Subject: Re: Home Ec
From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 22:58:10 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

It's always so interesting to read of others' school sewing
experiences. Over the years that I have been active on internet
sewing/quilting lists, more folks than not have admitted their school
classes have been the most discouraging and disappointing times of
their sewing careers.

However, I enjoyed my junior and senior high school sewing classes.
I took the complete optional high school sewing sequence offered at
my school (as well as the "academic" program - I'm a chemical
engineer). I'm still using, practicing, and improving on many of the
techniques we were taught by our thoroughly organized and
hard-working teacher.

Jennifer Hill
Calgary, AB


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hoorah for the tracing wheel
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 11:39:52 +0000
X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks Mary for the wonderful ideas for multiple size patterns - last
summer I laboured over patterns for ballgowns for a school production,
some very 'interestingly sized' young ladies. Your idea would have
saved me hours. And applique patterns! Brilliant!

Come back, tracing wheel, all is forgiven.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Home Ec
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 06:49:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

So why not use a treadle? I have several treadles (now) and they are all in
working order. Granted I have my two favorites for sewing and, yes,
quilting. Think about it: they require no electricity and thus are energy
efficient and 'green' (although mine are all black with beautiful wood
cabinets or tables) and they provide good exercise while you are sitting and
sewing.

I always wanted a treadle when I was growing up in CA and would have loved
an opportunity to try one in junior high Home Ec - but we had electric
machines. As Barb Garrett described, I had the type of Home Ec class that
was required and for me a waste of time. Not because of the teacher but
because my mother started teaching me to sew and by the time I was in
kindergarten I was 'allowed' to use her Featherweight. I had been making my
own clothes since 3rd grade. In our class we were allowed to choose
whatever pattern and fabric we wanted. My friend and I both chose long
fitted dress patterns. The teacher was busy helping students who needed
help and Beth and I finished well ahead of the rest of the class. We both
wore our dresses on a class outing later in the year and we received A's in
the class so I suppose I have nothing much to complain about. Although, I
opted NOT to take Home Ec in high school because I felt my time was better
spent in college prep classes. Although, if the curriculum had been
something like what Judy Knorr described I might have reconsidered.

As for the cooking portion, I don't remember much except that every recipe
we made in class my Mother quashed for home consumption because of high
sodium levels and fat content (my father's heart required a healthier diet).
I do recall after I was married trying one of the vegetable recipes saved in
a scrapbook - Mom was right the saltiness killed any taste of the
vegetables. Years later when my daughters attended the same junior high
(which was by then 'middle school') Home Ec was entirely optional. Both of
my girls felt they got enough sewing and cooking instruction at home they
opted for wood shop and typing (on an IBM Selectric) instead.

I think it's interesting reading the variety of experiences from Home Ec.
Thanks for sharing.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Treadle sewing machines
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 04:20:39 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 4

BTW, a lady in my quilt guild announced recently that she has a NEW Singer treadle machine available for sale - they still make 'em!!! She is selling it because she has downsized to a condo. But the fascination in our guild was that not all treadle machines are antiques!

Not all people who use them are antiques, either, Greta!!! :) Susan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Treadle sewing machines
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 07:45:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

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The Amish in our area use treadle machines so possibly that is one
outlet for the continuation of Singer treadles.

Stephen Schreurs wrote:

BTW, a lady in my quilt guild announced recently that she has a NEW Singer treadle machine available for sale - they still make 'em!!! She is selling it because she has downsized to a condo. But the fascination in our guild was that not all treadle machines are antiques!

>
>
>

--------------020309050509070407080704--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: treadle machines
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 05:36:52 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 6

I have heard that treadle machnes are also prized in areas of the world where the availability of electricity is not reliable. Also, in a chat with an heirloom sewing hobbyist, she allowed that the stitch line possible with a treadle was better, for fine sewing, than that available on most modern machines. I have no personal knowledge of this. Susan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: treadle machines
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 08:59:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

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Yes, the old Singer treadle makes an incredibly fine stitch. The closest
I've been able to duplicate it is with my Singer 401 slant. However, I
can't speak for later Singer models or other brands. But those treadles
are worth their weight in gold. I literally wore mine out during 17
years of heavy sewing . Only the cabinet was salvageable.

And yes, we forget that electricity is not reliable nor available in
many places. A good point you make.


Stephen Schreurs wrote:

I have heard that treadle machnes are also prized in areas of the world where the availability of electricity is not reliable. Also, in a chat with an heirloom sewing hobbyist, she allowed that the stitch line possible with a treadle was better, for fine sewing, than that available on most modern machines. I have no personal knowledge of this. Susan



--------------040204050800060208010709--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: treadle machines
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 09:11:10 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

I would say that stitch quality would depend upon the treadle machine and
how well it has been maintained, much like electric machines. I do some
heirloom sewing and good control of the machine used is critical whether it
is electric or people powered.

I also live in Amish country and have several neighbors who still use
treadles - many of which have been electrified to run with battery power or
air powered using compressed air which is how many tools are operated.
Compressed air using a gasoline air compressor and a large tank is how our
home had running water when we purchased it from an Amish couple. We used
that system for the first few months we were here until we could get our new
electric system in including an electric well pump.

Moving here and living Amish for a while was a good lesson in how many ways
there are to accomplish the same task.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle
(A CA native living in the heart of Lancaster County)



-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Schreurs [mailto:schreurs_ssyahoo.com]

I have heard that treadle machnes are also prized in areas of the world
where the availability of electricity is not reliable. Also, in a chat with
an heirloom sewing hobbyist, she allowed that the stitch line possible with
a treadle was better, for fine sewing, than that available on most modern
machines. I have no personal knowledge of this. Susan




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Home Ec and treadles
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 08:51:32 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9

I had Home Ec my freshman year in HS (1965-66) and we had one semester ( or
3 marking periods) of Sewing and 1 semester of cooking. My teacher taught
both. I still have recipes in my box from when I was in class. And I do use
some of them. The others I keep for nostalia. How do I know? The Home Ec
recipes are graded! Missed putting the "Tuna" on Tuna Pinwheel
Sandwiches.....

As for sewing. We made a 3 piece suit, jacket with set in sleeves, lining
and buttonholes, skirt fitted with darts and a zipper and a shell, fitted as
well. My greatest lesson that I kept there was properly fitting and setting
in sleeves. Mostly girls in the class, but a few boys as well.

Treadles: we have my husband's grandmother's treadle from the 1930s. It was
burned in a hallway fire in their home in the 1930s and, it being the
Depression, Bill's grandfather filled in the burned areas with plaster of
paris and painted over them with puce colored paint!!! Several years ago, in
the early 1990s, Bill's dad shipped us the machine and Bill restored it
completely. It does run, has most of the original parts that are accessories
and lives in the upstairs little sitting area. Bill remembers sewing his
first sailboat sails on it!

Ah, memories.....well, back to work!

Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadle sewing machines
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 09:28:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

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Lehman's catalog sells brand new treadle machines. I've been tempted, more
than once.

Patricia Cummings

On Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 7:20 AM, Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>wrote:

> BTW, a lady in my quilt guild announced recently that she has a NEW Singer
> treadle machine available for sale - they still make 'em!!!

------ _Part_16259_17693774.1226932122428--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadle sewing machines
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 08:06:03 -0800
X-Message-Number: 11

If I were in the market for a treadle I'd keep looking for a used antique o
ne in good working condition. They do exist. I would expect they would be s
turdier than any new machine.
It took me a year or two to find one but it was worth it.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Patricia Cummings [mailto:quiltersmusegmail.com]
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2008 8:29 AM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] Re: Treadle sewing machines

Lehman's catalog sells brand new treadle machines. I've been tempted, more
than once.

Patricia Cummings

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadle sewing machines
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 16:20:46 +0000
X-Message-Number: 12

Sadly, they don't any more - quoting 'quality issues'. Intrigued, I
went surfing I just found their site, but all they now have on the
sewing machine page is a lonely drive belt!

Sally Ward




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadle sewing machines
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 10:48:57 -0600
X-Message-Number: 13


I believe Bernina still makes treadle machines, for use in Africa. How to
get one here is another question. . .

Kim



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Home Ec
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 08:52:24 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 14

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I went to the School of Home Economics at Cornell University, because it wa
s a modestly priced state school within a fabulous college,and thought it w
ould prepare me for my future career as a teacher.. I should have known whe
n my corduroy jumper flunked Sewing 101 because the nap was in two directio
ns, and when my popovers failed to pop in Food & Nutrition 101, that certai
ns aspects of the coursework were not for me. If only I had paid more atten
tion and taken more courses in textiles A0and design, what a leg up on A0my
antiques business I would have had. But I took all the art and lit and psy
ch courses I was allowed to in the various other colleges at Cornell, and l
ike most of my fellow (actually they were all female, so what's the term to
use?!) college pals, disdained "home ec". (On a droll A0note, I was able t
o quote about vision and perception A0in my book A0Quilts of Illusion refer
ring to my college notebooks I saved all those years later). The year
after A0graduation, the school changed its name and emphases to the Colleg
e of Human Ecology, whose primary A0focus areas A0nowadays are A0everyone's
critical A0concerns. Now the college is predominantly male, and much wonde
rful thought and innovation about community and family and environment A0ha
ve come from subsequent A0classes and faculty. On another droll note, when 
we had a major class reunion, the Johnson Art Museum coincidentally had an 
exhibition of signature/community quilts A0just donated, and the reunion ch
air A0asked me to conduct a walking tour of the show as part of the weekend
's A0featured activites. So, from being pretty much undistinguished as a sc
holar among a class of thousands, and anonymous was this woman throughout m
y four years, I A0became one of four classmates A0 added to the book of col
lege memories by leading a program at reunion. Who would have thought......
! Quilts have been good to me.
 A0
Laura Fisher
--0-491834480-1226940744 :59995--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadle sewing machines
From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 08:56:11 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 15

The "new" treadle sewing machines are made in China and not as well made A0
as the old original Singers. The A0tables are only pressed wood and, IMHO,
 A0the A0decals are gaudy, too. A0 :-)  0A 0AIncidentally, a straight stitc
h on a zigzag machine will never be perfectly straight but is the narrowest
of zigzag stitches, unlike the perfect straight stitch available on a dedi
cated straight-stitch sewing machine, like the older vintage electric and t
readle sewing machines. I have a number of treadles and handcranks and you 
can't beat 'em. They will still be sewing long after the plastic wonders ha
ve been relegated to the landfill.  0A 0AMary Anne


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: CD of Regional Quilt Study Day on 9/20
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>


Friends,

Many of you at AQSG seminar indicated that you would like to buy a CD of 
the quilts we saw on 9/20/08 at the Burlington County Historic Society. 
There are over 500 images of well over 100 quilts

I have mailed or handed out over 100 CD's so far. If you would like one 
please send me a check for $15.00 which will also cover the postage. 

E-mail to me for my mailing address and also send your mailing address. 
I'll have the package ready to drop in the mail as soon as I get your 
check.

Judy Grow
judy.growcomcast.net
------ _NextPart_000_0043_01C948B1.5EBD5F10--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Home Ec
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 09:47:31 -0800
X-Message-Number: 17

I think one of Home Ec's (college) strong points is it teaches you how to b
e resourceful and research and teach yourself to do most anything from both
the Home Ec courses and the general studies you take.
Sure worked for you.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com
 years, I beca
me one of four classmates added to the book of college memories by leading
a program at reunion. Who would have thought......! Quilts have been good 
to me.

Laura Fisher


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: More about the CD
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 13:55:52 -0500

Sorry -- I just reread my last post and it made it seem as though I will 
be making money off the sale of the CDs. Not so!!!!!!!

The money from the CD as well as all our Quilt Study Days enriches the 
treasury of the Mid Atlantic Quilt Study Group, so that when we host the 
AQSG Seminar here in NJ in October of 2011 we will have the funds to 
spend on Seminar related events. 

Support AQSG! 

Buy our CD!

Judy Grow


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: treadle machines
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 13:56:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 19

Hi Greta -- A matter of semantics; I apologize. By fine stitch, I meant
length which was extremely short, way into the high 20s per inch. And
you could switch from sheer to heavy fabric and still get the same
beautiful result without adjusting tension. The closest I could match
that length was with Singer 401 slant although others may have had the
same experience with their particular brand and model.

Speaking of maintenance, those were the days when Singer guy came to
your home to service machine for $3 including new belt and other minor
adjustments although by early 60s cost had risen to $6.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle wrote:

I would say that stitch quality would depend upon the treadle machine and
how well it has been maintained, much like electric machines. I do some
heirloom sewing and good control of the machine used is critical whether it
is electric or people powered.

>
>
>

--------------060900050009080005040901--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Surprise re: UGRR
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 16:01:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 20

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I was just shocked when I tuned into a You Tube video about the Underground
Railroad. The story of the secret quilt code is presented by children, as
photos of quilt blocks flashed by.

I'll be jiggered if one of my antique quilt blocks, in a frame, that I used
to illustrate my articles, wasn't there. It is so distinctive, I AM SURE it
is the same one - the "Wagon Wheel."

This situation just gets pushier and pushier and in our faces every day. Hot
dam! First they lie, then they steal.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v bBvmEoWsJq0

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com

------ _Part_18961_15425952.1226955675390--


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Subject: Re: Surprise re: UGRR
From: Jccullencrewaol.com
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 16:57:01 EST
X-Message-Number: 21


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I noticed that there is a place to make comments. Time to set things right
or send people to correct historical facts?


