Subject: At Quilt Market
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com>


Everybody who's a 'civilian' (not involved in retail) and quilts thinks that
Quilt Market in Houston must be one long party. Hmmm.....looking at the
blisters on my feet this morning, I am here to tell you that it's darn
serious business. No particular lone trend has emerged so far as the next
hot thing. Personal observations: there's way too much look-alike fabric.
How can this be? Just because you can print the stuff, doesn't mean you
should--the quilter's pocketbook is not bottomless. The number of Amy Butler
knock-offs is still growing. Way too much pink, aqua, brown wallpaper-type
prints. Gray (a color I usually like) is also coming on but when translated
in Retro prints, often looks flat and dreary. I long for the sophistication
of the early 19th century grays+sharp color. Fabric companies still aren't
'getting it' with their booth displays. Extremely busy quilts that use every
print in a line, are stippled like scrambled eggs, and then still can't hang
straight in the booth are common. Grump, grump, grump,,,
The good stuff: great threads. Other handcrafts, such as punch needle, are
being worked into beautiful pieces. Crazy Quilt aficionados will be
happy-silks are coming on the scene and conveniently in pre-cut packs to
make them more affordable. The economy of the US might be shaky but in Japan
and China, they're starved for US dollars. Applique of all sorts is popular.
New 'green' quilt battings in bamboo and soy fiber. Other good stuff: Meg
Cox of The Quilt Alliance, is a great 'Johnny Appleseed' of quilting and is
determined to get patchwork and a needle and thread into the hands of
anybody she talks to. I listened to her advice to shop owners to get out of
their store to spread the gospel of quilt and found myself nodding. She uses
bookstores and coffee shops to start groups and do demos--she's a force for
good as far as I'm concerned.
Today is my lecture on the Dreaded Customer and I'll be giving out
'munchkin' packs of fabrics and pinning the Cowardly Lion's badge of courage
on someone. Humor goes a long way when talking about interpersonal
relations! The very best thing: as a former alcoholism and drug abuse
therapist, quilters are all cream puffs. No one got the shakes or fell on
the floor crying during presentations--life is still good and I'm glad I
chose this field.
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com

------_Part_44203_12222995.1225104492401--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: At Quilt Market
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2008 07:15:11 -0400

Pepper and all -- please beware that while bamboo is a great fiber and
fabric and would make an excellent batting, it is not an eco or green
plant. Bamboo is a rayon and by law must be labeled bamboo rayon.

The production of rayon is one of the worst polluters, and all
production of rayon and acetate in this country has been banned for 20+
years. The now vacated AVISCO [formerly American Viscose Rayon] plant in
VA is still in cleanup mode from polluted grounds. Rayon is now produced
mainly in third world countries except for Tencel and Modal by Lenzing
in Austria which produces its cellulosics under a rigid and certified
"green" process.

I love the feel of bamboo, especially in sheets, so this is not a
disclaimer for the fabric. But being a renewable source, like weeds,
does not necessarily mean green. :-)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: History Channel - Underground everything
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2008 08:39:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

And I thought I was the only one who spotted that! I'd REALLY like to know
the sourceof that info!! Marcia Kaylakie

Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Anne Orr design?
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2008 08:28:14 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

Hello Friends,

I just posted a couple of photos of a pair of mid-20th century
pieced pillowcases (Mr. and Mrs. Be-Nimble?) on the e-Board.

Shirley McElderry thinks these really cute designs are either
Anne Orr or Lockport.

Anyone know more?

Thanks,
Julie Silber


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: fabric lines
From: <aquilteralltel.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 9:21:20 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Pepper, thank you for your notes from Market. Good luck with your talk.. I'm sure shop owners will find it very beneficial. I especially appreciate your notes on some fabric lines and whether or not manufacturers get it..... oh for a range of value and some lights, or tone on tone blenders in a fabric line. So often using all the fabrics in one line yeilds a quilt that looks muddy or busy with no resting place for the eye. Not always, but it seems quite often.

Also, Joan, thanks for your comments on bamboo. I knew I had read warnings about the energy required to make this ostensibly "green" product and how it's unwise to think just because bamboo is plentiful and renewable, that it is energy efficient. Another case of "at first glance". But a closer look reveals more to the story. I appreciate both of your posts. Thanks. Nancy Roberts

PS- apologies in advance if this message does not conform to list standards... a recent clean up of my computer actually cleaned it out. This is forcing me to begin all over again, and I have not yet found or tinkered with my message settings. This is an experiment.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NOT Anne Orr! Merikay solved this!
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 09:35:15 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

YESTERDAY I asked:

I just posted a couple of photos of a pair of mid-20th century
pieced pillowcases (Mr. and Mrs. Be-Nimble?) on the e-Board.
Shirley McElderry thinks these really cute designs are either
Anne Orr or Lockport.

Anyone know more? Julie Silber

TODAY Merikay Waldvogel wrote: (THANKS, MERIKAY!)

Julie:

I just found it!

"Pyjama Boy"
Hetty Winthrop Pattern #31 for sale through Chicago Daily News -
probably 1930s.
Cost 5 cents

Here's what the clipping says--text with the line drawing of the
block:
No. 31: This Pyjama Boy, pieced from bright colored print, is a
gay design for a child's quilt or a pillow top. It was sent in
by Mrs. Mirtle McCormick, Streator, Ill. This pattern is on sale
at The Daily News office, 9 West Madison Street or at the
Personal Service Bureau, The Chicago Daily News Building, 400
West Madison Street. To order it by mail send 5 cents in stamps
to Hetty Winthrop, same address and the pattern and directions
for making a quilt will be sent you immediately.

