Subject: speaking of animal skin textiles From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net> 

Not sure how you all might find this photo; it came up as a Yahoo photo taken by Cameron Spencer/Getty of the world's teams entering the stadium at the Olympics in Beijing. The flag bearer for Australia is wearing a cape of some sort of fur/animal skin.

Andi in Paducah, KY

------=_NextPart_000_000A_01C8F9C5.89F35BC0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: speaking of animal skin textiles From: "Lorraine Olsson" <svenpnc.com.au> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 21:14:38 +1000 X-Message-Number: 2

The flag bearer for Australia is wearing a cape of > some sort of fur/animal skin.

The flagbearer for New Zealand, Mahe Drysdale, wore a NZ Maori cloak. While Mahe was actually born in Australia, he is definitely a New Zealander, leading the NZ team.

I believe he is a rower, as is the Aussie flag bearer, James Tomkins, who is competeing at his 6th olympics.

Off topic, but at this time we are all feeling extremely patriotic. Gotta have the facts straight.....

Cheers, Lorraine in Oz

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: scalloped pinked edge From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Sat, 09 Aug 2008 08:07:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------040008070508020309080700 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Caryolyn -- I have seen and have edges like that which are made by factory specialty cutters, the same kind used to make trim edgings. I can't say that yours is factory made but if made by hand, that was one precise hand-pinker :-) From photo, fabric looks like felt but can't remember if you stated what kind of fabric earlier. .

Joan

Crm793aol.com wrote:

I've posted a picture of the edge of the quilt showing the pinked scalloped edging under the General category. Each scallop is a little over 1". Wool double border. Thanks for all the information about this.

> > >

--------------040008070508020309080700--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: question for Joan/Pinking Iron From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 21:30:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

If this is anything like what I am thinking, this tool only makes the pinking doesn't seal the edge. The edges were treaded with stuff much like fray check. Most of the time it was used on the raw edges of seams. In the 1850's when there were lots of tiers on dresses the edges of the ruffled tiers were pinked. Bonnet ribbons sometimes were trimmed using the pinking iron. Debbie Hill-Russell russhillbeecreek.net ----- Original Message -----

> Do you know if the fabric edges sealed when using the hand held pinker or > would there be enough force to accomplish that with a hammer?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re&Green Unknown Block in gallery From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 22:32:47 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

I just posted a photo of a crib quilt found on eBay that is in my collection. It has some resemblance to the other Red & Green Unknown pattern posted here in the Gallery ---in a general way.

Got to http://www.quilthistory.com/ then click on <Gallery> on the left side of screen. It's posted under the under the General category.

Karen Alexander Three straight days of sunshine! Maybe summer is here? But temp in the mid-50s at night!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Red & Green Unknown Block in gallery From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 08:58:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Karen:

I can see a resemblance, and it's interesting that they both have tan greens. Do you have any provenance on yours?

Dale

Karen said: I just posted a photo of a crib quilt found on eBay that is in my collection. It has some resemblance to the other Red & Green Unknown pattern posted here in the Gallery ---in a general way.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Pinking irons From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 09:05:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Pinking machines also come in heavy duty. My husband inherited one from an old airplane building buddy. And yes, he has used it--after ruining one pair of my shears!

Jean

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: question for Joan/Pinking Iron From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 16:05:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Thanks Debbie! That helps round out the info on the home seamstress of long ago. Bless their sweet hearts, those women worked hard for pinked edges. Gloria ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Thanks and gimme From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 15:16:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_004B_01C8FA32.D4E93060 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Teddy Sue can be quite different ! You must look up the SBS quilt in the current Quilter's Newsletter mag....unique :{ jean

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: odd printings of my recent postings From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 21:14:37 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

--0-1439875666-1218341677=:25012 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

ooooh --=A0what happened? In my most recent postings to QHL -- A "New York City dealer" comments..., and other dialogues, A O and =3D signs and a bizarre construction of the sentences appear on my signed=A0comments in the=A0daily QHL mailings. Can anyone tell me why they look like that and how to correct this?=A0Looks like I am typing under an influence of something......Ipromise=A0I=A0know how to type on this thing......=A0Thanks, =A0Laura Fisher --0-1439875666-1218341677=:25012--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: odd printings of my recent postings From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sat, 09 Aug 2008 23:58:49 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Laura,=20

Check under "format" (on my Mac) to be sure you are not posting in HTML. Sometimes that produces results such as you describe.

Your post "A New York City Dealer...." appeared free of glitches on my computer.=20

In fact, I was tempted to write you and say "Amen." Some of the biggest complainers about such things are residents of PA, South Jersey, and VA/MD who have in their collections exception finds, purchased for a pittance. NYC dealers pay NYC rents and taxes and salaries. We can all find hotel rooms in Wilkes-Barre for less than we pay in NYC. But Wilkes-Barre does not have the opera houses, the theaters, the museums, and bookstores for which we go to NYC. Sometimes the word "greedy" comes to mind.

Pay no attention to such talk. Besides, I think they are speaking figuratively. Maybe they'll think your A O and =3D signs are imprecations!

Gaye Ingram Louisiana

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: odd printings of my recent postings From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 00:25:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Laura, The text was normal as it came to me....And I wanted to thank you for your input and experiences as a dealer.=20 Jean

----- ------=_NextPart_000_0010_01C8FA7F.A9807DA0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Pinking Iron From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 00:27:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0016_01C8FA7F.EF449920 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I've posted to Eboard (on the general tab on white background "pinking tool" ) a photo of the pinking tool I have along with its box cover. It is not what you are referring to - more of a precursor to the pinking shears but I thought it was interesting when I came across it.=20 The Florian Mfg Co was in Plantsville, CT and the product has the Good Housekeping Seal of Approval. There is a certificate of guarantee in the box states that "proper pinking is an art". . The top 'ruffled' metal rolls along with the metal wheel underneath the fabric. It is not supposed to get dull and gives a nice sharp edge.The smooth wheel is to be on the table and it self feeds once started. It suggests many used such as "novel party and table decorations, paper costumes, (?) luncheon cloths and baby clothes with the small neat seams that will not chafe the skin". It works for either right or left handed people. All of this information but no date on anything. I did only a brief search and see a few sold on Ebay but didn't get to history. It works so much better than the pinking shears I've had where only 2 inches are sharp and they are located in the middle of the blade!

The close up of that wool edge that started the discussion looks like all the scallops are not perfectly uniform? It reminds me of the little plastic scissors now used by scrapbookers for various edge treatments of paper. When you have to start again you are ineveitable NOT at the same place in the design. jean

------=_NextPart_000_0016_01C8FA7F.EF449920--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: oops From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 06:09:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multipart message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_000C_01C8FAAF.AB4F2250 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I wrote: The flag bearer for Australia is wearing a cape of

> some sort of fur/animal skin.