In a message dated 11/17/2008 4:06:14 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
quiltersmusegmail.com writes:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v bBvmEoWsJq0

**************Get the Moviefone Toolbar. Showtimes, theaters, movie news &
more!(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212774565x1200812037/aol?redir htt
p://toolbar.aol.com/moviefone/download.html?ncid emlcntusdown00000001)

-------------------------------1226959021--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: UGRR's ugly side
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 14:48:51 -0800
X-Message-Number: 22

I followed the link and was shocked to hear them using the voices of children to propagate this myth. I tried to leave a comment but received this message "Adding comments has been disabled for this video." How cowardly is that !
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Surprise re: UGRR
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 18:36:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 23

And another UGRR lesson that references quilts . . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v QjUUdxh6Gw8&feature related


-----Original Message-----
From: Patricia Cummings [mailto:quiltersmusegmail.com]

I was just shocked when I tuned into a You Tube video about the Underground
Railroad. The story of the secret quilt code is presented by children, as
photos of quilt blocks flashed by.

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Surprise re: UGRR
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 18:39:13 -0500
X-Message-Number: 24

And another . . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v KXmPJeDmtSI&feature related


-----Original Message-----
From: Patricia Cummings [mailto:quiltersmusegmail.com]


I was just shocked when I tuned into a You Tube video about the Underground
Railroad. The story of the secret quilt code is presented by children, as
photos of quilt blocks flashed by.

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Surprise re: UGRR
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 15:50:42 -0800
X-Message-Number: 25

This one is about the Undergrond Railroad!
Check the spelling as featured on the video header!


Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle [mailto:maquilterepix.net]
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2008 5:36 PM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] RE: Surprise re: UGRR

And another UGRR lesson that references quilts . . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v 3DQjUUdxh6Gw8&feature 3Drelated
om


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Surprise re: UGRR
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 19:04:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 26

Watch the video and hear/see the reference to quilts used for the UGRR.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Surprise re: UGRR
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 16:11:50 -0800
X-Message-Number: 27

You tube is not a reliable reference for many things.
Any one can put anything out there.
Hopefully few people will pay attention to these poor quality videos.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadle sewing machines
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 19:38:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 28

Brubaker's Sewing Center, in New Holland, PA, used to convert new
electric sewing machines to treadle. I assume they still do -- I was
last there about 2 years ago. They had someone who made wood cabinets
for the conversion also. I believe they had a steady customer base
among the Amish and team Mennonites in the area, but according to 2
Amish women I've spoken with, many of them are using batteries to power
their sewing machines.

Barb in southeastern PA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadle sewing machines
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 19:26:34 -0600
X-Message-Number: 29

Ah, Lehman's. . . I'd forgotten about that wonderful catalog. Thanks for the
reminder!
Stephanie Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Surprise re: UGRR
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 19:40:54 -0600
X-Message-Number: 30

Is it on Wikipedia yet? If not, it's only a matter of time.
Stephanie Higgins



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question on magazines markets for quilt-related articles
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 19:45:29 -0600
X-Message-Number: 31

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Would this august group have any recommendations for a non-quilter 
historian who has discovered a truly gifted quilter from the 19th 
century, has access to some of her quilts, and would like to write an 
article about her for the quilting community? (at my urging)

I mentioned AQSG membership (and a possible paper), Piecework Magazine, 
Quilters' Newsletter. . . but realize I am woefully ignorant of 
newsletters/magazines that would welcome an informal article of a 
historical nature.

My friend is gearing up for a more academic work based on this woman, 
but in the meantime. . . .

Thank you for any suggestions.
Stephanie Higgins
------ _NextPart_000_001B_01C948ED.0B58AE60--


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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Question on magazines markets for quilt-related articles
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 21:11:14 -0500
X-Message-Number: 32

American Patchwork & Quilting has been very receptive to articles of
interest to quilt historians, and the Fons & Porter publication, Love
of Quilting, also supports quilt history.

Xenia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 17, 2008
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltn comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2008 05:30:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Just a thought, even if comments are disabled on a you tube video, you can
still click on the name of the creator/poster of the video and send them a
private message. That would be better than to send a message publicly,
anyway, to discount a children's production. Even if what the kids are
saying/doing isn't right, they are innocent kids whose parent's are probably
looking at this video and sharing it with grandparents.
So the creator, who is probably the teacher, is the person to contact and
call attention to the validity of the information.

Also, if one is seriously looking to buy an older treadle machine, there is
a Quiltropolis group called "Treadleon" and they are all about sewing,
restoring and using (I'm a member) these old "people powered" machines.
Another group is called ISMACS (International Sewing Machine Collector's
Society) and they are the very serious colletors, vs. Treadleon people being
the "users" of antique machines.
On Treadleon, do quilt block exchanges, etc. and rules are strict that only
people powered machines can be used.
I, personally, have owned as many as 35 antique sewing machines but have
whittled it down to a mere 12, due to space issues. I still have three
treadles and love them dearly. My favorite older machine, though, is a hand
cranked 1908 Singer, it uses a vibrating shuttle vs. a bobbin and it sews a
marvelous stitch. I made a reproduction of an early 1900s basket quilt with
that machine and challenged myself to use only the old methods, no rotary
cutters and things like that. I drafted the pattern from seeing a quilt in
a quilt history book and it was one of the most fun projects for me. I used
vintage fabrics and repros to make it. The quilt was pictured in a now out
of print magazine called "Traditional Quiltworks".
By the way, if you decide to take the plunge and buy one of these old
"dears" (custody of them is an honor and you can just touch them and feel
the history that surrounds them and wonder about the years of happy sewing
and wonderful projects) check out e-bay for auctions near you (you don't
want to have to pay to ship these things, believe me) and also Craigslist.
Sometimes your local paper will have them as well, but not as frequently.
Most are priced reasonably, be beware of those who think Grandma's old
Singer is worth about 15K vs. the more reasonable $150.00 that is probably
an average price. Some are worth more than others, just like an old quilt.
Condition, rarity and other things are a factor. I have many books on them,
if anyone would ever want to look at one and contact me, I could give a
value. I'm more of an expert in that area than quilts, which is why I am
here to learn from all of you!

Linda Heminway
New Hampshire



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gees Bend quilts on YouTube
From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt rockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 21:42:44 -0800
X-Message-Number: 2

As a result of looking at the UGRR link to YouTube, I discovered a whole
bunch of links to Gees Bends quilts as well. Here is a very clever one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v XdpOkLdtM50&feature related

Karen in the San Juan Islands




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: UGRR's ugly side
From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbingham att.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 18:27:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

It looks like the only place to leave comments in on the maker's channel
site:

http://www.youtube.com/user/weluvgreenD

Peg



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: treadles & sewing skills
From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilter alltel.net>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2008 09:54:24 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

What is smaller than a treadle machine, but just as "green"? A hand crank
model. Some friends recently began a business in restoring and selling
vintage machines and gave me a tour of the workshop and collection.
Currently their hand crank models are selling well, along with
Featherweights. I was unfamiliar with hand crank machines, but I can see why
they are popular. One reason I traded my treadle in for a FW is because the
sheer size and weight of it made it cumbersome and hard to store, despite
it's beautiful finish and lovely cabinet. But the hand crank machines are
fairly light, take up little space, and operate in a surprisingly smooth
manner. They, too, have some nice cases... rounded and sometimes decorative.
I'm sure the task of guiding fabric under the needle one-handed is an
acquired skill. The most wonderful among their finds, though, is a
late-1800s machine inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Very impressive. They also
have a '60s Bernina and a variety of other early machines. It's just
fascinating to see all of these vintage machines.