Note:
Laurel Horton found a red and white quilt in this pattern ON the
beach. She sent me the quilt photo in 1993. The only difference
between your pillow tops and her quilt is that hers did not have
the candle holder and candle--and hers did not have the buttons,
etc.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: men who quilt
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 09:34:26 -0700 (PDT)

Hello all,
Is anyone out there doing research on men in quilting?
Thank you.
Judy Schwender
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NOT Anne Orr! Merikay solved this!
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 13:02:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Hmmm...well, that proves it; I am not receiving all of the QHL
messages, because I did not get Julie's message about posting photos
to e-Board, or her question about the source of her pieced pillowcases.

Any suggestions...Kris?

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men who quilt
From: artalanrkelchner.com
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 12:55:17 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 5


>snip< Is anyone out there doing research on men in quilting?


Since I'm one of those men who quilt, I'd be very interested in learning
if any study has been done on us. Quilting is such a ladies' club and us
guys get forgotten.

Alan



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men who quilt
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 10:59:32 -0700
X-Message-Number: 6

I know there have been some exhibitions of quilts by men.
I think it is something that should be studied and documented as there are
so many fantastic men quilters - I mean their work and the men themselves.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men who quilt
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 14:32:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

In 1992 or 1993, the Quilt America! show in Indianapolis had a good-
sized exhibit of "Men Working" - quilts by men, including early
entries by Phil Beaver and Ricky Timms. The exhibit was complete
with day-glo orange "Men Working" highway signs.

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men who quilt
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 12:00:01 -0700 (PDT)

Hi all,
I had heard about this. Do you have any label copy or brochure or gallery guide I could get copies of?
The National Quilt Museum (Museum of the American Quilter's Society) held a juried exhibit called "Man Made" in 2003, then it traveled for two years.
Judy Schwender
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men who quilt
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 15:26:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Judy,
Thre was an exhibit at the Renwick some years back, might have been the Men
at Work. Marcia Kaylakie


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: men
From: Joe Cunningham <Joejoethequilter.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 23:23:34 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

I think I was contacted last year by someone doing a study, and
perhaps I sounded too eager to talk, for I never heard from them
again. I do a lecture on the subject, in which I trace the
developments of the 1960's and 70's that fostered an atmosphere that
made it more hospitable for men to take up the quilting needle. My
conclusion is that few men make quilts unheralded. Most men who enter
the quilt world decide fairly soon to either win every prize or to
make a living out of it some way. The other significant part of it,
it seems to me, is that men receive the opposite of hazing. That is,
when a woman enters a men's realm, the men often do anything they can
think of to keep her down. Police work, construction--you name it. In
quilting, women have always done anything they could think of to
smooth my way, to welcome me and make me feel important.
From the Luckiest Guy in the World,
Joe Cunningham


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men who quilt
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2008 23:28:59 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

I think everyone probably knows about the article in the 1990 Uncoverings:

Laurene Sinema, Janet Carruth, Emma Andres and Her Six Grand Old Characters
I don't have it in front of me but it included Charles Pratt and 5 others.
All Mid 1900s.

The other thing I can think of off hand is soldiers in past wars quilting
when they were injured, but I can't remember a reference.

This book
The 1776 Quilt: Heartache, Heritage, and Happiness
By Pam Holland
is about a quilt made on the battlefront by Sorbian soldiers. They used
materials from their uniforms to make it.

There are a lot of men who helped start the art quilt movement. I just did
an article on that and some of the books I listed might help. It's not
ancient history but it is history.
http://www.womenfolk.com/quilting_history/art_quilts.htm

I would love to know about more resources on the history of men quilting.

Judy Breneman



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: men quilters
From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net>

I mentioned doing a book on men quilters to a few guy quilters and got the
response, "That's sexist and probably not interesting," which was, of
course, an interesting response in and of itself.



Andi in Paducah, KY



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: men
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 08:43:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

What a nice thing to say! We can be a little b----y, you know.

Best regards,
Sharron.............
...who's usually from Spring, TX but this week I feel like I'm from Quilt
Festival....my feet feel like it too!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Men who Quilt
From: Edwaquiltaol.com
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 10:18:02 EDT
X-Message-Number: 5

Yes, there are a lot of us out there. Remember the "Men of Biblical
Proportions" exhibit about three years ago.
Also, there is a web site for men quilters with 144 members from all over
the country and in other countries. We even had our first all men quilting
retreat last August at the Woodstock Quilt Supply in NY. Also, I have started
an all men's quilting group here in south central Mass. I believe the Rocky
Mountain Quilt Museum has occasional exhibits.

Holice
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: men and quilts
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 07:32:34 -0700
X-Message-Number: 6

Hi All,

I offer a slide lecture called "NOT FOR GIRLS ONLY! A Look at
Gender and Quilts."

For it, I have done a bit of research on the general topic. My
talk also includes small "portraits" of both living male quilt
makers, and historic men who quilt(ed).

For YEARS, Joe Cunningham has done quite a bit of thinking on
this subject. He does a couple of wonderfully amusing, very
enlightening talks on the subject.


Julie Silber
The Quilt Complex

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men
From: Alan <artalanrkelchner.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 10:05:59 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

For the most part I agree with Joe. A nice warm welcome. I've even had
some of the women interested in me "that" way, the ides of a guy with the
same bug is attractive.

