Subject: Exhibits in the Charleston, SC
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2008 3:02:30 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Greetings, I'll be in Charleston, SC 17-20 Nov, does anyone know of any quilt or quilt related exhibits in that area?

Thanks,
Pam
O'Fallon, IL


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Exhibits in the Charleston, SC
From: Senoperaaol.com
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2008 06:38:40 EST
 

Hi Pam -

I'm in Charleston every year for the Spoleto Festival - and there are two
quilt related venues. One is the Museum, which occasionally has quilt exhibits
- and, if you are a quilter, the other is a wonderful little quilt shop on
Henrietta St. called People, Places and Quilts. Don't miss it -

Enjoy the city - be sure to try Hominy Grill!

Sue



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: feed sack enthusiasts?
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2008 10:39:23 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

T

Hi All! Are there still feed sack enthusiasts out there. I ahve come
across a need to speak to someone from the group. Marcia Kaylakie
Please sedn your reply to texasquiltgalearthlink.net

 

arcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Feedsack historian
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 06:50:34 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

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I'm also looking to talk to a feedsack historian. Please, if you're
conacting Marcia, include me in the loop.Thanks-
Pepper
pepcorygmail.com

--
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com

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Subject: First week of Alliance auction ends today: new quilts tonight!
From: MegMaxCaol.com
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2008 09:47:45 EST
X-Message-Number: 2


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Dear QHL Friends:

Just a reminder that the first of three weeks of auctions benefitting
the nonprofit Alliance for American Quilts ends tonight, Thursday, Nov. 6, at 9
pm Eastern Time. There are some amazing bargains here and some simply stunning
quilts! Buy yourself or a friend a beautiful quilt, 15 inches square, for
little more than you'd spend on a pretty picture frame, less than you'd spend on
a handmade scarf.
Go to eBay.com and type Alliance for American Quilts into the search
box.
The second week's batch of 21 quilts from the My Quilts/Our History
contest will be up for bidding immediately after the first week's auction ends.
This group includes two of the three prize-winning quilts from the contest,
including first prize winner Allison Aller's lavishly embroidered quilt "The Home
in the Garden". The contest celebrates the 15th anniversary of the Alliance,
whose mission is to preserve and share the stories of quilts and their makers.
Go to the Alliance website, www.allianceforamericanquilts.org, to see
all 67 contest quilts and learn more about the organization.
Thanks for your support!
Meg Cox, vice president, AAQ


**************
AOL Search: Your one stop for
directions, recipes and all other Holiday needs. Search Now.
(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212792382x1200798498/aol?redirhttp://searchblog.aol.c
om/2008/11/04/happy-holidays-from-aol-search/?ncidemlcntussear00000001)

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Subject: quilts in Embassy
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 11:50:12 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 3

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You may recall I was invited to loan whitework trapunto quilts to the State
Department's Art in Embassies program for display at the American Embassy
in Canberra, Australia, thanks to an old client who is the wife of the then
-newly appointed Ambassador.
 
When the State Department representatives came to my shop to finalize loan
details, the man said they do not pay for loaned art, but compensate donors
by inviting them to a state dinner at the White House. Before I could hold
my tongue, I'm afraid I asked him if it would be alright if they hold my i
nvitation 'til the next administration. He replied with a smile "you are
not the first donor to ask me that...."
 
So I'll let the list know how the White House dinner will be under the
new administration. Can't wait!!!
 
Laura
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Subject: embroidered patriotic quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 13:05:10 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 4

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With my sloooooooow old computer, it's so much easier, and more interesting
and communicative, to ask quilt list members about certain quilts I have
(not that anybody except us really cares about the history; most just want
to know if it is cute and matches the wallpaper)
 
Among my patriotic mid-20th century quilts needing (for me) information on
who and when they were published/sold are
 
embroidered blocks depicting scenes from American history and notable image
s, the embroidered squares joined with a block pieced of red/white/blue s
trips; the four corners are a  diagonally split red/white square.
 
embroidered blocks depicting scenes of American explorers and settlers, the
embroidered blocks alternating with blue squares, the quilt bordered in re
d/whte/blue borders
 
Seals of the 49 states, ending with Alaska, admitted to the Union in 19
59 (maybe someone should buy this to give to Sarah Palin as a consolation
prize (oooh, slap my hand, Judy!)
 
All 50 states, little pastel maps in rows with embroidered names and the
entire US at the top
 
State birds and/or state flowers, of 48 states. I realize there were seve
ral incarnations, which co is best known for the pattern?
 
Eagle and flowers cross stitch embroidery
 
I like to know what I am handling, in case someone should want to know too.
 
thanks all.
 
Laura Fisher
 
--0-1423433707-1226091910:54309--


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Subject: www.shellyquilts.com-2 new articles added to the site
From: zegrtquiltaol.com
Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2008 16:57:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5


from Shelly Zegart

Two new articles were added to the 'Articles' section of my website.I welcom
e your thoughts about each of them.