Related to the Home Ec. sewing skill experiences: When I worked for a time
as a county agent with the 4-H program, the sewing projects were very strong
and many club members developed remarkable sewing skills. An annual event
called "Dress Revue" was preceded by a judging day during which members
brought their projects for evaluation by qualified judges that included Home
Economists. There was a score sheet and the young stitchers got some very
good feedback and evaluation. The event culminated in a runway show and top
winners were able to advance to compete in state fair. The garments and
sewing skills were downright impressive. And young club members often began
with a simple apron or gathered skirt, eventually advancing to fashionable
and complex projects over their years in 4-H. As many of you know, 4-H
projects were judged against a standard so meeting the standard earned
members a blue ribbon, red, or white rather than there being one first-place
award and many "also rans". But there were some sound skills emphasized in
this fine program. Regards, Nancy Roberts




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Moore Gees Bends links
From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt rockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 21:50:42 -0800
X-Message-Number: 5

If you never got to see this exhibit or hear the women sing, these links
will take you there! Technology is amazing!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v 16lOdYmLSi0&feature related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v wvNLX3xRSDs&feature related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v MpYNsmRtLNE&feature related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v Px1sXvHWWlo&feature related

Karen Alexander




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Gees Bend quilts on YouTube
From: quiltersmuse gmail.com
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2008 09:42:03 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6



Thanks for this link, Karen. Did you notice that the curator of the Chrysler
was comparing Log Cabin quilts to what he referred to as "Housetop" quilts,
saying that both had a center chimney?

Not seeing the quilt, up close and personal, it is hard to say, but the
Housetop quilts do not appear to have the same order of construction as the
quilt we call "Log Cabin." Yes, strips are added from the center, but with
the "Log Cabin" design, they are added in a clockwise manner.

It was great to see the pride of the Black women who had, before now,
considered their quilts "trash." Imagine that, white folks putting trash on
the wall. (a paraphrase of what I heard).

P.S. The singing quilts are fun!

Patricia Cummings


> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v XdpOkLdtM50&feature related
>
> Karen in the San Juan Islands
>
>
>

------ _Part_24421_16002173.1227019323820--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: treadle and UGRR
From: QUILTMOORE aol.com
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2008 10:51:15 EST
X-Message-Number: 7


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The past weekend I had the privilege of helping out at the quilt
documentation portion of the Davenport, FL Quilts and Tea Festival. Davenport is a VERY
small town SW of Orlando, but they put on a lovely small venue to raise money
for the local churches and historical society. Part of the festival included
Civil War re-enactors and vendors. As my fellow quilt appraiser and I were
walking around after lunch there was a young lady in period dress working at
one of the vendor booths. She was using a hand crank Singer to make a purse
out of a vintage curtain. I had never seen a hand crank in actual use before and
it seemed to sew quite well even through the many layers of curtain material
as she attached the purse handle. Quite interesting. My friend then happened
to notice the sewing machine was sitting on top of a vintage Lemoyne Star
quilt which we all started talking about and we encouraged her to bring it over
to the appraisal/documentation area which the young lady later did. It was
an lovely little quilt, although quite worn in some places, and had a number
of wonderful examples of fabrics which the appraiser dated 1850 and earlier.
It was what I would call a "limited" scrap quilt, in which the maker tried to
remain true to a two color pattern but due to lack of enough fabrics,
resorted to similar colors, etc., even adding a couple of odd blocks. Now the
"funny" part. Not only had the vendor purchased the quilt for $2.00 at a Goodwill
after another customer picked it up then put it down commenting it was
ragged, but this young lady had an elaborate, made up story about how the quilt
must have been an UGRR Civil War quilt due to the certain color patches in the
stars pointing to certain other patches, etc., etc. She kept repeating this
story to anyone who would listen, and no matter what we told her, she left
believing her own story.

Nan in FL
www.mooreandmoorequilts.com
**************You Rock! One month of free movies delivered by mail from
blockbuster.com
(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1212639737x1200784900/aol?redir https://www.blockbuster.com/signup/y/reg/p.26978/r.email_footer)

-------------------------------1227023475--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: treadle and UGRR
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilter epix.net>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2008 11:47:20 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

Nan, I believe you have hit the nail directly on the head. (Sorry, I've
been spending too much time working on renovation projects on our 1870
home.)

However unfortunate, the UGRR myth is out there. Ozella told a wonderful
'story' that was taken literally and put into print. In these United
States it was well within her right to tell her story and it was well within
the rights of the authors to write the book. It is unfortunate that the
myth was taken so literally; but consider all of the falsities we've learned
along the way.

Many quilt historians have done, and keep doing, a wonderful job providing
information based on facts that are currently supportable. As historians we
can only inform those we encounter to the best of our ability and within
reason. Just consider the You Tube videos - how awful it would be if
negative comments could be made public about a child's project.

I propose that unless the false information will somehow cause more harm
than good as it is presented (i.e., a monument of Frederick Douglas) that we
adopt a 'live and let live' philosophy about this topic and let it run its
course. I, for one, just don't have the time and energy to correct every
mistake out there - I can hardly keep up with my own. And I truly believe
that just as the truth about George Washington and the cherry tree has
finally been revealed so will the truth about the UGRR and quilts.

Just my two cents.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle


-----Original Message-----
From: QUILTMOORE aol.com [mailto:QUILTMOORE aol.com]

Now the "funny" part. Not only had the vendor purchased the quilt for $2.00
at a Goodwill after another customer picked it up then put it down
commenting it was ragged, but this young lady had an elaborate, made up
story about how the quilt must have been an UGRR Civil War quilt due to the
certain color patches in the stars pointing to certain other patches, etc.,
etc. She kept repeating this story to anyone who would listen, and no matter
what we told her, she left believing her own story.

