Subject: Any comments on this book?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 08:47:29 +0100
X-Message-Number: 1

I just stumbled on this book while idly surfing and was intrigued.
Does anyone have any comments/recommendations about it?

The Natural History of the Traditional Quilt

http://www.amazon.com/Natural-History-Traditional-Quilt/dp/0292724977


Lisa, do you know if there will be a catalogue on the DeWitt Wallace
exhibition? I'm particularly interested in patterns on quilted
petticoats from the 17th and 18th centuries.

Sally Ward




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Any comments on this book?
From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 07:05:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Don't know if the Williamsburg exhibition will have an accompanying book,
but it wouldn't surprise me since the exhibition will run until 2010.

Lisa




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: historic fabric
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 07:55:37 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

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Thanx Newbie. I guess many factors have to be taken into consideration.

Wouldn't it be nice to have botox soap; a little dab will do ya. LOL.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: washing antique items
From: palamporeaol.com


I think that the person mentioned by Joan was probably mostly referring to the dyes of the 1800's. When I wet clean textiles that is my biggest concern ----- What will this dye do? Is it a natural dye and what was the mordant? Is it a synthetic dye from right after the Civil War or one from the turn of the century or one from after WWI? Has the item been washed before? And that isn't always a help because I had a quilt that had been washed many times and had never run. I thought I was home free. It didn't bleed during the wash. It bleed an hour after I put it on the rack to dry. Obviously there had been break down of the dye over the years. It was a red dye from about 1900.
There is also a group of people who wonder if de-ionized water is too pure for antique dyes and it that why we see them run at times? Any ideas on this?
I have bought some ALL FREE after talking with Newbie. I am very anxious to give it a try. I really hate the way Orvus doesn't rinse out well. That has always made me a bit uneasy. What is it leaving behind? It sure leaves my hands feeling as if they have a slime on them.
I do worry about the weave and fiber structure when wet cleaning for many reasons, but the dye is always my biggest concern once I establish that the weave structure and the fibers are sound and that is a rather quick study compared to the dyes.
Best regards,
Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

----------MB_8CAD655F5E6EB49_880_57B7_webmail-de05.sysops.aol.com--


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Subject: Re: Any comments on this book?
From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 08:17:00 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Dear Sally,

I have this book and did my best to read it, but found it absolutely
useless. It's an attempt to create an anthropological diagramming of quilt
block patterns, but it doesn't even cite Barbara Brackman's excellent work
which does pretty much the same thing they are trying to do. And you need a
machete to hack your way through their anthropologist writing.

Thumbs down on _The Natural History of the Traditional Quilt_.

And yes, The Colonial Williamsburg quilt exhibition will have an
accompanying book--which will be excellent and have lots of information on
quilted petticoats.

All best,
Lynne

>I just stumbled on this book while idly surfing and was intrigued. Does
>anyone have any comments/recommendations about it?
>
> The Natural History of the Traditional Quilt
>
> http://www.amazon.com/Natural-History-Traditional-Quilt/dp/0292724977




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Colonial Williamsburg quilt symposium
From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassettcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 09:25:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

I should add that Colonial Williamsburg is planning a quilt symposium, Feb.
22-25 (or thereabouts), which will also be great. Linda Baumgarten, the
curator of textiles, always does an outstanding job with her exhibitions,
catalogues, and conferences.

Hope to see you there!

All best,
Lynne




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Natural History of the Traditional Quilt
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 15:55:11 +0100
X-Message-Number: 7

Thanks to listmembers for their honest opinions. Its not a cheap
book, either, so I'm glad I have this impeccable source of review.
>
> And yes, The Colonial Williamsburg quilt exhibition will have an
> accompanying book--which will be excellent and have lots of
> information on quilted petticoats.

