Subject: Another UGGR quilt code myth perpetuation
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>

Good afternoon, fellow QHLers - Sigh..here's another quilt code
perpetuation:



http://tinyurl.com/4cjrha



I'm literally out the door for the rest of the week so can't set the staff
writer nor the museum folks straight. Anybody got some time to do so?

Regards,

Meg

._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______

Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney

Textile/Costume Conservator in Private Practice

Professional Associate, AIC

mgmooneymoonware.net




------=_NextPart_000_00D6_01C9248B.2EA5C640--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Another UGGR quilt code myth perpetuation
From: "Patricia L. Cummings" <patquiltersmuse.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2008 14:00:27 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

Amazing and not so amazing. The community has not caught up with the educated community who continues to dispute the quilt code. See how much power Ozella McDaniel Williams had? Her lies have outlived her. What is the saying, "A lie can get half way around the world before the truth can get his pants on?"

Actually, the situation goes beyond truth. It speaks to the need to celebrate Black History. It's just that the people making the quilts don't understand Black History, perhaps because they have not studied it, or perhaps because they go by hearsay. It's such a mess!

When I was speaking the other night to a group, on another topic, the last person to respond to "Are there any questions?" said that she had just finished reading the book, Hidden in Plain View. I told her that she had just opened a hornet's nest and that the book was not accepted by scholars. She insisted that it was a nice story. Yes. So, now we are back to the root of it - "nice story." Who cares if it is true, as long as it seems as though the Blacks were empowered and not helpless, after all?

Thanks for bringing another travesty to our attention, Meg. Somehow, I don't have the heart to respond personally.

Patricia Cummings, author of a new book!
http://www.quiltersmuse.com

 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Armadillo workbaskets.
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>


Sorry for cross-posting, those of you who are BQTHL members. I posted
this there first, and then remembered which list actually talked about
the workbaskets....

I just stumbled on this page today, on the subject of armadillo
farming. I suppose I somehow thought those workbaskets were isolated
impulses, never thought of the creatures actually being farmed to make
baskets, lamps, and other household 'necessities'.

http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2008/10/01/armadillo-farm-is-oddest-money-maker/#more-5587

Sally Ward
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Shelly Zegart's catalogue available for ordering now ....
From: zegrtquiltaol.com

Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft Releases
Shelly Zegart: Passionate About Quilts Catalogue


Shelly Zegart: Passionate About Quilts catalogue beautifu=
lly documents the
retrospective exhibition of her more than thirty years work with quilts held=
at
the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft in Louisville, Kentucky (September 4=

October 26, 2008). Fifty color photographs compliment the essays and article=
s
from Zegart on state quilt projects and their history, contemporary quilt
collecting, exhibitions, African-American quilt scholarship and a historical
look at 19th century women, politics and quilts. The thoughtful
introduction by Dr. Bernard L. Herman, Department of Art History, University=
of
Delaware, provides insight into this complex woman and her accomplishments.


Shelly Zegart's love of American quilts began in the
mid-1970s. Since then, she has been a passionate collector, curator, author=
and
lecturer on both antique and contemporary quilts. Zegart, a zealous advocate
for quilt scholarship, was co-founder and the driving force behind the Kentu=
cky
Quilt Project, initiated in 1980 to survey the state's quilts. It was the fi=
rst
of many to follow. One of her most significant contributions began in 1993 w=
hen
she was a founder of The Alliance for American Quilts and went on to lead th=
e efforts
of its university and museum partners to preserve and share the nation=
=99s quilt
heritage from 1993-2006. She has helped
to build quilt collections in Kentucky and arou
nd the world.