Nan in FL
www.mooreandmoorequilts.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Forgive the story-NQR but somewhat sewing
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcory mail.clis.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2008 17:44:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

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If this is the second time I've told this on this list, someone email
me....but here goes...speaking of learning sewing-I have a friend who was
born in India. The strict convent school she went to as a girl also taught
sewing and it was a required course. The first sewing project for the
newbies was a pair of underpants (bloomers). The teacher handed out the
pattern and everyone dutifully sewed up a pair. Trouble was, the pattern was
in the teacher's size...far too large for any of the students. Drat! Another
20 new pairs of undies every term! Fast forward, a group of us meet once a
month to sew and talk and we call ourselves 'Late Bloomers' because of that
story.
Cheers from the NC coast where we actually had a snow flurry for about five
minutes today.
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 18, 2008
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltn comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 03:00:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Greata said:
I propose that unless the false information will somehow cause more harm
than good as it is presented (i.e., a monument of Frederick Douglas) that we
adopt a 'live and let live' philosophy about this topic and let it run its
course. I, for one, just don't have the time and energy to correct every
mistake out there - I can hardly keep up with my own. And I truly believe
that just as the truth about George Washington and the cherry tree has
finally been revealed so will the truth about the UGRR and quilts.


One thing I wanted to add to this is that perhaps a few more technically
advanced people who are knowledgable about what quilt historians believe to
be true about the UGRR quilts, or lack thereof might make it a project to
produce their own You Tube video. Considering that so many others have
promoted what historians believe to be a myth using this venue, why not
produce something in the form of a lecture with actual historians, offering
their credentials?
I think it would be a worthwhile project.
Linda Heminway
NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: A mysterious textile in UK
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddy btinternet.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 10:13:16 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 2

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Hello,
 C2 A0
I've posted a short piece C2 A0concerning C2 A0a mystery textile on my P&Q 
Blog, which I hope some American C2 A0List members (or anyone else!) might 
be able to throw some light on.
The link is:
http://shredsandpatches.blogspot.com/
 C2 A0
I'd be most grateful if anyone could let me know if C2 A0they have any thou
ghts on this, or if I can provide any further information which might be he
lpful.
 C2 A0
Thanks
Celia

Celia Eddy
The Brown House
Fleming Place
Maryport
Cumbria CA15 6ES
Tel: 01900 814959
--0-287567775-1227089596 :23900--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: A mysterious textile in UK
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip ncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 06:34:43 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

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Celia -- one remote possibility. If I read your description correctly
regarding the canvas-like quality, in the early 1900s coated fabrics
were popular for floor coverings. They were decorative and could easily
be cleaned. I've seen ads in old magazines; florals were and Persian
motifs seemed to dominate. Just a thought.


I've posted a short piece concerning a mystery textile on my P&Q Blog, which I hope some American List members (or anyone else!) might be able to throw some light on.
The link is:
http://shredsandpatches.blogspot.com/

I'd be most grateful if anyone could let me know if they have any thoughts on this, or if I can provide any further information which might be helpful.




--------------040604070609040101040900--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Simple Request
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmuse gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2008 14:15:09 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

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My request is that those who write to the list make some breaks in their
writings. (paragraphs) I have a lot of difficulty reading what looks like
one very long (almost run on) sentence. Thanks very much for your
consideration.
--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com

------ _Part_26506_528034.1227035709685--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: A mysterious textile in UK
From: textique <textique aol.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 11:41:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Celia;
I agree with Joan's thought. It is a good possibility that it is a turn
of the century interpretation of a floor cloth. It might have been
printed in the factory in quantity and would then have been sealed to be
impervious to water and wear.
They were inexpensive, easy to care for 'rugs' and the border-style
design makes me think of just that. I'm making one right now.

Jan

Joan Kiplinger wrote:
> Celia -- one remote possibility. If I read your description correctly
> regarding the canvas-like quality, in the early 1900s coated fabrics
> were popular for floor coverings. They were decorative and could
> easily be cleaned. I've seen ads in old magazines; florals were and
> Persian motifs seemed to dominate. Just a thought.
>
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Query
From: Gaye Ingram <gingram suddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 13:13:02 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6


If any of you on this list has contact information for Linda Seward and
feels free to share it, I'd appreciate your contacting me privately. She is
the author of "Country Quilts: International Designs to Make and Display"
(1992, Grove Press UK & USA).

Thanks,
Gaye Ingram



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fabric Question for everyone
From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507 yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 18:22:04 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 7

--0-1278790872-1227147724 :91979
Content-Type: text/plain; charset us-ascii


A Local Quilter died after a 4 year struggle with cancer, her quilt guild is getting together and organizing a sale of all her fabric, quilts, etc. I was looking for shirtings, I found a bunch of small bags full of shirting fabrics, 6-7" squares, they are sample fabrics, there is paper on the edges of most of the fabrics, these are old fabrics and that paper has been on there FOREVER, I am wondering how to get the paper off there without damaging the fabric. If worse comes to worse I can cut that part of the fabric off but I would like to use as much as possible. Anyone have any suggestions? I am sure some of you have seen samples like these and this paper is stuck on there REALLY GOOD, I have no ideas. TIA, Jeanne



--0-1278790872-1227147724 :91979--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fabric Question for everyone
From: Kay Sorensen <kay kaysorensen.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 18:40:53 -0800
X-Message-Number: 8

I would definitely advise you to use only the part without the paper glued 
on.
It may seem fine now but in a few years stains may come back to haunt you.


Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kay kaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fabric Question for everyone
From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507 yahoo.com>

So just cut the part with the paper off??? AND WASTE IT????? LOL. I am terrible about saving ALL MY SCRAPS!!!!!!!!!!! Thanks for the tip tho, makes sense. Jeanne

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fabric Question for everyone
From: Kay Sorensen <kay kaysorensen.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 19:37:16 -0800
X-Message-Number: 10

If you don't want to waste it save the parts with the paper back, cut piece
s from them, paste them to a backing a create paper backed quilts you can f
rame.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kay kaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com


-----Original Message-----
From: Jeanne Jabs [mailto:jeanne53507 yahoo.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2008 9:08 PM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] RE: Fabric Question for everyone

So just cut the part with the paper off??? AND WASTE IT????? LOL. I am terr
ible about saving ALL MY SCRAPS!!!!!!!!!!! Thanks for the tip tho, makes se
nse. Jeanne

--- On Wed, 11/19/08, Kay Sorensen <kay kaysorensen.com> wrote:

From: Kay Sorensen <kay kaysorensen.com>
Subject: [qhl] RE: Fabric Question for everyone
To: "Quilt History List" <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com>
Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2008, 8:40 PM

I would definitely advise you to use only the part without the paper glued 
on.
It may seem fine now but in a few years stains may come back to haunt you.


Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kay kaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New book from Japan
From: karenquilt rockisland.com
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 17:19:34 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 11

Dear QHL members,

A big new book full of beautiful glossy photos was just published by
Nippon Vogue of Japan. Nippon Vogue contacted me by email in September
asking for information about TQHF. I sent them some of my articles and
directed them to the TQHF website. I thought they were just publishing an
article about Yvonne Porcella in a special issue of a magazine. However,
it turns out it was a much bigger project than I was fully aware of. I wa
s
astonished when I saw the comp copy yesterday.