On the other hand I've experienced some hostility. It's mainly a women's
world and some women are threatened or just miffed that a guy would
willingly invade their territory.

But on the whole, I've been treated well.

Alan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: men
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 18:54:00 +0000
X-Message-Number: 8

> . In
> quilting, women have always done anything they could think of to
> smooth my way, to welcome me and make me feel important.

Where are the sociology students when you want them? What an
interesting thesis that would make...

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Men who Quilt
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 12:40:01 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9

If anyone is doing research on men who quilt (quilted) please look at Albert Small of IL, (1930s-40) Albert did incredible work, he worked with explosives something like that, his wife and daughter were quilters, they challenged him to make a quilt and he chose hexagons, something like 30,000 pieces... a lady further west wanted to outdo him in the # of pieces and she completed one with 50 or 60 K, so Albert made two more each successively smaller hexagons, the last had about 120,000 pieces (approx 1/4 inch size).....All 3 of his quilts are in the IL State Museum collection.

I'm not home, I'm in Baltimore (having a great time), but no access to my files, so I may have the #s skewed, but, I'll be glad to send a picture of the quilts and more info if anyone is interested in doing the research. I think one of his was in the best 100 quilts.... not sure. Contact me off line.

I'm off to the Walters this evening, (symposium social) and off to see the Baltimore Album Quilts tomorrow!!! Lucky me!

Pam
O'Fallon

> Is anyone out there doing research on men in quilting?
> Thank you.
> Judy Schwender
>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QHL Albert Small
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 15:47:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

You can see Albert Small's quilts
here:
http://www.quiltindex.org/

Type Albert Small into the search engine

****
Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men
From: "Peter Leate" <craftersbigpond.net.au>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2008 08:04:56 +1000
X-Message-Number: 12

Alan said

> For the most part I agree with Joe. A nice warm welcome. I've even had
> some of the women interested in me "that" way, the ides of a guy with the
> same bug is attractive.
>
> On the other hand I've experienced some hostility. It's mainly a women's
> world and some women are threatened or just miffed that a guy would
> willingly invade their territory.

> But on the whole, I've been treated well.

My experience is just kike yours

and if it helps the preson researching men in quilting I am profiled in
Australian Patchwork & Quilting this month (October edition)

Peter Leate

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 18:33:33 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

LOL!!
Alan and Joe...
But those of us who know you, still love you, regardless you your
"invasion" into the "womanly art"!
>
Laura Syler
Richardson, Tx



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: men
From: "Carole Ann THomas" <kcatshaw.ca>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 17:47:08 -0700
X-Message-Number: 14

Many of you will know that men did a great deal of quilting during the
depression. Many men had no jobs and when their wives pieced quilts the
husbands would quilt the quilts. These quilts were sold or traded by the
family. Often the only cash money these familes had over the year was from
selling a quilt.

I have two such quilts in my possession. one a great uncle pieced and
quilted, the other was a family effort by some " 42nd cousins". The quilts
came to me years ago, as I am only quilter in family.

They will go to a museum locally along with the provenance, when it is time
for them to leave home. ( I hope not too soon)

Catbc



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New book on quilt code
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 17:49:45 -0700
X-Message-Number: 15

I wish I didn't have this info to post

>From Market Watch and WSJ-

"Relive the Underground Railroad Experience and Unlock the Secret Code of
Quilts -- New Book Reveals the Significance of Quilt Patterns That Led
Slaves Toward Freedom
AURORA, Colo., Oct 29, 2008 (GlobeNewswire via COMTEX) -- Eliza was born in
Missouri in 1894 to parents who had vivid memories of trying times endured
under slavery. Her father was born into slavery in 1864 just prior to the
end of the Civil War and the passing of the Thirteenth Amendment which
abolished slavery. Discover more fascinating stories about her time as
author Judy Haslee Scott presents Eliza's Rail Tales: The Underground
Railroad and Code of Quilts." http://tinyurl.com/6y45pk--

I'm just the messenger.

Kim


Kimberly Wulfert, PhD

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: New book on quilt code From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2008 21:10:03 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Good evening, QHLers - And to rub salts in to our wound, from the article Kim posted: "Written as a learning tool, Eliza's Rail Tales is further enhanced by the availability of coordinated teaching materials available through the author's website...." And it will be touted at NY and CA library book exhibits this November, too, so it will be bought by library systems? ...sigh.... Regards, Meg

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: New book on quilt code From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2008 10:15:42 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

Not that it will change anything, but it might make some of you feel better ... I looked at the website, followed UGGR links, and ended up on a page where you can leave a comment for the author.

This looks like a large project. As well as a fairly expensive book, if I am reading it correctly you can buy a quilt made of the 'UGGR blocks' (you just have to use inverted commas, don't you) which will be a 'perfect hands-on learning tool'. There are also worksheets to colour and answer questions on 'to make sure the students have understood and retained the information'.

The site says this author 'researched' all this stuff. She didn't look very hard.

Sally Ward

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: New book on quilt code From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2008 06:37:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

--Apple-Mail-1-98845035 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUS-ASCII; delspyes; formatflowed

As a former elementary teacher, who has used quilting in the classroom, I find the whole concept of her publication even more irritating. Using quilts to teach math and art have proven to be a great success. But, to further the whole UGRR fiasco is just down right wrong. I agree with Sally, her research cant have been very extensive...or she's been up in that thin air in Colorado for the last 3 years and not bothered to check any current research. I did leave a comment on the site. She should be ashamed of her lousy research!