And Lorraine wrote:

The flagbearer for New Zealand, Mahe Drysdale, wore a NZ Maori cloak. While Mahe was actually born in Australia, he is definitely a New Zealander, leading the NZ team.

I believe he is a rower, as is the Aussie flag bearer, James Tomkins, who is competeing at his 6th olympics.

Off topic, but at this time we are all feeling extremely patriotic. Gotta have the facts straight.....

So I guess I shouldn't believe the captions on Getty photos. Sorry, folks!

Andi in Paducah, KY

------=_NextPart_000_000C_01C8FAAF.AB4F2250--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: odd printings of my recent postings From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 09:04:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Gaye,

You're right! But when in Wilkes Barre one should not have to pay NYC prices for what is in Wilkes Barre! That, I suppose, is why NYC dealers leave their cultural filled city to buy in PA, South Jersey and VA/MD . . . or pay pickers to do the buying for them.

No offense intended to any dealer, but IT DOES NOT MATTER WHERE THE DEALERS ARE FROM. To see the faces and listen to the frustration of local PA dealers who make their living on what they buy at local auctions watch the best PA quilts leave the area to be sold at prices far higher than they could hope to ask in PA is a sad experience.

I don't think anyone wants to begrudge dealers every where from making a living. Like my local quilt shops (and yes in PA we're spoiled by prices there too) I do my best to support as many quilt and textile dealers as I can afford. Goodness I could probably even turn a profit from what I purchased at an estate auction just yesterday. But that is not my intent when making my purchases - I purchase based on what my heart desires and what my budget can afford. If another collector or dealer can pay more than they win and I wait until the next one comes along, or the next, or the next . . .. Sometimes the word 'jealous' comes to mind.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle One of those lucky quilt collectors currently living in Lancaster County, PA

-----Original Message----- From: Gaye Ingram [mailto:gingramsuddenlink.net]

Some of the biggest complainers about such things are residents of PA, South Jersey, and VA/MD who have in their collections exception finds, purchased for a pittance. NYC dealers pay NYC rents and taxes and salaries. We can all find hotel rooms in Wilkes-Barre for less than we pay in NYC. But Wilkes-Barre does not have the opera houses, the theaters, the museums, and bookstores for which we go to NYC. Sometimes the word "greedy" comes to mind.

Gaye Ingram Louisiana

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: odd printings of my recent postings From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 06:54:54 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Laura (et al)

The odd postings (and blank postings) come from posting in MIME or Rich Text or HTML (however your mail client phrases it.) Sometimes it creates an attachment and Lyris will block block and sometimes it doesn't. Some people have mail clients set up to automatically read enhanced text, so they don't see the problem. The digest, however, will faithfully reproduce everything. Since the majority of the list is on digest, it's best to post in Plain Text.

Laura, we use "dealers from NYC" as a euphemism for just about anyone that out bids us in a country auction. I would really be surprised if they were actually from New York City.

As for quilt value, I guess I am at the opposite end of the scale. Someone has to be. I collect loveworn quilts. These are quilts that are given to me or sell for less than $25 at auction or at an antique shop. I have boxes, bins, a couple of chairs, two antique cribs and one haberdashery display case filled with them. Like children, each one is special in it's own way.

But I still enjoy the spectacular ones!

Kris

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Needles and Pins exhibit in Santa Fe, NM From: "Glenn Hardy" <ejghardyverizon.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 08:58:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Hi All, I haven't seen anyone else on the list mention this exhibit, so I'll step out of the shadows of lurkdom just long enough to tell you about the Needles and Pins exhibit in Santa Fe, NM. It is at the Museum of International Folk Art, part of an impressive museum complex. This small exhibit focuses on the tools humans have used to create cloth/textiles throughout time along with examples of those textiles. The exhibit starts with tools for fiber preparation and proceeds through spinning and weaving, lace, embroidery, knitting, crochet, tatting. There is also a section about coloring fabric which shows tools for block printing and batik. What I like about the exhibit is the side-by-side comparison of tools; spindles from 4 continents, for example. Also, one case shows tools most of us remember: bead looms, potholder looms, and those crafts we all learned at camp. I had never seen a potholder throw before-- dozens of those things woven together. I also discovered that a pounded barkcloth textile I had seen for sale elsewhere in town was actually a painted loincloth. This exhibit is on display until Jan 4, '09. While you are there take time to see the rest of the museum, which has a fantastic collection of folk art. The website is www.InternationalFolkArt.org

Julianne, in Easton, MD always happy to leave the Eastern Shore in July or August

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: question for Joan/Pinking Iron From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 16:55:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Sure glad to help. Now that heavy duty pinker imagine using that on fabric. I used to have pictures of period dresses done that way and if I did they may be on a disc I can't open. If the computer guy can open it, which he should he made it, I may just get them back on to the new computer. My old one died a few weeks ago. Anyway if I am able I will send them to you so you can see what the dress inside looked like. Debbie Hill-Russell russhillbeecreek.net ----- Original Message -----

> Thanks Debbie! > That helps round out the info on the home seamstress of long ago. Bless > their sweet hearts, those women worked hard for pinked edges. > Gloria >

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: odd printings of my recent postings From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 11:11:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

> No offense intended to any dealer, but IT DOES NOT MATTER WHERE THE DEALERS > ARE FROM. To see the faces and listen to the frustration of local PA dealers > who make their living on what they buy at local auctions watch the best PA quilts leave the area to be sold at prices far higher than they could hope to ask in PA is a sad experience.

Gretta,

I am instructed and humbled and apologetic. I understand so well. And I think the issue of quilts leaving the area is something most of us understand, even if we can't think of what to do about it. And coming from the South, I understand the cost-of-living differences that irritate. The NYC dealer might make no more than the OH dealer in terms of real profit, owing to cost-of-living differences, but that makes no differences to the OH buyer, whose dollars are keyed to Ohio, not NYC. The same, I'm sure, is true of West Coast dealers who travel to the Midwest and rural East.

I think Kris said it: NYC dealers is really a blanket term for folks who outbid us on our home turf.

In PA and environs, you are fortunate that museums are preserving some of the best quilts. But Candace, whose post began this thread, expressed the plaintive situation there, where museums can't compete with outside buyers. Now THAT is the situation for which I feel most sympathy. For we depend on those resources to reveal to us regional variations and idiosyncrasies.

You folks in the mid-Atlantic do have good pickings that strike us in the hinterlands as Wonderland. I remember Sue Reich's bidding on an elephant quilt top for me for which I was prepared to pay what I considered a reasonable amount by our standards here. She got it for much less than one would have had to pay around here because of the scarcity of quilts here.

None of the above excuses my off-handedness, however. I know we've all done it---thought we were writing to an individual and posted to the list. Yet that does not excuse it.