Quilts from 27 museums world-wide are covered, plus a chapter each on:
Quilts in Provence; Quilts in Sweden, Quilts in Australia, Quilts in
India, a featured section on Japanese children's costumes, a featured
section on molas, and a featured section on The Museum of Korean
Embroidery.

In addition, they have 4 special featured sections they call Quilt Column
.
These are strategically placed throughout the book. Quilt Column-1,
unfortunately, doesn't give an English sub-title to it. However, it
features photos of 9 quilts &#8230; one of them a Marie Webster quilt
&#8230; plus a kimono made by TQHF Honoree Yvonne Porcella.

Quilt Column-2 is titled The Quilters Hall of Fame. Was I excited?
Naw.....! The TQHF page lists contact info and has a small photo of the M
W
House, a small photo of the Grand Opening ribbon cutting, a box-inset
containing a list of all the Honorees with their induction dates, plus
what I assume is a very brief blurb about each. There is also a lot of
other copy on the page in what looks to be 2-3 different articles about
TQHF or Marie Webster. I&#8217;ll have to get it translated by a friend s
o
that I know exactly what they wrote.

The preceding 6 pages to the TQHF article is about the Indianapolis Museu
m
of Art and features 10 Marie Webster quilts plus a photo of Marie, the
house restoration in progress, a shot of the original grand staircase and
a photo of Marie's signature on the back of one of Marie's quilts that ha
d
appeared in Ladies Home Journal in 1912.

Quilt Column-3 does not have a sub-title in English either but features
photos of 5 quilts from what must be 5 museums that may not be featured i
n
a larger article.

Quilt Column-4 is titled Museum and Gallery. This one features St.
Anthony's Hall in York, England, new home of the collection belonging to
the Quilters' Guild of the British Isles and presents 5 small photos, a
good size quilt photo plus a half a page of copy. It is preceded by a 5
page article about The Bowes Museum in Great Britain.

Each of the sections about the 27 museums that share quilts in the book
also contain a boxed inset street map so that you can find the museum, if
you are visiting the area.

The book is approximately 12 x 9 1/2, softcover with a removable slipcove
r
in a heavier weight paper than the book's already nicely weighted pages
and has excellent color photography. The ISBN number is 978-4-529-04659-6
.
Title is Quilts in the World. I haven't been able to find it on-line yet.
 
I have emailed the publisher and asked for ordering information.

If you are interested in a complete listing of all the museums covered,
contact me personally.

Karen in the San Juans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: shirtings with papers
From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507 yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 05:27:28 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 2

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I will try to take some pics this evening, I am at work now. Some of the fabric has "Sample" stamped on it with ink, others have paper with no wording on it, but not like it was cut from a book because all the edges are pinked. I know they are from sample books because I have seen this before. I bought some at a household auction a few years ago and the family owned Mens Clothing Stores, so I am thinking these all come in some sort of sample book and are somehow glued together with these papers because like I said, all 4 edges are pinked. :) Really cool fabrics tho. I think the idea of framing the papered pieces is good too. I hate wasting fabric. :) can someone give me the link to post photos again PLEASE. thanks, Jeanne


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re:  A mysterious textile in UK
From: "Robins-Morris, Laura A" <lrobins scharp.org>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 08:32:23 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

Celia, et al,

I had quite a laugh this morning and I hope you find it amusing too.
I checked out your blog to see the fabric, and then saw your photo and
was shocked.  Since I've heard you name so often and for so long as an
authority, I always thought you were about 90 years old!  I sort of
pictured Amy Emms and Averil Colby whenever I saw your name.  Heck,
you're YOUNG!  That's nice, because it means you'll be writing for a
long time to come.

We need something more up-close-and-personal with our quilting friends
across the waters, to make people more real. (I have The Quilted Planet,
maybe your photo is there, but it's still on my "to read" pile.)
Anyway, it was a very pleasant surprise.

Laura in Seattle


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 17, 2008
From: "Christine Thresh" <christine winnowing.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 10:46:59 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

I have a treadle (Singer) that is looking for a new home. Write to me
off-list.

Christine Thresh
on an island in the California Delta
http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog
and
http://www.winnowing.com <-- website



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: UNL students magazine on quilts and fabric
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdating jetlink.net>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 11:07:02 -0800
X-Message-Number: 5

I don't know if this has been announced on the list, sorry if it has, I
haven't seen it in digest version

"Students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Journalism and
Mass Communications recently completed the first phase of a year-long depth
report on global quilting traditions. The first product of this depth report
is a 104-page, full-color magazine produced by college news-editorial
students. The magazine is "Fabric as a Narrative: Constructing a Global
Quilting Tradition" and features the writing, photographs and designs of 16
students."

" Research for the project began in spring 2007, when students interviewed
quilters from around the world and investigated the origins of quilting. "

"The highlight of the students' research was an August 2007 trip to the
Festival of Quilts in Birmingham, England"

http://tinyurl.com/6b3y5h  for the article in the Fremont Tribune.  Info for
purchase of the magazine is included at the end of the article.

Thanks  UNL!

Kim



Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com
www.antiquequiltdating.com







----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: shirtings and papers
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 17:33:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Sometimes a warm iron will soften the glue enough for you peel off the
paper.

You also could try soaking the fabric pieces ( try one first) in a plain,
very hot water. Frequently the  early 20th century glues are hide based -
which means they disolve in water. Then I would wet clean with All-Free
detergent to remove any soils or color from the glue.

I get a lot of early 19th c samplers that were framed in the early 1900's in
for treatment. Many of them were glued onto board or cardboard with a kind
of glue made from animal hooves.  The plastic based adhesives are a post
1950 product. Usually all I have to do is sponge on hot water ( if the
embroidery floss is color fast.) You might need to soak the swatches as the
glue is probably spread all over the fabric - not just on the edges - as it
was probably applied with a machine of some kind.

If that does not work, then try acetone ( nail polish remover). I used that
a few times when removing samplers from "frame it yourself" kits form the
1970's which used a plastic based glue as the adhesive. I first tried using
rubbing alcohol - but it did not cut the glue.

Good luck
Newbie Richardson

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: All Free
From: Jean Lester <jeantomlester comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 07:50:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

This was mentioned again and I haven't been able to find it. I did
Google and found "All-Free and Clear". Is this the same thing? I
still haven't found that at a store, but....

Jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: A mysterious textile in UK
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddy btinternet.com>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 14:50:44 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi, Laura,

Well, let's admit it: I'm not as young as I look! Just lucky genes, I guess
. My mum really IS 90 + and still looks pretty good.

Hope you enjoy Quilted Planet when you get round to it. I've also got a rea
ding list as long as my arm, beginning with Florence Montgomery's Textiles 
in America (1650 - 1870), which I hope to get to before Christmas. It's suc
h a busy time between now and then and I've got so much quilting to finish 
as well.

Yes, I agree about the 'more close up and personal' - maybe we should all p
ut our photos on a QHL gallery!

