Subject: Judy's paper on rotary cutter
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 21:23:46 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Hey Judy,

You answered this question on qhl before and mentioned your paper. Your
response and rundown of info was so good I printed it out and put it in
Eleanor Levie's book on modern quilt making, excellent reference book-
American Quiltmaking, 1970-2000.

Your answer to the question is dated Sunday march 10, 2002, 2:52 PM if you
look in the archives.

I'll save you the trouble of looking though, as you didn't say an
individual's name for the inventor, just under Olfa's president supervision
and brought to America by YLI thread Co.

Piece,
Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.antiquequiltdating.com
www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judy's paper on rotary cutter
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 08:19:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------090906020907010909080304
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1; format flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I've been searching Google and old catalogs ever since this question
came up. Nada. Does anyone besides me remember using a rolling cutting
blade in latter 60s -early 70s?? I know I only used this gadget several
times and pitched it. The idea was good but not really a good tool for
cutting anything. I supposed I could compare it to some of the As Seen
on TV infomercial items being hawked today. :-)


Kimberly Wulfert, PhD wrote:

Hey Judy,

You answered this question on qhl before and mentioned your paper. Your
response and rundown of info was so good I printed it out and put it in
Eleanor Levie's book on modern quilt making, excellent reference book-
American Quiltmaking, 1970-2000.

Your answer to the question is dated Sunday march 10, 2002, 2:52 PM if you
look in the archives.

I'll save you the trouble of looking though, as you didn't say an
individual's name for the inventor, just under Olfa's president supervision
and brought to America by YLI thread Co.



--------------090906020907010909080304--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Frontier children
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 20:40:05 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

Stumbled across this tonight while doing some research on doll quilts and
crib quilts. I don't know that it mentions quilts at all, but it is filled
with GREAT photos of children. It popped up because I had googled <advent of
Victorian cult of childhood>. Published in 2002 the book is called Frontier
Children Frontier Children, written by Linda Peavy and Ursula Smith. Looks
very interesting. No affiliation.

Karen in the San Juans




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Alliance for American Quilts Auction -- New Quilts Tonight!
From: MegMaxCaol.com
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 09:34:24 EST
X-Message-Number: 4


--part1_d03.480a0aac.364d94f0_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset "US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear QHL Friends--
The second auction week for contest quilts from the Alliance for
American Quilts is winding down on eBay and bidding will end tonight, Thursday, Nov.
13, at 9 PM Eastern Time. The third and final group of quilts from the My
Quilts/Our History auction will be available for bidding immediately after Week
Two bidding ends.
The My Quilts/Our History contest celebrated the Alliance's 15th
anniversary so the quilts are 15 inches square. The quilts themselves depict their
makers' personal quilt history, so be sure to read the artist statements that go
with these intriquing quilts.
Until tonight, you've still got a chance to buy some impressive quilts
at bargain prices: of the 22 small quilts offered this second week, a majority
will likely go for less than $100 and as of Thursday morning, there were 9
quilts going for the minimum of $50. I'm doing some of my Christmas shopping at
these prices, and you can too. Remember, all proceeds help grow the nonprofit
AAQ, whose mission is to document, preserve and share the stories of quilts and
their makers.
Go to the eBay.com and type Alliance for American Quilts in the search
box.
Let me know if you have any questions.
Meg Cox, vice president, Alliance for American Quilts
megmegcox.com



**************
Get the Moviefone Toolbar. Showtimes, theaters, movie news
&amp;
more!(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212774565x1200812037/aol?redir http://toolbar.aol.com/moviefone/download.html?ncid emlcntusdown00000001)

--part1_d03.480a0aac.364d94f0_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Judy's paper on rotary cutter
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 10:53:53 EST
X-Message-Number: 5


-------------------------------1226591633
Content-Type: text/plain; charset "US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Now that I think about it, I used to have a device that was like a double
cutter. I just looked for it and didn't find it and am pretty sure I got rid of
it after having it for quite awhile and never using it. It was brown plastic
and I think it had a handle that split into two with a round blade on each
side maybe an inch or a couple inches apart. I didn't buy it new so I probably
got it at a thrift store or yard sale and this would have been at least 20
years ago.
What about doing some type of patent search?

Nan in FL
_www.mooreandmoorequilts.com_ (http://www.mooreandmoorequilts.com)


**************Get movies delivered to your mailbox. One month free from
blockbuster.com
(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212639737x1200784900/aol?redir https://www.blockbuster.com/signup/y/reg/p.26978/r.email_footer)

-------------------------------1226591633--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rotary Cutter
From: Edwaquiltaol.com
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 10:55:47 EST
X-Message-Number: 6


-------------------------------1226591747
Content-Type: text/plain; charset "US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I remember this subject being discussed a couple years ago. I also recall
an article in (I believe) PATCHWORK QUILTS magazine back in the 80's or 90's
about the cutter. The one omission in more recent info about the rotary
cutter is the roll Jerri Salem played in the development of the cutter for
quilters. According to this article, the original cutter didn't rotate like the
pizza cutter but was stationary. The numbers on the blade indicated the next
position to rotate the blade for a sharp cut. Jerri suggested the cutter be
made to roll.

Holice
**************Get the Moviefone Toolbar. Showtimes, theaters, movie news &
more!(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212774565x1200812037/aol?redir htt
p://toolbar.aol.com/moviefone/download.html?ncid emlcntusdown00000001)

-------------------------------1226591747--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judy's paper on rotary cutter
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 11:48:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------020807060106030306020003
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1; format flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Nan -- I did a cursory search using rolling blades, rolling scissors,
rolling cutters, rotary versions, etc. and got nowhere. A host of lawn
mower and industrial cutters plus pizza cutter but nothing for which I
was looking. I still have some catalogs to check; maybe something will
turn up there.


QUILTMOOREaol.com wrote:

Now that I think about it, I used to have a device that was like a double
cutter. I just looked for it and didn't find it and am pretty sure I got rid of
it after having it for quite awhile and never using it. It was brown plastic
and I think it had a handle that split into two with a round blade on each
side maybe an inch or a couple inches apart. I didn't buy it new so I probably
got it at a thrift store or yard sale and this would have been at least 20
years ago.
What about doing some type of patent search?

Nan in FL
_www.mooreandmoorequilts.com_ (http://www.mooreandmoorequilts.com)



--------------020807060106030306020003--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: QUERY: Who invented the rotary cutter?
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 09:47:19 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 8

--0-1428174197-1226598439 :37787
Content-Type: text/plain; charset iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Carol Anne Wein, The Great American Log Cabin Quilt Book (New York: Dutton,
1984)---suggested cutting fabric strips with a paper cutter.
Beth and Jeffrey Gutcheon, Quilt Design Workbook (New York: Rawson Associat
es Publishers, 1976)---staple several fabric layers together to accurately 
cut multiple layers with scissors.  This idea was published in the Quilt 
Bee section of Quilter's Newsletter Magazine  (QNM) in 1982.
Olfa cutter developed under the supervision of Yoshio Okada in the late 197
0s.
Marti Mitchell not impressed when she first saw RC (rotary cutter) in 198
0.
Not long after, Mitchell and Mary Ellen Hopkins tried RC to cut strips and 
Mitchell was impressed.  (se 'Rotary Revolution', QNM September 1999, pp.
66-67)
First ad for RC in QNM June 1981.
Beginning in February 1982 QNM ran a 7-part strip piecing series; RC was in
second installment.
March 1982 QNM plastic templates 1/8" thick and 22" long in widths from 1
/2" to 6" offered for sale in 'Strip Piecing Hints' by Yvonne Porcella.
Quilts and Other Comforts catalog first offered RC in 1984.
Retail ads for RC in QNM numbered 11 in 1983 and 15 in 1985.
Quilter's Rule offered lucite ruler "designed to be [used] with rotary cutt
er for marking strips" in 1985.
January 1985 Quilter's Quick Strips ad: eight individual Plexiglas strips o
f varying widths.
 
from research paper "The Technological Ages of Quilting" August 5, 2001 by 
Judy Schwender
 
  0A 0A 0A
--0-1428174197-1226598439 :37787--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Old Rotary Cutters
From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 13:25:13 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9

I remember having a rolling cutting blade thingie when I first started trying to
sew in approximately 1970. It was terrible.