"Myth and Methodology"

Just released and available to download - Shelly Zegart's groundbreaking
article picking apart African American Quilt Scholarship, published in
January 08-Selvedge , an international textile magazine. This article
is a benchmark in understanding the problems with myth and methodology
in this highly charged arena beginning in the late 1970's.




"Old Maid, New Woman"


In
times of high interest in politics in general and womens' roles and
choices in specific , it is more than time for Shelly Zegart's Old
Maid, New Woman article to be publicly available for the first time
since it was originally publsihed in Quilt Digest in 1986. Susan
Elizabeth Daggett, for whom the quilt was made to celebrate her 30th
birthday, chose to remain single in the 1870's, as did a surprising
number of her friends. Their work with the Young ladies Aid society in
Canandaigua, NY, and their enduring friendship through the years was a
force for women's activism and choices.








 



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: UGRR Quilt: just for fun
From: Jackie Joy <joysbeesyahoo.com>

I'm sitting here on a Friday afternoon, babysitting my grandson and catchin
g up on my e-mail.  I read Pat Cummings' post about photo transfers, and
then the UGRR.  An idea hit me for a UGRR quilt that I would love to make
(if I had the time).  I would make it with repro fabrics and pieces in t
he blocks would include actual Yahoo maps of the UGRR route printed out o
n muslin.  Just for fun I would include a Log Cabin block whose cente
r piece would have the little man from Google Maps printed on it.  This w
ould be just as accurate as anything else people have imagined.  
 
Jackie in Reno0  A
--0-1533141086-1226097595:75910--


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Subject: Baltimore Album Quilt??
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 16:09:17 -0800
X-Message-Number: 7




Julie Silber
The Quilt Complex
POB 729
Albion, Ca 95410


Hi All,

I just posted a few photo of a mid 19th century Album Quilt on
the eBoard.

Can anyone help me with "placing" its origin? Maryland?
Baltimore?

Please note the monument square.

Many thanks,
Julie

Julie Silber
quiltcomplexhughes.net



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Baltimore Album Quilt??
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 18:36:02 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8

Julie--
I can't tell if it's Baltimore or just the general PA/MD area. But the
"monument" reminds me of Angkor Wat in Cambodia, complete with palm trees:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angkor_Wat

Kim


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: need info
From: "Rose Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 19:14:04 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9

Hello,
I am looking for information on Jean Moore from River Forest IL. She had a
business called Patchwork Interpretations and sold quilt kits in the 1970s.
She wrote a letter to the editor of Quilters Newsletter Magazine in the 70s,
in which she complained about people who asked for information on the kits
she was selling and then reproduced them without buying from her. I'm
guessing that her kits were original designs. If so, I'd like to include her
in my documentation of quilt kits. Any leads would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Rosie Werner



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Australia
From: Joy Avery <csulb73yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2008 05:22:37 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 1

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I'll be visiting Australia ( Sydney, Freemantle and Adelaide) Nov 25-Dec 10. Any suggestions for quilting events or related opportunities? Thanks in advance -Joy Avery



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Subject: Re: www.shellyquilts.com-2 new articles added to the site
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2008 06:38:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

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Shelly,

Are these newly-posted articles free to read on your website? What is the
url for your website? Thanks.

Patricia Cummings

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Subject: Re: quilts in Embassy
From: skspiresbellsouth.net
Date: Sun, 09 Nov 2008 01:42:02 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3


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Oh Laura, That is so exciting. I will look forward to hearing your report.
shari

> So I'll let the list know how the White House dinner will be under the new
> administration. Can't wait!!!
>
> Laura

-
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts in Charleston
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com>
Date: Sun, 9 Nov 2008 14:21:03 -0500 (EST)
X-Message-Number: 1

I've just noticed in last weekend's Charleston newspaper this listing:

Through December 31: Charleston Museum presents "Quilts in Bloom," 11 new quilts on display as part of an ongoing rotation of quilts from the permanent textile collection. 360 Meeting St. 9AM-5PM Monday -Saturday, 1-5 PM Sunday. Free for members, non-members $10/adults, $5/children 3-12 years old. Call 722-2996 or visit www.charlestonmuseum.org

I checked the website but did not see anything specific regarding the quilts on display. I hope to get up to see them sometimes in December when I return to the area.

Nancy Hahn, Dataw Island, SC


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Need help locating info. in Chicago
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Sun, 9 Nov 2008 20:39:04 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi!

I am writing on the off-chance that someone reading this lives in Chicago
and can help me with a couple of quilt-related research questions. If so,
I'll be happy to hear from you. Thanks.