Order the sixty-page soft cover, comb bound volume ($14.95
plus US shipping Priority mail $4.75; International shipping $12.95) from th=
e
Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: major PA auction
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2008 11:18:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Take a look at the quilts -- but then make sure you look at the rest of the
sale -- it is a good education in PA German folk art and furniture!
http://pook.securesites.net/cat/2008-10-24/Textiles/0

Candace Perry


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: major PA auction
From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com>

Thank You for sending the auction site. Great things!!!!
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: major PA auction
From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net>
Thanks Candace! This is the collection of Richard and Rosemarie
Machmer, one of the best of its kind. I love the Lone Star with the
Mariner's Compass corners . . . awesome. Wonder what all the stock
market troubles will do to the prices. - Judy


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: major PA auction
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2008 12:35:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Isn't that one yummy? That's the one I would pick...
Well, I have my eye on the Masonic apron from Bernville PA, a town in PA
where some of my ancestors settled (and nothing much else happened.) I am
hoping the economy IS slow enough for me to be able to buy it.
Candace


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: major PA auction
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

My favorites were the PA silkwork pincushion, the needlework group of
pincushions and sewing balls and the sewing pockets.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: major PA auction
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2008 12:55:33 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Just as an FYI and an advert (with apologies) I have 2008 sampler/needlework
calendars of the Schwenkfelder collection available at less than half price
($10) plus shipping. The calendar isn't so useful but the images are -- and
we have pinballs and purses to die for!
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hilton rooms - festival
From: QuiltEvalsaol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2008 14:52:29 EDT
I may have 3 rooms available at the Hilton America's for Festival, beginning
10/28-11/2. If anyone is interested please email me off list right away
before I cancel them.

Thanks, Deb Roberts

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Armadillo Workbaskets
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>

I'm astounded that someone would farm these poor lil ole critters. Around =
here come daylight their remnants decorate every road and highway. W=
e often answer the question "Why did the chicken cross the road?" with the=
answer "To show the armadillo it can be done."

There are mornings when one's lawn appears to have been pocked by a small battle of some sort. Those amazing claws dig caverns insearch of some tend=
er morsel or other then move on a few inches away.......infuriating. I =
wish I had written down some of the ways that people have attempted to rid themselves of a resident armadillo.

To make this quilt related now that the AQSG seminar is over the list=
may perk up again. I didnt get to go this year much to my heartbreak=
 as I seldom miss it. I am waiting to hear if they flew the flags just =
a teensy bit lower because I was absent....or if they wore armbands in mour=
ning for those of us not present. Not a black armband but perhaps a sim=
ple madder brown of some sort. Teddy Pruett ra'chere in the midst of ar=
madillo kingdomwww.teddypruett.com ---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: economy block ideas
From: kldevaol.com
 
This just got the wheels going - what a new twist to ponder -
How about
?????? Borrow and Lend
?????? Bars and Stars
???????Chain and Bar
?????? Crown and Thorns
??????
I just got started looking at names of blocks - www.quilterscache.com

K



Karen Dever
AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser
Moorestown, NJ 08057

www.karendever.com
856-816-6628
njquiltappraisraol.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: economy block ideas
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2008 15:14:50 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

I did a post about Robbing Peter to Pay Paul(son) on my blog. Scroll down to
October 1, 2008

http://winnowings.blogspot.com/

Christine Thresh


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Appraisal values
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2008 19:49:34 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Laura, would you please share the responses you received? I just got back
online after 26 days of being without. I'd love to hear what people said.

Thanks and best regards,
Sharron.......................
..........in wind-blown Spring, TX...............
---------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Sewing and slavery books From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2008 12:55:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2
Has anyone read "The Seamstress" or "Stand in the Storm"? I would like to hear more about them. I wonder if they are historical fiction or just novels? The review begins "Two new historical novels, both featuring protagonists who are immersed in sewing and slavery, .."

There is no mention of quilts or the ugrr in the review. Stand in the Storm's cover has quilts blocks, such as log cabin, bears paw, hole in the barn door, and broken dishes, overlaid on a photograph brick buildings and horse and buggies in the streets..

Novels Stitch Tightly Woven Tales Of Freedom- Review and excepts on NPR http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=95011333

This is Alan Cheuse, the reviewer's, closing paragraph-

"It's odd how two books about characters who sew turn out to be about characters who want their freedom, but good stories don't grow out of thin air. They begin with a writer's keen sense of narrative and sharp sense of observation. As Sewing Annie, the mother of Gabriel Coats, says of her tailor son, "He was born to this work, and he is the better of most at it ...'She could be speaking about this pair of talented new writers.' "

They sound good to me!

Piece, Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD www.antiquequiltdating.com www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Sewing and slavery books From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2008 13:57:56 -0700 (PDT)

There are reviews on Amazon.com.

"Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> wrote: Has anyone read "The Seamstress" or "Stand in the Storm"? I would like to hear more about them. I wonder if they are historical fiction or just novels? The review begins "Two new historical novels, both featuring protagonists who are immersed in sewing and slavery, .."

There is no mention of quilts or the ugrr in the review. Stand in the Storm's cover has quilts blocks, such as log cabin, bears paw, hole in the barn door, and broken dishes, overlaid on a photograph brick buildings and horse and buggies in the streets..

Novels Stitch Tightly Woven Tales Of Freedom- Review and excepts on NPR http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=95011333

This is Alan Cheuse, the reviewer's, closing paragraph-

"It's odd how two books about characters who sew turn out to be about characters who want their freedom, but good stories don't grow out of thin air. They begin with a writer's keen sense of narrative and sharp sense of observation. As Sewing Annie, the mother of Gabriel Coats, says of her tailor son, "He was born to this work, and he is the better of most at it ...'She could be speaking about this pair of talented new writers.' "

They sound good to me!

Piece, Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: AQSG Seminar From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2008 21:09:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I'm finally beginning to decompress from five fabulous days in Columbus, OH hosted by the Midwest Fabric Study Group. Teddy we MISSED you! Dee Dadik and Molly Butler and their committee organized an amazing weekend (notice how we now define a weekend as five days). I can only skim the surface of what was offered. I'll tell you about what I saw and heard. I hope others will describe events that I didn't attend.

I know how fortunate I am to have so many wonderful quilt related experiences. If I had to choose only one event each year (which I hope with all my heart will never happen) it would be the AQSG Seminar wherever it was held. The Seminar combines serious scholarship in the paper presentations, in depth learning experiences through study centers, the opportunity to see hundreds of quilts and the joy of being with people whose eyes don't glaze over when you talk about your passion for quilts and quilt history. Anne of Green Gables always longed for kindred spirits; I find them at AQSG. You can too.

My Seminar started on Thursday a.m. with a study center, Quilt Designers of the Midwest," presented by Xenia Cord, Lisa Portwood and Amy Korn. The focus was the work of three designers whose work was relatively unknown to me: Esther O'Neill, Florence LaGanke Harris and Eleanor Beard. I hope that these presentations are published. There is so much to be learned about these early entrepreneurs. Maybe Xenia, Lisa and Amy will offer some comments. I only want to say that in addition to the intellectual stimulation there were wonderful examples in the cloth of the designs these women sold and published.

Thursday afternoon was one of our Quilt Nirvanna experiences. Julie Hardy, Jean Carlton, Carolyn Miller and I drove all over Columbus to see four exhibits. The first at the Ohio Historical Society featured Ohio quilts made over a 150 year period. I love 4-block quilts and Ohio women made some of the best (after PA, of course). I especially loved an 1860 examples in which small Pineapple blocks and fylfot elements were crossed to make 4 large blocks finished off with pots of flowers, vines and grapes in the border (double and triple rodded quilting too). A red and white Pine Burr dated 1858 had a sampler of stuffed quilting in the alternate blocks and stuffed grapes and leaves in the border. A 9 block Rose of Sharon from the 1840s had sashing created by stuffed quilting.

An 1886 Saw Tooth stripy in taupe and brown silk was made by Quakers for a wedding. There was a wool wedding comforter from 1898 in the Zoar community of German dissenters. The National Quilt (1888) made to raise money for Civil War veterans contained blocks made by the wives of Union heroes: Julia Grant, Jessie Benton Fremont, Mrs. Benjamin Harrison, etc. WW II was commemorated by the Hatfield McCoy Victory quilt marking the end of the famous feud. A wonderful pictorial quilt made by Phebe Cook in 1872 (it's on the cover of Quilts and Community, the Ohio documentation book) which shows people milking, driving buggies, churning butter, lots of animals--joyful.

In another part of the museum we saw new acquisitions including a 9-Patch made of 725 2.25" blocks set on point with alternate plain blocks made by Phoebe Benedict, a Quaker, around 1870. The fabrics are mostly pink and brown. We always play "Which One Would You Choose to Take Home." This would have been my choice; I love small scale blocks in a large quilt.