Gretta, for you, I'll crawl in the snow on Mee MORE ial Drive. Okay?

Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Needles and Pins exhibit in Santa Fe, NM From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 11:58:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Julianne-- I just saw the exhibit, and it was VERY well done. I didn't want to leave. . .

Kim

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: unknown red and green pattern From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 17:40:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

I am probably late commenting on this so if I am way off base, just ignore me. I've been out of the loop for a while.

I just looked at both red and green block patterns posted on the quilthistory.com website. Pictures are always so hard to evaluated, but to my eyes the first one looks a bit like a version of the Hawaiian thistle applique pattern. The second one posted by Karen Alexander looks more like a wine glass but it could be a rough facsimile of the thistle.

Just my penny's worth!

Best wished, Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Speaking of dealers from NYC: From: Jackie Joy <joysbeesyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 19:51:44 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 13

--0-2094516446-1218423104=:60538 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Today, I was reading an article on Shaker design in a recent Martha StewartLiving magazine and was admiring a quilt hanging on a wall in a bedroom shot.=A0=A0 The room was so spare that the quilt=A0was quite striking.=A0 I even hunted up the "Guide" section to find out=A0the location of the shoot and the origin of the quilt:=A0 =A0it was=A0from Laura Fisher.Antiques.=A0 Lovely quilt. =A0 Jackie in Reno

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: odd printings of my recent postings From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 08:20:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Gaye,

I agree wholeheartedly that it is a great misfortune to all, local residents and visitors alike, when museums cannot afford to compete to preserve items specific to their local heritage. Any regions with museums willing to try are most fortunate. As yet, I have not had the good fortune to visit Candace at her museum but it is on my very long list of things to do.

I suppose too that my perspective at local auctions is a little different than those who are from here since I am, and always will be, a CA girl regardless of where I reside physically. As an outsider I understand the frustrations of the local businesses AND the interlopers who come to buy. I also feel comfortable talking to both which often provides me opportunities to get business cards which help me identify who I can't afford to bid against. I am sure we have all seen time and time again in more places than PA where wonderful things, not just quilts, leave because outsiders can pay more, but I suppose that is the way of the world.

Oddly, I am not a big collector of PA quilts; my preference is for quilts from various regions around the country because I find the subtle differences and similarities interesting. I have been fortunate to travel and live in various regions around these United States and I have supported local businesses whenever I can. So, I too am humbled to admit that in my own way I am one of those who buy things that may eventually leave their local area.

Like every collector, I love to find good deals on the pristine but like Kris often the less-than-perfect and sometimes otherwise dispossessed quilts find comfortable storage at my house. I believe both are a true representation of quilt history.

As for what is put out on this list, I'll gladly accompany you in that crawl in the snow on Mee-MORE-ial drive anytime.

Have a wonderful week!

Greta Spoiled again with great finds yesterday!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: unknown red and green pattern From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 09:33:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks, Kathy! I'll look into the Hawaiian thistle connection. Those tan parts look a bit like half-fleur-de-lis to me. But who knows where she got her inspiration ...

Dale in beautiful balmy Indiana

Kathy Moore said: ... to my eyes the first one looks a bit like a version of the Hawaiian thistle applique pattern. The second one posted by Karen Alexander looks more like a wine glass but it could be a rough facsimile of the thistle.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: scalloped pinked edge From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 07:56:08 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

--0-1122398909-1218466568=:30935 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hi all, On page 13 of the catalog for the exhibit "The Log Cabin Returns to Kentucky: Quilts from the Pilgrim/Roy Collection" there is a wool quilt circa 1870 with a pinked scalloped edge that also has a circle cutout of the scallop. I posted a picture (not very clear but you will get the idea) on the eboard. The effect is lace- or eyelet-like. Since fulled wool will not ravel when cut, I would imagine that such decorative trimming was often found on clothing of the 19th century, if not earlier. I am still trying to figure out how cotton or silk taffeta would not have ravelled with such an edge. Judy Schwender

--0-1122398909-1218466568=:30935--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt values From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 08:20:55 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

--0-1659054285-1218468055=:28653 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hi all, Since there are many collectors on this list, here is something to think about, in light of Candace's frustration at being outbid.

If something fatal happened to you today, what would happen to your quilt collection?

If you don't look at your quilt collection as a monetary assett for your survivors to auction off, where will the quilts go? Do you have a favorite quilt museum that would like certain quilts from your collection? If so, be sure and put that quilt in your will as going to that museum.

Collecting antique quilts became popular in the 1970s. Those collectors have now reached or are now reaching retirement age, and will be leaving this world in the next 10 to 15 years. Why leave it up to your descendents who gets those quilts? Do they really know the value or importance of your collection? Or, will they have an estate auctioneer auction them off with other household goods? Will Candace and other museums be outbid yet again?

If you have a quilt that you know a particular museum would be happy to get, then be sure it does. I am not trying to be morbid. I just would like collectors to plan ahead so that some of these quilt treasures can be enjoyed by a wider audience for a much longer time.

Do you want your collection to end up as blankets for outdoor rock concerts and beach days?

Judy Schwender

--0-1659054285-1218468055=:28653--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Rosie Lee Tompkins Quilts Exhibited in DC From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 08:33:18 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

--0-1999978470-1218468798=:64889 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hi all, I do believe I saw this exhibit at the Shelburne last October. IT WAS WONDERFUL. Don't miss it. Judy Schwender

karenquiltrockisland.com wrote: For those traveling to or thru the DC area this usmmer, here is another exhibit to visit. ROSIE LEE TOMPKINS QUILTS EXHIBIT - "Something Pertaining to God: the Patchwork Art of Rosie Lee Tompkins." Through Sept. 21. An exhibit of the quilts, quilted clothing, chair covers and pillows of the acclaimed African American artist at The National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW. (202) 783-5000. Admission $10, seniors and students $8, age 18 and under free. Karen Alexander

--0-1999978470-1218468798=:64889--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt values From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 11:56:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Judy,

You raise a very good point! And, might I add to that careful consideration and instruction for all of our collections including books, sewing tools, fabrics, etc. All of these items are an investment and have a value worthy of our time to photograph and catalog. That information should be updated periodically too; just like updated appraisals of quilts.

Clear instructions for spouses and family would be most helpful too. And perhaps even a list of trusted quilt friends who might be willing to help.

This information can also be useful for insurance purposes too.

Just something to think about (and possibly another 'to do' for the list).

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

-----Original Message----- From: Judy Schwender [mailto:sister3603yahoo.com]

If something fatal happened to you today, what would happen to your quilt collection?

If you don't look at your quilt collection as a monetary asset for your survivors to auction off, where will the quilts go? Do you have a favorite quilt museum that would like certain quilts from your collection? If so, be sure and put that quilt in your will as going to that museum.