Laura Syler Richardson, Tx On Oct 30, 2008, at 5:15 AM, Sally Ward wrote:Not that it will change anything, but it might make some of you feel better ... I looked at the website, followed UGGR links, and ended up on a page where you can leave a comment for the author. > The site says this author 'researched' all this stuff. She didn't > look very hard. > > Sally

--Apple-Mail-1-98845035--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt kit From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2008 08:10:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

 

For quilt kit collectors who search for information about origins of their kits -- here is one which might be of interest. A Pied Piper stamped muslin kit with percale for appliques and binding offered by House Beautiful, Nov. 1942. www.vintagepictures.eboard.com See quilt tab.

--------------040600000808050509080003--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: West Virginia Heritage Quilt Search From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2008 10:47:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Dear QHLers, Can anyone give me info. on who I might be able to contact regarding the above project and its documentation records? I have a client's crazy quilt that was documented in 1992 and would like to get the rest of the info. from the project. Please email me offlist.

Thanks much -- and boy, did I have a great time in Columbus! Thanks to all who did such a great job in the organization of the conference!

Martha Spark Quilt Restoration Services and Consulting Salem, OR ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QHL RE New book on quilt code From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2008 11:52:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

And, what's worse, there are lesson plans and quilt directions to accompany the book. http://www.freshdiscoveries.com/custformnew240130.html

Kim, just the messenger, wrote quoting the press release: "Discover more fascinating stories about her time as author Judy Haslee Scott presents "Eliza's Rail Tales: The Underground Railroad and Code of Quilts""

Note that fictional Eliza's father was born in 1864 into slavery but could have had no first hand knowledge of codes.

Susan in Raleigh NC

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Men in Quilting From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2008 15:51:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

 

This year at Houston the guys were well represented. Ron Paul (Laura Lee Fritz's husband) is a longarm guru. Nice to see John Flynn was teaching and vending. The multi-talented Ricky Tims as well. The AIQA quilt was by Phil Beavers. Seen at Market: Jay whats-his-name ( winner of Project Runway) there to promote his line of fabric for Free Spirit. I seem to remember from the program that he said both his mother and aunt were quilters and incorporated some quilt-y embellishments in his creations. Talked to Patrick Lose at Market and he seems like a nice guy. Patrick is famous for his whimsical patterns but did you know he did Moda's Marbles? That's a line I'd like in my resume! There were others of course but this is just a sampling. From Quilt Market staff: what was lacking at Market were the shop entourages. The shop owner came but left her emplyees at home-makes sense. The exhibition of the DAR quilts was awe-inspiring. I almost was thrown out of the exhibition because I had my nose so close to the surface of an 1820s masterpiece. Sorry-had to see how she did that reverse applique border! Pepper

-- Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Albert Small From: <gpconklincharter.net> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2008 15:28:15 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

Susan... thanks for the link, I have to remember on the road I can go to the Quilt index, what a great resource we have at our finger tips! Always delights me to see the quilts.

Went to the Baltimore Art Museum this afternoon and saw the quilts... awesome to see the quilts I've only seen in books. Also fun to see Deb Cooney was one of the conservators of the James W Harvey Baltimore Album Quilt. Also found a beautiful Crewel Embroidery Coverlet and lots of other interesting pieces. I was looking for William Morris fabric Prints but, no luck.

Took lots of pictures of architecture today, Baltimore is visually a wonderfully rich city. Wish I had more time.

Albert Small into the search engine QuiltHistory.com.


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Men who Quilt - Dr. Gladys Marie Fry's research
From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com>

What a great thread regarding men who quilt.... let's be sure to include:

"Man Made: African American Men and Quilting Traditions"
by Gladys-Marie Fry, 1998
38 page catalog, including quilt photos and exhibition list
The exhibit opened at the Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture in Washington, DC.

Enjoy!

Kyra E. Hicks
www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Potholder Invitational
From: "Pam Weeks" <pamela.weeksgmail.com>

The 2008 Potholder Invitational

Those of you who attended the AQSG Seminar in Lowell, MA in October of 2007
will remember me as "Potholder Pam". I am researching the quilts that are
made by finishing one block at a time, then sewing many together, a
technique that is a subset of quilt-as-you-go.

I invite you to participate in a social quilting experiment. I have a theor
y
about potholder quilts that I would like to prove or disprove, and I need
some help from my friends.

I ask that the participants make a quilt block, layer it, quilt it, and
finish it, either by binding it or finishing it knife-edge, i.e., turning
under the edges and stitching it closed. It is to finish 9" square. Send th
e
block to me, and I will stitch the blocks together to make a quilt.

As many potholder quilts were made c. 1850, I would like you to use this era to drive your block choices and hope you will consider the many pieced or appliqu block designs from this period. Please sign the block with your
name, city/town, state (country) and date.

The first 70 people who respond to this invitation with complete name and
mailing address will receive instructions via e-mail. I will follow that by
sending a stamped, self-addressed return envelope to expedite the process. (unless you are from outside the USA, and then I wouldn't be able to include postage)

If you would like to participate, please respond to me by November 10,
off-list at this e-mail address: Pamela.weeksgmail.com

The deadline for the finished 9" block is February 10, 2009

Thanks in advance!