The Gallery at Ohio State University was the venue for "Amish Quilts: the Midwestern Tradition" curated by Jan Wass. A very helpful info sheet was available. These quilts are a fascinating contrast to the PA (especially Lancaster Co.) Amish quilts. Seeing quilts like this in a gallery setting is like being inside a jewel box. If you don't own Jan's beautiful book "Illinois Amish Quilts" published by the Illinois State Museum do yourself a huge favor and get it now. Finding the right room in the right building was a challenge. I'm tempted to think that most OSU students don't take art too seriously.

Linda Phumphrey deserves the AQSG volunteer of the year (or decade) award for not only chairing the live and silent auctions but curating an exhibit of the Mountain Mist Collection at the Columbus Arts Center (I apologize if I have the name wrong). The building is a marvelous example of adaptive re-use, an old armory converted into gallery and studio space; it's absolutely beautiful. It was a joy to see the familiar Mountain Mist patterns displayed in that light filled setting. All of my favorites were there: Iris, Martha's Vineyard, New York Beauty, Boston Common and others much less familiar like Hollywood an orange, yellow and cream tessellating geometric on a gray background, Zinnia Border with the flowers outlined in rickrack and Magnolia Blooms with soft grey and blue strips appliquéd with pink and white magnolias.

Before I forget I have to tell you that I was so jealous of the mother/daughter teams Mary and Linda Pumphrey and Mary and Kate Edgar who enjoyed the Seminar together. My children are respectful of my enthusiasm for quilts but make no secret that they think me a bit daft.

"A Century of Quilt Designers" was organized by Molly and Dee and Curated by Jan Rodgers. More than 40 quilts were hung just for the Seminar weekend. Drawn from private collections they included designs by Marie Webster, Ruby McKim, Mountain Mist, Carlie Sexton, Anne Orr, Hubert Ver Mehren, Mary McElwain, Nancy Page, William Pinch. It was an absolute symphony of color. Twentieth century quilts are not my focus either for study or collecting, but it's hard to find one that isn't "easy on the eyes" as my father used to say. They are usually bright and happy and well-designed. This exhibit brought the best of the best together and I can't imagine ever again seeing so many wonderful examples in one place.

Now as if that wasn't enough for one day we are just getting to the "Icebreaker," the official opening event. Sponsored by Mountain Mist, it was an evening with 20th Century Designers. Around the perimeter of the Ballroom were "bed" featuring quilt designers and commercial enterprises of the 20th century. A heroic group of presenters shared their knowledge, quilts and ephemera continuously from 6 to 9 p.m: Arene Burgess-kit quilts, Marilyn Goldman-the Wilkinson Sisters, Amy Korn-Nancy Page, Xenia Cord-Esther O'Neil, Joy Schwartz-Nancy Cabot, Pat Nickols-Mary McElwain, Lisa Portwood-Eleanor Beard, Linda Pumphrey-Mountain Mist (did Linda ever sleep?), Cindy Claycamp-Ruby McKim, Connie Chunn-Ladies Art Company, Jan Wass-Amish quilts. When you needed a quick pick me up delicious cakes, coffee etc. were available in the lobby. Does it get any better? Remember all this was the first day. The Seminar proper doesn't begin until Friday dinner.

All weekend you could see the Study Quilt collection of small red and green quilts based on an antique quilt chosen by each maker. I was thrilled to find a Princess Feather on orange which Carol Poitras of NH said was inspired by my PA Study Center last year in Lowell. That's one of the nicest compliments I've ever received. Those PA quilts truly demonstrate that orange is a neutral. Twenty five of the study quilts will travel to venues around the country during the next two years. I hope you'll be able to see them.

Anita Shackelford generously lent her collection of red and green appliqué quilts for a special exhibit. It was breathtaking. Some of Anita's own interpretations of the antique quilts were hanging with them. I kept revisiting those quilts; what a luxury to be able to study them at leisure (at least as much leisure as one gets at Seminar).

Merikay Waldvogel gave a special presentation "Anne Orr: A Second Look" She shared lots of new information gleaned from Orr's private writings. Most interesting was a letter in which Orr wrote that she knew that Margaret Rogers Cadden, the winner of the grand prize in the Sears quilt contest had not made the winning quilt in spite of having signed an entry form attesting that it was all her own work. Orr said that she voted for Cadden anyway because she wanted a southern woman to win!