Judy Schwender

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: thanks and more From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 10:51:39 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

--0-91000807-1218477099=:89899 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Thanks to all of you who replied to my comments about the "New York dealer"stereotype, whether they appeared correctly on their computer screens, or had the A's and O's and =3D signs and sentence breaks that showed up on mine!

I too recall tales of the "Pennsylvania mafia", the major players who scarfed up all the good stuff at auctions and prevented a "civilian"=A0 from having a shot at something, and the notorious buying pools at auctions that blocked small fries from playing in the big leagues.=20

I just get testy about all this when I experience how hard it is to maintain a business now in the things we love, what with rising costs of everything and a formerly-interested audience that is aging or dying or downsizing, with no replacement collector population on the horizon. What will happen to this stuff we cherish and research,=A0 if no one wants it as we did during the exciting years of quilt learning and quilt buying?

People contact me practically everyday to sell their beloved collections, but the audience for a multitude of quilts just in not there anymore, whether in New York or elsewhere, in my experience.=20

As to the sorrow of quilts leaving their home communities, this departure of local patrimony is an ancient lament; think back to the Elgin marbles, King Tut's tomb, etc.=20

On the other hand, if the quilts stayed "home", how would the world have known about and appreciated them? I think back to the photo on the front pageof the New York Times when that earthquake struck Osaka, Japan -- there was a wounded woman sitting amidst a pile of rubble wrapped in an American Star of Bethlehem quilt which provided at least some comfort and protection. The world is way smaller now, and national and international business in cultural artifacts has enhanced us all (as well as enriched some people perhaps more than others think is fair!)

Thanks to making a market in quilts made everywhere, for me and my clients,horizons and knowledge have expanded, and the aesthetics and cultural heritage of Pennsylvania communities and elsewhere have spread throughout the world. Selling Amish quilts to Germans has led to the development of major collections, exhibitions, books, art news, etc, and selling to the French has stimulated the creation of a museum of Amish history in the community there from which they emigrated. I much prefer all that, to pieces staying in some musty local historic house. That's another side of this whole quilt dealer controversy.

Laura Fisher

--0-91000807-1218477099=:89899--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt values From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 10:54:10 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

--0-1451292462-1218477250=:39145 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Re: "Clear instructions for spouses and family would be most helpful too. And perhaps even a list of trusted quilt friends who might be willing to help."

This is not a judgement of anyone's spouse or family. If you want such-and-such a quilt to go to such-and-such a museum or friend, GET IT IN WRITING IN YOUR WILL. I have heard too many horror stories about leaving the dispersal of belongings up to family and friends. Besides, they will be grieving. Save them a hassle and put it all in your will.

--0-1451292462-1218477250=:39145--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt values From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 14:41:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Before you commit anyone by leaving your final instructions in a will, be absolutely sure they are willing to accept the responsibility. Individuals and/or museums or other organizations included. How many discussions have there been of quilts left on the doorsteps of museums that are unwanted.

Remember, unless you confirm with the person or organization you want to have a quilt or other item they may not want it and it could very well end up as a beach blanket anyway!

-----Original Message----- From: Judy Schwender [mailto:sister3603yahoo.com] Sent: Monday, August 11, 2008 1:54 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: Quilt values

If you want such-and-such a quilt to go to such-and-such a museum or friend, GET IT IN WRITING IN YOUR WILL. I have heard too many horror stories about leaving the dispersal of belongings up to family and friends. Besides, they will be grieving. Save them a hassle and put it all in your will.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 1830s sailing ship textiles From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 14:10:17 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

--0-752810909-1218489017=:97005 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

A customer today is a sset decorator propping a movie that takes place aboard a c. 1830s sailing cargo ship from England to the U.S.

He is looking for cabin furnishings--what kind of bedding, blankets, etc would have been used by the captain, and by the sailors? Did they differ, what were furnishings made from.

would there have been floor coverings, upholstery, even mattresses. Was everything sailcloth, or homespun linen? Blue and white check blankets, woven coverlets, or was everything plain?

Any help you textile and costume experts can share, or books with pictures to refer him to, would be most appreciated!!

Movie will star Morgan Freeman, if he heals, and if he doesn't get dragged through divorce court by his angry wife after he crashed with his mistress in the car! (does this sound too much like Access Hollywood?! sorry -- but at least this makes the day interesting -- there was a veritable flood rainstorm in NYC today, and only 1 person ventured in.)

Laura Fisher

--0-752810909-1218489017=:97005--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: thanks and more From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 17:11:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Laura F wrote: =20 I just get testy about all this when I experience how hard it is to maintain a=20 business now in the things we love, what with rising costs of everything and a=20 formerly-interested audience that is aging or dying or downsizing, with no replacement collector population on the horizon. What will happen to this stuff we cherish and research,=A0 if no one wants it as we did during the exciting years of quilt learning and quilt buying? >=20 People contact me practically everyday to sell their beloved collections, but=20 the audience for a multitude of quilts just in not there anymore, whether in New York or elsewhere, in my experience. ---------

This strikes me as the real issue we should address----how to create a market, even if of a very selective group. If this can be done in the short run, the quilts will come back on their own ultimately. But they need to be saved.

Of course, we are probably of several minds: the collector in us wants to benefit from lower prices in a buyer's marketplace; the other collector in us wants stable or rising prices because those increase the value of our holdings; the real collector in us wants people in succeeding generations to value what we value.

I cannot recall a time when I did not want quilts. Yet they simply did not come up for sale in the South, where estate sales are a fairly recent development and still frowned upon by many (e.g., me). Locating pattern collections was hard. As a newly wed, living in an apartment on a wee-tiny block of space in an urban area, I subscribed to Progressive Farmer an Farm Journal because of the quilt patterns. (One had to choose swine or cattle issues, I recall.)=20

But then, with Williamsburg's advertising and development, the approach of the bi-centennial, Jacqueline Kennedy, the broader interest in historic furnishings, things began to change. What had always been true in New England, I think, spread to the rest of the country. It was a romantic age, whether one was tripping on drugs or on 18th-century Philadelphia-made cabinet pieces, there was a certain idealism prevalent. And most that idealism had been fueled originally when the results of the space race became clearly to America's benefit. As a people we were proud to be Americans and we wanted a piece of our past.

In more recent years, we've been moving in a very different direction, probably because we know so little about our history and also because we've developed a pervasive sense of guilt about having power and wealth (even as our young and old want the perks of power). And we don't think in words as much as we do in symbols, which won't tell you what the free world needs to do about Russia's effort to install a puppet gvt in Georgia right now.

But I certainly hope we will see things turn around.

But we should endeavor to create a positive movement now. We need to band together with others to assure the teaching of the history of our nation, which for all its flaws, is an extraordinary history of a land that provided more freedom for more people than has ever existed in the known world. Instead of advancing minor threads or sub-strands of our history in grades 1-7, we should insist that more accurate standards based on relative importance be established for inclusion in political history curricula. Out of a respect for our history will come a respect for the artifacts of history. Right now, barring a miracle, a youngster comes into 8th grade talking about the US "hypocrisy" of The Great Compromise and a nation of free white men's permitting slavery, treating the nation as if it was a place where WASPS always took advantage of immigrants or women or people of color----as if we just fought a bloody revolution to establish a land where we could whup up on other people. Even as they enjoy the unparalleled benefits of living in a land of freedom and political power, they are cynical about their nation and see patriotism as na=EFve, for dullards. I know exceptions galore, but I've seen what comes out of an almost backwardly conservative school, and it distresses me. We probably wouldn't be terribly interested in historical quilts had we come through such an educational programme. We should change it.

And we should develop and encourage publications like VINTAGE QUILTS and assure they are placed right in venues.

Maybe we could start taking our children to Williamsburg instead of Disneyworld one year or to Gettysburg or to stand where the first European settlers stood at Jamestown, to Plymouth to see those tiny vessels that brought people across what Wm Bradford called a "vast and furious ocean."

There are so many ways to exert individual influence, and each act counts.

It beats quarreling among ourselves, certainly.

Mary Poppins in Louisiana where we've had RAIN,

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Pinking in the 18th century From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 20:03:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0038_01C8FBED.574D6510 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Pinked edges were very popular in the mid-18th century on ladies' gowns for trim and on the sleeve edges. The fabric did not fray because the weave was so wonderfully tight. The wools were fulled ( just like the wool used on billiard tables now) so did not have any hems. I also seem to remember that the pinking iron was heated before being applied to the fabric.

I have a few late 19th century sewing manuals which direct you to treat the raw edges of silk with gum arabic ( the old version of Fray-Chek) to prevent the edges from ravelling.

I have seen several dresses from c1789 which were made in the "old style" from much softer ( fabulous, buttery soft) silk satin which came from China - which frayed as the thread count was not tight enough to prevent it.

Newbie in Northern Virginia where we have the kind of heavenly weather that folks drive 12 hours to get in Maine!

------=_NextPart_000_0038_01C8FBED.574D6510--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Dating Club (long) From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 21:54:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Look at a map of Maryland and you'll see that the only way to get to the Eastern Shore from DC is to cross the Bay Bridge. When there's an accident on the Bridge monumental backups result. There was a dreadful accident yesterday and it was nearly mid=night when I got home from the Dating Club. Was it worth it? Of course, we had gotten mocha milkshakes to go in Annapolis and survived the delay nicely. The topic of the day was quilt backs. The quilts were examined back fist to see what we could tell. It was challenging and really fun. I plan to steal hazel and Bunnie's good idea for a future meeting of the Eastern Shore Study Group. I was really sly, presenting two of my fraktur quilts which have the date inscribed. Polly didn't hesitate over the first one remarking "It's not 1870, look at the fancy ground behind those large brown flowers. It's 1840s." We turned the quilt to revel the 1852 date! Polly and Debby chorused "1860's" when they saw the back of Aveline Ziegenfuss Stern's 1862 Rolling Stone. We were all stumped by the marvelous quilting on the back of a Feathered Star. 1840's we thought until we say the red, green and yellow 1870s calicos on the front. An 1880 Modified 9-Patch from York Co., PA had a fugitive purple back in a large scale leaf print.. An 1870s 9-Patch was described as the back of a quilt ; the other side (which probably was the back to the maker) was the Centennial faux patchwork print. A very colorful plaid, circa 1915, was the back of a red, cheddar and green Carpenter's Star. The Old Order River Brethren in Franklin Co., PA made quilts in a single huge block of that pattern. An 1840s striped vine was the back of the world's greatest Mariners Compass. An 1880s brown and red plaid backed a Lemoyne Star with fugitive purple setting blocks. The variety of fabrics revealed a very deep scrap bay--40 years deep! A "porch furniture" floral circa 1900 was the back of a One Patch of 2" squares set in diagonal rows of color: pink, yellow, double blue, gaudys. We were totally surprised when the aqua and red paisley turned out to be the back of a fabulous Lancaster County Joseph's Coat. A pastel Trip Around the World with a poly batt had a back of what might have been a sheet with motifs of fisherman, fish and whales. It was marked copyright 1954. The back of a scrappy 1840s Variable Star was a delicate pink and brown print of flowers on a seaweed ground. We turned over an Art Nouveau lily print to see a scrappy Chinese Coins stripy with great gaudy prints and red and black setting strips. The coffin drape that Polly mentioned in her Quilter's Newsletter article combines Tumblers and 9-Patch blocks; the back is brown and beige 9_patches--very mournful. Lots of the backs from the 1880s were stripes, lots of browns as one would expect. We had a spirited discussion about whether the tiny Lemoyne Stars, red and white on butterscotch, clearly 1880s had been more recently quilted. We never did get a consensus.. A 1940s wholecloth floral print had a back of pre-printed apron panels! A 1920s quilt inside a quilt had a back pieced from diapers. That one definitely got the 'weird award" for the day. Cinda on the Eastern Shore hoping to find my heart's desire at Bouckville this weekend

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt values From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 20:55:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

I just want to offer a "thank you" to Judy for mentioning this. It's a very good idea to PHOTOGRAPH the things that matter to you and keep a record with your will of where such-and-such should go. Include family history if you know it. Don't count on your family remembering the things they've told you about Great Aunt Sophie's tea pot.

I just made a note to my children about having a trusted book collector in our area come in and peruse my personal library when I'm gone because I have some rare/valuable books. I want my family to glean the most benefit possible from my possessions when I am gone and some things just shouldn't be put out at the garage sale for a dollar. Now if that happenes, OK. . . but I don't want it to happen because I didn't inform anyone.

Quilts and textiles are especially this way. For example, that piece of fabric with the image of George Washington on it that I keep nearby isn't going to mean a thing to a non-fabric person. But it's the real deal 1876 centennial fabric. So they need to know.

Yes, it takes a while to catalog these things but it is a very loving thing to do for our families.

Stephanie Higgins (who is very big on pre-planning funerals, too, and already has that bought and paid for so my kids don't have to make such expensive deicsions at the most stressful moments)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "My Treasure" form (was: Quilt values) From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 20:25:45 -0700 X-Message-Number: 15

Good evening, QHLers - If anyone is interested, just email a request to me and I'll send the "My Treasure" form to you. It's a great place to start noting down what "things" are important to you and why (where you got it, condition, story behind it, attach the photograph, etc., etc.). Keep the forms in a notebook marked "My Treasures". Mention the notebook and its location to your heirs, etc.

