouldn't bid less than $1000 on such quilts? It seems too high. I did end up getting two poor relations to that lovely -- both with stains, but good local provenance and interesting patterns and colors. They were $250 and $440, even with the stains. I find myself more and more feeling completely ignorant, or lost somewhere in the 1980s of pricing. Oh, and remember, I am buying for a museum. Any thoughts on ANYTHING in this message would be most appreciated (my bidding, the color combination, the lattice pattern). Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center Pennsburg PA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt values; need some honest thoughts From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 12:03:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

"If you like it, the price is always right"...or words to that effect. Obviously if you are going to bid at auction, you do need to set reasonable limits; what is the most you will pay? Have you looked at sales of similar items? Is your maximum reasonable? Does the item make your heart race? Does it fill a blank in your collection or your inventory? Is it a good example of the type? Is the condition acceptable to you? Is there "buyer's premium" tacked onto the final price, and can you figure the percentage and the dollar figure in your head?

Remember this: you don't have to be the first bidder, just the last. But no one can determine what your final price should be - except you.

Xenia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Southwestern Quilts From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2008 10:20:20 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

I just know this has been discussed but I've had a 'lazy' attitude this past week and couldn't find it in the archives. I just saw pics of an quilt, somewhere around 1900, purchased out of New Mexico. Each block has a different cow or horsie with brands on them. I'll see if I can get permission to post it. I'm sure someone has mentioned similar ones.

Jan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt values; need some honest thoughts From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 12:27:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Candace, The quilt you "lost" is the kind of quilt I love. I would never pay close to $1,000 for one like it (unless it had fraktur inscriptions and then all bets are off). To me that is a dealer's price after the quilt has made its way up the food chain. I want to get my stuff closer to the bottom. Can you post an image of the lattice block? Cinda on the Eastern Shore planning to be in PA later this month

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt values; need some honest thoughts From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 12:50:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I'm going to try to post -- I don't think I have a close up. I'd really like thoughts on it. It's a wonderful design. I agree with your thoughts about the dealer's price. Thanks! Candace

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Posting of the "lattice" block From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 13:01:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

On the eboard, under quilts, see Lattice block. The quilt I lost at auction was a double pink lattice on a double blue ground, with a black mourning print back. Waaaaa! Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: quilt values; need some honest thoughts From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 09:39:29 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

This message interests me. I do not have an answer for your dilemma.

My interest is how you DO determine value of quilts today.

I am also interested in anyone's advice on where and how to sell a quilt collection.

I no longer have the room for or interest in the old quilts I purchased 20 - 30 years ago. They date from various periods and include tops and completed quilts.

I know eBay is an option but its not an option I really want to pursue withthese quilts.

Any advice?

Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen

 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: quilt values; need some honest thoughts From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 13:15:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Candace,

I often stop bidding a little short of the final price at auctions. BUT I learned long ago to determine what I am willing to pay and stick to that price. If the bidding goes higher than perhaps that quilt (or whatever) just wasn't meant to come home with me.

I agree with Cinda about the price sounding like a dealer's price. I have been at auctions in Lancaster, PA where New York dealers outbid everyone else in the room - just because they can since they will get a better price in NY than what dealers could sell for locally. At one auction a NY dealer was buying every decent PA quilt in the room but apparently knew nothing of PA quilted pillowcases - two sets went for less that $200 for each set.

Years ago, in CA I attended enough auctions at the same auction houses and got to know some of the dealers. Believe it or not once they realized I was not in business to compete but buying for my own collection some dealers were kind enough to let me win. Of course, it always depended upon the item and what their profit margin would have been.

Your situation, of course, is very different since you are bidding for a museum. But we all have to live within our budgets.

I've often found too that when I've lost out on purchasing something there's often something better waiting for me elsewhere for a price I am happy to pay.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bidding From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 10:45:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

One of the advantages of ebay is that, since I can't always sit and babysit a listing, I have to set whatever reasonable price I am willing to pay, and let things take their course. That process also pushes me to think carefully about what I am looking at, and how much I am gambling. Admittedly, I sometimes lose out, but I seldom have buyer's remorse. Susan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: lattice block From: Judy Schwender <

Hi all, This almost looks like part of a Carpenter's Square quilt.

One thought about a museum bidding at auctions: you need to have an appraiser or a group of three or four who can advise you. Is that possible?