Pam Weeks

Custom Concierge
PO Box 123
Durham, NH 03824-0123
603.661.2245
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: review copy
From: "Andi Reynolds" <andi0613iowatelecom.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 05:39:56 -0500



I called the number listed in Kim Wulfert's original post about Judy Haslee
Scott's UGGR book and will receive a review copy
(http://tinyurl.com/6y45pk--). My intention is to create an organized
campaign of sending reviews to credible news sources and book review
publishers after I've read the book. I'll be signing the review with my
title - Executive Book Editor, American Quilter's Society - and bona fides,
member, Quilt History List.



Andi in Paducah


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Research via Google News Archives
From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 04:09:05 -0700 (PDT)

Hello -

I read earlier this week that Google is expanding the number of newspapers
it has in its searchable archives. Like many on this list, I've spent my
time rolling through microfilm - hoping to locate articles from years ago.
 At the Library of Congress (great benefit from living in the DC area),
there's wonderful databases of US, UK and African American historical newsp
apers.

Are there other quilt historians here who are using Google News? What's
your experience with this tool? I'm excited by what local quilt histo
ry can now more easily be rediscovered. With www.news.google.com, it's n
ice to search at home and, if I need to, pay an individual articles. Thi
s week I stumbled upon a great photo of an African American quilter in the
context of a newspaper article about "mammies". (I did post a note
about the article on my blog, if you'd like to see it.)

Best, Kyra E. Hicks
www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com20



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New Book on quilt code - I'll read the book first
From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 03:50:36 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

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Good Morning -20

I appreciate learning about "Eliza's Rail Tales" from this list. I have
posted a note about the book on my blog. However, I have also ordered th
e book to read it. I would love to read any references from the 1800s ab
out quilts made as coded items. However, I am not going to "rail" agains
t the author before even reading the book, to use a pun.

This was a self-published book. I applaud the author for following her q
uilting passion and recording her fictional story. Having written a chil
dren's book I know how difficult that can be.

I've also left the author a note so that I can talk to her about her resear
ch. I'm open to learning from her - even if I may not agree.

Best, Kyra E. Hicks
www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: Potholder Invitational
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 15:31:06 +0000
X-Message-Number: 7

If you'll take a UK offering, I'm in and happy to pay postage.

Sally W


On 31 Oct 2008, at 14:06, Pam Weeks wrote:

> The 2008 Potholder Invitational



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: turkey red
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 11:43:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

If you covet turkey red repro fabrics either for making quilts or just
looking and petting you'll love the new collection by Judie Rothermel from
Marcus for the Heritage Center of Lancaster Co. The inspiration for the
line, called Quaker Quilts, is an 1848 Quaker friendship quilt made in Cecil
Co., MD (pictured in Quilt Digest 4, p. 39 and Made to Remember, p. 45).
The fabric is available from the Heritage Museum gift shop and in fabric
stores. I'm passing this along because I am thrilled to have really good
turkey reds available again.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore planning what to do with my Quaker stash



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New book on Quilt Code
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 11:05:09 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9


I honestly didn't have the heart to tell you all the bad news in one post;
the educational aspect is just too hard to take. Giles and I really thought
this code issue had topped the crest in public and educational venues and
was riding off into oblivion. The educational pushing of this book stings
like a bee.

One good thing is that I seldom get requests from elementary teachers
anymore about wanting to teach via the code in their classroom. I hope
this book doesn't start the cycle in their domain again. I'm sure it still
exists, so it wouldn't take much to reboot.

Are you also aware of the book released earlier this year by J. Tobin about
slaves going to Canada? I took it out at the library and looked it over- no
mention of quilts that I could find, but I just couldn't bring myself to
read it, so I can't say for sure or give any more info. Even the title is
forgotten, but her name would find it at Amazon.

It's beyond me where the author of the new book researched for her book? I
would really like to know how she answers that question, truly. If she
happens to be reading this email, I respectively request she contact me and
I'll be happy to put an interview on my website to share her thoughts, if
they can indeed be supported.

Piece,
Kim


Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 29, 2008
From: Trimble4aol.com
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 14:23:50 EDT
X-Message-Number:


At the risk of sounding um, well, as if I'm being a little grumpy, I am
curious how many of you gentlemen who quilt have experienced the sort of "reverse
discrimination" I've seen in a couple of quilting groups...that is that the
women in the group tend to get all goofy over the fact that men quilt...as if you
could not? I mean, obviously, men and women are different...but maybe my
thoughts result from being a child of the 60s. I see no reason why men should
not be quilters if they so choose, but I also see no reason to praise anyone's
work beyond reality. Does this make sense? I just hate seeing men in groups
who are lifted up to be more than they are, simply by virtue of the fact that
they are men.

Just my 2 cents,

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt code book -- some more background info
From: "Force Majeure Quilt Restoration" <fmquiltsfrontiernet.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 14:19:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

I was disturbed to read that this book was being published -- surely any
reputable editor/publisher would have found out how seriously debunked this
story is with just some cursory fact-checking -- so I decided to dig around
a little bit. As it turns out, Xlibris is a self-publishing service.
Furthermore, the website "Fresh Discoveries" is listed at a residential
address in Colorado -- it is not a large educational or publishing business,
and so far the materials for this book are the only product listed..
Finally, the only thing it takes to get a book into the California and New
York Library Assocation book exhibits consists of stuffing two copies of a
book into an envelope and mailing it to them. In other words, there has
been ZERO quality control outside of the author.

Can a talented author successfully self-publish and self-promote a book?
Certainly, there are examples. Most crash and burn. There have been a few
gems that were overlooked by publishers, but by and large it turns out that
having an editor with tough questions and a blood-red ink pen is a benefit
to both author and reader. Unfortunately, even one sale is too many.