Mary

--
Mary G. Persyn mary.persynvalpo.edu
Associate Dean for Library Services
School of Law Library
Valparaiso University
656 S. Greenwich St.
Valparaiso, IN 46383
219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: QUERY: Who invented the rotary cutter?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 20:15:38 +0000
X-Message-Number: 10

I've been idly wondering who invented the 'self healing cutting mat'
and when, as it was surely a necessary adjunct to the use of the
rotary cutter, both in the efficiency of cutting without dulling the
blade and in the prevention of damage to the work surface. Was it
there for craftspeople using knives before the rotary cutter
appeared? Similarly, the rotary cutter couldn't be a really efficient
piece of kit until satisfactory guide rulers appeared. However early
the cutter was invented, it needed these two developments to make it
really work.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: cutting mats
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 15:46:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------040308050903070805060103
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1; format flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have used an artist's or engineer's cutting mat -- Coharvos cutting
base -- since the mid-60s. It is a solid 1/4" thick and superior to the
sewing/craft mats. More expensive but worth it as my needs for cutting
mats are more for miniature work, matting, etc. although it gets its
fair share for sewing projects. It is self-healing; however, when the
thingie came out to smooth cutting surfaces, I also began using that to
keep surface really smooth. Xacto knives, rotary cutters and other
cutting tools sink right into mat to give a sharp, defined cut, and no
marks show. Mat is now 40+ years old and good as day it was bought. If I
remember correctly I paid $36 for 18" x 24" size at that time at a
graphics art supply store.

What I like most about it is that it does not warp or curl like regular
cutting mats; can be stored flat or on end. I have two larger June
Tailor mats which fit a work table and hang from wall for storage; they
have to be reversed every so often to prevent curling. But cutting on
them is not as precise as the cutting base. I think it is their lighter
weight which causes them to move when in use. Just my personal experience.

Sally Ward wrote:

I've been idly wondering who invented the 'self healing cutting mat' and
when, as it was surely a necessary adjunct to the use of the rotary
cutter, both in the efficiency of cutting without dulling the blade and
in the prevention of damage to the work surface. Was it there for
craftspeople using knives before the rotary cutter appeared? Similarly,
the rotary cutter couldn't be a really efficient piece of kit until
satisfactory guide rulers appeared. However early the cutter was
invented, it needed these two developments to make it really work.


--------------040308050903070805060103--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: rotary cutter
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 20:15:54 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 12

--0-1131325852-1226636154 :46615
Content-Type: text/plain; charset us-ascii

Wasn't the rotary cutter used first in pizza parlors?1



Laura Fisher


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: tracing wheel
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 00:25:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


----------MB_8CB14308A3CE6A5_2CC_5480_webmail-db19.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain; charset "us-ascii"

Today I was searching for an item in some old sewing baskets and came across several tracing wheels. Maybe a person saw that and decided that without the teeth it might be pretty handy. Then they went out for a pizza and the light bulb?went on! I would definitely choose the rotary cutter over a tracing wheel as something helpful and functional. I keep wanting to throw those little things away, but the pack rat in me keeps thinking there has to be a good use for them. I remember using a wheel with tracing paper to mark darts only because my sewing teachers said I HAD to do so. Once out of those classes I never used one again. Are they a sewing tool of the past for everyone?
Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

----------MB_8CB14308A3CE6A5_2CC_5480_webmail-db19.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Electric Scissor
From: OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 00:56:54 EST
X-Message-Number: 2


-------------------------------1226642214
Content-Type: text/plain; charset "US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Joan:

I don't remember a rotary cutter in the late 60s or early 70s but I did have
an electric scissor that I used for cutting fabric. It had a long cord and
it worked great for zipping around clothing patterns. It would easily cut
through 2-4 layers of fabrics. I used it for my first quilt in 1974. In 1981 I
bought my first Gingher Sheers and it easily cut through 8 layers of fabric for
my first large log cabin quilt. I was really impressed with that Gingher and
I still use it today.

Kathy Kansier
AQS Appraiser
Ozark, Missouri
**************Get the Moviefone Toolbar. Showtimes, theaters, movie news &
more!(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212774565x1200812037/aol?redir htt
p://toolbar.aol.com/moviefone/download.html?ncid emlcntusdown00000001)

-------------------------------1226642214--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: tracing wheel
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 04:01:19 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

I still have the tracing wheel I used in high school home ec class in my one
sewing basket! I swear I think I would feel the "wrath" of my Home Ec
teacher even now if I threw it away!! Marcia Kaylakie

Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: rotary cutter
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 07:24:34 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------060309000601080904070507
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1; format flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Laura -- Lawn mowers and industrial cutters came first; I think that's
where Olfa and others got the idea.

Marcia -- Re tracing wheels :-) I never had much use for a tracing
wheel as a sewing tool but it makes a great perforater and fancy line
design for paper crafts. I still have mine from the 50s.

Kathy -- as for electric scissors, those first electric gizmos were
what drove me to try what was suppose to pass for a rotary cutter. Both
were badly in need of being re-engineered. As for Ginghers...........ah,
can life get any better.


Laura Fisher wrote:

Wasn't the rotary cutter used first in pizza parlors?1

>
>
>
>
>

--------------060309000601080904070507--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Tracing wheels
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 13:13:36 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5

We have a saying over here about a large ready-made mustard-making
firm, Colmans, that they 'made their money from the mustard people
left on the side of their plate'. Thinking of the money made from all
the unused gizmos, the tracing wheel must be the finest example.

Sally Ward
(At one time I had mine, my mother's and my grandmother's, all unused
<G>)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Tracing wheels
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 08:26:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------040805070702050509080105
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1; format flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Add to that the gizmo which made French tailor tacks for you. Rubik must
have gotten his cube idea from that whazzit. :-)


Sally Ward wrote: We have a saying over here about a large ready-made
mustard-making firm, Colmans, that they 'made their money from the
mustard people left on the side of their plate'. Thinking of the money
made from all the unused gizmos, the tracing wheel must be the finest
example.

Sally Ward
(At one time I had mine, my mother's and my grandmother's, all unused <G>)


--------------040805070702050509080105--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Tracing wheels
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 07:31:58 -0800
X-Message-Number: 7

I could not have gotten along without my tracing wheels.
I have done a lot of garment sewing BQ (before quilting) and still occasion
ally use mine.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com
om


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: tracing wheel
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 09:13:00 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8



> I still have the tracing wheel I used in high school home ec class in my one
> sewing basket! I swear I think I would feel the "wrath" of my Home Ec
> teacher even now if I threw it away!! Marcia Kaylakie

Marcia K., send it to me: I loathed my home ec teacher. Really loathed her.