Judy Schwender

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: lattice block From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 14:36:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Well...we do that, yes. I actually felt like I was using some appropriate guidelines this time, and it was kind of a quick turn around, so I didn't have the time to consult with anyone (this was a small country auction, a few good quilts with household junk -- literally). My committee is actually pretty picky with me, and I was working with the chair of the committee, and she was in agreement with what we did -- just so you know it's not just me doing strange random things! I guess I did the right thing -- I had a price and stuck to it. The problem is I don't know if I can agree with the idea that the right price is whatever someone will pay for it -- I don't believe that. I was outbid on a PA German decorated hand towel at a major auction a couple of years ago. It had condition problems and I stuck to my price. In the scheme of things it should not have brought that price, but there was lot of excitement around the auction, and IMO, people were nuts. The nuts factor has to account for something. Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt values; need some honest thoughts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 14:43:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Xenia said:

> "If you like it, the price is always right"...or words to that effect.

I like that, Xenia. Also, to quote the famous (or infamous?) Graham Forsdyke who is the esteemed guru of Antique Sewing Machine Collectors, "It's worth whatever you are willing to pay for it". When I first got into antique sewing machines (the bug bit after buying my first Featherweight and then several thousand dollars later, the antique quilt and reproduction vintage clothing bug hit too) I remember Graham using that phrase. He hated when people got into talking prices on the ISMACs on line digest (comparable to this group, just discussing antique sewing machines). I liked his viewpoint, truly as some collectors, especially new ones, wanted a value guide book that would govern all sewing machine purchases. Things just don't always work that way. You might develop a scale for yourself in terms of "rarity rating", and give it a 1 - 10 and then condition 1 - 10, etc. and assign a dollar value for these factors. You could also have a "heart goes pitty patter" rating that could outweigh all other thought process. I'm a real sucker for that! I would weigh out pattern, design, fabrics, stains and all those things, but if the "heart goes pitty patter" rating is very high, you just know you will regret it (sounds like you do regret not getting this one quilt) later if you don't go for it. I have an antique spool cabinet that I paid DEARLY at auction for, but I still have no regrets. It's a Heminway Threads spool cabinet and our last name is Heminway.... just HAD to have it. Heminway threads was owned by my husband's great grandfather. I never knew if I would ever find another Heminway cabinet, particularly one in this good condition. To this day I love it and know I overpaid for it, but what could I do? It's special to me and I keep all my thread in it. I could have paid as much as a hundred or more over what it was really worth, and given that some collectibles/sewing notions have been hit with a decline in pricing, it's probably worth even less than it was worth when I bought it about 8 years ago. But, truly, I still just love it and as I do not intend to sell it, I could care less.

Beauty and value are in the eye of the beholder.

So, Enjoy!!!!! Life it too short to think otherwise and if you could afford it, we don't always have to think about some kind of value guide.

Quilts are subjective in that they are all individually made, as well. No two quilts are really alike out there.

I also like how Xenia added, "you don't have to be the first bidder, just the last". A very good auction point, as well. If you hang back and wait to see who is doing the bidding and evaluate your completion and don't jump in, all anxious and showing that you think the item is really worth something, it gives a different impression than a bidder who looks desperate and determined. You appearance as a person of knowledge vs. a casual person just "liking" something is important too at auctions. If you are known as a dealer or collector, best to allow your spouse or companion to bid with your direction so as not to call attention to your primary interest. The dealers notice and take note. Auctions are fun, but there is certainly some good psychology involved. I haven't been to a good auction in a long time, this made my fingers "itch".... Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: lattice block From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 14:53:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

Candace,

My father always taught me that 'things are only worth what someone is willing to pay for them.' But when the 'nuts factor' comes into play at an auction I can't help wondering how many get carried away and pay more than they might otherwise be willing. Early on I got caught up in the frenzy a time or two which is how I learned to set my top price and stick to it.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

-----Original Message----- From: Candace Perry [mailto:candaceschwenkfelder.com]

The nuts factor has to account for something.

Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: lattice block From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 11:57:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 15

Candace Perry wrote:=0A"In the scheme of things, it should not have broughtthat price, but there was lot of excitement=0Aaround the auction, and IMO,people were nuts.=A0 The nuts factor has to account for something."=0A=0AIsee that a lot on eBay where newbies (those with very, very low numbers) will get into a bidding war with each other and=A0bid repeatedly,=A0far beyond the=A0reasonable value of=A0the quilt. I never even try to bid when I see that happening. There is no rhyme nor reason to it, it's the nuts factor at play.=0AMary Anne=0A=0A=0A=0A

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: quilt values; need some honest thoughts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 14:50:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 16

Kay - Consulting an appraiser is one good way to get help with market values for both new and vintage quilts. Go to either the AQS or PAAQT website for a list of certified appraisers in the US and Canada. This is our job - interpret the market; comparing what you have to other pieces. Some appraisers offer oral consultations and most will be able to offer you some ideas for selling your quilts.=20 That being said, auctions - as opposed to dealers - have factors from things as subtle as the weather that day to who shows up (make-up of the attendees). All you need for an item to go over a estimated market value is two parties that both 'want it'. That winning bid may not really be an accurate reflection of the larger market but you can't argue with the fact that it IS what the quilt was 'worth' on that day at that time to someone!=20 Jean

Jean Carlton, Minnesota AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser 763-420-7229 (home) 952-240-9187 (mobile)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Possum quilts From: Annette Gero <A.Gerounsw.edu.au> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 23:18:26 +1000 X-Message-Number: 17

-

Yes Possum quilts do exist and are very very famous in down under here in Australia.

They appear in a special chapter in my new book ""The Fabric of Society. Australia's Quilt Heritage From Convict Times To 1960" (Its just being printed and is not out yet)

Here is what I have written about them......

THE FABRIC OF INDIGENOUS PATCHWORK

The Australian Aborigines first made skin patchworks long before white man arrived. Early explorers found parties of Aborigines in possession of small rugs made of possum skin and sewn together with sinews, and the rugs became trade items between the natives and the white settlers.

Later in the mid 19th century it became fashionable for "ladies " to also make patchworks out of animal skins. It is known that possum and platypus skin patchwork rugs made by the women of New South Wales (Australia) were displayed in the Australian Courts of the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876 and the 1893 Chicago World's Columbian Exposition. In the late nineteenth century it continued to be fashionable for Sydney women to make these skin patchworks and they continued to be made up until the 1940s.

The earliest quilt made by aboriginal children was at the Swan River settlement Western Australia in1845 under the direction of Miss Elizabeth Irwin who is thought to have taught the aboriginal children sewing, reading and given them religious instruction. Elizabeth Irwin was the niece of Colonel Frederick Irwin, Commandant of Western Australia and sometimes acting Governor of the Colony. In 1854 the family returned to England and the quilt was kept here by a former family nursemaid, Jane Nixon. Much later it was donated to the National Library of Australia.

Aboriginal children were also taught to make both skin rugs and "English" patchwork in sewing classes by the German missionaries Mrs Strehlow and Mrs Heinrich in the 1920's at the Hermannsburg Mission (near Alice Springs). Needlework began at Hermannsburg, with quilt making. The quilts were made on a piece-work rate and the teacher, Mrs Heinrich, gave the women material and cotton. The women would then 'go bush' and return at the end of the week with the completed quilt. (Many of these were skin quilts)

happy quilting history!! Annette Gero in Sydney Australia (cold and wintery!!) --============_-994007386==_ma============--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Thoughts on auctions From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 22:54:40 +0100 X-Message-Number: 18

I don't have any words of wisdom on quilt values, but I do have experience of auctions from 'the other side'. For a time I worked for a very experienced property auctioneer and would sit behind him as he teased the last penny out of an auction room. I often saw him draw 'just one more bid' out of people who had obviously already gone beyond where they meant to be. Whenever I saw a bidder who had obviously gone beyond their limit and was in an agony of indecision I knew they were not going to get the property in the end. There was always someone else in the room, cool and comfortable, and going to be the winner. But every extra pound the auctioneer could get the bidding up meant an extra few pennies on his commission, and more money for his client. Like it or not, he was a good auctioneer, and was doing the best job he could for the sellers.

What I mean to say is, no-one ever loses an auction just for the sake of 'one more bid'. They lose it because someone else in the room is prepared to keep on going, and *keep on going* until they get what they have set their heart on. If you are that person, you will win. If you're not, someone else will win.