The announcement states that copies are available for reviewers. Perhaps
those of us with blogs should request copies and then publish our
reviews.....

Kim Nettles



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 29, 2008
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 13:42:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12


LORI wrote:
At the risk of sounding um, well, as if I'm being a little grumpy, I am
curious how many of you gentlemen who quilt have experienced the sort of
> "reverse discrimination" I've seen in a couple of quilting groups...that is
that the women in the group tend to get all goofy over the fact that men
quilt...as if you could not?


Lori, do you think this behavior is related to the broader one of women's
getting all goofy about men---period? Or at least, many women's getting all
goofy on those grounds? Just guessing here :)

I'm wondering if women were in a woodworking or welding class made up mainly
of men, they were be fawned over? It's not a rhetorical question.

gaye



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt code book -- some more background info
From: "Force Majeure Quilt Restoration" <fmquiltsfrontiernet.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 15:24:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

> I've just posted a review of the book at Amazon.com:
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/143630038X/refcm_cr_thx_view
>
> Kim
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt code book
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 14:13:52 -0700
X-Message-Number: 14

Thanks, Kim.

The book is 60 pages and costs $32. That seems a bit pricey to me.

"I've just posted a review of the book at Amazon.com:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/143630038X/refcm_cr_thx_view
Kim"

Christine Thresh
on an island in the California Delta
http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog
and
http://www.winnowing.com <-- website



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ghastly
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 20:45:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15

The Eastern Shore Quilt Study Group met on Wednesday. In honor of
Halloween our topic was "weird, strange and unusual" quilts however the
members define that. My contribution was my 1905 redwork from Bethlehem,
PA, mostly scenes from the Bible but the center and largest block
memorializes Christine Kerner 1862-1903 in fraktur letters.
We really couldn't decide which quilt had the best story. There was the
indigo diamond stripy with alternate plain strips of an 1840s print. We
called it the "Shroud Quilt" because the story is that it arrived at an
Arkansas undertaker's establishment wrapped around a corpse. Or how about
the red and green Double Star (Brackman 3784) from Denton, MD (where we
meet). A typical Eastern Shore quilt with blocks set on point, sashing and
a triple border it was made by the owner's great grandmother. The quilt is
badly stained. The quiltmaker's husband ran a sawmill. One day he tripped,
fell into the saw and lost both his arms. The stains are thought to be his
blood. He survived the accident; his wife wrapped the severed arms in her
apron and buried them near the house. I defy anyone to come up with
stranger quilt stories for Halloween.
Polly Mello was dressed for her favorite holiday in spider pins and
orange plaid. She brought her micro mosaic fly pin and pointed out the
black enamel skull pin lent by a friend whose father attended mortuary
college. We got to see the center of Polly's Prairie Quilt with wonderful
critters like a roadrunner and armadillo.
A lovely early Lemoyne Star had been "murdered," cut in half (there's a
story there) but has been carefully reconstructed by the new owner. We saw
a redwork witch and a movie stars doll quilt pieced of small felt pennants
bearing the images of stars of the 1920s. A charming blue and white Basket
quilt had sashing formed by alternating Album blocks with the baskets (a
most unusual touch). A silk hexagon patchwork was made from hat linings
from the Stetson factory. The world's most boring Yo-Yo (solid yellow and
brown) was rescued by an elaborate Yo-Yo monogram in the center.
We had a discussion about "Cloth of Gold. The name refers not to the
fabric, but to the glaze, and there were prints as well as solids. What do
you know about this subject. There was a block totally unknown to any of
us, squares and rectangles with feathered edges in a variety of colors,
heavily quilted. Red and black plaid Baskets on Steroids from the 1940s on
the Eastern Shore had 2' wide handles, a pink border and a purple back
turned to the front for binding. We saw a top of appliquéd yellow roses
made to mimic a kit quilt. Barb Garrett showed us her latest doll quilt
made from the panel in Quaker Quilts fabric line and a marvelous
Bowmansville quilt of half square triangles in lozenge shapes using blue,
red, yellow, double pink, white black and green (1890-1910). Another local
(Caroline Co., MD) was a very organized String Star all red and white. We
saw three real samplers, collections of sample blocks put together into
quilt tops.
A truly spectacular Touching Stars found in New Oxford, PA was
consolation for a flat tire. The orange, green and double pink stars are on
a large scale floral blue on blue print with a wide brown and beige border
(c. 1850). We saw two Crossroads quilts: a crib size from the 1850s and
another dated 1864 with a center of small Flying Geese, Evening Stars and
Pinwheels probably from the 1840s. The Crossroads blocks are much larger
and frame the outside--great fabrics. A candlewick spread was signed Lydia
Springs, age 60, Aug. 30 1831, Worcester, MA. And from the vendors at AQSG
in Ohio a pristine red and green 9-block Rose Wreath with diamond shaped
leaves and running vine border. 1834 is embroidered on it, but that might
be the maker's birthdate; the quilt is probably 1850.
A great topic and a really fun afternoon. Our next meeting is set for
Jan. 28. We'd love to have you join us.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Subject:: Women in a woodworking or welding class
From: "Louise" <ltiemannstny.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 06:47:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Gaye, I was one of those women in woodworking class back in the early 70s
- the only girl. The teacher was less than thrilled to have me there and
the boys ignored me. But since my father did woodworking, I had some
exposure to it, and when my piece started turning out better than some of
the boys, they were mocked by him for letting a 'girl' do a better job.
He also would not let me use the jigsaw, since it was 'way to dangerous'
for a girl to use. Mind you I had been using a jigsaw for years prior to
that - not electic - but foot petaled, and I still have it, and use it
from time to time.

With kindest regards, Louise

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 29, 2008
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 13:42:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

Lori, do you think this behavior is related to the broader one of women's
getting all goofy about men---period? Or at least, many women's getting
all goofy on those grounds? Just guessing here :)

I'm wondering if women were in a woodworking or welding class made up
mainly of men, they were be fawned over? It's not a rhetorical question.

gaye
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Check it out: Alliance contest quilts on eBay
From: MegMaxCaol.com
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 15:53:53 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2

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Dear QHL Friends--
Just a reminder that the annual eBay auction of contest quilts from the
nonprofit Alliance for American Quilts has just begun.
Those of you who have been to Quilt Festival in Houston had a chance to
see all 67 quilts hanging at the show, but it's worthwhile going to eBay or
the AAQ website to see them.
The contest theme was My Quilts/Our History and all the quilts express
something about the personal quilt history of their maker. This produced some
exquisite quilts, some by well-known quiltmakers such as Yvonne Porcella, Scott
Murkin and Pam Allen. John Flynn, the well-known maker of quilt frames, also
submitted a quilt, as did his wife. All the quilts are 15 inches square, to
celebrate the 15th anniversary of the Alliance for American Quilts.
Bidding starts at $50, and if last year's auction is a guide, many will
sell for less than $100 (though Pam Allen's quilt Domestic Goddess, with hair
rollers included, fetched $1,500).
The first group features 23 quilts and went up for auction Thursday
night, Oct. 30. This segment of the auction will end next Wednesday night, Nov. 5,
at 9 pm eastern. There will be two more weeks of auction after that.
To see these quilts and bid, go to ebay.com and type in Alliance for
American Quilts in the Search box. You can also view the quilts on the AAQ's
website, www.allianceforamericanquilts.org.
Please help grow one of the best resources on quilt history on the
planet!
It's not too early to start Christmas shopping for the quilt lovers you
know.
from Meg Cox, vp, Alliance for American Quilts


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: new book on UGRR quilt code, etc.
From: "Patricia L. Cummings" <patquiltersmuse.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2008 16:59:57 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

I was so relieved to find out that the new book is fiction, and not another version of a supposedly "real" code. I guess we can't fight a story that someone has made up in their imagination, except for the fact that if it is historical fiction being created, the story should include believable dates.

To use fiction as a teaching tool of "known, but secret" facts seems outrageous. Kids have enough trouble learning to deduct one penny from a dollar so they can return the right change, without a computer. I can definitely see quilts in the classroom for the teaching of math skills and to enliven interest in that discipline. In this case, the writing of the book seems geared toward classroom sales.

I wish someone would ask the author "why" she wrote the book, just as my alma mater, the University of New Hampshire, asked me to write about the reasons "why" I wrote the book about Ellen Webster. All authors are motivated by their own reason for writing, and usually more than one reason.

Yes, it all comes abundantly clear. Like so many commercial products today, it's buyer beware. Some items are junk and some are great, and it does not always depend on how much one pays for goods. For example, I sure am enjoying the warmth of my department store flannel sheets a lot more than I would like the guilt I would have if I had spent three times as much to buy them in a more upscale store.

The price of $30. or $40. for the book, if it is another version of malarkey, is alarming on the one hand, and satisfying on the other hand. Perhaps, if the book is not a good one, then, in this economy, less people will buy it, lessening its impact and the potential spread of rumors masquerading as truth, if that is what the book does.

Maybe we should reserve judgment unless some of us have actually seen the book in question. The choice of publisher is telling, in that it is a company, as far as I know, that does not print great numbers of books, at a time. I believe it is a print on demand (one book at a time) company, which makes me think that a larger publisher may have not wanted to take it on because they were unsure of monetary returns. It's a "wait and see" case.

In the meantime, today we heard a wonderful presentation offered at the University of New Hampshire. Susan B. Anthony, the well-known woman who fought for women's rights, especially the right to vote (suffrage) was played by an actress, re-enactor, you might say, in period dress. The program was fabulous! Miss Anthony was a quilter, although that was not mentioned in the dramatization of her life. There is some information about the program and presenter on my blog.

If you are interested in the column about my new quilt history book, written for the University of New Hampshire, Fall 2008 magazine, online, here is the link: http://unhmagazine.unh.edu/f08/bookreviews.html

Patricia Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt code book -- some more background info
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 09:40:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Woo hoo! You go girl!! :-) Good sleuthing, too.

I just cast my vote that your review was helpful ... the count is now 14 of
15. Hopefully not all of those votes are from QHL members!