Patricia Cummings


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Need help locating info. in Chicago
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Sun, 9 Nov 2008 21:14:31 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

I am not in Chicago but I am a charter member of Illinois Quilters that mee
ts in the suburbs.
If you'd want to let me know what you need I may be able to put you in touc
h with someone who could help you.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com
com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Quilter's Journal
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Sun, 9 Nov 2008 21:15:13 -0800
X-Message-Number: 2

Unfortunately I think I disposed of mine, but I will double check and see i
f maybe they are hiding somewhere.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Buying a new camera in a hurry!
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2008 10:40:05 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

My four year old, 4 megapixel Nikon camera needs to be replaced. It is draining the battery and the timer doesn't work. The camera store has advised me correctly to just buy new. Repairs are prohibitive and not worth the expense.
My DH and I have been invited to the Space Shuttle Endeavor launch this Friday. One of the astronauts was a close friend to my son. So, I am scurrying to buy a new camera for the trip. My first priority is finding a camera that will take excellent pictures of both textiles and my young grandsons. Megapixel, optical zoom, digital zoom, etc.... All of these features! What is really important? Now you can buy a camera with a 50x zoom!
When I replaced my last camera, QHL listers were very helpful in guiding me to the right choice. Any and all recommendations are appreciated but I need to make the purchase by Wednesday. Ugh!
Thanks in advance for your help. sue reich


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: cameras
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2008 10:56:29 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 4

Sue, in October, JUST before seminar, I replaced my digital camera with a Canon A1000 IS. I absolutely LOVE it. Very high quality pics so far, fits in a pocket, and uses AA batteries - either rechargeable or the regular, easily available kind. No more spending $40.00 on proprietary rechargeables, only to have them quit after 6 pictures. Again, I am loving it's sized and flexibility - I am also taking lots of pictures of grandchildren! Fits in my purse and in my pocket. It does come with a pretty wimpy memory card - buy one with much more capacity; and I did buy a good quality battery charger and NiMH batteries - which are much more reasonably priced than what I had been struggling with. Hooray for advanced technology - especially the kind that is so user friendly! Susan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilts in Charleston - "Quilts
in Bloom"
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2008 14:30:09 -0500 (EST)
X-Message-Number: 5

Hello Larry,

Thanks for sharing your photos with me. I will really enjoy perusing them over and over.

Your pictures of "Quilts in Bloom" really answered my question-reading the newspaper item for the Charleston Museum show I did catch the phrase "new quilts" and I wondered if they were contemporary quilts or just quilts new or recent to the museum's collection. It also does say it is part of an "ongoing rotation of the quilts from the permanent collection."

However, your photos and the signage does show they are recently made quilts. They are beautiful!

Thanks again. Not sure if the link to your photos will go through to the QHL list. If anyone else is interested in seeing the photos I'm sure they could just contact Larry directly at his address.

Nancy Hahn, Dataw Island, SC, getting ready to pack up and head home to Maryland for a few weeks. Consider coming to the York, PA antique show, Nov 21-23, if you are in the area.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts in CT
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2008 14:49:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

When Lynne Bassett offered to do a gallery talk and a look at some of
the quilts not included in the exhibit she has curated for the Wadsworth
Athenaeum in Hartford, "Who Was Anna Tuels? Quilt Stories, 1750-1900," four
of us on the Eastern Shore signed up immediately. Among the 11 lucky
participants were many friend from AQSG from NY, CY and MA. What a great
experience. Lynne chose quilts from the Athenaeum collection which have a
story to tell. You have till Jan. 25 to see the quilts.
The Anna Tuels quilt is iconic. The dedication "Anna Tuels bedquilt
made by her mother Aug. 1785" is appliquéd in red wool letter in the center
block which is framed by paper template-pieced Hourglass blocks. The border
is raspberry pink wool.
Another template-pieced quilt is a Hexagon Mosaic made in Bedford, PA in
1794, America's oldest documented hexagon-pieced quilt. In 1794 Bedford, PA
was pretty close to frontier territory yet Sarah Ewat Spencer had access to
a wide range of elegant fabrics. She incorporated pieces of her wedding
dress, dresses of her ancestors and dresses of some famous women of the day,
including Martha Washington and Dolley Madison. Paper tags attached to the
quilt identify the origin of many of the fabrics. It has a truly
extraordinary lace fringe.
Submit Gay made a spectacular Star of Bethlehem in 1842. It won the top
prize at the Hartford Co. Agricultural Fair in 1842. There are 21 rows of
diamonds in each blade of the star. The background is scattered with
smaller stars, but the outstanding achievement (IMHO) is the border of
diamonds composed of 4 small diamonds which turns all 4 corners perfectly.
Submit never married. Perhaps her name gave her pause.
Sisters Flora and Maria Barrett of Boston made a totally original charm
quilt (1885-90). A Broken Star center surrounded by 8 point Blazing Stars
and a double zigzag border is a masterpiece of design.
A second small gallery features silk quilts. Sunburst by Jane Hamersley
is on the cover of Shelly Zegart's "Antique Quilt Masterpieces." The most
intriguing is the Crazy made by Signora May in Hartford (1888). It was
created to memorialize Signora's three children all of whom died within five
years and before the age of 5. These were her only children. There's
nothing missing from this glorious Crazy: bow, fans, flowers, fruit,
animals, objects (an owl reading Godey's is my favorite). She even made her
own lace edging.
Our next stop was the storage area. Crewel bedhangings, circa 1700, set
the tone. A CT bedrug dated 1802 had pots of flowers and deep curves of
gold, green and brown. Query: Which is more time consuming, making a
bedrug or a quilt of the same size?
There was a Starburst with a border of appliquéd cherries, an 1860 Lady of
the Lake, a charm Tumbler with Centennial prints in the center and (my
favorite) an 1830s Lone Star (lavender, green, brown, red, Prussian blue)
set on a large scale, red and gold, Greek Revival print. The border is
Lemoyne Stars on point set with various chintzes; it has a tape binding.
We recovered from visual overload with a delicious lunch in the museum
cafe (lobster bisque and salad perks me right up). Lynne told us that the
Massachusetts documentation book will be published in January. We've all
been waiting! Get your orders in early; it's bound to sell out. Another
piece of good news is that the CT Historical Society is planning a major
needlework show to co-coincide with a needlework exhibit at the Boston
Museum of Art (either 2009 or 2010). Definitely another trip to New
England.
I never do just one thing, so we stopped in Wilton, CT to see"Quilts and
Quiltmaking" (until Nov. 15). First thing I saw as I walked in was a framed
toile, a blue eagle pillar print! Next were three pre-1830 wholecloth
chintz quilts and a Rob Peter to Pay Paul with an aborescent chintz border
of peacocks and peonies. My absolute favorite was Sarah Booth's whitework
wedding quilt (182), the most spectacular whitework I've ever seen. The
center is a sunflower medallion, but it's the border that makes it special:
feathered plumes and sunflowers! There were doll quilts and crib quilts
including a charming Uneven 9-Patch (3.5" blocks) in pink and browns with
beautiful quilting. The whole of the 19th century was represented and the
20th right up to contemporary art quilts. We were especially interested in
a Century of Progress quilt with a transportation theme.
We left CT early so we could see Judy Roche's quilts at Ursinus College
in Collegeville, PA near Philadelphia. Don't miss this one. The college
art gallery provides a perfect setting for the quilts. My favorite was the
Big Star Medallion, 2nd quarter 19th century. A large Lemoyne Star center
is framed by seven borders of random 1/2 square triangles and 9-Patches,
busy, busy, busy, lots of browns, beige but touches of a totally surprising
clear yellow--just wonderful! There's a baby quilt made of 3" Evening Stars
without sashes or border. The Pointless Star is a circle of diamonds
(1880-90). An 1870s Medallion from Bethlehem, PA is made with tiny scraps
of pinks and browns. A NJ Mariners Compass friendship quilt has turkey red
compasses on blue.
The appliqué quilts were a delight: a 9 block Whig Rose with a scalloped
border (1880-1900), another Whig Rose from Ohio this one a four block with
an acanthus leaf swag border, Diantha Myers Rose Bud made in NY in 1852 is a
simple rose block with an elaborate vine and rose border (signed and dated
in appliqué). A Tulip from PA (last quarter 19th cen.) has large, jaunty
tulips (orange and red) with free form leaves, green sashing but no border.
Orange Pots of Flowers from NY has 5 blocks on point with tiny stuffed
berries with pots of flowers as two borders and buds and leaves on the other
two sides. A floral Album from NY (1840-60) has lots of blue, outsized
flowers, birds circling a nest. A sampler from VA (1875-1900) has many
original designs in a combination of piecing and appliqué: checkerboards
with hears, flowers, circles, stars. The Dog and Sampler (NY, 1840-60) is
definitely a bit macabre. Angels hover over a shroud wrapped body inscribed
"Mother," other blocks include a dog and cat, a nest with eggs, birds,
feathers and flowers. Strawberries (1860-80) is a 4-block with giant
berries pieced from diamonds with pomegranates (orange, pink and green) with
elements repeated in the border.
We even had time for a stop at Sauder's on the way home. I have decided
that a detour to Lancaster is never an inconvenience. Fortunately my friends
are very agreeable.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore so grateful to Lynne Bassett



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Baltimore Album Quilt??
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2008 16:20:50 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 7

Julie,

That is certainly an interesting *monument* block. I've never seen anything like it. Have you received any hints? Is the quilt dated?

Two monuments appear frequently on mid-century Baltimore Album Quilts; the Battle Monument (dedicated to those who died during the War of 1812), and Baltimore's monument to George Washington (begun in 1815). Another *monument* block often seen is the temporary memorial to Major Samuel Ringgold, who died in the 1846 Battle of Palo Alto in Texas. (You can see a tiny picture of the Battle Monument block (Block C2) here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore_album_quilts

I do get the feeling that this block might represent a crypt or tomb. (Polly Mello might have some thoughts on this.) I did an image search online and found this eerily similar photo from Necropolis San Cristobal:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/h_savill/309761526/

Barbara Burnham
Ellicott City, MD

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: san diego
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 07:31:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


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This is not quilt related.....Our family will be in the San Diego area Dec. 24-30 and I am trying to find us a great place to stay. Would love to hear PRIVATELY from any QHL folks in that area who might have suggestions.
Are there any great places there to see quilts? (My family will hate I?asked this!)?I knew the quilt thing would over rule.
Thanks!
Lynn palamporeaol.com


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

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Subject: RE: Need help locating info. in Chicago
From: "Barbara Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 07:05:34 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

Pat, I am also near Chicago. Perhaps between who and what Kay knows and who
and what I know we might be able to help you.

Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have made a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research. Cheer me
on at: www.AlzQuilts.org




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cinda
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 09:00:24 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

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Once upon a soft2C lavender2C dewy morning2C the Great Goddess-of-All-Wo
nderful-Quilt-Things discovered a secret place of Quilt Blessings. She had
placed those blessings there her very self2C but as GG was getting on in
years2C she'd forgotten where she put them. It was as much fun as discove
ring money in an old purse! She held this enormous pile of blessings in he
r hand2C blessings that sparkled and glistened and delighted her. The gre
atest among the blessings was the opportunity to see every wonderful quilt
related event on earth. The next greatest blessing was the ability to be a
ble to write passages of great description to share with mere mortals who c
ould only dream of possessing Blessing Number One.

GG moved her hand slowly2C admiring the effect of the blessings she held
2C delighted that they looked much like a hand full of sparklers.
The negative thing about sparklers is that they burn out so quickly2C and
if shared with others2C you get the effect of many many sparklers and much
fizzy light. At this point2C GG decided to share the wealth of the bless
ings. She raised her sparkling2C blessed hand to her face2C closed her e
yes2C and blew the blessings to earth.

SHe hit Cinda Cawley right square in the ass. Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett
.com"All God's Children got the Blues"XM Satellite Radio2C #742C Bluesvil
le
_________________________________________________________________
Windows Live Hotmail now works up to 70% faster.
http://windowslive.com/Explore/Hotmail?ocid3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_hotmail_acq_fast
er_112008

--_31fe8e04-645b-46d7-ad3e-cd 76a2a351_--


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Subject: RE: Cinda
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 08:27:04 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4


love it


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Subject: Re: Baltimore Album Quilt??
From: pollymellocomcast.net

There are palm trees in south Texas. I wonder if there is or was a Spanish American War Monument that was built in Texas. I am looking.
Polly Mello
--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_14789_1226414501_0--


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Subject: Re: Quilts in CT
From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 09:22:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Dear Cinda,

It is I who is grateful to you! Thank you and your friends for making the
trek all the way to Connecticut for my little exhibition. I had a great
time talking to you about it!

And thanks for your insight into that funky dahlia-like c. 1840 quilt--I'd
never seen anything like it, but you, Cinda recognized the pattern as one
you had seen once before in Pennsylvania, the same state the Wadsworth's
"dahlia" quilt came from--a regional pattern, apparently!

Thank you to everyone who came for our quilt day!

All best,
Lynne




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cinda
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 10:02:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Here I thought I owed my good fortune to my Fairy Godmother. Thanks to
Teddy I will now acknowledge the Great Goddess-of-All-Wonderful-Quilt-Things
(GGOAWQT). Whoever is sprinkling blessings on my head (and any other parts
of my anatomy) I hope she keeps right on doing it.
Cinda enjoying a sof, lavender, dewy morning on the Eastern Shore



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cinda
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>


And fortunately some of those sparkled blessings fell upon Teddy to
light up our day. :-)

SHe hit Cinda Cawley right square in the ass. Teddy Pruett
www.teddypruett.com"


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: laptop
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 10:28:25 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

John just bought me my very own laptop. What should I do with it? I am
not the most computer savvy person on this list (in fact, I may be near the
bottom of the pile). I have several research projects going. I do a lot of
traveling (bet you didn't know that). I make, collect and lecture about
quilts. Whatever goes on this new computer is just for me. The slate is
clean. How do I want to approach this?
Cinda a Luddite on the Eastern Shore



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Subject: Mexican-American War
From: textique <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 10:34:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Just wish I had time to research this Julie but I'll throw this into the
mix. There was a Palmetto Regiment
from South Carolina in the Mexican-American War. I know there is a
monument but I can't remember if
it was period to the war. I'll think on it today.

Jan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Baltimore Album Quilt??
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 15:40:39 +0000
X-Message-Number: 11


--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_23331_1226418039_0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Pardon my mistake: Mexixan Americcan War. Or is it a state seal?
Polly Mello

--------------
> There are palm trees in south Texas. I wonder if there is or was a Spanish
> American War Monument that was built in Texas. I am looking.
> Polly Mello
>
> ---
--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_23331_1226418039_0--


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Subject: Re: Baltimore Album Quilt??
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 16:34:05 +0000
X-Message-Number: 12


--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_14898_1226421245_0
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Jan may be on the right track. The South Carolina flag has a cresent on it also palmetto palm tree. At one time it had 3 cresents said to represent Stamp Act protests, The cresent was actually supposed to represent a "gorget" part of a Revolutionary war soldier's uniform, a metal cresent fastened by a chain around the neck. The palmetto palm was a state symbol from the Revoluntionary War representing Ft. Moultrie that was built from the palm logs. Possilbe connection with The Citadel who's cadet fought in the Mexican American War?
Still can not find anything that looks like the monument. Still looking.
Polly Mello

--------------
--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_14898_1226421245_0--


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Subject: Re: Baltimore Album Quilt??
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 16:56:22 +0000
X-Message-Number: 13


--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_8964_1226422582_0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

It also looks like Mayan monument. Catherwood an English artist drew pictures of Mayan monuments that were first published in 1841-1842 and were highly popular. I am becoming obsessed. I must stop and start sewing.
Polly Mello
--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_8964_1226422582_0--


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Subject: update on BAQ .. ?? a second one!
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 08:54:19 -0800
X-Message-Number: 14

Hi,

I posted photos of an Album quilt on the eBoard a few days ago.
I was asking if anyone could help with recognizing clues as to
its origin.

I received some very interesting responses. Will share them with
anyone who e-mails me directly: quiltcomplexhughes.net

NOW -- I have been reminded of ANOTHER, very similar quilt that
we sold a few years ago.

I am trying to post those photos but I CAN NOT GET INTO THE
E-BOARD. (Anyone else having this problem?) E-mail me for
photos.

Both quilts have a block with a very odd monument (or perhaps a
beehive) surrounded by two palm trees, as well as a bird with
leaves ascending from the center of its back.

Check out the two sets of photos. They must be related.

Thanks a LOT to you who responded.

Julie Silber
quiltcomplexhughes.net



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Napoleon's locust/honeybee
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>

Does anyone on the list happen to have a clear image of the honeybee
Napoleon used as a symbol of his reign? I'm most interested in textile
interpretation of that image and the things I've found on the internet
either won't enlarge or aren't particularly clear.

I'll head to the local university library for further study but any
insights/experience from the textile experts is appreciated.

Stephanie Higgins
www.stephaniewhitson.com
------_NextPart_000_0255_01C943EF.73DC6C40--


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Subject: Monument block
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 17:12:10 +0000
X-Message-Number: 16

Sorry, too enthusiastic with the housekeeping. Can someone please
give me the original link to this block?

Sally Ward



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Monument block
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 17:26:46 +0000
X-Message-Number: 17

Apologies, didn't realise it was on the Eboard.
D'Oh.

Sally

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Napoleon's locust/honeybee
From: textique <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 12:42:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 18

Stephanie; No expert and you might already know that the bee and bee
hive are symbols of work and perseverance and are representations of
such in the Masonic and other 'Secret' Societies. (and elsewhere too) I
have seen some bee hives on pre-1850s samplers and mourning silks.

Polly; To follow up on your Mayan reference, The Palmetto Regiment was
associated with the Aztec Order of 1847.

Jan

Stephanie Whitson wrote:
> Does anyone on the list happen to have a clear image of the honeybee Napoleon used as a symbol of his reign? I'm most interested in textile interpretation of that image and the things I've found on the internet either won't enlarge or aren't particularly clear.
>
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: laptop
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 11:16:13 -0600
X-Message-Number: 19

As a nearly-illiterate computer person, I wouldn't want to live without my
laptop. I'm a novelist but I write most historical fiction so research is
the lifeblood of what I do and quilt-related research as a special passion.
I'm grateful for a laptop because of the portability of my information. If
my reearch notes are in this little 3 pound wonder I use, then I don't have
to haul my crate of real files with me everywhere. My aging back and
whiplashed neck appreciate that.

My laptop is my only computer, but I especially appreciate the laptop for:

research notes (I can keyboard faster than I can photocopy or request copies
of information when I'm in a museum or archive)

photos of the quilts I'm studying (I love being able to import a photograph
into a file so I have that instant recognition factor)

travel so I can e-mail colleagues and stay in my business loop, appearing to
be "in the office" when I'm really by the pool :-).

I have a very small laptop with a small screen. When in the office it's
connected to a big screen monitor to save my eyes. When I don't have that
option I increase print type by 150% and it still saves my eyes.

But the very most important thing to know about any computer is BACK UP
EVERYTHING ON IT CONSISTENTLY. Flash drives are the next best thing to
computers.

Stephanie Higgins



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Napoleon's locust/honeybee
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

Stephanie -- I googled using the images option and found two excellent
bee images. If you have trouble finding these, I've saved them to
scanner and can send them to you.

Stephanie Whitson wrote:

Does anyone on the list happen to have a clear image of the honeybee Napoleon used as a symbol of his reign? I'm most interested in textile interpretation of that image and the things I've found on the internet either won't enlarge or aren't particularly clear.



--------------050905040905090008030406--


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Subject: Re: san diego
From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 07:43:29 -0800
X-Message-Number: 21

Greetings From San Diego!
Hi Lynn,
Any place that suits your budget in the Hotel Circle area will put you
in a location that is "near" everything and has great freeway access.

You are in luck as far as quilts go because Quilt Visions 2008
Contemporary Expressions opened Nov 9 and runs through March1 at the
Oceanside Museum of Art in Oceanside. This is a gem of a museum and the
quilts are beautifully installed.

The art quilts are spectacular - the creme de la creme!

Regards,
Julia Zgliniec



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: monument
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 13:29:47 -0600
X-Message-Number: 22

I still think it's Angkor Wat, in Cambodia.

Wikipedia has this to say about Angkor Wat:
"the temple was popularised in the West only in the mid-19th century on the
publication of Henri Mouhot's travel notes. The French explorer wrote of it:

"One of these temples-a rival to that of Solomon, and erected by some
ancient Michelangelo-might take an honourable place beside our most
beautiful buildings. It is grander than anything left to us by Greece or
Rome, and presents a sad contrast to the state of barbarism in which the
nation is now plunged."[6] "

Also,
"A depiction of Angkor Wat has been a part of every Cambodian national flag
since the introduction of the first version circa 1863."

Go to the page and check out the 1866 photo of the site
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angkor_wat

Kim

-



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: sparklers
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 13:48:16 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 23

Well, Teddy, your post about GG's generosity was a great big LOL on a particularly just-gettin'-by kind of morning!!!

Teddy, Cinda, and a host of other quilt lovers and good sports were MY sparklers for the day!!! Susan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt/bedrug query
From: Tracy Jamar <tjamaroptonline.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 17:19:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 24



I think it was Cinda, in one of her detailed descriptions of quilts
and the like enjoyed on a recent outing, that queried whether it
would take longer to make a particular quilt pattern or a bed rug. It
reminded me that I had read how long it had taken someone to make a
bed rug in the 1970s. I happened to come across the notes for that
book today; they are shown below. I don't think the maker was
counting the time to shear, card, dye and spin the wool or weave the
foundation in the making of her rug.

No wonder they were prized then as well as now.

Tracy Jamar

Author made a bed rug and estimated that 4 full working days are
needed for 1 square foot of rug. Variations in time would be due to
whether the rug was clipped and the intricacy of the design. This
time does not include the prep or finish time. 56 sq. ft  225 days.
(147)

Needlework in America: History, Designs and Techniques
Virginia Churchill Bath. Viking Press: NY, 1979.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt/bedrug query
From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 17:59:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 25

I meant to respond to this, too. I didn't think of it while we were
standing there in storage at the Wadsworth Atheneum (one of MANY senior
moments these days...), but there is a short essay on this topic in
_Textiles in New England II: Four Centuries of Material Life, The Dublin
Seminar for New England Folklife Annual Proceedings 1999_. It is by Jesse
Marshall, who spun, dyed, wove, and embroidered her own version of a
Connecticut bed rug. Jesse says that she spun and dyed the wool herself and
that it took 14,000 yards to complete the project.

Sounds like preparing the wool alone would take as long as completing an
entire quilt!

All best,
Lynne

> Author made a bed rug and estimated that 4 full working days are needed
> for 1 square foot of rug. 56 sq. ft  225 days. Needlework in America:
> History, Designs and Techniques
> Virginia Churchill Bath. Viking Press: NY, 1979.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Julie's query
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 17:17:28 -0600
X-Message-Number: 26


If that block does not represent the SC Palmetto Unit, it ought to, Julie.

The monument to the unit that is best known is the one at the old state
house in SC, a tall affair from the top of which grows a marble palmetto
tree.

Check Monterey architecture or area. SC was not "invited" to this war at
first and was much insulted that its sundry units had not been called up.

James Knox Polk was President, and he had his problems with a number of SC
politicians and what he called SC or RATE ors. And only after almost every
man in Tennessee was in or near Mexican territory, were the South
Carolinians called up. (Please recall SC was first southern state to secede,
so they got the first draw later). The famed Palmetto Unit made its first,
biggest mark at the Battle of Monterey and it was immensely proud of that
contribution. SC orRATEors loved it way past the CW.

The unit (I'm not using that word technically) included Scarlett's "Culnel
Butler" and a Huger or two and maybe a Rhett. It included the later Gen Bee,
CSA, who gave Thomas Jonathan Jackson the epithet "Stonewall," when he tried
to rally his own men by saying, "See Jackson there: he stands like a stone
wall." More than you wanted to know, eh?

That little architectural doo-dad could just be symbolic of Mexico/Spanish
territory in general.

Will check my library later.

Gaye



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt/bed rug query
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 18:38:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 27

Jessie Armstead Marshall has a book called "Bed Rugs" which I bought
directly from her. It is lovely, full of history, color photos and designs.
There is a copy on Amazon now for $16.00 -- and a used copy for $176.00
(?).

http://www.amazon.com/Rugs-Early-Century-Embroidered-Covers/dp/0970893000

Judy Grow

Jesse
> Marshall, who spun, dyed, wove, and embroidered her own version of a
> Connecticut bed rug. Jesse says that she spun and dyed the wool herself
> and that it took 14,000 yards to complete the project.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Update - now ... TWO Album quilts, Julie Silber
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 17:21:13 -0800
X-Message-Number: 28

Hi,

Hello All,

A few days ago I posted an Album quilt on the eBoard to see if
any of you could help me place its origin.

I got several VERY interesting responses, which are BELOW. Thanks
to the responders.

NOW -- I was reminded that a few years ago we had sold ANOTHER,
intriguing similar Album quilt.

Today I posted a second set of photos -- of Quilt #2. They share
at least two very unusual blocks -- one with a monument (or
"beehive") surrounded by two palm trees.

Thank you all!

Julie Silber


From VIRGINIA VIS:

Julie - it is BAQ/Maryland influenced. The blocks show some
characteristics of BAQ blocks but none have the cookie
cutter/professional block look to them. The person who made this
had obviously seen the BAQ's but couldn't/didn't choose to pony
up for the kit. I have not seen the monument block before.
My best guess, based in others I've seen would be that it is from
PA near the MD border.
VA


And then VIRGINIA again, after I sent her BOTH photos:

I am at the Gallery today so I don't have my files in front of me
- but there is something "fraternal order"-ish about that
monument. Yes clearly the images are related, the palm trees with
the monument are significant.....
Let me hash this over with some of my fellow BAQ fanatics and
I'll let you know if we have anything to tell.
I would still hold with PA/MD area description.
VA

From DEBBY COONEY:

Dear Julie,

Virginia forwarded the photos of your two appliquE9 quilts w. the
odd block. Good for you remembering the earlier one. The nearly
identical slated basket and bird, as well as the one in question,
has to mean some connection-96same designer or one92s knowledge of
the other. Ronda92s beehive idea is a good one; the structure is
even on a stand as in similar blocks. The height of the 93tower94
and the palm trees made me think of those Mexican stepped
pyramids(especially the red one( which US troops saw during the
war. Teotichlan, just outside Mexico City, even has steps right
up the center, which the red one seems to be illustrating!
Angkor Watt is too esoteric for the 1840s. When I have time, I92ll
look at contemporary illustrations to see which one might have
been the inspiration. The ones I can recall at the moment showed
some of the local landmarks & included palm trees.

I attend a lot of auctions in Carroll County, just west of
Baltimore. The one you have now strikes me as one of those
albums. They often have 16 blocks, a lot of wreaths and laurel
branches, plus swag or vine borders. Their designers obviously
had seen the high-style BAQs and just did their own simpler
versions. The red & green one looks more Pa. influenced than the
current one, but that92s also common in that county, which borders
Adams and York Counties to the north.



From: BARBARA BURNHAM

Julie,

That is certainly an interesting *monument* block. I've never
seen anything like it. Have you received any hints? Is the quilt
dated?

Two monuments appear frequently on mid-century Baltimore Album
Quilts; the Battle Monument (dedicated to those who died during
the War of 1812), and Baltimore's monument to George Washington
(begun in 1815). Another *monument* block often seen is the
temporary memorial to Major Samuel Ringgold, who died in the 1846
Battle of Palo Alto in Texas. (You can see a tiny picture of the
Battle Monument block (Block C2) here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore_album_quilts

I do get the feeling that this block might represent a crypt or
tomb. (Polly Mello might have some thoughts on this.) I did an
image search online and found this eerily similar photo from
Necropolis San Cristobal:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/h_savill/309761526/


From RONDA McALLEN:

Julie,

Thanks for the photos. I don92t think it is a monument. It is
the Odd Fellows beehive. The beehive was always part of the Odd
Fellows symbols but in 1851 it became symbolic of the Degree of
Rebekahs. These quilts have a definite 93Jewish feel.94 Later
this week I will send you a pic of the Odd Fellows beehive as
well as some of the blocks which are found in the Jewish albums.
I am not quite sure if they are truly Baltimore, maybe New
Jersey.

Ronda



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QuiltMania II in Dallas TX and Marie Webster "Clematis in Bloom" pattern
From: "jhorsey" <jhorseynumail.org>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2008 17:39:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 29

I was in Dallas Texas on Saturday and went on the first of the QuiltCrawls
which are a part of QuiltMania II. Wish I possessed Lucinda's or Gaye's
descriptive powers to share the experience with you. Marian Ann Montgomery
did a great job. Lots of wonderful quilts at different venues, including a
fabulous Clematis in Bloom by Marie Webster. I can't find a copy of this
pattern anywhere, either in the recent books compiling Webster's works or on
the Web.

Can anyone please point me in the correct direction to find it? I am
thinking that making that quilt may be a true life goal for me, it was that
spectacular.

Thanks for any help you can give me


Jo Horsey Glass
Newnan, Ga



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: QuiltMania II in Dallas TX and Marie Webster "Clematis in Bloom" pattern
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 01:42:13 +0000
X-Message-Number: 30



Jo,
At the Culumbus, Ohio AQSG Rosalind Webster Perry did a gallery walk of quilts of her gransmother's designss, some she had made herself, at one of the venues. She was very excited about the Clematis quilt. It was previously unknown to her.
Which does not help you. Maybe you could draft your own.
Polly Mello
Elkridge, Mayland