Sally Ward

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Bidding From: "Sarah Hough" <dougandsarah1gmail.com> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 17:02:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 19

I used to work for a long-time collector of all things antique. He always said "you forget it when you pay too much but you never forgive yourself for the ones you let get away."

I think of that often when I get too thrifty -- but then he had lots more money than I have.

Sarah

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt values From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2Hi Candace,

You pose quite a question! I am fairly new to collecting quilts- started in 2004- but I think (and hope!) I have some good insights to offer.

"If you like it, the price is always right"- as Xenia said- is surely the right advice. Sarah- I loved what you said too.

I collect many things, and the market for certain collectibles varies greatly- and thus so does "fair market value". Wine is a well-defined market. Supply of top wines is limited, but the market of buyers is quite vast- and so it is very easy do to a basic auction results review and see what a given case of wine is worth at any given point since the selling market is very carefully calibrated to be attuned to buyer demand. Antique paperweights have an extremely limited market of buyers, but also a very limited number of sellers who earned their money elsewhere and can afford to be patient in their sales to protect market values, and so the market is fairly "tight" there too. So pricing is fairly stable in both cases- since there is a good match of the buying and selling side.

Where quilts differ is in that there is a large audience of non-serious buyers who want them for various reasons that serious collectors would never consider. There is a famous tale of legendary dealer Jean Lyle refusing to sell a quilt to a buyer at a show when she found out that the buyer- on the advice of the interior decorater she had in tow- wanted to buy a quilt so it could be cut up and used to upholster chairs for a dining room table. Quilts are so popular, and their potential uses so diverse- that we serious collectors are competing with the average public to buy them for differing reasons. And so very often a piece will sell for more than its real value in the eye of a serious collector. Even though the height of general public interest in quilts as investments is long gone (for the moment), that attitude is still very strong at many levels of the market- and it is driven by an impulse appreciative of American history and the quilt as an art form which will endure forever.

Quilts also vary from many other collectible markets in that each is different. Even a poorly made quilt will often have specific attributes that sets it apart. A piece might have lousy quilting but a very intelligent color scheme. Or a piece might have outstanding quilting, but a lousy color scheme.

My advice to you is to really think hard about what matters to you in a quilt. When it comes to making purchase decisions- that question also includes what would matter to you in the first 30 seconds you see a quilt versus your love for it over time. And a good bit of that comes with experience.

For my part, what matters to me has changed a lot since I started collecting. These days, I care about the quilting complexity first- and also about the uniqueness of the design. There are lots of pieces out there with very snappy color schemes, but not much subtlety to back it up when you live with the quilt over time. These are the pieces I bought when I first got started, and for the most part they are long gone- even if I sold them at a loss.

And be careful too about any kind of categorization which tells you that X pattern is worth more than Y pattern. That is true, but ask yourself what you want to spend for rarity over quality. For many collectors, me included, a really well executed Drunkard's Path is worth more than a poor to average NY Beauty- even though that flies in the face of the market. If you have millions to spend, each year you can get the rarest patterns with the best executions and drop 5-6 figures per quilt. If you are like the rest of us, decide whether you want a really well done common pattern or a poorly executed rare/complex pattern.

The most I have ever spent for a quilt was last year for an Irish Chain. It is a very common pattern, but this piece is off the charts- c. 1850 in mint condition with a PERFECT zig zag border and some of the most amazing quilting (14-15 stitches per inch!) in complex patterns you would ever find. By some accounts, I should never have even considered this piece for a "serious collection" since it is a common pattern. And yet in my collection of mostly singular pieces, it stands out despite the fact it is one of the most common patterns there ever was.

Think about this. Your personal decision about what matters may vary in the end- but think about all the aspects of a quilt that makes it great and then decide which ones matter to you. From there you will know when to be an aggressive bidder at auction and what you want to pay.

Kay- as for to who to sell a quilt collection for you, email me directly and I can make suggestions. I have a pristine 10 year eBay feedback and yet I consign all quilt sales to someone else. Thanks to the market in general and a lot of very dishonest people, eBayers only buy quilts from trusted sources- me too, there are very few sellers I follow. The commission you pay trusted sellers will be far less than the extra money you get selling through them.

Tom.

************** Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in your budget? Read reviews on AOL Autos.

(http://autos.aol.com/cars-BMW-128-2008/expert-review?ncid=aolaut00050000000017 )

--part1_c39.3a7de2c5.35cd346a_boundary--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Buying for a museum collection From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 09:13:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0004_01C8F936.FBE13610 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Candace et al, On the subject of quilt values - it is actually more a question of plugging holes in your collection. I do bid by proxy for a couple of museums when I am at an auction with items of interest to the museum. The curators I work with have an annual budget for acquisitions. Before bidding on an artifact, they determine how much of that budget the item is worth ( the whole year's worth, just 10%, etc.) I can usually give a questimate of the hammer price by what a similar artifact has fetched in the past - but that is speculation. You never know what interior decorator working for a megabucks client will want the item.

The BEST education in this I ever saw was at the recent sale of the Tasha Tudor collection of antique clothing. The pre-sale estimates were very high - based on the anticipated "celebrity" value added factor to the items. Many smaller museums were scarred away by the estimates so did not come. One who did come was the Phoenix Art Museum. She went to her board and said, "this is an opprotunity. I need a 'war chest' - and the persission to spend as I see fit. I may land lucky as there are many things we could use." So, knowing what her total budget was, she was able to jump into a bid when she saw that it was likely to be affordable for her. Sometimes she lost, sometimes she won. The point is, she had a budget -and she was flexible. She knew the artifacts - whichcones were perfect for her collection and therefore worth going tothe mat for, and which ones, while nice, were not important to the collection - unless they went for a song - and some did.

You have to do your homeowrk, go to the preview and ponder, then know your budget - and just how badly your collection needs that "missing link". In the process you may have to set a record for the sale of such an artifact - but even so, the collection has been enriched for it -and no amount of money can buy that.

Newbie Richardson

------=_NextPart_000_0004_01C8F936.FBE13610--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt values From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 10:32:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Barbara Woodford here, dealer who is fading fast.

When I first started this business, I thought that I could sell quilts for twice as much as I paid. Not so at all.

Maybe New York dealers can go to the top at auctions, but we Midwest dealers cannot. I find that I often pay too much at auction, because the quilt is worth it. Well, it's not always worth it because you can't make a profit on it. I've always been puzzled by the myth that dealers ruin the auctions for collectors by bidding too high. Actually, it's just the reverse here and I try to stick to an under- the-market price, but sometimes I do get carried away because I love the quilt and then it's probably mine forever.

Although my business does not make a profit year after year, I do get a great deal of satisfaction from selling to someone who is delighted when they receive the quilt and tell me so. In the meantime, I get to see lots of period quilts.

Barbara historic-american.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pinking iron From: Crm793aol.com Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 11:24:17 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

I examined a friend's velvet, silk and brocade quilt yesterday and it has a straight border of wool that has a pinked scalloped border (about a 1" scallop). I did find a mention somewhere about antique pinking irons. Does anybody know about this tool? The quilt is not a crazy and it came from England.

Thanks, Carolyn Miller

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: quilt values From: "Candace Perry" 

The quilt I lost actually went to a dealer, so I suppose he/she will mark it up a little. The dealer bought most of the quilts that I was not interested in -- a bunch of 1930s log cabins, some 20th century appliqu=E9 and white quilts...interesting but those were gaps I did not need to fill! Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: pinking iron From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 12:07:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Singer had a pinking tool - not an iron, but a cutting device - that clamped to a table and had a blade in it like today's rotary cutters. One cranked the handle and fed the fabric edge through, creating a figured edge. There was also a wavy-edged disk. Eventually there was a second version of the tool that could be attached to the sewing machine and operated electrically. My guess is that both of these devices are early 20th century, but I could be wrong on the mechanical version.

Xenia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: pinking iron From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 09:20:04 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

From the online dictionary (quick google search) :

2. The act or method of decorating fabrics or garments with a pinking iron; also, the style of decoration; scallops made with a pinking iron. [1913 Webster]

Pinking iron. (a) An instrument for scalloping the edges of ribbons, flounces, etc. (b) A sword. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] Susan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Pinking Tool From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 10:29:22 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

First one has no pic but scroll to the bottom and it shows one type of pinking machine. There was also a hand tool. Jan

http://www.patented-antiques.com/Backpages/All_Archives/SEW_ARCHIVE/Sewrelated-archive.htm

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Pinking Iron From: rgnixonoct.net Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 12:47:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

From this website http://www.oldandsold.com/articles01/article603.shtml

An old-fashioned pinking iron is a useful article for the doll dressmaker, since pinked ruffles and flounces were often used. Pinking is a term used for finishing the edges of a ruffle with tiny scallops. The old irons came in sets and made one-fourth-inch, three-eighths-inch, and one-half inch scallops. They are to be found in antique shops or through advertising in mediums like the Swopper's column in Yankee Magazine, published at Dublin, New Hampshire. It was thus that the writer found a pinking machine which did the job by the turn of a crank. For those too young to have seen the old pinking iron in action, it may be explained that pinking was a laborious process which consisted of laying the single or folded cloth the width of the desired scallop on a hardwood block and hammering the iron down on it until the cloth was cut through. Today there are "pinking shears" but the end result is not so attractive nor so oldfashioned in appearance. end quote ****************

I've seen pinking irons on antique woodworking sites, too, but don't know if they were the same ones used on fabrics.

Gloria

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Pinking Iron From: "Nancy" <izannah1msn.com> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 12:56:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

There is one place that makes reproduction pinking irons for fabric--www.greenmanforge. com--if anyone is interested. These are designed more for clothing than quilts. I don't know how the fabrics might have been stabilized so that they didn't fray though. Does anyone know?

Nancy in PA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Red/Green block pattern From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 13:13:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Hello again, everyone ... has anyone had a chance to look at this, and does it look at all familiar? Maybe parts look familiar or resemble some other patthern? I'd really like to know more about this one. Thanks!

Dale in Indiana

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: A "New York dealer" comments From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> 

Reading the conversation about pricing and seeing the glaringly incorrect yet oft repeated=A0stereotype about "New York dealers", I feel I must reply.=A0 Contrary to your opinion,=A0New York does not have the highest pricest in the country,=A0nor do we glom up everything in sight at country auctions, asis the gossiped-about habit=A0 of some=A0highly competitive=A0dealers in many states.=A0Just to inform yourself, have a=A0look at=A0the websites of dealers=A0located outside of=A0New York City with=A0quilts and=A0folk art inventories=A0where some mighty=A0hefty prices=A0will dispel this myth once and for all.=20 =A0 All of us have been to, or have read articles about, shows=A0and auctions around the country=A0where some quilt on display has a price tag that occasions the observation=A0"they are asking that kind of money for that?!"=A0 =A0 I'd have a far more lucrative business if I could get what=A0I see=A0asked elsewhere in the country for conventional material that some people=A0over-estimate their local "treasure"=A0to be worth. Unique, truly eye catching, wonderful quilts=A0with few or no visual comparables, and in great condition, can be almost any=A0price the seller and buyer agree upon.=20 =A0 The rest --albeit pretty=A0Wedding Rings, Granny's Gardens, Nine Patches, and pieces in compromised condition where more intact comparables can be found to buy,=A0are so abundant now=A0because of the Internet=A0that prices across the board have come down markedly. Higher prices should attach when anexample=A0has an artistic individuality=A0and craftswomanship that set it apart from the thousands of=A0typical examples visible daily on line.=20 =A0 Auctions are a fascinating psychological environment about which much has been written to fathom the process. Tales abound about wild=A0price=A0records in all areas of the antiques market, especially where men with excess money compete in areas like contemporary paintings, decoys, automobiles, earlyfurniture, etc.! =A0Sadly, prices in every realm can=A0escalate at auction=A0depending=A0on who is competing against whom=A0in=A0that public forum and why, rather than being related to an item's intrinsic value. That's why the anonimity of a system like eBay is almost preferable (except that=A0is important to be able to see and handle the piece in person).=20 =A0 In your case Candace, if someone saw that a Museum (or a dealer!) was interested in a piece, they could challenge you for it by continuing to outbid you til you stopped, all because it must be worth something or be something rare and=A0great if you wanted it. =A0 The cautionary word about auctions to all is bid what you are willing to pay and no more. Used to be--before the Antiques Roadshow, all the books and periodical coverage--that estate=A0contents at auction could be purchased for less than they might ultimately be priced in a retail shop, but no more.Often auction prices are the new ceiling, and shoppers can get better value, and vetted goods,=A0from expert dealers around the country -- especiallyin New=A0York, promise the few of us still in business here! --=A0=A0than at a public, and publicized, auction. =A0 Laura Fisher =A0 =A0 --0-1009231870-1218218425=:37946--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Pinking Iron From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 14:25:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Hi Nancy,

I haven't come across any info explaining if and how fabrics were stabilized for pinking and am wondering if it was handled through fabric choice? I'm anxious to hear more on the subject.

In reading through the google entries, I came across this charming story that makes brief mention of the pinking iron. The setting is 1882 Indiana.

I laughed at the father's reaction to paying for twenty yards of fabric. "....little did he know that this was just the beginning...."

"A GIRL OF THE 1880's GETS A NEW DRESS"

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~inhenry/bessie5.htm ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pinking iron From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 14:33:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------080104010100020402010608 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Re pinkers -- please note that factory pinkers and scallopers both pinked and sealed edges which is why so few old costumes with these decorative flounces ravell In recreating an 1870s doll's taffeta dress, I was amazed to see how intact both taffeta and scalloping were.

Crm793aol.com wrote:

I examined a friend's velvet, silk and brocade quilt yesterday and it has a straight border of wool that has a pinked scalloped border (about a 1" scallop). I did find a mention somewhere about antique pinking irons. Does anybody know about this tool? The quilt is not a crazy and it came from England.

> >

--------------080104010100020402010608--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Pinking Tool From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 14:29:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 15

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------090604040007010301080403 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Jan -- I have one of these and they are marvelous for pinking long lengths. They do need to be sharpened occasionally; I have not run into this problem yet but will have to find somebody who is set up to do this sort of thing.

Jan Thomas wrote:

First one has no pic but scroll to the bottom and it shows one type of pinking machine. There was also a hand tool. > > >

--------------090604040007010301080403--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [qhl]Possum Political Correctness From: jocelynmdelphiforums.com Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 19:26:32 +0000 X-Message-Number: 16

----=_vm_0011_W2317710593_12235_1218223592 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

As for picking up possums, I know (and intend to learn) nothing. <G> However, when I was in college, we were taught to pick up lab mice and gerbils by their tails. You have to grab them right at the base of the tail, though, and while the tail technique quickly isolates the rodent you selected from the masses, you should ASAP get a solid surface under the paws.

----=_vm_0011_W2317710593_12235_1218223592--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: armadillo story-true and OT From: jocelynmdelphiforums.com Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 19:48:34 +0000 X-Message-Number: 17

----=_vm_0011_W2417214799_17814_1218224914 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

>>When the dirt and smoke cleared, the armadillo was waddling across the lawn and his bush was neatly split into 4 equal pieces. Many years ago, I worked for a man who proved that brains and tempers arenot assigned in equal quantities. He had proudly presided over the building of a new office, and was devastated when anyone did not treat the building with respect. His tolerance for insult was sorely tested when a woodpecker decided to start pecking away on the outside wall of my office. (Well, actually it was a stuccopecker. But you get the idea.) One day I told him that the fake owl he'd put up was obviously not working, since the stuccopecker had been pecking away all morning. He ran outside, saw the damage, and hollered, 'That S-O-B! I'm gonna go get my shotgun!' and took off. I was left standing there wondering how a shotgun blast to the side of the building would be an improvement over the stuccopecker's work. Fortunately, though, he came to his senses before he got back...

----=_vm_0011_W2417214799_17814_1218224914--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE:From possums to road kill From: jocelynmdelphiforums.com Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 20:14:36 +0000 X-Message-Number: 18

----=_vm_0011_W2584221555_24015_1218226476 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

On April 15, in Lawrence Kansas, the Alferd Packer Memorial String Band plays a concert in the main post office, in honor of the late filers of income tax. You can sample roadkill stew (the exact ingredients of which depends upon...well...what was killed on the roadways) and dance with the mountain men. http://www.alferdpackerband.com/whois_packer.htm There used to be a clip from CBS's Sunday Morning, but unfortunately that's not available any more either at their web site or at CBS. Too bad...you could have seen me in the background. <G>

----=_vm_0011_W2584221555_24015_1218226476--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: pinking iron From: jocelynmdelphiforums.com Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 20:41:13 +0000 X-Message-Number: 19

----=_vm_0011_W2796029658_30088_1218228073 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Xenia, I have a hand-held pinker...it has handles like scissors, but the other end is a rotary cutting blade. I believe it belonged to my Aunt Lula, or her mother, who was a prolific quilter. Aunt Lula was an RN during WWI, sothat gives you a rough idea of how old it might be.

----=_vm_0011_W2796029658_30088_1218228073--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: question for Joan/Pinking Iron From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 16:47:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 20

Hi Joan, Do you know if the fabric edges sealed when using the hand held pinker or would there be enough force to accomplish that with a hammer? I'm guessing if a wife had her husband do the whacking, she'd get a better edge! Gloria ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Pinking Iron From: jocelynmdelphiforums.com Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 20:48:00 +0000 X-Message-Number: 21

----=_vm_0011_W2830931007_31650_1218228480 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

>>>I laughed at the father's reaction to paying for twenty yards of fabric. >"....little did he know that this was just the beginning...."

I am reminded of my own father, who set out one summer day with the females of the family, whose goal was to purchase the fabric for my sister's wedding and new home. Twenty yards of upholstery fabric later....which hadto be carried in and out of stores to try to find the perfect braid to decorate it...well, my sister described it in her bride's book as 'being followed by the Ancient Mariner, with a bolt of fabric albatross'. <G>

----=_vm_0011_W2830931007_31650_1218228480--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: : question for Joan/Pinking Iron From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Fri, 08 Aug 2008 19:00:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 22

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------020908050007060202010808 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

My understanding it was done all in one operation; something to do with sealer laid on pinker roll. Of course there might have been other models to do it differently. The are of course factory or commercial pinkers done by the mfg. There also might have been home methods for the sewer.

Gloria Nixon wrote: > Hi Joan, > Do you know if the fabric edges sealed when using the hand held pinker or > would there be enough force to accomplish that with a hammer? I'm > guessing if a wife had her husband do the whacking, she'd get a better > edge! > > >

--------------020908050007060202010808--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Thanks and gimme From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 19:50:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 23

--_6588c9e2-d6c0-4d38-af55-5f6cf3a33994_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Please bear with me while I mis-use the list to thank you all for the cardsand kind words on the recent death of my brother and only sibling. It's been so much harder than I'd anticipated and the enormous stack of cards from all across the U.S. has been such a surprise and such a sweet blessing. I've even heard from list members that I've never met! The phrase "You all are the best!" is often seen on the QHL list and I can certainly affirm the statement. You are the best indeed. Now - on a lighter note - I will soon be ready to make my Sunbonnet Sue quilt. (Hideous hand-wringing maniacal laughter here.) Those of you who have seen my quilts based on traditional patterns probably think something is up.......and you would be correct. Sue has humiliating secrets that will soon be public information. However - and this is why I am writing - I need a couple of really crappy old SS blocks to begin the quilt with. I used to see orphan blocks everywhere and stacks of old Sue blocks for sale.I probably handled a few hundred while working in Xenia's booth! I wouldn't touch them but now I wish I had that ten foot pole as I want to have a few "real" Sues on the quilt. The ideal would be to get a block fromseveral of you so that the blocks would be different. Hmmmm......old Sue doesn't get a whole heck of a lot different does she?? I'll be happy topay postage but I will pay only a pittance for the old hag herself. Apologies to the Sue fanatics on the list - I can appreciate that she is beloved by many. Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com "I always try to balance the light with the heavy - a fewtears of human spirit in with the sequins and the fringes."Bette Midler

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rosie Lee Tompkins Quilts Exhibited in DC From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 13:00:03 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 24

For those traveling to or thru the DC area this usmmer, here is another exhibit to visit.

ROSIE LEE TOMPKINS QUILTS EXHIBIT - "Something Pertaining to God: the Patchwork Art of Rosie Lee Tompkins." Through Sept. 21. An exhibit of the quilts, quilted clothing, chair covers and pillows of the acclaimed African American artist at The National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW. (202) 783-5000. Admission $10, seniors and students $8, age 18 and under free.

Karen Alexander

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: scalloped pinked edge From: Crm793aol.com Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 18:21:04 EDT X-Message-Number: 25

-------------------------------1218234064 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I've posted a picture of the edge of the quilt showing the pinked scalloped edging under the General category. Each scallop is a little over 1". Wool double border. Thanks for all the information about this.

Carolyn Miller