I may be a little slow to respond this week as I am off to take daughter to college tomorrow (Tuesday) and probably won't have access to my email - the nest is starting to empty! Regards, Meg ._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______ Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 11, 2008 From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 01:21:03 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

--part1_be0.3e566d15.35d277bf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Candace wrote,

This strikes me as the real issue we should address----how to create a market, even if of a very selective group. If this can be done in the short run, the quilts will come back on their own ultimately. But they need to be saved.

Of course, we are probably of several minds: the collector in us wants to benefit from lower prices in a buyer's marketplace; the other collector in us wants stable or rising prices because those increase the value of our holdings; the real collector in us wants people in succeeding generations to value what we value.

Laura has spoken with great wisdom in all her posts on this topic, and to follow up on your comments Candace- I think the answer is purely economic.

Right now is a great time to buy quilts. In the past 8 months I have purchased more pieces than I have in the 3 years prior from my entry into the market with a serious collecting plan up until the financial crisis really started to hit the housing markets for the average homeowner.

I am new to quilts as a collector, but my family is not. And my Mom trained me well after her years as a quilter and enthusiast coming into the 1970s beginnings of the boom market.

Great antique quilts hitting the market come from two sources,

1. They reach the market for the first time coming from families who don't care about them and would rather have the money, or need the money more than they want the quilt. 2. They reach the market from a previous collector whose collection is sold as the result of death, need for cash, loss of interest etc.

Option #1 still exists, but the supply is greatly reduced since what happened 20-30 years ago brought a lot of top quilts to market fast.

Option #2 exists on an ongoing basis.

In tough economic times like these, both options #1 and #2 will bring more quilts to the market since the need for money forces the sale in many instances. And the resulting supply depresses prices which brings out the buyers.

At Houston Festival last fall, I bought 5 pieces- all of them exemplary and 2 of them among the finest I have. And I was lucky to get them. Prices were down and quality was up. It was a feeding frenzy out there like I have never seen in my few years attending. In one instance, I got one of the best of the total haul by about 30 seconds- just after I said yes, one of the greatest collectors in the US came up and wanted the quilt before I had even taken it off the wall. Top pieces from good dealers with reasonable prices were flying off the tables. And the economic picture then was far better than it is now.

What great antique and vintage quilts mean and signify in our culture will, I believe, ensure their continued value and appreciation. They are a unique form of art and expression yielded by a major segment of our society (i.e. women- well in most cases) who had no other form of enduring expression of their souls. The long term is covered.

In the short term, it is all a matter of who has the cash to come to the table. And real collectors know and appreciate this and continue to buy even though there is no forseeable return on their financial investment to justify the purchase on purely financial terms. Plus- in any market there will be outsiders who do not really care about the quilts and do not take good care of them, or use them for purposes the rest of us would cringe at.

On another point, I kind of went crazy in my post the other day and I failed to ask a question that Candace's post brought to my mind.

Specifically, how do museums approach purchasing decisions with limited funds? When there is a limited budget, is it more important to acquire "best of type" examples of common patterns, rare patterns regardless of condition and execution- obviously within certain limits, or is the driving force to fill holes in a collection with a specific goal to cover a certain genre/era etc.? Or is it perhaps more like the personal collection where you just "know it when you see it"?

Take care,

Tom.

************** Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in your budget? Read reviews on AOL Autos.

(http://autos.aol.com/cars-BMW-128-2008/expert-review?ncid=aolaut00050000000017 )

--part1_be0.3e566d15.35d277bf_boundary--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "My Treasure" form (was: Quilt values) From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 08:12:47 -

I would LOVE to have a copy of 'My Treasure' form. Mitzi from Vermont (where it has rained every single day of August so far)

In a message dated 08/11/08 23:29:20 Eastern Daylight Time, mgmooneymoonware.net writes:

Good evening, QHLers - If anyone is interested, just email a request to me and I'll send the "My Treasure" form to you. It's a great place to start noting down what "things" are important to you and why (where you got it, condition, story behind it, attach the photograph, etc., etc.). Keep the forms in a notebook marked "My Treasures". Mention the notebook and its location to your heirs, etc.

I may be a little slow to respond this week as I am off to take daughter to college tomorrow (Tuesday) and probably won't have access to my email - the nest is starting to empty! Regards, Meg ._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______ Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice Professional Associate, AIC mgmooneymoonware.net

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Red/green quilt at the Indiana State Fair From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 09:24:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

All:

I just posted two photos in the QHL gallery that I took through the glass of the display case at the Indiana State Fair. They show the blue ribbon winner in the antique quilt category - a wonderful red/green quilt with tiny six-pointed stars (the points were, I believe, about 1.5"-2" long) and a great vine border, signed and dated on the back"..ry Agnes Adams 1874" (probably Mary).

If you're in the area, the State Fair will be running through August 17. The antique quilts on display were wonderful!

Dale Drake in Indiana

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Red/green quilt at the Indiana State Fair From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 09:35:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

What a beautiful quilt. Thank you for sharing photos.

Best regards, Sharron.................... .........in Spring, TX where we may get rain today!.....YA!.........

--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt article in the American Museum, Bath england magazine From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 10:55:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

There is a lovely article titled Pattern Piecing on the Oregon Trail, 1849, in the recent American Museum (Bath, England) magazine. I have to brag a bit because I also have a beautifully illustrated article on Pennsylvania German fraktur in this issue. The illustrations are smashing -- better than the article!!! Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 Subject: Re:patriotism From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 11:39:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Over the years I have refined my definition of patriotism as: a devotion to and defense of the Bill of Rights as listed in our constitution. In my mind, those are our freedoms.. Shari in NC

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Pinking in the 18th century From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 11:56:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0009_01C8FC72.810AF770 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Pinked edges were very popular in the mid-18th century on ladies' gowns for trim and on the sleeve edges. The fabric did not fray because the weave was so wonderfully tight. The wools were fulled ( just like the wool used on billiard tables now) so also did not ravel. I also seem to remember that the pinking iron was heated before being applied to the fabric.

I have a few late 19th century sewing manuals which direct you to treat the raw edges of silk with gum arabic ( the old version of Fray-Chek) to prevent the edges from ravelling.

I have seen several dresses from c1789 which were made in the "old style" from much softer ( fabulous, buttery soft) silk satin which came from China - which frayed as the thread count was not tight enough to prevent it.

Newbie in Northern Virginia where we have the kind of heavenly weather that folks drive 12 hours to get in Maine!

------=_NextPart_000_0009_01C8FC72.810AF770--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pinked scallop edge From: Crm793aol.com Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 12:37:38 EDT X-Message-Number: 11

-------------------------------1218472658 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Judy,

Thanks for the notice of the quilt in the Kentucky book. Using a magnifying glass it does look similar but then she added the cut-out hole, she really wanted something unique!

About the velvet quilt with the blue border: the blue wool fabric is the backing of the quilt. Another narrower pinked border inserted, then the top of the quilt's edges are turned under and machine appliqued onto the backing. The quilt is tied only where the velvet-covered buttons are. It must have been 'English paper pieced' because we could still see some basting threads. The quilt was purchased in Houston a few years ago from a dealer who said she got it in London.

Carolyn Miller

**************Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in your budget? Read reviews on AOL Autos. (http://autos.aol.com/cars-BMW-128-2008/expert-review?ncid=aolaut00050000000017 )

-------------------------------1218472658--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pinked scallop edge From: Crm793aol.com Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 11:45:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 12

-------------------------------1218555907 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Judy,

Thanks for the notice of the quilt in the Kentucky book. Using a magnifying glass it does look similar but then she added the cut-out hole, she really wanted something unique!

About the velvet quilt with the blue border: the blue wool fabric is the backing of the quilt. Another narrower pinked border inserted, then the top of the quilt's edges are turned under and machine appliqued onto the backing. The quilt is tied only where the velvet-covered buttons are. It must have been 'English paper pieced' because we could still see some basting threads. The quilt was purchased in Houston a few years ago from a dealer who said she got it in London.

Carolyn Miller

**************Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in your budget? Read reviews on AOL Autos. (http://autos.aol.com/cars-BMW-128-2008/expert-review?ncid=aolaut00050000000017 )

-------------------------------1218555907--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Southwestern Quilts From: Crm793aol.com Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 11:51:53 EDT X-Message-Number: 13

-------------------------------1218556313 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Did you get the cattle brand quilt posted? If not, can you tell us where you saw the picture?

Carolyn

**************Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in your budget? Read reviews on AOL Autos. (http://autos.aol.com/cars-BMW-128-2008/expert-review?ncid=aolaut00050000000017 )

-------------------------------1218556313--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: gingramsuddenlink.net From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 10:21:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

Apologies notwithstanding, you might feel differently if someone you love was murdered on 9-11. They were not willing participants....

--- On Tue, 8/12/08, Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> wrote: When 9-11 happened, the country went wild for homeland security. In the process we- American citizens- have lost precious freedoms. My feeling has always been if you are not willing to give up your life for your country, you cannot be a patriot.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Red/green quilt at the Indiana State Fair From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 10:25:18 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 15

Dale, It is nice that they offer that category, and even nicer that they are displayed behind glass. After googling, I see they have an extensive Antiques category; it must be a wonderful and educational display for the public. Barbara Burnham

--- On Tue, 8/12/08, Dale Drake <ddrakeccrtc.com> wrote: ... through the glass of the display case at the Indiana State Fair. They show the blue ribbon winner in the antique quilt category ...

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: patriotism From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 12:41:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 16

Shari wrote:

> Over the years I have refined my definition of patriotism as: a devotion to > and defense of the Bill of Rights as listed in our constitution. In my > mind, those are our freedoms..

My point in writing was not my own personal politics, but the critical value of historical knowledge in sustaining a respect for the artifacts of history---in context, the quilts we on this list respect and love.

That being said, I personally don't think people can be devoted to or roused to defend abstractions, ideas. If there is a lesson to come out of 20th-century history with its totalitarianism, I think it's that ideas that are not anchored to flesh-and-blood can lead to terrifying deeds. Ethnic cleansing such as Hitler introduced to what was in time Nazi Europe and Stalin, for instance, carried out in Georgia (More Georgians were massacred than Jews even) and what became the Soviet Republics came out of unanchored abstraction. And the hearts of those who carried out these atrocities became hardened and incapable of feeling what their victims felt. No idea is perfect. It's not even real until it's embodied, and lots of thought has been given to that proposition, starting with Aristotle.

The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne described man's spiritual lostness as "losing touch with the great chain of human sympathy"---by which H. meant empathy, human feeling, sympathy with real living breathing people. In the Christian faith, men are instructed to "love God with all your heart and your neighbor as yourself"---which, I believe, suggests that we love God by loving our neighbors, who share the spirit that we share, are "temples of the holy ghost." It's easy to love an abstract God. I find it hard to love, to identify with my noisome "neighbor" routinely. Love, like hate, acquires fullness only with the notion is tied to physical reality. (Back to Aristotle!)

And it is in the study of history that we can actually understand the fullness and value of abstractions, ideas that deal with man's political lives and governance. We learn what courage is, what cowardice is, what the price of both are. We look, for instance, at Valley Forge and marvel--at least, I marvel---at what men can endure and do when they are defending the freedom of their families, their own rights to participate in their governance. Reading Washington's letters and personal recounts of that bitter winter encampment and ensuing battle makes me know selflessness is possible and desirable. It reminds me that most success stems from personal risk. Just as children who never encounter human love grow up unable to love, so do men who have never encountered courage or wisdom or the fine art of compromise find themselves unable to believe these things exist. They become cynical.

Just knowing the names George Washington gave some of his hounds---Drunkard, Tippler, Tipsy, Sweetlips, Truelove ---helped me grasp that he was no Superhero: he was a human being who loved life---a life in which he was free to participate in the decisions which affected him.

I have carefully examined the history and social studies textbooks of the major textbook publishers in the U.S. and the social studies curricula most used, and I can assure you that barring some kind of extra-class intervention, students emerging from these programs will know more about America's flaws than about her virtues. The evils of slavery---and nobody doubts them---are taught in a way to promote quick-guilt, not understanding of how it is the little decisions that lead to big and irreversible tides. Instead of locating and deciphering the real values of women's contributions to the early republic (largely domestic), textbook writers must find or create political women, who actually were rather singular. It is cause-driven history. About quick feeling, not about full knowledge.

Looking through sixth-grade texts on the history or Athens and Rome, one seldom sees this kind of thing.

Look at those Leno or Letterman history on-the-street queries if you believe Americans know either history or understand the political structure of our government.

It would, for instance, be possible to use quilts and other domestic artifacts to locate and represent the positive role of women in our nation.

The word "patriotism" suggests the link between abstract (idea) and concrete (physical). A feeling for our fatherland. When the feeling is feigned, it is something else. In his famous dictionary Sam. Johnson described THAT kind of patriotism as "the last refuge of a scoundrel."

Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: History and artifact From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 11:19:14 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 17

Perhaps, along with the desire to put forth a richer understanding of history, and the usefulness of connecting ideas to actions (and to artifacts), we might also consider placing, in our schools and elsewhere, the value of critical thinking. I sometimes think that this concept is misunderstood as "being critical about someone's thinking, especially if they think differently". But I believe the habit of listening, asking relevant and insightful questions, of considering the strength and weaknesses of data and sources, and especially of considering alternative explanations or solutions to a problem is indispensable to real education, not to mention a functional democracy. It also is useful in keeping discourse focused on the merits of an argument, rather than the merits of a person who holds a point of view. In fact, it allows us to even recognize the merit of argument (as in debate) itself! Susan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: patriotism From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 12:29:11 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 18

--0-1026974741-1218569351=:99683 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Re: It would, for instance, be possible to use quilts and other domestic artifacts to locate and represent the positive role of women in our nation.

Hi all, Now, this interests me greatly. And, I can grow a quilt exhibit out of just that sentence. If anyone has a quilt that can illustrate the above sentence, please email me off list.

Judy Schwender

--0-1026974741-1218569351=:99683--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: gingramsuddenlink.net From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 15:46:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 19

And this has what to do with quilt history?

Why not join a political discussion group.

L. Heminway Plaistow NH

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: gingramsuddenlink.net From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 16:33:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 20

I sent an apology for replying to you, but it came back for some reason.. I don't agree with all your thoughts about patriotism, but this not the place to discuss it. Sorry again. Shari in NC

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: using quilts to represent the positive role of women in our nation From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 13:39:42 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 21

That is really an interesting concept! How could we do that? Antique quilts could be Temperance quilts, red cross quilts, personalized crazy quilts but what of modern quilts?

How about the thousands of charity quilts guilds across the nation make? Or...fund raising raffle quilts?

Any thoughts?

Kris

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: using quilts to represent the positive role of women in our nation From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 17:58:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 22

Just about every American war since 1812 has produced quilts, or rather, the women whose menfolks fought, suffered, died, or returned made quilts in celebration and remembrance (to steal a title); some political/economic situations have had similar responses. Who can forget, for instance, Fanny Shaw's wonderful "Prosperity Is Just Around the Corner, " or Lucinda Ward Holstain's "Reconciliation Quilt"? The thousands of quilts being made today as a part of the "Quilts of Valor" project and "Home of the Brave" are evidence of the positive role of women in our nation, shown through quilts. There were National Recovery Act quilts, Townsend Plan quilts, Sanitary Commission quilts, Gunboat Quilts, Red Cross fundraising quilts, church fundraising quilts, quilts made in support of orphanages, women's shelters, Sunday Schools, settlement houses, county homes, temperance, and the list goes on and on.

Just for starters...

Xenia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QHL: Patriotic Quilts From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net> Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 19:11:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 23

Illinois Quilt Artist Sharon Malec shared a picture with me of her Lincoln Quilt "With Malice Toward None" quilt. You can check it out on my web site.

http://www.illinoisquilthistory.com/qhlsharonmalec.html

Sue in Illinois

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: some Florida quilts From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net> Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2008 01:37:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multipart message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0006_01C8FCE5.301BD5A0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In the process of replying to Judy Schwender off list, I found http://www.flheritage.com/museum/collections/quilts/ , which shows some of the quilts owned by the Museum of Florida History. Enjoy.

Andi in Paducah, KY

------=_NextPart_000_0006_01C8FCE5.301BD5A0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: using quilts to represent the positive role of women in our nation From: SoldierGrrrl <soldier.grrrlgmail.com> Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2008 06:12:34 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

On 8/12/08, xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> wrote: > The thousands of quilts being made today > as a part of the "Quilts of Valor" project and "Home of the Brave" are > evidence of the positive role of women in our nation, shown through quilts.

Actually, this is a great lead in for something I wanted to say. My husband was medevaced out of Iraq due to a late onset complication of eye surgery and he received a quilt as he was processing through Landshtuhl Medical Center. It is lovely and he was deeploy touched to receive it. (He will be fine and projected to return to the theater in November.)

If you participate in one of the quilts for soldiers projects, please know that you have touched someone here.

Thank you. Sgt. Jennifer Atkinson, on behalf of Staff Sgt. John Atkinson -- Blonde. It's not just a hair color; it's a way of life.

http://soldiergrrrl.livejournal.com/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Red/green quilt at the Indiana State Fair - and the Hall of Fame From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2008 08:26:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Barbara:

Yes, all of the quilts (old and new) are behind glass - the good thing. The bad thing is that there is very little display space so most are folded and hanging over bars. But the antique quilts were in one of four quilt cabinets - while I'm not positive (I don't go every year) I think the new quilt entries have decreased in recent years. There's a $30 entry fee, which certainly discourages me from entering. ($30 covers multiple entries, one per category, and includes six tickets to the fair, but it's still pretty steep.)

And this comment is for Karen Alexander - while I was standing there taking pictures a woman came up and asked me if I'd ever been to the Quilters Hall of Fame in Marion. She went on and on about how wonderful it was - she's from Marion but she's not a quilter. We had a good discussion of QHF and antique quilts in general.

I just loved that red and green quilt ...

Dale in sunny Indiana

Barbara said: It is nice that they offer that category, and even nicer that they are displayed behind glass. After googling, I see they have an extensive Antiques category; it must be a wonderful and educational display for the public.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Textile conservator in Colorado? From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net> Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2008 15:17:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0008_01C8FD57.BD2BDE50 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear List,

Can anyone help this lady? I am a geographical undesirable!

Newbie

Hi,

I have a red and white full/queen handmade quilt. I don't know if the fabrics were washed before being pieced. The quilt was made in the late 1980's.

Do you know of anyone who will carefully and safely hand-wash such a quilt? Do you offer this service? My concern is that the red fabric will bleed.

Many thanks,

Andra

Boulder CO

------=_NextPart_000_0008_01C8FD57.BD2BDE50--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: question From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2008 13:23:05 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

--0-112926608-1218658985=:35741 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Does anyone know how many books were in the quilt digest series? Were there 5 or were there more? Thanks Donna

--0-112926608-1218658985=:35741--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: question From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2008 16:35:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I believe there were 5 books in the Quilt Digest series - three in one size and two others in a larger format.

Xenia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rock a Bye Baby From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2008 00:35:24 +0000 X-Message-Number: 8

--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_22363_1218674124_0 Content-Type: text/plain Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Dear List, I have had a request from a person wanting to know if I knew anything about a crib quilt design of "Rock A Bye Baby" that was made for her by her grandmother. Has any one seem a crib quilt with this theme? Circa 1930-40's Thank you in advance, Sincerely, Polly Mello --NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_22363_1218674124_0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Rock a Bye Baby From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2008 21:12:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

-According to Brackman (Applique, #85.18), Colonial Art Needlework had a kit called Rock-a-Bye Baby, with a star shape of little circles forming a doll figure in each corner (like a bead baby), and a cradle on a small branch in the center, with baby, leaves, another bead baby in the center, and the words in script above and below (on the Tree Top) the cradle.

Xenia