Mmmmmmm..... Christmas.........must write lists..........<G>

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Georgia
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 11:35:59 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8

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Hi all,
I remember hearing something about a quilt museum being created in Georgia. If anyone on this list is part of that effort or knows someone who is, could you please email me off list at sister3603yahoo.com?
Thank you.
Judy Schwender
Paducah, KY


--0-1794723864-1219862159:38110--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: washing antique items
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

I'm wondering if there might not be several categories for historic
textiles -- one for cleaning/care/storage and one for fashion styles.
When I think of historic I think of fashion first which in my mind forms
a time frame of everything up to the end of 19thC. I purposely overlook
the fact that the moment something is created it becomes a part of
history. :-)

Perhaps Meg and Kay will come to our rescue on the detergent technology
involved in All Free and Orvus.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Shirt Factory Memorialized
From: "Beverly Birkmire" <bevnedjrverizon.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 16:03:25 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

I recently heard Jay Elbourn speak at the Historical Society of Kent
County on his memories of the Rock Hall, Maryland, Shirt Factory. Mr.
Elbourn's father, Purnell J. Elbourn, started the factory in 1925 after
traveling to Baltimore to get a contract with the Marlboro Company. Jay
Elbourn continued the factory after his father's death until finally
closing it in 1985 when off-shore manufacturing made it very difficult to
compete. He ended his remarks with a mention of putting a sewing machine
on his father's headstone - which brought to me an image of something
carved into the decoration. He went on to explain that he took an old
Singer 440W1 from the factory and bolted it on. I've posted photos on
eBoard in case you'd like to see it - a fitting way to honor his dad and
the company that was such a fixture in Rock Hall for 60 years.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: symposium in Williamsburg
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 17:34:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

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Dear List,

The Southeastern Regional Symposium of the Costume Society of America is
set for Oct. 31-Novemeber 2. See highlights below. It is a impressive list
of papers as well as the fabulous quilt exhibition recently announced on the
list.

You do not have to be a member to participate (although it is a great
organization!)

Newbie Richardson

REGISTER NOW for the Southeastern Region Annual Symposium:

The Many Layered Meanings of Costume will be held Oct. 31-Nov.2 in
Williamsburg, VA, hosted by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, The
College of William and Mary, and the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation.
Highlights include: new exhibit of quilted garments and objects, behind the
scenes tours, fashion and costume shows, 18 juried research papers and
exhibits, lecture by Caroline Weber, author of Queen of Fashion, What Marie
Antoinette Wore to the Revolution. Follow the link www.history.org/conted
<BLOCKED::http://www.history.org/conted> for more details and to register
online or call 1-800-603-0948 (M-F, 8:30-5); alternatively contact Doris
Warren at dwarrencwf.org <BLOCKED::mailto:dwarrencwf.org> or
1-800-229-1000 ext. 2538 for registration form. Early-bird registration
deadline is September 15.


------_NextPart_000_0038_01C9086B.2918BDE0--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Colonial Williamsburg quilt symposium
From: "Lisa Evans" <charter.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 18:46:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12

A symposium? *ears prick up*

Do you have any details, Lynne? That sounds marvelous!

Lisa Evans



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Colonial Williamsburg quilt symposium
From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 19:44:43 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

Hi Lisa,

The CW website has some information here (you have to scroll down a bit):

http://research.history.org/ConferencesForumsWorkshops.cfm

I will be speaking on New England's quilts, with an emphasis on friendship
quilts; Linda Eaton of Winterthur and Alden O'Brien of the DAR Museum will
also be speaking, along with Linda Baumgarten and Kim Smith Ivey of CW--and
others whom I'm afraid I can't remember just now.

Hope to see lots of you there!

All best,
Lynne

>A symposium? *ears prick up*
> Do you have any details, Lynne? That sounds marvelous!
> Lisa Evans




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 26, 2008
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 22:49:42 EDT
X-Message-Number: 14


--part1_c95.3793a3df.35e76c46_boundary
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Subject: An amazing coincidence : I spent last weekend ... with several20
quilt historians among them Annette Gero from Australia, author of Historic
20
Australian Quilts (2000). In the intro... she discusses Quaker Elizabeth F
ry, a20
prison reformer who provided more than 12,000 convict women with supplies20
from which to make quilts during the long voyage from England to Australia20
(1817-1843).... During a brief break in last weekend's activities, Annette20
went20
antiquing in Lincoln. In one antique mall ... she was startled to see ...Mr
s20
Fry! And what's more, on the reverse of the image was a separate page - a20
letter written by Mrs. Fry, again about the welfare of female convicts! Ho
w20
amazing is that! --Xenia Cord

Xenia, that is so terrific. How wonderful for Annette! I bet that it made he
r20
trip even more memorable and special!A020

I'm of the opinion that COINCIDENCE is just God's way of staying ANONYMOUS.20
Bright blessings!