This year the slots for tours, study centers and roundtables were filled by lottery, an innovation which seemed to work well. I didn't get everything I asked for which turned out to be a good thing because it gave me more time for the book sale and vendors. A power failure Friday afternoon led to something new at Seminar. The vendors opened up after dinner for a kind of "midnight shop hop." Talk about fun! We got to explore rooms full of textile treasures with full stomachs and cheerful attitudes. I hope this becomes a permanent part of the schedule (without the power failure). The vendors add so much to the richness of the experience. Seeing so many antique quilts in one place with people ready to share their knowledge is unique to AQSG. Thanks to all of you!

My second study center, on Saturday afternoon, was "A Gathering of Red and Green" with Sue Reich and Kathy Metelica. It was so much in demand they gave it twice. The generosity of our members is overwhelming. I doubt that anyone has seen more red and green (mostly appliqué) quilts in one place ever. The quilts were grouped by region which gave us the chance to note particular characteristics. They ranged from the pristine to pathetic, but even the most worn quilt has something to tell us. The icing on the cake was a CD of the power point presentation.

The paper presentations are the reason for the seminar since quilt history is the reason for AQSG. I look forward to reading everything in Uncoverings. I think that registration hit a record number. We had people from Canada, Germany, Ireland and Australia. Such fun to meet Janet O'Dell, Maureen Teager and Gai Haines who jointly won the prize for traveling farthest.

I think I've managed to give you some idea of what I did. There were so many great choices I hope other people will share some of their experiences. Next year you can join us in San Jose (from the number of people singing the song I guess they do know the way) and see just how wonderful a long weekend of total immersion in quilt history with kindred spirits can be.

Cinda on the Eastern Shore----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: An exquisite taster....
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2008 10:04:25 +0100
X-Message-Number: 1

Last night I had the great pleasure to see the preview of the latest
exhibition to hit the QGBI Gallery/Museum in York. It is the small
but perfectly formed travelling exhibition from the International
Quilt Study Centre at the University of Nebraska. Called 'Quilts In
Common' it draws from the IQSC collection to show small groupings of
quilts with commonality of line, shape, colour, technique, and/or
narrative, 'Around the Globe and Across the Centuries'.

Now to those of you who get to AQSG Seminars, or any of the Fabric
Study Groups such as Cinda reports on so eloquently, this exhibition
would be very small fry. But to one who has been reading about and
looking at pictures of American quilt styles for so many years it was
an amazing experience to actually stand within a foot of a real
'live' (and beautiful) Baltimore Album, Tree of Life, Palampore,
Scherenschnitte, Hawaiian Applique...you probably don't want me to
list them all. In addition to quilts crossing the US and Canada, the
International element comes from India, Wales, Norfolk, France,
Germany, Zimbabwe, and Japan.

As an information freak I would have loved much more detailed
labelling, although the three-fold catalogue sheet is brilliantly laid
out to show where in the world and on the time line the quilts
belong. I'd have loved also a large catalogue. But you can't have
everything!

Any QHL members in the UK who want to get close to American quilt
history in particular, I recommend you get there well before the
exhibition leaves in January, you may well want a return visit.

In addition, on the 15th October, they are opening a small exhibition
in the Bailey Gallery to run at the same time, of Victorian 'Patchwork
for the Parlour'.

Sally Ward




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: AQSG Seminar
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2008 04:53:10 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

Cinda,
Wishing I could be there with you! After reading your wonderful descriptions, I can dream in technicolor. Thanks for taking the time to share with us.
Barbara Burnham
Ellicott City MD

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: interesting quilt
From: mopalka <mopalkaalaska.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2008 12:14:12 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

http://www.laborarts.org/exhibits/union/ttpics.cfm?pic=11
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: More information on new book about Ellen Webster
From: "Patricia L. Cummings" <patquiltersmuse.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2008 17:07:12 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

Today, I have finally submitted the last copy (to the museum) of the e-book that Jim and I wrote. I decided to add a photo and additional information to both my blog and my website. The index (or homepage) of our site includes info. about how to order this product from the museum, the recipient of all of its proceeds.

Patricia Cummings