I hated that she called everything we made "products," as if we were robots
on some assembly line----when anyone with half an eye could see from the
chaos that was not the case.

I hated that we had to use recipes that even my mother, under great
pressure, acknowledged were not "healthful" (e.g., a slippery, sweetsweet
dressing for otherwise perfectly good fruit salad).

I hated that when we baked muffins or biscuits (often), she always paused
and scrutinized my partner and me and asked in an arch way, "Are these YOUR
products?" Of course, they weren't: the team next to us shared theirs, made
by another recipe, so we could pass the darned course. We looked hurt,
offended that our muffin-making proficiency was being questioned.

I hated that she said dumb things like, "Ladies must present a solid back to
the world," meaning we needed to wear girdles to mash our healthy fannies
and innards into some shape appropriate to Sir Walter Scottness Suthen
Ladyhood.

And I hated that when my friend/partner Marie and I managed to pull the
newly delivered kitchen cupboard down upon our ungirded selves, trapping
ourselves beneath it, she said to the girls at the next "station," "Oh, just
leave them there for a while! I need some peace and quiet in this kitchen."

So, if you want to dump your tracing wheel but can't bear to do it for fond
remembrance of your home-ec teacher, send it on over. I haven't a fond
thought in my head about my home-ec teacher.

I did and do use my tracing wheel for darts, however, and have always
thought it looks rather attractive with its faux horn handle.

Gaye




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Nor Eyes Have Seen......
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 10:07:09 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9


I hope I will not be violating list policy by noting the arrival of a new
web site, recently added by one of our members.

If you have time, take a look at Julie Silber and Jean Demeter's new web
home at www.thequiltcomplex.com. So much to see, such fine design!

I'd heard much about the progress and lack of progress attached to this
site, and when it looked like it was all coming together at last, I asked
Ms. Silber if www pages were hard to set up and hard to use, once
constructed.

She replied that it was very difficult to set up a web site if one were 1)
not too smart and 2) very neurotic. Right then, I knew I was not made for
web site construction.

And I think I envisioned something more prosaic, like a page that read,
"Here are some quilts we have for sale" and "Here are some pretty things to
look at."

Not so. Congratulations, Julie and Jean: the new site is a delight.

Gaye



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Nor Eyes Have Seen......
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 08:19:13 -0800
X-Message-Number: 10

I just went to the site and it is fantastic.
When viewing a website I always select Skip Intro - Don't do this here. The
re are some great quilts in the intro.
I checked out Julie's current lectures available.
I'd like to hear them all - even the ones I've already heard and seen.
Thanks for sharing Gaye.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Tracing wheels
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 14:13:40 -0800 (PST)

I think I used one once to prick a design in a pie crust.........
And I think I used one in ceramics to imprint surface designs in the cl
ay...........
Judy Schwender



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: In defense of the tracing wheel
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>

Dear List,
Tracing wheels, like all "gadgets" with specific uses, are useful for the
intended purpose. The problem is that the intended purpose is no longer
popular.

Take a look at the kind of clothing we wear now - none of it tailored or
fitted. I use a tracing wheel and fabric carbon paper when I have to make
very fitted clothes that require a good deal of maniupulation - lots of
darts and pleats, etc. Fitted garments must be cut carefully on the grain
and the darts, pleats, tucks etc also accurately marked on the assigned
grainline. Tracing the lines on the proper grain really does save time in
the making and gives great results.

I found I used the tracing wheel a lot when I was sewing childrens clothes
that required many box pleats - it was a great gadget.

Newbie Richardson

------ _NextPart_000_0072_01C94708.BCFD7F10--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Julie Silber -- our new web site
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2008 09:50:11 -0800
X-Message-Number: 2

Thank you Gaye Ingram, for your unsolicited recommendation of our
new web site, and for your kind, kind words. I was only told of
your posting this morning. Been busy working on a web site! :)

We plan to ANNOUNCE (send out e-mails to our mailing list, etc.)
soon -- once we get some of the kinks out -- AND add a BUNCHA
more quilts for sale. Technical issues make adding additional
quilts for sale cumbersome and time consuming. But more are
coming -- we are adding daily!

Thanks, too to those of you who visited, and sent kind words.

Julie Silber
www.thequiltcomplex.com


 


-----Original Message-----
From: Quilt History List digest
[mailto:qhllyris.quiltropolis.com]
Sent: Friday, November 14, 2008 9:01 PM
To: qhl digest recipients
Subject: qhl digest: November 14, 2008

QHL Digest for Friday, November 14, 2008.

1. tracing wheel
2. Electric Scissor
3. Re: tracing wheel
4. rotary cutter
5. Tracing wheels
6. Re: Tracing wheels
7. RE: Tracing wheels
8. Re: tracing wheel
9. Nor Eyes Have Seen......
10. RE: Nor Eyes Have Seen......
11. Re: Tracing wheels

-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: tracing wheel
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 00:25:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


----------MB_8CB14308A3CE6A5_2CC_5480_webmail-db19.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain; charset 3D"us-ascii"

Today I was searching for an item in some old sewing baskets and
came across several tracing wheels. Maybe a person saw that and
decided that without the teeth it might be pretty handy. Then
they went out for a pizza and the light bulb?went on! I would
definitely choose the rotary cutter over a tracing wheel as
something helpful and functional. I keep wanting to throw those
little things away, but the pack rat in me keeps thinking there
has to be a good use for them. I remember using a wheel with
tracing paper to mark darts only because my sewing teachers said
I HAD to do so. Once out of those classes I never used one again.
Are they a sewing tool of the past for everyone?
Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

----------MB_8CB14308A3CE6A5_2CC_5480_webmail-db19.sysops.aol.com
--


-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: Electric Scissor
From: OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 00:56:54 EST
X-Message-Number: 2


-------------------------------1226642214
Content-Type: text/plain; charset 3D"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Joan:
 
I don't remember a rotary cutter in the late 60s or early 70s but
I did have an electric scissor that I used for cutting fabric.
It had a long cord and it worked great for zipping around
clothing patterns. It would easily cut through 2-4 layers of
fabrics. I used it for my first quilt in 1974. In 1981 I bought
my first Gingher Sheers and it easily cut through 8 layers of
fabric for my first large log cabin quilt. I was really impressed
with that Gingher and I still use it today.
 
Kathy Kansier
AQS Appraiser
Ozark, Missouri
**************Get the Moviefone Toolbar. Showtimes, theaters,
movie news &
more!(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212774565x12008120
37/aol?redir 3Dhtt
p://toolbar.aol.com/moviefone/download.html?ncid 3Demlcntusdown0000
0001)

-------------------------------1226642214--


-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: Re: tracing wheel
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 04:01:19 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

I still have the tracing wheel I used in high school home ec
class in my one sewing basket! I swear I think I would feel the
"wrath" of my Home Ec teacher even now if I threw it away!!
Marcia Kaylakie

Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: rotary cutter
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 07:24:34 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------060309000601080904070507
Content-Type: text/plain; charset 3DISO-8859-1; format 3Dflowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Laura -- Lawn mowers and industrial cutters came first; I think
that's where Olfa and others got the idea.

Marcia -- Re tracing wheels :-) I never had much use for a
tracing
wheel as a sewing tool but it makes a great perforater and fancy
line design for paper crafts. I still have mine from the 50s.

Kathy -- as for electric scissors, those first electric gizmos
were
what drove me to try what was suppose to pass for a rotary
cutter. Both were badly in need of being re-engineered. As for
Ginghers...........ah, can life get any better.


Laura Fisher wrote:

Wasn't the rotary cutter used first in pizza parlors?1

>
>
>

>

--------------060309000601080904070507--


-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: Tracing wheels
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 13:13:36 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5

We have a saying over here about a large ready-made
mustard-making firm, Colmans, that they 'made their money from
the mustard people left on the side of their plate'. Thinking of
the money made from all the unused gizmos, the tracing wheel
must be the finest example.

Sally Ward
(At one time I had mine, my mother's and my grandmother's, all
unused
<G>)


-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: Re: Tracing wheels
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 08:26:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------040805070702050509080105
Content-Type: text/plain; charset 3DISO-8859-1; format 3Dflowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Add to that the gizmo which made French tailor tacks for you.
Rubik must have gotten his cube idea from that whazzit. :-)


Sally Ward wrote: We have a saying over here about a large
ready-made
mustard-making firm, Colmans, that they 'made their money from
the
mustard people left on the side of their plate'. Thinking of the
money
made from all the unused gizmos, the tracing wheel must be the
finest
example.

Sally Ward
(At one time I had mine, my mother's and my grandmother's, all
unused <G>)


--------------040805070702050509080105--


-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: RE: Tracing wheels
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 07:31:58 -0800
X-Message-Number: 7

I could not have gotten along without my tracing wheels.
I have done a lot of garment sewing BQ (before quilting) and
still occasion 3D
ally use mine.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: Re: tracing wheel
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 09:13:00 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8


 
> I still have the tracing wheel I used in high school home ec
class in my one
> sewing basket! I swear I think I would feel the "wrath" of my
Home Ec
> teacher even now if I threw it away!! Marcia Kaylakie

Marcia K., send it to me: I loathed my home ec teacher. Really
loathed her.

I hated that she called everything we made "products," as if we
were robots
on some assembly line----when anyone with half an eye could see
from the
chaos that was not the case.

I hated that we had to use recipes that even my mother, under
great
pressure, acknowledged were not "healthful" (e.g., a slippery,
sweetsweet
dressing for otherwise perfectly good fruit salad).

I hated that when we baked muffins or biscuits (often), she
always paused
and scrutinized my partner and me and asked in an arch way, "Are
these YOUR
products?" Of course, they weren't: the team next to us shared
theirs, made
by another recipe, so we could pass the darned course. We looked
hurt,
offended that our muffin-making proficiency was being questioned.

I hated that she said dumb things like, "Ladies must present a
solid back to
the world," meaning we needed to wear girdles to mash our healthy
fannies
and innards into some shape appropriate to Sir Walter Scottness
Suthen
Ladyhood.

And I hated that when my friend/partner Marie and I managed to
pull the
newly delivered kitchen cupboard down upon our ungirded selves,
trapping
ourselves beneath it, she said to the girls at the next
"station," "Oh, just
leave them there for a while! I need some peace and quiet in this
kitchen."

So, if you want to dump your tracing wheel but can't bear to do
it for fond
remembrance of your home-ec teacher, send it on over. I haven't a
fond
thought in my head about my home-ec teacher.

I did and do use my tracing wheel for darts, however, and have
always
thought it looks rather attractive with its faux horn handle.

Gaye




-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: Nor Eyes Have Seen......
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 10:07:09 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9


I hope I will not be violating list policy by noting the arrival
of a new
web site, recently added by one of our members.

If you have time, take a look at Julie Silber and Jean Demeter's
new web
home at www.thequiltcomplex.com. So much to see, such fine
design!

I'd heard much about the progress and lack of progress attached
to this
site, and when it looked like it was all coming together at last,
I asked
Ms. Silber if www pages were hard to set up and hard to use, once
constructed.

She replied that it was very difficult to set up a web site if
one were 1)
not too smart and 2) very neurotic. Right then, I knew I was not
made for
web site construction.

And I think I envisioned something more prosaic, like a page that
read,
"Here are some quilts we have for sale" and "Here are some pretty
things to
look at."

Not so. Congratulations, Julie and Jean: the new site is a
delight.

Gaye



-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: RE: Nor Eyes Have Seen......
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 08:19:13 -0800
X-Message-Number: 10

I just went to the site and it is fantastic.
When viewing a website I always select Skip Intro - Don't do this
here. The 3D
re are some great quilts in the intro.
I checked out Julie's current lectures available.
I'd like to hear them all - even the ones I've already heard and
seen.
Thanks for sharing Gaye.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Subject: Re: Tracing wheels
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2008 14:13:40 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 11

--0-93783877-1226700820 3D:366
Content-Type: text/plain; charset 3Diso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I think I used one once to prick a design in a pie crust.........
And I think I used one in ceramics to 3DA0imprint surface 3DA0designs
in the cl 3D
ay........... 3DA0
Judy Schwender


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: In defense of the tracing wheel
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2008 16:06:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Newbie, I thoroughly enjoyed your explanation of the use of the tracing
wheel in your clothing construction work, and can see how you have found
the tool useful. In contrast, let me share my experience ---

I first met the tracing wheel in 8th grade home ec where the project was
to make a blouse. I had been sewing since elementary school and at
that point was making my own clothing -- taught techniques by my
mother. In class, we were to use the tracing wheel and paper to mark
darts and button hole placement, much as you described. I was used to
using pins and tailor tacks, so used them, thus losing points on my
grade for my blouse -- I didn't have the appropriate "H" marking each
buttonhole, nor the the lines showing where the point of the dart was.
My best friend made a white blouse, and it had "perfect" lines of blue
dots everywhere it was supposed to, marking darts and buttonholes. The
blouse was unwearable and received an A -- because she had followed all
the steps on the checklist. I continued to wear my blouse through
high school, and received a grade a good deal lower than A because I
didn't follow directions.

So, for me, the best use that has been made of my tracing wheel was to
cut and make pretty designs in play dough creations when my girls were
small. I also used it to make perforations when I needed to make
tear-off coupons for something years ago.

Barb in southeastern PA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: old tools
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2008 13:38:16 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 4

I too still use my tracing wheels. I've had to get careful about what kind of tracing paper I use - my fave is stuff I must have bought 25 years ago! Some of the newer stuff doesn't seem to work as well.
No, I don't do the garment sewing I used to, but have kept tools. You just never know!

I remember just a little of home ec. I remember the cooking part as a complete waste of time. Since I already knew how to roll out a pie crust, and could measure to make brownies and birthday cake (from mixes), I'm sure I thought I already knew what I needed to. I really learned to cook after I got married - from my new husband! LOTS of pathetic kitchen stories later....

I also had done some real sewing before home ec - on a treadle machine, and found going to the electric machine both exciting and unnerving. We all had to make, believe it or not, shirtwaist dresses!! Mine came out pretty well, but I never wore it or any other shirtwaist - they all look absolutely AWFUL on me. So, it was a waste of time and scant money. I did learn to make much better styled, better fitting clothing from an older sister, and proceeded to make most of my clothes from at least 9th grade into my 30's. I also helped make tents, canvas bags, and a variety of other gear for camping and the out of doors. Those were the back to the land, self-sufficiency days...I'm still astonished at the numbers of people who can't do any of these things for themselves. Susan




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re The humble tracing wheel
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2008 17:46:26 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5


Barb Garrett's condemnation of the handy tracing wheel is yet another piece
of evidence that gives substance to my hypothesis about sewing and cooking
as taught in high schools of yore: 1) most introductory courses were
ill-designed, planned for novices when in fact their clientele was already
fairly practiced and 2) they were taught by inflexible and sometimes
diabolical women who were less concerned that their charges learned than
that they themselves "covered the subject." I know all were not like that,
but enough were that I've often wondered what trait led them to become home
ec teachers.

I bet you couldn't get a full chapter for a book on "My Favorite Home Ec
Teacher" out of WW II babies and boomers.

I was pleased, however, to hear Susan and Newbie speak up on behalf of this
little instrument.

I don't even know when I learned to sew---very young and on a toy machine
that did chain stitches, I think. But by the time I was in the eighth grade,
I was sewing clothing. My mother had sought to teach me, but when my
hardheadedness got the best of her (once I put sleeves in backwards and
refused to take them out, said they felt and looked fine), she laid down
this law: you may only purchase Vogue patterns. I will answer any question
you have, but I will not undertake your instruction.

I was making bound buttonholes and putting sleeves in correctly in what
seemed no time.

Several years ago I came upon a box of those patterns. No one could have
asked for clearer, more precise prose and graphics. If you could read, you
could master sewing from those patterns. I confess I had already developed a
respect for the precise placement of darts and such before Vogue. I knew
enough about fabric to appreciate that. But if there were an award to be
given for instructional excellence, it should have gone to Vogue pattern
writers. I sometimes wonder if that is a lost art.

My mother was an at-home mother, but her college major had been in
elementary education. She knew there was more than one way to skin a cat and
that you had to keep your eye on the end goal, not on your own control of
children. Flexibility. Practicality.

gaye



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: In defense of the tracing wheel NOT
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2008 17:41:26 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------020406000305020806060902
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1; format flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Newbie -- In line with Barb's experiences, my 8th grad home ec teacher
[1945] along with other teachers and sewing experts recommended not
using tracing wheel for several reasons. Wheels were considered
unreliable -- damage to pattern and fabric, wheel not suitable for all
fabrics plus not everyone had a steady hand. And tracing paper was
unreliable; one had to be careful of smearing. It was recommended that
straight pins or tailor tacks be placed at intervals along printed lines
or in perforated holes; then with sharp tailor chalk pencil make a dot
on both sides of fabric where pins or tailor tacks were. After pattern
was removed, a ruler was then used to connect dots. This resulted in a
more perfect marking.

You mentioned pleats -- we were taught to use tailor chalk or basting
lines, then fold fabric on those lines and then loose baste to hold
pleats in place. Pleated fabric was then suspended, usually with hands
or on large hanger to assess proper drape, then hung overnight to ease
tension and let pleats fall in place. Basting was removed the next day
and pleats were pressed. I've followed those guidelines to this day;
fast, easy and no error unless my little grey cells were not in working
order.

As Barb notes, tracing wheels, whether smooth or toothed, are great
craft items.


Barb Garrett wrote:

Newbie, I thoroughly enjoyed your explanation of the use of the tracing
wheel in your clothing construction work, and can see how you have found
the tool useful. In contrast, let me share my experience ---

I first met the tracing wheel in 8th grade home ec where the project was
to make a blouse. I had been sewing since elementary school and at
that point was making my own clothing -- taught techniques by my
mother. In class, we were to use the tracing wheel and paper to mark
darts and button hole placement, much as you described. I was used to
using pins and tailor tacks, so used them, thus losing points on my
grade for my blouse -- I didn't have the appropriate "H" marking each
buttonhole, nor the the lines showing where the point of the dart was.
My best friend made a white blouse, and it had "perfect" lines of blue
dots everywhere it was supposed to, marking darts and buttonholes. The
blouse was unwearable and received an A -- because she had followed all
the steps on the checklist. I continued to wear my blouse through
high school, and received a grade a good deal lower than A because I
didn't follow directions.

So, for me, the best use that has been made of my tracing wheel was to
cut and make pretty designs in play dough creations when my girls were
small. I also used it to make perforations when I needed to make
tear-off coupons for something years ago.

--------------020406000305020806060902--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Tracing wheels and home ec teachers
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2008 16:19:28 -0800
X-Message-Number: 7

I took my first sewing class in the 9th grade (1954) as we didn't have such
things in our "state graded school".
There was no structure to our class so we chose to do whatever we wanted.
When I asked the teacher a question she would say "Read the Pattern and do 
what it says!"
She was a weak first year teacher and I don't think she knew how to do the 
things I asked her about.
But in reality that was the best education I could have received. I learned
how to figure things out myself.

And having little confidence in my ability to sew accurately I marked EVERY
seam allowance and detail with my trusty tracing wheel and waxy tracing pa
per!



Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The humble tracing wheel
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2008 19:43:13 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------080007040802000809040508
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1; format flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I owe my love of fabrics to the 8th grade teacher previously mentioned.
She was fresh from college; we were her first class and she was so alive
and innovative. At the start of the year she gave us a list of 25 fabric
samples to get; we had to keep these in a notebook and write a
definition and use. At end of year, 50% of our grade was based on being
able to ID 20 fabrics she gave us and to write a definition. 50% was
based on the dress we made. The equal emphasis on fabrics was to teach
us to experiment in sewing and become familiar with fiber properties.

While all dresses were alike she encouraged latitude and allowed me to
add a peter pan collar so my dress would be different. Took the time to
show me how to make pattern how to attach it. She also was in favor of
the commercial flat sewing construction or factory method which pattern
companies were just starting to adopt although we did learn the
prevailing French methods. So we learned two construction techniques and
the values of each and when it was advisable to use or not use them. One
of the few teachers who make a subject come alive. Wish we had more like
that.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hom Ec
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 08:23:43 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------ _NextPart_000_0019_01C947C4.A34A56D0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset "iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Home ec! In 7th or 8th grade we were to make corduroy jumpers. As we 
laid out the pattern it was obvious that the teacher didn't know about 
nap - a few of us were so enraged that we walked out of class, went 
straight to the office and reported her. She was not teaching there the 
following semester and we 13 yr olds liked to think we brought that 
about!
I don't recall how I made it through the class after that ....or my 
grade :)
jean


------ _NextPart_000_0019_01C947C4.A34A56D0--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hom Ec
From: "Lisa Evans" <kittencat3charter.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 09:53:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

All we were allowed to make in Home Ec was an a-line skirt, which of course
no one was wearing in 1974. One of the girls was given a D because she used
the skirt hemming attachment on her mother's sewing machine, when of course
we were all supposed to be hemming by hand.

It was the most useless class I've ever taken in my life. It made me wish I
were back in wood shop, where at least I learned to drive a nail and use a
jigsaw.

Lisa Evans




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re humble tracing wheel
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 09:11:50 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

Joan K. wrote:
>I owe my love of fabrics to the 8th grade teacher previously mentioned.
>She was fresh from college; we were her first class and she was so alive
>and innovative. At the start of the year she gave us a list of 25 fabric
samples to get; we had to keep these in a notebook and write a
definition and use. At end of year, 50% of our grade was based on being
able to ID 20 fabrics she gave us and to write a definition. 50% was
based on the dress we made. The equal emphasis on fabrics was to teach
us to experiment in sewing and become familiar with fiber properties.
...

Joan, how wonderful to learn of someone like this! You should write a little
essay about this woman for an educational journal or national periodical
like TEACHER and copy it to some website. Someone like this never would--
never could--change with time, so just think of the lives she touched at a
time when educational theory had already begun to dismiss junior high school
as a time for real learning to occur! If she gave the world only you, that
would have been a real blessing.

The course she gave would today be a beginning university course, I suspect.

I know that changed homes, broken families, drugs, and a society where the
mall hopping has become the social life of many children have all
contributed to the generally lowered achievement of American students. But
the absence of teachers who truly, deeply believe in the power of knowledge
to elevate young lives strikes me as even more important. Like you, I had
teachers who were life-changers. I regret to say that when I went to the
prep school level to set up a special academic program, I did not meet many
like them. Any, in fact. Partly, of course, that is because of expanded job
opportunities for women, but partly it is because of a bloated educational
system that does not believe schools CAN teach. A lack of great
expectations. I saw an interview with the new D.C. educational czarina, Dr.
Michelle Yee, and I almost wept in gratitude that someone like her existed,
a person who both understood the value of education in building a life, not
just a fortune, and who had the grit to buck entrenched attitudes. And who
actually seemed to like young people.

If even a few of us on this list taught quilting classes to two or three
middle-high school or high school students, that would be a tremendous
contribution. Not classes that look formal, but that have goals and that are
warm and respectable havens for young people to encounter art and history
and something more challenging than The Gap. When I first tried this, Xenia
generously contributed pages and pages of labeled antique and vintage fabric
swatches to the project. I am still impressed when new girls first open the
now expanded book and see fabrics from the era of Jefferson, Adams, Madison
and Jackson. For many, it is their first experience with real history and
the beginning of their understanding of time. When I tell them about Xenia,
they say things like "Gawww, SHE could make Jane Austen movies!" A learning
experience for all.

Gaye

gaye



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: humble tracing wheel
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 10:58:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------010908000000090205010608
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1; format flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The sad part is that after 8th grade ended, the war ended that summer
and my parents moved us to the burbs. I never saw her again but every
time I bought a pattern [Vogue mostly] I followed her advice: each
pattern should teach you a new construction method and the fabric you
buy for it should be one you have never used before as long as it is
suitable. In a post-WWII era with manufactured fibers beginning to pop
right and left, I left no fiber untouched. And I felt a great loss when
I read her obit in the paper earlier this year; she was in her 80s.
Several times over the years I had tried to get in touch with her by
sending letters to the school system and asking them to forward them.
This never happened due to some policy about outside contacts which I
never quite understood. Telephone calls to all the persons with her
last name in the Cleveland directory resulted in phone slamming hangups
LOL.

It is interesting to note the change in class atmosphere per Jean, Lisa,
Newbie and others' comments how home ec from my day went from fabric and
style to just style. I think part of this was due the invasion of
must-have-these labels started by Carnaby St and Mary Quant and on to
Jordache, the return of Levi, etc. The realization of the ultimate
flight of fabric occurred to me when in the early 70s I asked a fabric
store clerk where the wool section was. Her reply: "What is wool?"



Gaye Ingram wrote:

Joan, how wonderful to learn of someone like this! You should write a little
essay about this woman for an educational journal or national periodical
like TEACHER and copy it to some website. Someone like this never would--
never could--change with time, so just think of the lives she touched at a
time when educational theory had already begun to dismiss junior high school
as a time for real learning to occur! If she gave the world only you, that
would have been a real blessing.

The course she gave would today be a beginning university course, I suspect.


>
>
>

--------------010908000000090205010608--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: In Defense of Home Ec. Teacher!!
From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 14:03:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

--Boundary_(ID_YnzphGqsioq3bhA5zcd9TQ)
Content-type: text/plain; charset iso-8859-1
Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable

As a recently retired Home Economics. (now called Family and Consumer 
Science) Teacher I just can't let the complaints go on without defending 
the other side. I would be the first to admit that there are all kinds 
of Home Ec Teachers, just as there are variations in other disciplines. 
Some do seem to have a rather narrow focus, but often the practices that 
are used in classroom are designed to provide a means for teaching a 
large number of students in a short time. Usually one project is chosen 
to provide a common ground. I always tried to allow for personal 
"design" on the part of the students and also to provide more freedom to 
those who had previous sewing experience. But, keep in mind that Home 
Ec. classrooms have potentially dangerous machines, i.e. sewing 
machines, ranges, and other appliances which are a hazard if improperly 
used. The teacher is responsible for the safety of the students and the 
care of the machines and many classrooms have at least 25 to 30 students 
in each class. I never had a classroom aide to help me so the "eyes in 
the back of my head" were well used!
Cooking classes have similar problems with the added need to stay 
within a department budget and still provide a learning experience in 
the lab. (Sorry, no lobster cooking!) I encouraged my students to 
select their own recipes from a variety preselected by me and meeting 
the above requirements. My students won prizes in cooking competition, 
did lots of community service work and provided good PR for the school 
through nursery school operation and fashion shows.
I still encounter former students when I am out shopping and am always 
delighted with their memories of class they share with me. I sure hope 
none of them dislike me as much as Gaye disliked her Home Ec. teacher. I 
was active in my state Home Economics teacher association in all three 
states in which I taught during my career. Happily, most of the teachers 
I knew were concerned, involved and caring people who provided life long 
learning experiences for their students.
I loved teaching Home Economics! I entered the field because I wanted 
to teach. One of my aunts taught Home Ec and I saw and heard about her 
class experiences as I was growing up. I enjoyed the subject matter as I 
learned to both cook and sew when I was quite young. The field also 
included interior design, child development and family living, 
nutrition, management skills and today, includes entreprenurship and 
career planning in New York State. A subject with that much variety was 
never boring to teach and changed constantly with the invention of new 
appliances and new materials.
Please don't base your feelings about the whole field on one 
experience with one poor teacher. There are thousands of us out there 
who gave our best and loved doing it!!!

Judy Knorr. 

--Boundary_(ID_YnzphGqsioq3bhA5zcd9TQ)--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Home Ec
From: Mary Persyn <Mary.Persynvalpo.edu>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 13:45:20 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

Never took it. It was only required for the girls who were on the
"career" path in my high school (i.e. secretarial path). Those of us on
the "academic" path took Advanced Algebra and Trig instead.

I always thought I missed something not having had home ec. Now I'm not
so sure. . . :-)

Mary just home from a fabulous Midwest Fabric Study Group meeting in
Shipshewana IN.

--
Mary G. Persyn
Associate Dean for Library Services
Valparaiso University School of Law
656 S. Greenwich St.
Valparaiso, IN 46383
(219) 465-7830
FAX (219) 465-7917

Mary .Persynvalpo.edu



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Home Ec
From: "MARIE SARCHIAPONE" <mariesarchiaponeverizon.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 15:02:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Mary,

The funny thing was I was on an academic track too. We did not expect it to
be of much value, but it was. Thanks to my teacher it was loads of fun. We
laughed until we were in pain.

Marie



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Home Ec
From: "Lisa Evans" <kittencat3charter.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 15:39:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

It was required when I was in middle school: one semester of wood shop, one
semester of metal shop, one semester of sewing, and one semester of cooking
and baby care (?). The baby care still bothers me since we were so young,
and the "textbook" was, no lie, a promotional pamphlet from Nestle on the
wonders of formula!

Very, very sad. The only part of the home ec course that was worth anything
was the cooking unit. What a wasted opportunity!

Lisa Evans




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: In Defense of Home Ec. Teacher!!
From: "MARIE SARCHIAPONE" <mariesarchiaponeverizon.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 14:47:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

I enjoyed Home Ec. My sewing machine is a Singer Academic model purchased
from the high school.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Button books for sale
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 14:14:22 -0600
X-Message-Number: 10

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------ _NextPart_000_0049_01C947F5.9F529980
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset "iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

A LLLOOONNNNGGGG time ago someone on this list expressed interest in 
antique buttons.

I have two hard-backed reference books I'd like to sell(making more room 
on my shelves for quilt-related books).

If interested e-mail me at stephaniestephaniewhitson.com with BUTTONS 
in the subject line.

Stephanie Higgins
------ _NextPart_000_0049_01C947F5.9F529980--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: strip cutters
From: "Eileen Trestain" <ejtrestaincomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 13:14:42 -0800
X-Message-Number: 11

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------ _NextPart_000_008C_01C947ED.49CE7C20
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset "iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Nan, I still have one of those brown cutters. It was made by Salem, but 
has no patent numbers on it. It just hangs on my wall collecting dust. 
I have never used it either! I have a vague recollection that it was 
promoted for cutting strips for weaving rag rugs, but could be mistaken.
------ _NextPart_000_008C_01C947ED.49CE7C20--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judy K's home ec class
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 16:23:08 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12

Judy Knorr wrote:

"I loved teaching Home Economics! I entered the field because I wanted to
teach. One of my aunts taught Home Ec and I saw and heard about her class
experiences as I was growing up. I enjoyed the subject matter as I learned
to both cook and sew when I was quite young. The field also included
interior design, child development and family living, nutrition, management
skills and today, includes entrepreneurship and career planning in New York
State. A subject with that much variety was never boring to teach and
changed constantly with the invention of new appliances and new materials."


Judy, I did not mean to tar all home ec teachers with one brush. I knew
there were good ones around, but they were not in our parish. One of our
classmates had transferred from an adjoining "country" parish, and she told
wonderful stories of what her class had done. Poor thing, she kept waiting
for our group to get to the "real class."

Your first sentence above says it all: you loved teaching. And you saw the
real value of the subject you taught. And you knew something to teach. You
loved it so much you wanted to know what others in the field were doing. If
you weren't bored, your students were not bored either. And if they remain
in contact, they valued you for more than you taught them about sewing and
cooking and home design. Lucky folks! I would have loved your class!

I think part of the problem with home ec classes "in my day" was probably
narrow, outmoded curriculum design. I am glad to hear about the New York
curriculum: with a good teacher, such a course would be a joy.

I should add that the woman who taught home ec also taught me freshman
English. Our junior high school English teachers were superior, and most of
us in my group could diagram any sentence they encountered, could write a
competent expository paragraph and essay, and were people who loved reading.
Our teacher was teaching in her minor field and knew less than we. All we
did was those fill-in-the-blank exercises on grammar. If we completed our
work, we were free to read. One day I was editing a short short story I had
written just for fun. Miz R. swooped down the aisle to my desk, snatched the
paper up, and returned triumphantly to her desk. She said "read" meant
"read," not "write." And she kept my paper. The next day students in the
senior class told me she had read my story in their class and asked them if
they thought I could have written such (Bear in mind she had watched me
writing), said she didn't think I was capable of that. Her disapproval
aroused their approval, of course, and I loved that seniors knew who I was
and thought I was a good writer. But can you imagine such a person teaching
ANYTHING?

I had only one other really bad teacher, and she was just not smart and was
uninformed. She "taught at" world history, and you could tell her anything
and she would believe it if you just said, "I read this in a book last week"
or in TIME magazine. Probably in PARADE. One boy in our class was known for
high intelligence and absolute laziness. His "research-based" report on
alligators in our first biology course had been a jewel. Having done no
research, he began rather generally, managing to get alligators in the right
scientific categories. Then he became discursive, moving, it seemed, in the
direction of Indians (native Americans). Soon he was describing how Indian
women would take their garments to the creeks to wash them. He went into
some detail about the washing process. But, he said, alligators often came
out of nowhere and nabbed the hapless souls and killed them either with a
lash of their terrible tails or by chomping down on their necks with their
terrible jaws and teeth. And so, the report ended, that's why Indians are
always dirty. Our science teacher dismissed him from the class.

World history was a different experience, however. There, a large part of
one six-week grade was based on interviewing a veteran of WW II and writing
a report of the interview. L. claimed to have interviewed his uncle, who had
fought in Europe. He told us that his uncle's infantry unit had captured a
canon and the uncle had secured permission to dismantle it down and send it
home. As the war slowly progressed, he slowly dismantled the canon, often
filing off teeny-weeny pieces because that is all that would go through the
mails. He sent all the pieces home to his wife, who faithfully kept them. He
went through the Battle of the Bulge and other terrible battles, but he just
kept toting this canon around and filing it down into tiny pieces. When he
returned home, we were told, it took him a whole year to reassemble it. L.
ended by saying, And today if you go to my uncle's back yard, you will see a
barbecue pit that was originally a Nazi canon.

How we loved the ending! The barbecue detail came out of left field: none of
us had guessed it. We could have guessed a planter maybe, but a barbecue
pit? Genius. We could not forebear laughter. Our teacher sent L to the
office to check her mailbox, and then she read us the riot act about being
unpatriotic and said we should be ashamed of ourselves for laughing at what
showed a commendable love of country. Just imagine, she said, how he worked
tirelessly for an entire year to put all those tiny pieces together! We
could not make the connection and there were those among us who suggested
the improbability of an infantry unit traipsing all over Europe, through
terrible warfare, all the while pulling a German canon. About that time, L.
returned to class and said he had forgot to add one detail: the barbecue pit
had a flagpole with an American flag in it.

In other words, you can't teach what you don't know or care about. But
clearly, you knew that. I have always believed some kind of home economics
course should be given in junior high school. Sounds like the one in NY
state would be great for that.

gaye



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: tracing wheel
From: Mary Waller <mwallervyn.midco.net>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2008 08:35:03 -0600
X-Message-Number: 13

I still use my tracing wheel, if only occasionally. I make copies from
multi-size garment patterns by laying the original pattern on top of a
sheet of newsprint and running the tracing wheel over the lines on the
original pattern. That allows me to use all the sizes without cutting
up the original pattern. And it's fast and easy. You can use rotary
cutting rulers along straight lines. Sometimes I tape the newsprint
copies to poster board, then cut out the pattern piece on the lines.
This really saved time and headache when I helped make 50 lined vests
for the local high school choir.

I also make multiple copies of applique patterns using the same method.
It works best with large-scale patterns. Stack copies of the newsprint
and staple them together.

This would also work to make multiples of paper piecing patterns.

Mary Waller
Vermillion, South Dakota, USA





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Home Ec
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 14:52:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 14

------ _Part_11208_11721927.1226865170429
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline

Same here, Mary. I never took Home Ec. because I was not allowed to do so,
nor could I take Typing. One of the best courses I ever took at UNH was a 1
credit typing course. Little did I know then that I would write as a
professional some day.

Patricia Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com


On Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 2:45 PM, Mary Persyn <Mary.Persynvalpo.edu> wrote:

> Never took it. It was only required for the girls who were on the "career"
> path in my high school (i.e. secretarial path). Those of us on the
> "academic" path took Advanced Algebra and Trig instead.
>
>

------ _Part_11208_11721927.1226865170429--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Home Ec
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 17:37:33 -0600
X-Message-Number: 15


Lisa Evans wrote:
-
It was required when I was in middle school: one semester of wood shop, one
semester of metal shop, one semester of sewing, and one semester of cooking
and baby care (?). The baby care still bothers me since we were so young,
and the "textbook" was, no lie, a promotional pamphlet from Nestle on the
wonders of formula!

Lisa--

Three years ago, I was substituting in area high schools and junior highs. A
Family and Consumer Science (formerly, Home Ec) teacher was having a lot of
health problems, and I spent many days in her classroom. Her Child
Development class was an eye-opener. One boy was in the class because he and
his girlfriend had a baby--and he was a SOPHOMORE. One day, he brought the
baby to class, and most of ther girls were charmed--they all wanted to hold
the baby, and coo over her. I heard that he dropped out of school the
following year.

They had those robot baby dolls in the class, the kind you program. Each kid
was supposed to have the baby for 2 days, and she had to care for it and
treat it like a real baby. The robot would record if you let it cry to long,
or didn't change its diaper.

The kids loved to hold these dolls in class, but once they were programmed,
activated and sent home, they suffered mightily. They couldn't sleep, they
got kicked out of classes for haviung a bawling baby, and they hated all the
hassle. But I don't know if it made much impression on them--I suspect they
have mostly gotten pregnant since then.

Kim





---



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Home Ec
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 19:37:38 -0500
X-Message-Number: 16

Hi Judy -

I understand your desire to tell "the other side of the story", but I
think you are comparing apples to oranges. From what I've read on the
list, including my post, the memories are about the required junior high
home ec class -- 1 semester sewing, 1 semester cooking, -- that we,
being girls, were placed in during the 1940s, 50s and early 60s, usually
in 7th and 8th grades. It sounds to me like you are describing high
school home ec electives of the 1980s, 90s, and 2000s, open only to some
students who can fit them into their schedule during their 10th, 11th
and 12th grade years. I agree that home ec has come a long way since
the years many of us were in Junior High. And that is a very good
thing, and probably helps to explain the need for the more inclusive
name. But the curriculum you describe and taught is not the curriculum
of our 40-50 year old memories. You are dealing with older students
who chose to take your class. We were reliving memories of a class we
were placed in because we were junior high girls. Totally different
situations.

Barb in southeastern PA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Home Ec
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 19:00:21 -0600
X-Message-Number: 17

So. . . I'm thinking I may be the only one on the list who's junior high
home ec class (in the early 1960's) featured a long row of TREADLE sewing
machines lining the wall beneath the tall windows of the old building. Not
an electric machine in sight.

We made a horrible fully lined black v-neck shapeless jumper. And an equally
horrible fully lined wool jacket and straight skirt. They were horrible
because I was and am a decidedly horrible seamstress. But I'm a good hand
quilter, so I don't mind admitting to the garment-construction failures :-).

I am very nostalgic about those treadle machines and wish I owned one. Not
that I'd ever USE it, mind you.

Stephanie Higgins



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Home Ec
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 17:11:52 -0800
X-Message-Number: 18

I also learned to sew on a treadle (at home).
I had to have one and after years of searching found the exact one I wanted
.
And no, I haven't sewn on it although I think it is in working condition.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: strip cutters
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com



And I think mine might have still been in the (opened) package and had some
type of label and info with it too. Maybe I'll find another one in a thrift
store someday. ;>)

Nan

In a message dated 11/16/2008 4:18:56 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
ejtrestaincomcast.net writes:

Nan, I still have one of those brown cutters. It was made by Salem, but has
no patent numbers on it. It just hangs on my wall collecting dust. I have
never used it either! I have a vague recollection that it was promoted for
cutting strips for weaving rag rugs, but could be mistaken.





**************You Rock! One month of free movies delivered by mail from
blockbuster.com
(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212639737x1200784900/aol?redir https://www.blockbuster.com/signup/y/reg/p.26978/r.email_footer)

-------------------------------1226885498--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: . Home Ec
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 20:47:53 -0500
X-Message-Number: 20

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------010801060804070409040905
Content-Type: text/plain; charset ISO-8859-1; format flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Barb -- you bring up a good point about requisite classes. In city
schools only 7th and 8th were required; 9th on up was optional. However,
when we moved to the burblet, 9th grade home ec was required.

While our sewing classes used the latest in electric machines, I
learned to sew on grandmother's 1918 treadle which I used for 17 years,
sewing everything from upholstery to snow suits to fine sheers. Treadles
were remarkable machines with incredibly fine stitches. I can't imagine
sewing classes using treadles unless safety or budget concerns might
have been the reasons.

I am sorry for those who had bad experiences with class projects. Ours
was fun. Our great teacher chose wisely. A Simplicity pattern with cap
sleeves, bust and waist darts, button back and side zipper and gathered
skirt. Fabric was dusty rose chambray. Pattern was selected to teach us
how to put in lap zipper, make buttonholes, set in shoulder pads, gather
evenly and use seam binding as part of the hem. And for me, how to make
and attach a collar. I did have some familiarity with sewing; the summer
before my cousin showed me how to make a broomstick skirt and my
mother's cousin , a furrier and visiting us, showed me how to insert
gussets in a Vogue peasant blouse. So in a way, I slid into 8th grade
sewing.

Barb Garrett wrote:

Hi Judy -

I understand your desire to tell "the other side of the story", but I
think you are comparing apples to oranges. From what I've read on the
list, including my post, the memories are about the required junior high
home ec class -- 1 semester sewing, 1 semester cooking, -- that we,
being girls, were placed in during the 1940s, 50s and early 60s, usually
in 7th and 8th grades. It sounds to me like you are describing high
school home ec electives of the 1980s, 90s, and 2000s, open only to some
students who can fit them into their schedule during their 10th, 11th
and 12th grade years. I agree that home ec has come a long way since
the years many of us were in Junior High. And that is a very good
thing, and probably helps to explain the need for the more inclusive
name. But the curriculum you describe and taught is not the curriculum
of our 40-50 year old memories. You are dealing with older students
who chose to take your class. We were reliving memories of a class we
were placed in because we were junior high girls. Totally different
situations.

--------------010801060804070409040905--


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Home Ec


I had a wonderful teacher who challenged us and let us explore. I made 
bound buttonholes, cooked a capon and plum pudding and had input in 
decorating a small "living room" area. We also had a teacher who taught 
us the basics. Both teachers taught us how to do things from scratch. 
We didn't have the family planing sessions or the programmed dolls, but 
we were taught survival skills.

The classes today in our county, sew more "kits", and cook or bake from 
a box. Many of the schools do not have sewing machines. The classes 
are co-ed. Which isn't a bad thing, but doesn't encourage girls to make 
a dress that needs to be fitted. Where are our future clothing designers 
going to come from.? One of my quilt students did well at Kent State 
because she had the background in sewing (she belonged to a 4 H group). 
She commented that many Freshmen were weeded out because they didn't 
have a basic knowledge of garment construction. My sons are 25 and 27 
and took Home Ec. They made wind socks and a draw string bag. They 
should have been learning how to hem a pair of pants and repair a broken 
zipper as well as bake cookies from scratch. I was very disappointed in 
their home ec teacher. At least I can say that they have both made 
their own quilt when they were in high school.

Brenda Applegate