~Donna Laing
Bucks County PA
www.NorthStarQualityQuilting.com
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Any comments on this book?
From: laurel <laurelkalmiaresearch.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2008 10:11:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

I reviewed it for /The Professional Quilter /when it first came out.
There are some interesting ideas buried in it, but the suggested model
isn't very useful.

Laurel Horton


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Any comments on this book?
From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassettcomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2008 10:23:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Laurel, you're so diplomatic! :)

>I reviewed it for /The Professional Quilter /when it first came out.
> There are some interesting ideas buried in it, but the suggested model
> isn't very useful.
>
> Laurel Horton
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Any comments on this book?
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2008 16:57:31 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 3

--0-80031152-1219942651:28588
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Just read helpful comments on the book from Xenia and others - shan't bothe
r with it!0A0ACelia0A0A Celia Eddy0AThe Brown House0AFleming Place0A
Maryport0ACumbria CA15 6ES0ATel: 01900 8149590A0A0A0A-----

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Any comments on this book?
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com>


Hi, Sally,0A0AThanks for pointing this book out. I do seem to remember re
ading reviews of it, when it came out in 1995. Can't, however, remember wha
t they said. Looking at Amazon, it does look worth having, but although the
re are plenty of cheap copies available from America, those in UK are quite
pricey. It's just a question of working out if the additional postage stil
l makes it cheaper to get from USA.0A0AI'm thinking....0A0ACelia0A0A
Celia Eddy0AThe Brown House0AFleming Place0AMaryport0ACumbria CA15
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fwd: Re: Any comments on this book?
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>


Much as I would like to take credit, I haven't read this book; the
review was from someone else.

Xenia
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Confederate Soldiers Quilts
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Hi everyone, especially museum curators, etc. I am making replicas of the six existing U.S. Sanitary Commission Quilts, using all hand techniques, that I hope will be part of a traveling exhibit during the 150th anniversary years of the Civil War.

I have read that in the Confederacy, especially in the later years of the war, that Southern women made soldiers' quilts from homespun cotton that sometimes had newspapers for batting.

Two requests for help:

1. Does anyone know of an existing, authenitcated Confederate soldier's quilt; and if so where is it?
2. Does anyone know where to get authentic reproduction home spun fabrics?

Thanks for you help. Best, Don

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: source for homespum
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2008 06:39:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

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Don:
Here is a source for authentic repro homespun.
http://www.bittersweetprimitives.com/catalog.php?category3D11

Linda Heminway

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Subject: thimble collection up at auction
From: judy.growcomcast.net
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2008 16:24:33 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2


If you click the link and scroll down the page you will come upon
individual photos of around 760 different thimbles in the onecollection.

http://www.auctionzip.com/cgi-bin/photopanel.cgi?listingid3D457937

Judy Grow
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Confederate Soldiers Quilts
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>

The Shelburne Museum has had a confederate (maybe North) soldier's quilt that history says he made during his recovery from wounds he got in the war. I could check further on this for you if you'd like.
Mitzi from Vermont (whose is waiting news from her daughter who has just been told to evacuate her home in New Orleans -one they just finished repairing from Katrina - life can be a bitch sometimes.)



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: east coast attractions
From: deedadikatt.net


Hi all, I am going to Avalon, Cape May, N. J. from Columbus, Ohio. What quilt attractions are available in your areas out east? I will also be in the Allentown, Nazareth and Doylestown areas. Contact me off line. Thanks
--
Dee Dadik
Certified Appraiser of Quilted


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Confederate Soldiers Quilts
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2008 09:34:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Mitzi - My heart goes out to your daughter. They can't catch a break over
there.

Best regards,
Sharron................
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: thimble collection
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
 

Yesterday I sent QHL an e-mail with a link to an auction of over 700
thimbles and other related sewing tools. My post came through this
morning minues the link.20

If anyone would like to go see this huge collection, each thimble
individually photographed, you can e-mail me for the direct link, or go
to Alderfer Auctions.

Judy Grow
judy.growcomcast.net
------_NextPart_000_0031_01C90A94.61EC6650--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: east coast attractions
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2008 11:50:26 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

Dee,

There is a lovely museum, the Mercer Museum in Doylestown that I know has a
collection of quilts but they are not on display. The building is
interesting by itself for its construction in concrete, and the interior is
a history of all sorts of tools. Mercer's home, Fonthill is also open for
tours and is just as interesting. Also the Moravian Tile Works.

http://www.mercermuseum.org/mercer_museum.htm

For quilts on display you want to go to the Burlington County Historic
Society in Burlington City NJ, on the Delaware River and easily accessible
from major highways. They are closed on Mondays.

http://08016.com/bchs.html

The BCHS is where the MidAtlantic Quilt Study Group is holding its second
annual Regional Quilt Study Day on Saturday, September 20th. If that is
when you will be in the area, please let me know and plan to attend.

Judy Grow
Flemington NJ

> Hi all, I am going to Avalon, Cape May, N. J. from Columbus, Ohio. What
> quilt attractions are available in your areas out east? I will also be in
> the Allentown, Nazareth and Doylestown areas.
> Dee Dadik



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: blank messages
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2008 08:48:20 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 10

I *believe* the blank messages are being caused by attachments. People have colored backgrounds (or something), or don't change over to Plain Text, so an attachment is created. Lyris strips the attachment and either bounces the note to me, or sends it directly on. Thus the blank message.

What confuses me is that some people apparently get the messages intact. I sent a note to the people at Quiltropolis (who maintain Lyris) and asked them to look into it.

Kris


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: qhl digest: August 29, 2008
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2008 12:06:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

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<<I have read that in the Confederacy2C especially in the later years of t
he war2C that Southern women made soldiers' quilts from homespun cotton th
at sometimes had newspapers for batting.>>
20
DOn2C if you research far enough2C you will find that newspapers were as
scarce as fabric by the end of the war. Newspapers that were previously mu
ltipaged and very similar to today's newspapers were2C by the end of the w
ar2C mostly reduced to one page - often simply a masthead and a list of na
mes of deceased local soldiers. People fortunate enough to have stationar
y sometimes utilized "cross-writing." It is a method in which the writing
is done in the usual manner2C then the paper is turned sideways and the w
riting continues at right angles. Newspapers2C when still plentiful2C we
re used to stuff shirt fronts against the cold2C placed in the bottom of w
orn out shoes2C and even used as handkerchiefs. 20
20
I'm sure it is possible that newspapers were utilized as batting - Heaven k
nows2C we've seen everything under the sun used as batt!
I dont know of any actual examples - I am really interested to know if some
of the list members know of some. 20
20
Something else I think that you might consider is that the southern "homesp
un cotton" quilt might actually be better represented by a linsey quilt.
They weren't everywhere3B as far as my limited knowledge2C I think they w
ere most prevalent in the KY/TN and "upper" lower south. I know there are l
ist members knowledgeable in that particular area. Just something you migh
t want to check out if you are thinking of making a reproduction. Carry on
!!
Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com
"Only in a quiet mind is adequate perception of the world." Hans Margolius
"So - thats why I never know what's going on!" Teddy Pruett


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: homespun
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
As homespun originally meant wool at that time, you also might want to
add woolsey to linsey or consider quilt using plain thin wool.-

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Confederate quilts
From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 05:08:43 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Teddy, your wish is my command.
I just came upon this info yesterday in the Mississippi Quilts 20
documentation project book (page 43).
In the section on quilts made during civil war and reconstruction, 20
there is a mention of people sleeping on newspapers in a lawyer's 20
office and then the pertinent sentence:
In this instance, newspapers were used more or less as mattresses; 20
however, an account exists of a 'confederate quilt' that was made from 20
two homespun sheets filled with layers of newspaper--an extreme 20
example, perhaps, of the creative solutions to problems of shortages 20
created by the blockade." fn 26

footnote 26: Laurel Horton, 'South Carolina Civil War Quilts,' 20
Uncoverings 1985 page 61, AQSG

So an excellent reference, maybe someone can look it up as I don't 20
have that volume or maybe Laurel can give us more info on the quilt in 20
question.

Sandra Starley
Moab, Utah
AQS certified quilt appraiser
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

-------
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Confederate Soldiers' Quilts
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
 

Tjhanks for the responses--will look into suggestions. I forgot this was a three day weekend (when you're retired, everyday is a weekend), so am pleasantly surprised so many of you responded.

Mitzi, my heart goes out to you and your family. I would love to know more about the Shelbourne's soldiers' quilt--although it probably is a late 19th Century, remembrance or memento quilt--which is something else I hope to make one day soon. In fact, my version of the Lincoln Shrine's Sanitary Commission quilt was made by me with antique 1870-90's fabrics and I am going to make a remembrance quilt out of it as part of the exhibit.

Teddy, you are probably right--I read the newspaper batting story somewhere (it's hell getting senile), but that doesn't mean its true. One of the reasons I am looking for an actualyl 1861-65 Confederate soldier's quilt is to check this story out.

Same thing with the homespun; read that somewhere; but it doesn't make it true either.

So anyone else out there who can help this old, semi-senile guy; it would be appreciated.

thanks, Don

by the way, of interest to me and perhaps you--the six surviving Sanitary Commission quilts were all originally made in the New England states--there must be some out there from the midwest or Penns, etc.????

--0-1541165538-1220194866:57072--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Newspaper insulation -NQR
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 18:35:13 +0100
X-Message-Number: 3


Non-quilt related evidence of the power of newspapers to insulate. I
was surprised while waching the Tour de France this summer to see
riders at one point throwing away what looked like newspapers. ('They
have time to read???' ). Turns out that they stick newspaper up the
fronts of their shirts shortly before descending a mountain at 70km
per hour. The paper stops the cyclists' sweat-drenched chests from
getting too cold from the wind-blast that hits them on the way down
and is then discarded into the waiting crowd.

And I do recall watching an elderly lady on an episode of Simply
Quilts demonstrating making a string quilt on a newspaper foundation
which she left in situ. She described making quilts that way when she
was young, and tying them with newspaper wadding which lasted till the
end of the winter. She recalled sleeping under the new 'crackly'
quilts.

Sally Ward
In a dark and dreary but calm Yorkshire, thinking of all those in the
path of Gustav.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Newspapers, nql
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 10:56:43 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 4

And who could forget that staple of Brownies and Girl Scouts - the situpon?

Carefully crafted of folded, then woven newspapers, and laced with gimp into an oilcloth covering - for sitting around the campfire or on damp grass....

Now THAT was a long time ago! ! Susan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Newspaper insulation
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 14:21:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

One of my favorite mental pictures from my women's history research is the
description of a log cabin in south-eastern nebraska which the lady of the
house had used newspapers for interior insulation and where the newspapers
met she tacked a one-inch square of red felt. Voila. Function becomes
design.

Stephanie Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Newspapers, nql
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 14:23:25 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Girl scouts. . . . . what a reminder! I've often wished I could remember how
we made our situpons so I could use it as a craft for Bible school for
placemats, etc. But it's faded into crevices of my brain that refuse to be
resurrected.

Stephanie Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Newspapers, nql
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 20:33:20 +0100
X-Message-Number: 7

I'd never heard of these newspaper situpons, but I know about them
now. Thank you QHL and google!

http://basketmakers.org/topics/beginners/situpon1.htm

And I love the story of the newspapers and red felt so much that I
feel a quilt coming on.....

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sit upons (was: Newspapers, nql)
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 12:34:18 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

Good afternoon, QHLers - When my troop made sit-upons over the years, we
used a variety of outside covers, including oilcloth tablecloths cut down to
size (recycled; holes punched using an awl if thicker oilcloth or holepunch
if thinner oilcloth) with newspapers used as the padding. In the last few
years, we used old blue jeans (legs cut off, waist and leg openings sewn
closed) stuffed with plastic bags (recycled) as the padding. The jeans were
fun as one could string a belt or rope thru the belt loops and then you had
a means of carrying it, too.
Regards,
Meg
._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______
Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Article on Molas
From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 14:23:04 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

The latest issue of *American Indian*, the magazine of the Smithsonian
Institution's National Museum of the American Indian (Fall 2008 p. 43)
has a short article,"The Mola Makers of Kuna Yala" in which a couple of
Mola makers from Panama are interviewed. It's not an in-depth article,
but interesting with nice color pictures.

Mary


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Confederate Soldiers' Quilts
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 14:18:43 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Donald. . . I sincerely hope you are planning on compiling all your research
AND your reproduction quilts into a book for publication.

Stephanie Higgins