Best wishes
Celia

Celia Eddy
The Brown House
Fleming Place
Maryport
Cumbria CA15 6ES
Tel: 01900 814959

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Subject: Those pesky papers
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcory mail.clis.com>


Re: paper on samples. My Mom scarfed all my little sample books because she
liked to make teensy-tiny square watercolor quilts. She'd soak the glued
samples in water for about an hour and then pop them into the microwave! She
said they curled and popped right off! Remember, she got the samples for
free (don't try this with anything precious) plus my Mom never met a gadget
she didn't like. Why not try it with a couple and see what happens?
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com
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Subject: Williamsburg
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawley comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 11:55:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

If you haven't signed up for the symposium in Wburg in February you
should check it out. The exhibit "Quilted Fashons 1600-1800" at the Abby
Aldrich Rockefeller Museum includes some things that I really want to learn
more about. It includes bed quilts and quilted clothing. Wholecloth quilts
and quilted petticoats with images of the quilting designs are expecially
interesting as well as waistcoats, stays and caps etc.
The timeframe means that we see much earlier pieces than in the typical
quilt exhibit. There is a "Mayflower-type" quilt circa 1600 (very like the
quilt in the Lovely Lane collection said to have been brought to MA in the
1630s) silk with cording. The signage indicates that five or six such
quilts, probably of Mediterranean origin, have been identified. There was
one in Winterthur exhibit.
I was most excited by an English template pieced fragment (quite large
and in pretty good condition) dated 1700-1730. Some of the papers dated
from 1652. It combines figural applique and geometric piecing. I want to
know more!
An embroidered and quilted bedcover from Bengal, c. 1600, has elephants,
hunting scenes, deities, exotic birds in silk thread on cotton, all in pale
yellow. A small quilt (it would fit just the top of the bed) dated
1700-1725 has brown and gold leaves embroidered in silk on cotton and then
quilted with a backstitch, 25 stitches per inch. Two matching pillow covers
are also part of the exhibit.
My other textile encounter in the Hampton Roads area was at the Chrysler
Museum in Norfolk. The three story high entry hall is hung with the Norfolk
Keels, an installaction by DC artist Sam Gilliam, known for draped canvases.
Huge swathes of painted cotton duck festoon the huge space. The fabric has
been manipulated to look like the keels of sailboats seen from below. It a
marvelous combination of the classic (the building) and the modern.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Menswear quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 09:47:18 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 6

--0-1382041644-1227289638 :38006
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Hi all - reading the post about shirting samples A0with labels glued on mad
e me realize I have not yet informed QHL readers that I am curating an exhi
bition for the New England Quilt Museum for 2008 about menswear fabrics mad
e into antique quilts. The title is MASTER PIECES: HABERDASHERY TEXTILES IN
ANTIQUE QUILTS.
 A0
There are distinct categories of quilts for which I am seeking great exampl
es to include in the book that hopefully will coincide with this show: mens
wear wool suiting -- salesmen's samples, swatches, bolt ends, scrap woolens
, etc; uniform cottons and woolens, both civilian and military, including s
oldier's khakis, workmen's twill and denim; shirtings A0including striped s
ilks and mill-engraved cottons; neckties including silks and rayons and kni
ts; intimate haberdashery like long johns underwear, argyle socks, and misc
ellaneous textiles such as silk grosgrain or rayon hatbands, vest backs, li
nings, even cigar ribbons, and military commendation A0ribbons.
 A0
I would love to receive photos of quilts you have or know of that feature a
ny of these materials --  A0but, they have to be great designs as well. The
re are enough suiting swatch quilts to blanket the earth, rectangles sewn t
ogether with or without embroidered, but the great ones-- like the Pennsylv
ania Amish(?) embroidered sheared A0parrots on swatches,and the A0construct
ionsthat convert nearly monchromatic A0suiting swatch strips into something
dazzling -- are what I am looking for.
 A0
We have selected many already for the show, but if a great one surfaces, th
ere will always be room. More importantly, A0the book will give us the oppo
rtunity to include even more examples from this droll category of antique q
uilts.
 A0
I don't think I have any on my website, but I will try to post some so you 
all can see what I am speaking of........
 A0
Laura Fisher
--0-1382041644-1227289638 :38006--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Williamsburg
From: "Kim Baird" <kbaird cableone.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 12:12:19 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

Lucinda--

The exhibit in Williamsburg is actually at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative
Arts Museum. It runs now through February of 2010, so that gives me a good
chance of seeing it--more than a year to get there.

Kim

-----Original Message-----
From: Lucinda Cawley [mailto:lrcawley comcast.net]
Sent: Friday, November 21, 2008 10:56 AM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] Williamsburg

If you haven't signed up for the symposium in Wburg in February you
should check it out. The exhibit "Quilted Fashons 1600-1800" at the Abby
Aldrich Rockefeller Museum includes some things that I really want to learn
more about. It includes bed quilts and quilted clothing. Wholecloth quilts
and quilted petticoats with images of the quilting designs are expecially
interesting as well as waistcoats, stays and caps etc.
The timeframe means that we see much earlier pieces than in the typical
quilt exhibit. There is a "Mayflower-type" quilt circa 1600 (very like the
quilt in the Lovely Lane collection said to have been brought to MA in the
1630s) silk with cording. The signage indicates that five or six such
quilts, probably of Mediterranean origin, have been identified. There was
one in Winterthur exhibit.
I was most excited by an English template pieced fragment (quite large
and in pretty good condition) dated 1700-1730. Some of the papers dated
from 1652. It combines figural applique and geometric piecing. I want to
know more!
An embroidered and quilted bedcover from Bengal, c. 1600, has elephants,
hunting scenes, deities, exotic birds in silk thread on cotton, all in pale
yellow. A small quilt (it would fit just the top of the bed) dated
1700-1725 has brown and gold leaves embroidered in silk on cotton and then
quilted with a backstitch, 25 stitches per inch. Two matching pillow covers
are also part of the exhibit.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilting on the Halves
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_j worldnet.att.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 11:43:59 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

Somewhere in the dark reaches of my forgetful mind I remember the phrase,
quilting on the halves. Does it refer to when someone would give a person
the fabric for two quilts and the quilter would make one for that person and
one to keep? I know I read something like this somewhere but can't find it
in my books. Can anyone help me?

Judy Breneman



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: All Free
From: <parsnips1 verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 14:53:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Hi Jean,
Yes, All-Free and Clear is the product name.

Here is their web page. You can enter your zip code to find a store that
carries it.
http://www.all-laundry.com/detergent-products/index.aspx

Pat Roth
in snowy S. NJ
email to leave-qhl-1814384V lyris.quiltropolis.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilting on the Halves
From: Gaye Ingram <gingram suddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 19:16:58 -0600
X-Message-Number: 10

Judy B. wrote:
> quilting on the halves. Does it refer to when someone would give a person
> the fabric for two quilts and the quilter would make one for that person and
> one to keep?

Judy, it might have regional variations, but where I came from, that is
exactly what it meant.

My mother, a college graduate and highly intelligent, nevertheless feared
that my inventive sister and I would figure how to electrocute ourselves
under an electric blanket and knew with certainty that something would
happen to the natural gas heating in our room and we would be asphyxiated or
blow the house up. The answer was utility quilts for our room. She gave a
lady lots of feedsacks, fabric for backing, and two batts in return for a
quilt. The tops were always simple, the batts always heavy, and the quilting
surprisingly nice, done in fan design. On at least one occasion she had a
pallet made with a whole cloth top made from feedsacks with a older quilt
from her mother-in-law as the batt. I had loved the quilt for its French
knots and learned what happened to it only upon my mother's death.

I knew others who did that sort of thing, but always with scraps from home
sewing or from sacks, never with fine purchased cloth. However, I've been
told by African-American women whose quiltmaking skill was established that
they made quilts by complex patterns and all new fabric on the halves for
women. I've also seen some nice quilts reputed to have been made this way. I
think it depended on the community and the willingness of the quiltmaker.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilting on the Halves
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_j worldnet.att.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 23:12:35 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

I just found it referred to in an article as "on shares" by Cuesta Benberry.
I suppose another way of saying the same thing. I imagine all sorts of
arrangements were made and likely still are on occasion.

Judy Breneman




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: All Free
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 09:38:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Jean et all,
The product is good old All detergent - get it at the grocery store - but
you need the hypo allergenic version which has the word "free" in the title.
Perhaps a larger grocery store than one you have been to? Not all the
grocery chains carry all the various permutations of a brand.
Newbie

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] RE: All Free
From: xenia cord <xenia legacyquilts.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 10:21:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Purex also offers a "free" version - no perfumes and hypoallergenic.
The container is white, in a sea of red, green, and blue containers
with "Spring" and "Fresh Rain" and other scents, bleach, bluing, and
other blechhh.

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Those pesky papers
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 09:36:29 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Pepper -
The microwave - brilliant!


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: qhl digest:Protective mothers NQR
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer hotmail.com>

Gaye wrote: <<<My mother 2C a college graduate and highly intelligent 2C n
evertheless fearedthat my inventive sister and I would figure how to electr
ocute ourselvesunder an electric blanket and knew with certainty that somet
hing wouldhappen to the natural gas heating in our room and we would be asp
hyxiated orblow the house up. The answer was utility quilts for our room. >
>>>
 
My mother was quite the opposite - she acted as if we were indestructible. 
SHe cared for us with total attention and great great love 2C (still does!
) but she let us do things that 2C in hindsight 2C make my blood run cold. 
Parents today would report her to HRS!!
 
WHen I was 7 and my brother was 10 2C we would take the native city busses 
on Okinawa - a foreign land where no one spoke English - anywhere and every
where all over the island. The bus would be full of women and young childre
n with babies strapped to their backs and often a live chicken in their lap
s. Any child past the age of four or so was able to carry a younger babe o
n their back. They were amazing - they could play games much like hopscot
ch 2C or squat in the ditch to relieve themselves and jump right back up as
if all that extra weight didn't exist. That process was simplified by the 
fact that most of the younger chldren ran naked below the waist. But I digr
ess 2C which I do so well. FOr less than a dollar for the both of us 2C we
could ride anywhers on the island 2C swim in the ocean 2C get something to
eat 2C buy a new comic book 2C and get back to the base safe and sound 2C 
after an entire day's adventure. 
 
When I was 11 2C we lived on an enormous lake in FL - you couldn't see acro
ss it. I would don a swimsuit and head out early in the a.m. in a little b
oat with an outboard motor 2C my dog 2C a transistor radio and a sandwich. 
I would be gone all day 2C jumping out of the boat in the middle of the la
ke to swim if I got too hot. I would catch my own bait with bits of bread
 2C then fish for bass. Men would bring their boats up next to mine 2C and
I would sell them the shiners I caught for 50 cents a dozen. I was rich o
n those days. No one worried. I just had to be home by dark.
 
Frightening 2C isn't it? But perhaps it is why I am so gutsy today. Lotsa 
moxie. Must have come from somewhere!Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com"All 
God's Children got the Blues"XM Satellite Radio 2C #74 2C Bluesville
_________________________________________________________________
Windows Live Hotmail now works up to 70% faster.
http://windowslive.com/Explore/Hotmail?ocid 3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_hotmail_acq_fast
er_112008

--_4e7fc5fa-880c-42fc-8550-49d274afa29f_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QHL Copyright
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcw geneseo.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 10:47:47 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

There is a new article about copyright on my web site.

http://www.illinoisquilthistory.com/CopyrightSummary.html

Hope everyone has a wonderful holiday week.

****
Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: QHL Copyright
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharron charter.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 11:21:59 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

Thank you for the information, Susan. It's a good piece of information to
keep in my files.

Best regards,
Sharron Evans................
......in sunny but cold Spring, TX..................cold, a relative term,
55 deg.......................

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QHL Copyright
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip ncweb.com>
A nice summation and very helpful. Thanx for posting.



Susan Wildemuth wrote:

There is a new article about copyright on my web site.
http://www.illinoisquilthistory.com/CopyrightSummary.html


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: All Free
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkip ncweb.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 13:17:21 -0500

Arm & Hammer has also offered dermatologically tested no dye and perfume
free for years. I understand Cheer is now the prevailing detergent for
best results.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: All Free
From: "MARIE SARCHIAPONE" <mariesarchiapone verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 12:20:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10


The label says "free of perfume and clear of dyes" "Recommended #1 by
Dermotologists and Allergists"

The company Unilever makes "all". They are located in Trumbull, Conn and
can by reached by calling 1-800-298-2408.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question on Pictures of Shirtings with paper attached
From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507 yahoo.com>

Ok I have some pics ready to post of the shirtings samples with the paper a
ttached, but I don't know where to post pics. I can post them on my webshot
s but I thought there was somewhere else to post them. Let me know and I wi
ll post them. Thanks, Jeanne





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: norwegian translation
From: palampore aol.com
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 21:00:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 16

?I need a Norwegian translation, please......? God kake vil altidsmake? ----- I am wet cleaning a large kitchen towel for a person and this?is embroidered on it. Below this is a lovely blonde haired woman mixing up a cake.(1910-20 hairstyle)?I am assuming it has to do with baking a good cake. There is another piece of embroidery that has a lovely blonde woman spinning with a cute little kitty watching her. She is dressed in an old fashioned type outfit as opposed to the woman baking the cake. The?quote/saying on that is ----Det er rokken som spinner i stua
Very lovely pieces of embroidery made by a woman who came to the US from Norway?around the turn of the century.
Thanks for your help in advance. No big deal, but I was just curious.
Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC