Subject: Baltimore Exhibits
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2008 21:51:54 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Greetings, I'll be in Baltimore Oct 28th thru the 31st on business. Does anyone know of any quilt or textile exhibits in the area I might be able to visit in the late afternoon or evening? Would love to hear from you!

Pam Conklin
O'Fallon, IL




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Subject: Re: qhl digest: Prussian blue
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2008 05:36:59 EDT

Re: Prussian blue

I am planning to make a reproduction of an early patchwork quilt, 1840-1850,
and I am hunting for fabric.

I'm having good luck with browns, but where oh where can I find some cotton
fabric in a print from that period with that lovely Prussian blue? Does anyone
know of a current or recent line or perhaps an upcoming line of fabric that
includes a really fine Prussian blue?

Many thanks! Bright blessings!

~Donna Laing
www.NorthStarQualityQuilting.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Baltimore Exhibits
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2008 04:46:00 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

Pam, You are in luck!!!

Baltimore Museum of Art has three Baltimore Album Quilts on display, and a new quilt pattern is available for the Captain Russell quilt. Check their web site: http://www.artbma.org/

Baltimore Album Quilts Revisited: A Matter of Style
Berman Textile Gallery
Through 2008
Reconnect with three of the famous Baltimore Album Quilts, including the beloved Captain George W. Russell quilt and a new addition to the collection. Another selection of quilts will be on view in January.

You might want to also visit Maryland Historical Society:
http://www.mdhs.org/
... not sure what they have on exhibit right now but if you give them a call, they might have something quilt-related, or something you might be interested in. If staff is available, they might try to accommodate an out-of town visitor. Mount Vernon square is right around the corner, where you can see Baltimore's Washington Monument. Don't miss the Inner Harbor either, for the Science Center, National Aquarium, great restaurants like The Cheesecake Factory, and much more.

Have fun!
Barbara Burnham, Ellicott City, MD

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Subject: Re: Baltimore Exhibits
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2008 10:07:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Oh, and Fells Point is so fab.
And I love the Walters -- no quilts, just great art.
Candace Perry


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Subject: Re: cotton
From: "Sharon in NC" <patchworksecrets2earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2008 13:57:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Surprisingly many homesteaders today are starting to learn to grow cotton
for their own use on a small scale. I know several who are experimenting.

Sharon in NC
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Subject: Re: cotton
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2008 19:28:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

> Surprisingly many homesteaders today are starting to learn to grow cotton
> for their own use on a small scale. I know several who are experimenting.
> Sharon in NC

Sharon, when you use the word "homesteaders," do you mean "homeowners" or
people who have filed a claim on government land that is being sold?

For some time now, both the brown- and the "green"-boll cotton have been
grown commercially in parts of Louisiana for the use in clothing,
particularly in local-label children's clothing. It is as "natural" as
processed cotton can be---contains no dyes, for instance. Nor have the
fields been defoliated with chemicals. As a gardener, I would guess that
some kind of weed-preventer has been used (e.g., like Preen) and depending
on the location possibly some kind of pesticide, probably natural.

Gaye Ingram



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Subject: West Virginia Quilts: And Quiltmakers: Echoes From the Hills
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2008 10:17:31 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

I love this book!

I had been under the impression that the Irish Chain pattern had originated
in America but Fawn has discovered a link to Ireland in an 1807 quilt. You
can see a little about it at
http://www.womenfolk.com/quilt_pattern_history/irishchain.htm

She presents a marvelous cross section of quilts in this book and includes
fascinating information on every one of them.

Judy Breneman



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Subject: RE:Prussian Blue
From: adamroni <adamroninetvision.net.il>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2008 08:27:43 +0200
Windham came out with a line called Prussian Blue about 2 years ago - you
can still find it at www.thefabricshoppe.com
<http://www.thefabricshoppe.com/> (no affiliation etc.) I'd also recommend
doing a search through www.quiltshops.com <http://www.quiltshops.com/> .
However' the best Prussian Blue repros I've ever seen were two lines from
roughly 10 years ago, by Marcus brothers - Trade Goods (designed by Karen
Jarrar, I think) and Chateau Rose by Laura Wagner. These had deep, vibrant
blues, one an exact replica of the blue on the sashes of the quilt on p. 119
of Calico and Chintz, another a copy of the rather wild blue and gold in the
quilt on pp. 124-125. If you need further assistance please e-mail me
privately

Ady in Israel



----------------------------------------------------------------------



Subject: Re: qhl digest: Prussian blue

From: LinusDonnaaol.com

Re: Prussian blue


I am planning to make a reproduction of an early patchwork quilt, 1840-1850,

and I am hunting for fabric.



I'm having good luck with browns, but where oh where can I find some cotton
fabric in a print from that period with that lovely Prussian blue? Does
anyone
know of a current or recent line or perhaps an upcoming line of fabric that
includes a really fine Prussian blue?



Many thanks! Bright blessings!

~Donna Laing

www.NorthStarQualityQuilting.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: West Virginia Quilts: And Quiltmakers: Echoes From the Hills
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2008 05:33:50 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2


Whoops, I posted my message about this book to the wrong list. (blush) Too
many lists for my muddled mind. :)

Judy B


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Baltimore Exhibits
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2008 11:43:03 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3

Barbara and Candace

Thanks to you my calendar if full, this group always comes thruough! I feel so
blessed to be a member!

Pam Conklin
O'Fallon, IL

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Subject: Quilt Show in Kutztown, PA
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2008 18:22:34 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

For those who like advance notice, so they can reserve the dates, there
will be an exhibit of 1900s Pennsylvania quilts in Kutztown, PA, next
May. I spoke on Friday with the couple who own the quilts that will be
on display, and they said they are "early", and all 18th century. As
I learn more details, I will share them, but since the open days are
limited, wanted to let you know now.

This is what their announcement says --

Antique Quilt Show and Sale

May 2, 2009 (Show and Sale) 10 am to 4 pm
May 3, 2009 (Show and Sale) Noon to 4 pm
May 10, 17, 24 (Show only) Noon to 4 pm

Admission $5 for non-members
Featuring Antique quilts from PA
Antique quilt raffle

Kutztown Area Historical Society
Normal Avenue & Whitcoak Streets
Kutztown, PA 19530
610-683-7697

Barb in southeastern PA
Still on her Ohio Quilt High


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Subject: Re: Quilt Show in Kutztown, PA
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2008 18:33:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Oops -- I never was good at typing numbers -- My previous announcement
should read --

An exhibit of 1800s quilts, not 1900s quilts. I apologize for the
confusion, and will try to remember to proofread my posts.

Barb in southeastern PA


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Subject: weaving patterns/quilting patterns
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2008 18:41:13

When I went to the site about the Irish Chain Quilts and read about the correspondence to weaving patterns I thought of an "ah-ha" moment I had this summer. I was working with a person to try to find the name of a woven coverlet pattern. My printer was almost out of ink. When I printed out the woven coverlet pattern I "saw" the 3 strip sashing and checkerboard corners so often associated with Souther quilts. I wondered then if anyone had ever do a comparison of the similarities of woven coverlet patterns and quilt patterns. Any thoughts from any of you on this subject? It makes a great deal of sense to me. A quilter might take from these coverlets design elements to put into her quilt. So often they are both based on rectangles and squares. Homespun/home produced?plaid fabrics could also fall into this equation.
I need to find a piece of Prussian blue fabric to do a "repair/restoration" on a chintz quilt made in the 1840's. It is a hole that was probably created by a hungry rat. It is the size of about 1/3 of a dollar bill. Any ideas would be helpful. I am going to go look at those Prussian blue reproduction fabrics right now.
Off to sew in rather chilly eastern NC ----- We actually have some fall colors today after the rain and the cool spell.
?Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: prussian blue
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2008 18:56:00 -0400

Unfortunately none of the Prussian Blue reproduction are anywhere near the fabric I need to at least "sort of" match. I have never had to reproduce a fabric using fabric and an ink jet printer, therefore I am not sure about this. Have any of you who do restoration work done this and found it satisfactory? Have you tested it to determine fading, transfer of color, etc.? I would appreciate hearing from some of you regarding this.
Thanks! Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 18, 2008
From: "Eileen Trestain" <ejtrestaincomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2008 21:15:54 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Baum/ Wyndham has a line of Prussian coming out that will make your heart
go pitty pat.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: prussian blue
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2008 08:05:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Lynn:

I have been told that printing fabric with an ink jet printer works but I
haven't had to resort to it yet. The inkjet-printed quilts that I've seen
in shows (Carol Bryer Fallert's work, people's album quilts with family
photos) all look faded and flat to me, and I assume that if they're in a
show they haven't been washed, used, or exposed to light yet. And as far as
I know, all of the inkjet printers out there use dye-based color inks,
rather than pigment-based inks. I'd love to hear others' experiences also.

Dale Drake
Restoring quilts in Indiana


Lynn Lancaster Gorges said:
Have any of you who do restoration work done this and found it satisfactory?
Have you tested it to determine fading, transfer of color, etc.? I would
appreciate hearing from some of you regarding this.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt and Coverlet Patterns
From: Trishherraol.com
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2008 09:30:03 EDT
X-Message-Number: 5


-------------------------------1224509403
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Yes Lynn, there are certainly many cross over patterns out there. If you
look in early pattern books for weavers, European from the 16th century on and
American, particularly Northeastern US from the early 1800s you will see that
coverlet patterns by necessity are based on geometric shapes limited only by
the imagination of the weavers. Quite a large number of those professional men
were working in SE Pa. They shared patterns and developed new ones and came
up with amazing variations of patterns that could be done on multishaft
looms. That is not to ignore the home weaving that was done mostly in overshot and
summer winter structures by women in New England. They could also be very
innovative, but were more limited in loom capability and capacity.

Some coverlet and quilt patterns even have the same names, like Burgoyne
(spelling?) Surrounded. I could go on and on, but I won't bore everyone with one
of my favorite preoccupations! Trish

Trish Herr
The Herrs Antiques
_www.theherrsantiques.com_ (http://www.theherrsantiques.com/)
2363 Henbird Lane
Lancaster, PA 17601
717.569.2268

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Crossover patterns
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2008 6:44:02 -0700
X-Message-Number: 6

I was fortunate to attend Winterthur's Needlework Conference this past weekend. One of the speakers had a slide featuring an 1830s diagram of the Irish Chain stitch. You guessed it! Identical to the quilting pattern! sue reich
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com


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Subject: RE: prussian blue
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2008 10:10:52 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Lynn,

I have used ink jet printed fabric in new quilts and quilt labels that have
been washed over and over with no more fading of my printed pieces than the
other fabrics in the quilt - and Brie's quilts and some of the baby quilts
I've made are washed quite often.

I always get good color as long as I make sure the print quality is set on
high. A Prussian blue might be a bit of a challenge depending upon your
printer; I would suggest using (if you printer can accommodate one) a color
photo ink cartridge to get the best color. My photo ink cartridge replaces
the black one and truly improves the range of color. The tri-color
cartridges for typical color printing contain only a version of the three
primary colors. The photo cartridge adds the secondary colors - it makes a
big difference in the depth of color.

To be sure the printing takes use either fabric sheets prepared for printing
or pre-treat your fabric yourself. From lots of experience I find the EQ
Printables fabric sheets (cotton) to be the best for softness and
flexibility if I don't use my own fabrics. If you treat your own fabric,
press it onto freezer paper first and then cut to a size that will feed
through your printer - it can be a little tricky.

Once printed let the ink dry thoroughly - I think instructions say 15-30
minutes, I sometimes wait even longer. Then rinse your printed fabric
thoroughly to remove any excess ink. For me typically very little, if any,
is discharged and only right at the beginning of my rinse. I start with cool
water and gradually increase to the hottest water my hands can take because
I do it by hand and not gently. I then leave the fabric to soak in the hot
water for a few extra minutes. There should be no color in the soaking
water. Next, after wringing out the water I lay out the fabric flat and
press with an iron on the hottest setting the fabric will tolerate to set
the ink. Basically, if I abuse the fabric and I'm still happy with how it
looks I use it.

I've printed lots of things over the last 10 years with great success. I
have a piece I scanned and printed over a year ago for a repair to an
antique quilt since I can't find anything else - a lack of time is the only
reason I've not yet made the repair. It's only soft pinks and beiges but
side by side I wouldn't know the difference if I hadn't made the fabric
myself other than my printed fabric feels newer - just like a manufactured
reproduction fabric would.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: prussian blue
From: textiqueaol.com
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2008 13:40:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Hi Lynn,? I also wanted to try this so did a little inquiry.
(Silk screening is so expensive) Got only that far because of time
issues.? I was able to locate artist archival ink cartridges at an
art supply store.? You might already be aware of that but just
adding my 2 cents.


Jan, who wishes she were home in CO but is still frantically driving around OH searching reasearch 'stuff'.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE:Prussian Blue
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2008 15:05:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

Addy,
Thanks for another excuse to pick up Calico and Chintz. That is still
#1 among all the quilt exhibits I've ever attended. It changed the way I
see things.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: weaving patterns/quilting patterns
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2008 21:48:13 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Charles Pratt made quilts designed of tiny squares. As he was a carpet
maker some were based on rug designs. He is one of the Six Grand Old
Characters written about in the 1990 issue of Uncoverings.

Judy Breneman



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Subject: Kudos to Marcia Kaylakie!
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2008 20:18:33 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Marcia Kaylakie has won the "Writers League of Texas Violet Crown
Award" for non-fiction for 2008! This means that her book, "Texas
Quilts and Quilters - A Lone Star Legacy" is the top non-fiction book
in Texas for 2008, a huge honor. The award, which carries a monetary
component, will be publicly awarded on November 1, but Marcia
received advance notice just this evening.

So...if you don't have it yet, run out and get a copy. What you
will find is a book that explores the extraordinary quilt stories of
ordinary people. The stories are poignant, startling, amazing, sad,
exciting, uplifting, astonishing - delightful!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: calico & chintz From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2008 22:03:28 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Addy, Thanks for another excuse to pick up Calico and Chintz. That is still #1 among all the quilt exhibits I've ever attended. It changed the way I see things. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

i used to have a place bookmarked that showed a travelling schedule of the calico and chintz exhibit. does anyone know if it is still being displayed, or a place online that shows a schedule? the book is fantastic, one of the first that i bought and so glad that i did. thanx so much patti

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 21, 2008 From: Elpaninaroaol.com Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2008 01:30:55 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

--part1_bdd.3dca706b.3630148f_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 10/21/2008 11:12:39 PM Central Standard Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

> This means that her book, "Texas Quilts and Quilters - A Lone Star Legacy" > is the top non-fiction book in Texas for 2008, a huge honor.

Good show and congrats Marcia! I loved your book as a novice collector, and Mom loved it too as a seasoned student of quilting. A well deserved honor.

Tom.

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Subject: printing fabric with computer printer From: palamporeaol.com Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2008 09:39:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I wanted to give an update on my copying/printing. I have an HP All-in-One printer/scanner/copier. I put my fabric coated paper into the paper slot face down. Then I put the quilt corner on the copier bed. Closed the top and hit color print. Came out fine except the Prussian Blue is rather faded looking but the details are great. Went to Staples to ask if they had a special photo ink cartridge that would make the color brighter. The manager said -- no, but I could get a better color if we increased the DPI to as high as it would go. Did that this morning and it looks the same. Tonight we plan to take a digital photo of the quilt fabric and then make a high resolution copy of the photo. My husband seems to think that might be a better option than using the fabric as the primary source for the copy. Any opinions? I am going to set the dye/ink with Retayne. Any thoughts on that? This is a 2X3 inch hole in the center of the quilt. Most of the quilt is made of this chintz. I placed?a piece?of?the faded fabric in the hole. It doesn't make me 100% happy, but it is much better than just putting a non-matching design Prussian Blue in it. And the best part is that the flowers and vines can be lined up appropriately so it doesn't look so much like a "patch". ?I think that visually it?will not be as disturbing when the quilt will be on display. It will of course be written up in the report about the work done on the quilt and it will be easily removed if someone in the future finds a better option. I am hoping for the digital photo to give me better colors, but if not I will go with this. Thanks for the help you gave me. Will report on the digital photo tomorrow. Best regards, Lynn

Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio The Creative Caregiver New Bern, NC palamporeaol.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: printing fabric with computer printer From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2008 10:14:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Lynn -- I've had better luck making a scan of item. Then edit the scan for best clarity, sharpness and color, and set dpi at 600. Then print scan to the fabric using best or normal printer setting. Hope this makes sense.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: blue lines in kit quilts From: Karen Dever <njquiltappraisraol.com> Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2008 11:24:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

A member of my local guild has purchased a crib kit quilt but would like to quilt in a different way and wants to know how to remove the blue lines - ideas???

K

Karen Dever Moorestown, NJ

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: blue lines in kit quilts From: "deb" <debquiltingposs.com> Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2008 14:41:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

As far as I know, the lines are permanent. I have complete kit quilts that still have the blue lines showing in between the stitches.

Debbie Quilting Possibilities NJ

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: crib kit quilt From: "barbara" <estephenswindstream.net> Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2008 06:35:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

If the kit is a new kit, the lines should come out when water is applied to them. Either spray with water or wash the top gently. Of course, it this is an embroidery top, all the embroidery should be done before any water touches the top or there will be on lines (cross stitches) to follow.

Barbara

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Blue lines in quilts From: Judy White <whitey06029sbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2008 05:40:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I have several quilt kits, two of which I have in front of me. One which has never been opened is a Paragon kit from about the 60's and is a cross  stitch kit with swirly blue quilting lines.The other, also a Paragon ki t from the 60's, is one I started when pregnant with my first child.Wit h each pregnancy (3) I would work on this quilt.The cross stitching is  now fully complete and the panels are sewn together and it is ready to be q uilted.Maybe if I had had a fourth child, it would be done.However, the directions say under CLEANING:"We recommend dry cleaning.Howev er the quilt may be washed using care commensurate with the valuye of a fin e hand embroidered piece." No where does it say anything about removing the blue quiltiing lines.I have have seen some much older kits where blue lines were removed with ker osene but I would not do that myself if I were you.I personally think t hose quilting lines are part of the charm of a kit quilt.Just my opinio n. Judy White --0-1759721049-1224765657:20768--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: crib kit quilt From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2008 07:57:55 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

I made a quilt for my son from a Lee Wards kit. I started it when I was pre gnant with him and didn't finish it until his birthday - his 29th.

I didn't wash it immediately after I finished it. I kept it at my house for his children to use when they were visiting.

I eventually washed it with Orvus and all the lines disappeared.

Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: copying/printing onto fabric From: carylschuetzcomcast.net Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2008 18:27:48 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 4

Lynn, I didn't get the earlier message about the type of cotton you were using fo r the copy/print onto fabric, whether or not it was pretreated to be wash f ast or not.A0You jsut said "fabric coated". A0Be sure to read the e ntire printed material with the fabric to know what they recommend you do a fter the fabric has been printed. Every one is a little different. SOme say to wait 24 or more hours; some say to iron so as to heat set;  with some you need do nothing.A0

Just be sure that you have purchased a pretreated cotton that is color fast .Unless.... If you have pretreated the fabric yourself usingBubble Jet Set, then follow their directions.I use BJS a lot. I just let the printed fab ric set for a few days and then iron. I sometimes will sprinkle a bit of water onto the edge of the fabric to see that it is fast.

I taught a photo transfer onto fabric class for years.I have never u sed Retayne for this.

Trying the digital photo with the camera set on its highest resolution, the n using that digital to print out is worth a try.Hope that works for you!

Caryl Schuetz

I wanted to give an update on my copying/printing. I have an HP All-in-One  printer/scanner/copier. I put my fabric coated paper into the paper slot fa ce down. Then I put the quilt corner on the copier bed. Closed the top and  hit color print. Came out fine except the Prussian Blue is rather faded loo king but the details are great. Went to Staples to ask if they had a specia l photo ink cartridge that would make the color brighter. The manager said  -- no, but I could get a better color if we increased the DPI to as high as it would go. Did that this morning and it looks the same. Tonight we plan  to take a digital photo of the quilt fabric and then make a high resolution copy of the photo. My husband seems to think that might be a better option than using the fabric as the primary source for the copy. Any opinions? I am going to set the dye/ink with Retayne. Any thoughts on that?

--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: printing fabric with computer printer From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca> Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2008 20:21:15 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

>I wanted to give an update on my copying/printing....

Lynn, did you use treated fabric in your printer? If not, there is nothing you can do to prevent your colours from washing out the first time water contacts your fabric, as the inks used in almost all ink-jet printers are water soluble. There are several printer-ready brands of fabric sheets available that will provide colourfast prints. I've had good luck with the "June Tailor" ones. You can treat your own fabric with a product called "Bubble Jet Set", which is much more cost effective if you have many copies or sheets to print. Here is a link to the manufacturer's website, which provides a vast amount of information on how to optimally use this product.

http://www.cjenkinscompany.com/

Good luck!

Jennifer Hill Calgary, AB

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: blue lines in kit quilts From: kldevaol.com Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2008 08:18:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Thanks to all for your input and it seems to be a consensus that it depends on the age of the kit to some extent and that the blue lines will do what they will when they feel like it!

K

Karen Dever AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moorestown, NJ 08057

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Another Wrinkle in the UGRR Realm From: "Patricia L. Cummings" <patquiltersmuse.com> Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2008 13:04:18 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Dear friends,

I bring this to your attention because I know you care. I just received an e-mail from a well-meaning, if not misguided soul, who belongs to a brand of church of which I have never heard. She (and her group?) apparently want to make an "Underground Railroad Quilt."

She was soliciting my help as she has been all over the Internet and no one at all has what she needs, which are the "5 or 6 basic signals" for this so-called Underground Railroad Quilt, in a 4" x 4" size that she can photo transfer onto cloth.

Now, I am definitely not a quilt snob, nor am I racially-biased, nor unresponsive to most people who contact me, no matter how off-base their issue, nor how demanding or rude anyone is (we've seen an increase in that kind of behavior, lately). By the way, this lady was not rude at all, just asking for help.

Simply said, I cannot help her, nor would I encourage another quilt of this nature to be made as it is based on false history. Don't those concerned (by this I mean her church members) have any interest in knowing the truth, and instead of perpetrating mistruths, celebrate how far African Americans have come, in spite of pain, in spite of adversity, in spite of punishment, fear, and loss.

I poured my heart into writing about this topic of "Underground Railroad Quilts," and while the files are still online, I have not said anything here, for quite awhile. I don't intend to get into a rant over it, on or off screen. It's just rather sobering to realize that my words, and your words, have not seemed to matter.

In many cases, people choose to think whatever they want, regardless of the truth. I feel sorry that this quilt myth continues to be promulgated by churches and other organizations. I would think that Christians would realize that their Saviour would not tell lies, so why do they lie, even to themselves? I know. That's a rhetorical question. Perhaps they are just unaware. All she wants are visual images that, in and of themselves, seem benign. I don't have the energy to try to dissuade someone from their course. The song says, "I'm all out of love," but sometimes, I feel like "I'm all out of words," although you couldn't guess that by this message.

Anyhow, thanks for listening. My greatest enemy in life has never been one person. My greatest enemy in life has been Ignorance.

Patricia Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: a quilter's story Q for the Cure From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net> Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2008 19:45:43 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

http://www.news10.net/news/story.aspx?storyid49642&catid49

This is an ABC blog article that includes a video with lots of quilts made for a Quilt for a Cure auction. The story of one quilter is told and is a tender one I thought you all would appreciate too. (The kicker is at the end of her talk about her friend on the video.)

SACRAMENTO, CA - Hanging from the ceiling of the lobby, greeting you as you exit the elevator, in every hallway and on every bare wall, is a symphony of beautiful colors and patterns at the Sutter Cancer Center in downtown Sacramento.

These quilts are more than works of art: they have all been donated to help raise money for breast cancer treatment and research.....

Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD http://womenonquilts.blogspot.com http://quiltersspirit.blogspot.com

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Subject: RE: a quilter's story Q for the Cure From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2008 20:30:03 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

What a great story. It did bring tears to my eyes. I forwarded it to a friend who has done a series of charity/art quilts and  hasn't decided what to do with them. I asked her if maybe this wasn't what she was meant to do with her quilts a t a regional cancer center in our state. I also offered one of my really good quilts to the project if she decides t his is what she should do.

I hope this starts something for many cancer centers and benefits many peop le.

Thanks for sharing an important project.

Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen kaykaysorensen.com My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: Another Wrinkle in the UGRR Realm From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2008 06:39:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

To Pat: Firstly, I'm glad you wrote your concerns. I would honestly, and caringly, tell this woman what you believe to be the truth about UGRR quilts. I would reference articles and other things that depict what you believe and wish her well in her own interpretation. I don't know if this church is one that is made up of African Americans, or some other groups, mixed or otherwise, but it's important that they know the truth. If it is African Americans, I would wear "kid gloves" while addressing this as you, certainly, do not want to upset this woman and/or cause them to view this as a racial thing. I know you, and you are anything but a racist, Pat. So, I am sure you will do this gently.

Someone once told me, "people believe what they want to believe", I can't remember where that phrase comes from, but I believe it to be quite true. People can be "brainwashed" about things. I have thought of that term, sometimes, and remembered Patty Hurst, years ago and how amazing it was that she actually joined her captors and considered herself one of them. I think that is one of the most profound examples of brainwashing. Brainwashing can occur in many forms and one can even imagine this in our political ads. : ) I'm smiling, as each side of the isle is now nodding their heads and thinking the "other" side is doing this. Right? : ) In my mind, it's probably both, and we have take ourselves away from all of that, literally, and decide what is best for our country - good luck with that, America! : ) But there are those who cannot or will not break away from what they believe to be true and whatever you do say may fall on deaf ears.

At any rate, I would get back to her and, kindly, give her what you feel as truth. She can take that information, and believe it, or she may want to believe what most quilt historians think of as a myth. At least you will have done what you feel to be right in this case. To thy own self, be true, my friend.

I wish you the very best in how you approach this,

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Re: Another Wrinkle in the UGRR Realm From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2008 23:25:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I personally have decided to deal with the UGRR Code myth by keeping extr a copies of Barbara Brackman's book Facts and Fabrications: Unraveling the History of Quilts & Slavery on hand for just such opportunities as Pat Cummings mentioned in her recent post. Call it my donation to the cause o f informed quilt history. If I should encounter such a request, I plan to give away a copy of Barbara's book, plus a list of quilt history websites....such as Pat Cumming's, Kim Wulfert's, Judy Anne's and Leigh Fellner's.... that cover the story behind the book Hidden in Plain View that set off the whole controversy in the first place. That way the perso n can dig deeper into the issue themselves, if they are so inclined. Meanwhile, they have a good substantive piece of quilt history in their hands that can also inspire their quilt making. In the few instances I have been asked about the myth, folks have seemed content to simply look up the websites and read for themselves. One person, after reading a couple of the websites, did email me back and say, "Well, in spite of everything I have now read, I like the story of the myth so much that I a m going to go ahead and make a quilt based on the UGRR code anyway, but I'l l add to the label that the story is just a myth." But at least she does know a bigger part of the story now.

Karen Alexander in the San Juan Islands

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Subject: Re: Another Wrinkle in the UGRR Realm From: "Patricia L. Cummings" <patquiltersmuse.com> Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2008 04:44:54 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Linda,

Thank you for your thoughts. I believe this issue will continue and will be problematic for the rest of our lives and beyond. What may have started out as what was considered exciting "news" by the perpetrators of the UGRR/signal message, has morphed into something larger than ourselves.

In this case, especially not knowing why the person writing to me deemed this planned quilt one to "unify" her particular church, I wondered why an attempt at unification is necessary. The statement suggested divisiveness within the unit. She was short on words of explanation but longer on complaints that no one on the Internet had exactly what she wanted. By extension, "For free" is probably the understood terminology here.

In all of this fallout from the book, Hidden in Plain View, and subsequent other how-to books and children's books on the same subject, unfortunately, people lose the message of the real meaning of the slave's escape to freedom. This act was not done unilaterally, but with the cooperation and assistance of more (often white) abolitionists than one can imagine. Just recently, the existence of two more "safe houses" in New Hampshire were brought to my attention. I believe it is time to celebrate every slave's courage. It could not have been easy to runaway from the paternalistic/yet punishing atmosphere of the plantation.

There was sacrifice, and lynching, and jail time, etc. etc. for this country to have reached from Point A to Point B, where we are today. As a point of sacrifice, let me mention my book about Ellen Webster that speaks about her aunt who gave up her home in New Hampshire to go to Kansas Territory. She was an abolitionist who placed herself at much peril to stand up for the cause. Luckily, she chronicled her daily activities for years, so we can still read her first hand accounts of how being a missionary's wife affected her.

To return to the subject at hand, the letter writer seems to have had good intentions, and the idea of making a quilt, for any reason, is meaningful to any quilt maker. I just wish that people could think more creatively and come up with their own designs, rather than rely on these "signal" motifs that are like nonsense syllables. I say that with all due respect, and with all the love in Texas in my heart. I just believe she, and others, are on the wrong course.

Additionally, I think that the government, schools, and others have gone far enough in promoting, yes, promoting, this false set of ideas. I really feel sorry for her and others who have been taken in by the hype. Just think how much more fun making a quilt would be, if she involved other parishioners, as well as children? Now, that would have the impact of unification rather than her just reiterating one viewpoint. I'm being nice when I use the word "viewpoint." It isn't quite the word I would choose but I can't think of another more appropriate one, at this time of the morning.

Anyone at all is welcome to their own opinions. Have a great weekend!

Patricia Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Re: Another Wrinkle in the UGRR Realm From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2008 07:10:06 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Pat, If her intentions are to "unify" her church, it could potentially backfire and be devisive to travel a path that could lead her group toward any controversy, however well meaning. Perhaps you could encourage her to travel the path of Harriett Powers instead, and be inspired by symbols of bible stories, her church, or whatever else she feels might draw members of her church together, or confirm their religious beliefs, or their mission. Barbara Burnham Ellicott City

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Subject: Use of quilting terms in other mediums From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2008 13:33:09 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

Never know what you will stumble across when you start googling.

Social Fabric or Patchwork Quilt The Development of Social Policy in Canada

Edited by: Raymond B. Blake & Jeffrey A. Keshen

http://www.utphighereducation.com/product.php?productid3D764&cat3D13&pa ge3D9

Karen in the San Juan Islands

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Subject: Re: Another Wrinkle in the UGRR Realm From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2008 16:59:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15

I think you could respond with something like,

"I appreciate your request and, while I personally love the sense of community that arises when a group works on a quilt together, I cannot support the project mentioned in your request. Because of the number of questions I receive regarding similar projects, I've developed a kind of "position paper" and posted it on my web site. See _____ for more information."

Sincerely,. . . . . ."

Stephanie Higgins

 

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Subject: Re: Another Wrinkle in the UGRR Realm From: adamroni <adamroninetvision.net.il> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2008 09:21:03 +0200 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi all,

Well, if you thought this is only limited to the US and Canada, think again - the UGRR has reared its unappealing head in Israel, too. When the chairperson of our local guild announced that her husband, having thoroughly researched the subject (i.e, .read HIPV), would give us a lecture on the subject, I sent her the e-mail enclosed below. Not that it did any good, she simply went ahead with her plan, but at least I hope to have made guild members more aware of the problem.

Ady in Israel

Dear X

I have compiled here, for your convenience, a list of highly reliable sources debunking the Quilt Code myth. I'd like to correct my statement at the guild meeting - this subject is far from controversial. The unanimous, unequivocal view of ALL serious quilt historians is that this is a myth, a total fallacy fabricated for commercial purposes and perpetuated for financial purposes (such as quilt teachers promoting classes on how to make "An Underground Railway Quilt). Any quilt guild program that seriously attempts to lend even a modicum of credibility to this fallacy assists in perpetuating it and the damage it causes the serious research of quilting, black quilting and African-American history.

As a long-time member of the Quilt History List, an internet forum dedicated to the study and history of quilts and quilting, I can assure you that all serious quilt historians (many of whom are members of this list) condemn this myth, and most have done what they can to try and stop it from spreading. The subject of the Underground Quilt Code myth has been discussed time and time again, with growing exasperation, on QHL and in other on-line Quilt History forums. The sources I quote below are all well respected and well known quilt historians and appraisers.

May I suggest that before helping further perpetuate and promote this myth, your husband read at least some of these sources? I would recommend, first and foremost, the article by Giles R. Wright, director of the Afro-American History Program of the New Jersey Historical Commission, a well known and respected authority on the Underground Railway and one of the most prominent and out-spoken opponents of the Underground Myth:

http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11_doc_01a.shtml

Then there are:

Leigh Fellner's serious in-depth and lengthy review of the history of this myth and its propagation:

http://www.ugrrquilt.hartcottagequilts.com/

Pat Cummings's equally thorough review:

http://www.quiltersmuse.com/underground_railroad_and_quilts_blocks.htm

Xenia Cord's succinct summary of the question:

http://www.historyofquilts.com/underground-railroad.html

And lastly, this source which describes the damage the book Hidden in Plain View and the fallacies it promotes has caused in the school system in the US:

http://www.culver.org/academics/infolit/Faculty/foleyd/Teacher_files/craftin gfreedom/diatribe110304.pdf

Sincerely, Ady Hirsch

--Boundary_(ID_gEn+jKiqGbEVEgcf30PvAw)--

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Subject: Re: Another Wrinke in the UGRR Realm From: "Force Majeure Quilt Restoration" <fmquiltsfrontiernet.net> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2008 08:55:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

My approach to the UGRR myth in my presentations is to back into it by first talking about the role that quilts and other family heirlooms/keepsakes play in preserving family history and values (ref - Dr. Laurel Thatcher Ulrich's book, "The Age of Homespun). Then I talk about the colonial revival period and the way that marketing played into perpetrating myths, including about quilting. This is at the point where I see heads start to nod, and some even start pointing out modern versions of this. From there I move into the UGRR story, keeping within the context of examining the role that myth plays in family and society. I also speculate that fifty years from now, there will be exhibitions and theses about the UGRR quilt phenomena and the reason it so took hold of the popular imagination at **this** particular point in our history.

Does this approach always work? Not so positive from the quilt shops and teachers that I try to educate (by sending links to all the great sites that have documented this myth, plus Barbara Brackman's fact sheet). In quilt guild groups, I usually reach a few and that is something. Like Patricia, I am frequently disappointed that so many people are disinterested in actual facts. But this is true about many things, not just UGRR.

Keep up the good fight! Kim

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Subject: : Problem From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2008 10:04:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

My Thunderbird settings will automatically convert outgoing or incoming plain or html messages. Mizoakes is the only email I have ever had a problem with. I'm wondering it her settings are set to html only and not the automatic conversion???

Barbara Burnham wrote:

With Yahoo, I have to switch to Plain Text (not Rich Text) first to view Mitzi's text, which sometimes requires several steps to achieve. Yahoo keeps changing their software and it is not always intuitive. So many email programs, so little time....

--------------090804060907040609030502--

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Subject: Always A Next Time From: "Patricia L. Cummings" <patquiltersmuse.com> Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2008 15:30:50 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Thanks to all who wrote with suggestions as to what I could have said to the woman who would like free photo transfers. I'm sure you all would have handled the situation well. I had a more defeatist attitude, immediately feeling like a failure as she stated she'd been to my site, yet was asking for these items for a project she decided to make anyhow. Somehow, it seems like an "in your face" kind of request.

I also realize that it is difficult to change other people. Sometimes, the same is true of ourselves. Life is a learning experience and that goes for relationships, as all of us know.

Times like today, I have to look at what I have done right. My new book about Ellen Webster will be reviewed in many places, shortly, and I am grateful for that. As an early quilt historian in New Hampshire, she caused ripples in her own generation and perhaps interest in quilt history where there was none before. I am so happy to tell you all that I have been invited to be television, a grass roots Community Access program here in New Hampshire, and I will have the opportunity to speak about Mrs. Webster for 20 to 25 minutes. I am so pleased to be able to share quilt history at its finest with a broad, general audience. She was a remarkable woman, and I am just delighted to bring truth to the study of her life. I hope that a few of you are happy about that.

Although I have said a lot about the UGRR situation, I would rather talk about more positive issues, at any time. Studying the life of someone I respect, in life and in death, has been an outstanding experience. I was so lucky to be able to find the information I did. And, now, after all that hard research, at a time I had a temporary, but severe physical disability, well, you can see that I can smile again, knowing that I have personally made a difference.

P.S. I have also nominated Mrs. Webster for a state of New Hampshire Women's Trail Heritage marker.

Patricia Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: RE: Always A Next Time From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2008 10:50:23 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

It is because of you and others like you that many of us continue to be a p art of this list. No matter what area of quilting we are interested in, we all must be indebt ed to the women (and a few men) who have paved the way for us to choose to  make quilting a significant part of our lives. So thank you Patricia and the rest of you who contribute to this list with  your research and information.

Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen kaykaysorensen.com My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

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Subject: History Channel - Underground everything From: palamporeaol.com Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2008 22:04:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Last week I saw a program on the History Channel. I was sitting back?really enjoying it. It was all about things underground. Tunnels for the subways, tunnels in a fort that was a big part of the Rev. War and the Civil War, tunnels used by the Free Masons for all sorts of good things that helped this country, on and on..... THEN----TA DA------they told about a house in Concord (now an art gallery) that had a secret room for hiding slaves on their way to the train depot in Fitchburg, MA where they could head to Canada. And then...........they told about signals being used on quilts. Said that if a slave saw a quilt hanging on a line and the quilt?had a smoking chimney in the center of the block it was a safe house. Next they said that there were symbols on the houses as there were symbols on the quilts. I am not even going to comment on the quilt part of the show. We just all need to write to the History Channel and ask where they got this information. ?This list "gets it" so I don't need to expand on the topic. What struck me is that if I as a quilter and especially a quilt historian was annoyed/infuriated by their inaccurate information, what other historian was annoyed by inaccurated info they gave during the hour long show??Did they have things wrong about other aspects. It was sort of like my husband and I going to a CW movie. He gets all annoyed when they use the wrong guns, wrong shoulder and hat insignia, etc. and I get annoyed when the quilts or the clothing are incorrect.?Many fields of interest?get to be watchdogs of their own subject they are passionate about. And we should.... Haven't copied the fabric. Ran out of ink in the printer. Have to freeze corn and shrimp tomorrow. Will maybe print fabric on Tues. Lynn

Lynn Lancaster Gorges