Dale Drake in Indiana




>> I've just posted a review of the book at Amazon.com:
>> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/143630038X/refcm_cr_thx_view
>>
>> Kim



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: odd areas
From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 10:09:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

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Hi... another family memory. Years ago my 2 oldest girls took a semester
class on Tractors at a vocational high school. We ranched. Their father
said they could not drive the tractor or riding mower until they knew
how to care for it & do it carefully. Afterwards the teacher told us
that they were the first girls to ever take his class and the class was
the best behaved attentive group of boys he'd ever had! He said he
wished more smart, pretty girls would take tractors seriously. They'd
made the boys work harder! One still drives a tractor & helps her
husband & son repair theirs. They collect & restore antique tractors!
She also quilts! Her guys do not.

char in mo20

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Subject: men
From: "Charlotte Bull" <charloumo-net.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 09:59:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

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Hi... a few years ago a man called me to ask for help with a few quilt
problems. He was a quilter. I suggested that he join our guild. He said
"No Way" --- I asked "Why?" He replied that he did not want a lot of
women fussing over him as he did not want a girl friend! He asked if I'd
bring my husband with me when I agreed to look at his quilts. He was a
rich retired doctor who'd learned to quilt from a lady patient who
handpieced while in the hospital. I had to agree to not tell his name to
anyone as he was not willing to come out of His Closet! He did quilt
well.

I did have to laugh as I'd done the same thing, either as a patient or a
visitor when my mother was in the hospital or nursing home. Many nurses
& doctors watched me quilt, but only one decided to take lessons.

He had his reasons for staying hidden, but I was quite willing to bet
that the women in my guild would not be interested in him as anything
except a "fellow quilter" --- Pun???
My husband thought it was really amusing!

cb in mo
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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: vintage fabric
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 12:20:52 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7


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There isn't a date on this. I am assuming 1950's. Is that correct? Fun stuff!

http://www.dioramarama.com/fabric_friday/

Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

----------MB_8CB0A54F1B1D555_194_5589_Webmail-mg20.sim.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 31, 2008
From: Trimble4aol.com
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 17:16:10 EDT
X-Message-Number: 8


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I'm not sure that this is just women being goofy about men. I have seen
otherwise sophisticated and reasonable women look at a man's quilt (in a guild or
show setting) and turn into simpering, idiotic fools over mundane work. If I
had seen it only once I would just chalk it up to, "Ah well..."
Unfortunately, I've witnessed it several times.

Your question is good, Gaye...I suspect not. Too many women have walked into
groups that have traditionally been the domain of men only with a ginormous
chip on her shoulder, ready to hamstring any man who looks at her twice. This,
too, I think is the reverse of the "honey baby" mentality.

It all seems a paradox to me...men are often afraid to be friendly to women
in a male-dominated environment, but (some) women act like fools when men enter
their world.

I do not mean to sound unkind or sweep anyone with a broad brush but I have
seen the sides of this coin and simply find it curious.
Lori


In a message dated 10/31/2008 11:12:36 PM Central Daylight Time,
qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

Lori, do you think this behavior is related to the broader one of women's
getting all goofy about men---period? Or at least, many women's getting all
goofy on those grounds? Just guessing here :)

I'm wondering if women were in a woodworking or welding class made up mainly
of men, they were be fawned over? It's not a rhetorical question.

gaye


**************Plan your next getaway with AOL Travel. Check out Today's Hot
5 Travel Deals!
(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212416248x1200771803/aol?redirhttp://travel.aol.com/discount-travel?ncidemlcntustrav00000001)

-------------------------------1225574170--


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Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 31, 2008
From: "Virginia Berger" <cifbanetins.net>
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 17:08:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

> I just hate seeing men in groups who are lifted up to >be more than they are, simply by virtue of the fact that
> they are men.
> Lori

Thank you, Lori for bringing this up-I too had been trying
to figure out how to bring this up without sounding grumpy
and failing because I AM grumpy! I was at a quilt history
meeting a while back and we were having show and tell.
The assumption is that what is going to be shown is
either vintage or reproduction because it is a quilt study
group. The group had been told that they could each show
one quilt and then, if there was time, show a second quilt
later. Well, there was a male quilter there and the
moderator of the meeting not only allowed him to show
quilts that were neither vintage nor reproduction but
allowed him to show 5 or 6 quilts-because he was male who
quilts! This is not the first time I’ve seen something
like this happen in a couple of different groups.

Gaye asked about women being fawned over in a male
dominated arena. I am a consultant doing taxes, tax
planning and business analysis for farmers-a predominately
male arena. In addition to having mostly male clients, of
the 25 consultants in Iowa doing this specific job, I am
the only woman. I can’t say that either my clients or my
colleagues fawn over me but are not they hostile toward me
either. They all just expect me to do my job to the best
of my ability. The only static I’ve gotten from anyone
about being a female doing this job is from a few women
over 60!

I’m all for men quilting-they add a different dimension to
the quilt world in their selection of colors, patterns,
and techniques-you go guys! But I’m not going to treat
you any different because I don’t think “quilter” is
gender specific!

Virginia Berger


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: vintage fabric
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2008 19:11:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

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They are very 50s. Decade was noted for its small geos as latter half of
decade began superceding the Early American style from the 40s-mid 50s.

palamporeaol.com wrote:

There isn't a date on this. I am assuming 1950's. Is that correct? Fun stuff!

http://www.dioramarama.com/fabric_friday/

Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: DAR
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2008 20:16:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11


If you're in DC be sure to check out the quilts at the DAR Museum. If
you're in DC with kids you're really in luck. From now till the end of Feb.
the special exhibit is Return to Toyland (antique toys).
The quilt that really knocks your socks off is a circa 1860 Star of
Bethlehem from Nebraska. It's red, green and white with LeMoyne Stars in a
grid between the legs of the star. It absolutely pulses at the end of the
gallery. It's like a magnet as soon as you walk in the door. Next to the
star is a Rising Sun in blue and white made in Pittsburgh in 1842. It has
stippling, stuffed feathers and fringe!
There are six more quilts in the cases. Each one is a thing of beauty.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore