Subject: quilt dating workshop - Dec 6 --Central California
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 22:01:50 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello All,

I will be lecturing in Southern and Central California in early
December. I will also be doing a workshop on "Dating Old Quilts"
on Saturday, December 6 in Paso Robles on the California Central
Coast.

I received a message that there are still a few openings in the
workshop - and the guild welcomes non-members. Cost is $25.

Participants are invited (but not required) to bring quilts,
tops, blocks, and fabrics made before about 1950. I will eb
bringing some very special quilts.

These work shops are FUN! C'mon -- join us! I'll give you details
if you e-mail me directly: quiltcomplexhughes.net

Julie Silber
quiltcomplexhughes.net



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: norwegian translation
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2008 12:04:53 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I can't help with a translation, but I did just finish reading a
delightful book called "Nothing to Do but Stay: My Pioneer Mother" by Carrie
Young. It's a memoir about Norwegian homesteaders in North Dakota in the
early 20th century. There's even a little bit about quilts.
Cinda on the cold Eastern Shore



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: aword about ALL
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>


Dear List,
My recommendation of the option of using All: Free has nothing to do with
its claims of being hypoallergenic. It comes from the testing done by Dr.
Margaret Ordonez at the University of Rhode Isalnd where she heads the
conservation department.

It is a fluke that this product meets many of the requirements of vintage
and antique cellulosic fibers. It contains both anionic and ionic
surfactants ( which work on different types of soils). Consequently it
rinses out much more easily - very important when laundering something which
may not get wet cleaned again for 50 or 100 years. Although it does contain
optical brightners, they are formulated for man made fibers, not cellulosic
ones (cotton , linen).

Keep your eyes on the ingredient panel - if it changes - and the
manufacturers do that all the time - then don't use it! In the past Cheer
was safe - but they changed the formula about 5 years ago.....Remember Ivory
Liquid for dishes? - 10 years ago the formula was changed, suddenly it was
clear. I called the guys at Proctor and Gamble and they said no way to use
the new formula for wet cleaning! They also told me - at the time - that
Ivory Snow FLAKES was the exact same formula as Orvus - but as Ivory Snow
flakes no longer exist - that is a moot point.

Just remember, the manufactureres of laundry products are developing
formulas for kids jeans, etc - everyday laundry - not for sensitive
historic fibers.

And as Xenia says: "When you feel like wet cleaning a quilt - lie down until
the feeling pases!" But it is nice to know that families can safely clean a
beloved christening dress or table cloth that has come down through the
family.

Newbie Richardson

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: aword about ALL
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>


Newbie -- in an email from Margaret she states that they have not tested
All but have tested and use Cheer as well as some other detergents in
that class. .




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: spoof?
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com>

I do know a Susan Hinzman--she is a friend and helped at the Quilt Flap last
spring.
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: spoof? Yes, sort of...
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2008 12:14:46 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 6

Susan Hinzman probably (innocently) signed up for one of those services, such as Grouply, etc. that offers ways to organize all your email subscriptions.
When you sign up for the service, you provide your email address AND password. Then (without your permission) the "service" uses your email account to send invites to all your friends, groups, or everyone in your address book.
Grouply is just one of many such services.
Hopefully, people are not using the same email and password for any accounts involving financial transactions!
Barbara

--- On Sun, 11/23/08, Pepper Cory wrote: I do know a Susan Hinzman--she is a friend and helped at the Quilt Flap last spring.
Pepper





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Las Colchas de New Mexico
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>


For two years, I have been meaning to put together an article about Colchas.
If anyone has anything to add to the long file, including photos, I would be
most appreciative. Thanks. Enjoy!

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject:
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>
X-Message-Number: 8


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Norwegian textile interpretation
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2008 11:47:10 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9

This comes from a quilter in Norway:

altid smake is really two words. (And alltid is spelled with two l's)

it simply means "Good cake will always taste (well)".

Tha last one is "It is the spinning wheel spinning in the living room",
but "spinner" is a double meaning, it can also mean the sound a happy
cat makes.


Andi in Paducah, KY



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Las Colchas de New Mexico
From: textique <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2008 19:37:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Pat;
I'm not home in the Springs until Dec. and I don't have a copy with me
but the curator at the CS Pioneers Museum,
Katie Davis-Gardner did an article that included a photo of one in
"Colorado History" (I think that's the mag. name).
It is printed by the state historical society. If I remember correctly,
it dated around 1850.

You can contact her at KGardnerspringsgov.com

Jan

Patricia Cummings wrote:
> For two years, I have been meaning to put together an article about Colchas.
> If anyone has anything to add to the long file, including photos, I would be
> most appreciative. Thanks. Enjoy!
>
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Norwegian translation
From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2008 20:15:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

I got this from my friend, Tone.

1. Good cake will always taste good.
2. It is the spinning wheel that turns/spinns in the living room.

It just doesn't quite sound as good in English, but there it is.

Jean



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Pre-printed blue lines inn kit quilts
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 19:37:31 -0800
X-Message-Number: 12

How early are pre-printed blue lines to stamp kit quilts?

I recently purchased a crib quilt that is similar to Marie Webster's
Sunbonnet Lassies, only with the addition of embroidered fencing, appliqud
houses with embroidered smoke plus appliqud trees. I feel like I have seen
this somewhere before but can't for the life of me remember where. The quilt
is tied rather than quilted and I found blue lines indicating placement of
appliqu and fencing. I'll post a photo as soon as I can remember how to do
it.

Karen in the San Juans




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sunbonnet Lassies
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2008 20:33:21 -0800
X-Message-Number: 13

Well, what do you know. After I sent that last email about the Lassies, I
suddenly realized that their hats are made of printed fabrics! I'll post
some close-ups on the e-Board. http://www.quilthistory.com/ Then click on
Quilts under the Gallery tab. How do you get more than one photo to a
Gallery page? Thanks. I also posted another recent find in the last year.
A Ruby McKim The Three Little Pigs. I personally had not seen one with
prairie points before.

Karen

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: norwegian translation
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 06:56:53 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Lynn,

Here's a link to a Norwegian to English translation site.
http://www.translation-guide.com/free_online_translators.php?fromNorwegian&
toEnglish

When I tried it I got "Good cake shall altids make." I tried an online
Norwegian dictionary (http://www.freelang.net/online/norwegian.php?lggb)
for 'altids' and like the translator it comes up with nothing. Perhaps it
was a regional word or I have the spelling incorrect.

Hope this helps!

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle



-----Original Message-----
From: palamporeaol.com [mailto:palamporeaol.com]


?I need a Norwegian translation, please......? God kake vil altidsmake?


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Salt sack or sugar sack doll quilt
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2008 22:40:01 -0800
X-Message-Number: 2

I have just posted a small unquilted doll quilt to the Gallery e-Board. The
back is made of a salt sack. Is the front a salt sack also? Anyone seen one
of these before? I know I have seen some of these characters before, but I
don't remember where. Does anyone recognize or know the pattern designer of
these images?

Thanks, Karen in the San Juans




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: thanks - translation
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 08:35:42 -0500

Thanks for the translation. You were all a big help, as I knew you would be.
Lynn


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

-


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Salt sack or sugar sack doll quilt
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com


I think the front is from a sack also. I write a column called Eye on Ebay
for the Switches and Swatches feedsack newsletter, so I see things similar t
o
this on ebay. I also own a page from a child's book printed on a sack, The
Crooked Man, from the poem, which is still on the whole sack. There is a e-
list
at yahoogroups.com called Feedsack Memories if you would like to join the
list and post your picture there, someone on the list may have more info.

Nan Moore
Moore & Moore Quilts


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: norwegian translation
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 16:32:48 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

I just read the Nothing to Do But Stay as well and loved the account of the
woman who got tired of waiting for her husband to make her a quilting frame.
. . and made her own.And once again I stand amazed at the lives of those
women who settled on the plains.
Stephanie Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: norwegian translation
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 16:26:48 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

Babelfish is a site that helps with translation.
You can enter your phrase and ask for Norwegian to English translation. . .
at least I think Babelfish does Norwegian.
Stephanie Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kindle
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 21:00:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Has anyone had experience with amazon.com's Kindle: Amazon's Wireless Reading Device ? Please share your
opinions.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Kindle
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 18:42:58 -0800
X-Message-Number: 8

I bought one a month ago when Oprah had it on.
I have not been able to read a book (Or at least more than a few pages at a time) since I've had several eye surgeries.
I love my Kindle and was thrilled to be able to read again.
I read a 1000 page book in about a week.
I'm disciplining myself now as I have several quilts to finish for my solo show of 40 quilts in Jan-Mar 2009.
I also travel a bit so it will be great for taking with and on the plane.
But I still have a problem - I can't put a good book down and so I stay up well into the night and then I pay for it the next day.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Salt sack or sugar sack doll quilt
From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 02:13:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Karen,

It may very well be one of the nursery rhyme or story bags that were
popular in the late 1930s. The back of the bag had blocks that could be
sewn into a soft book for the little ones. I can't recall seeing one with
as many blocks as yours, though. The ones I've seen had four.

I'll keep searching for additional info. very interesting bag you have!

Gloria

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: machine quilting man question
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 23:57:09 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

I've been asked if there was a man in the 1920s or 30s who was known for
machine quilting his quilts. Help?

Andi in Paducah, KY


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Salt sack or sugar sack doll quilt
From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 02:09:53 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi Karen,

It looks much like one of the nursery rhyme or story bags that were
popular in the late 1930s. The back of the bag had blocks that could be
sewn into a soft book for the little ones. I can't recall seeing one with
as many blocks as yours, though. The ones I've seen had four.

I'll keep searching for additional info. Very interesting bag you have!


Gloria

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Kindle
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 15:03:54 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

Kindle: Amazon's Wireless Reading Device has been a hot topic on a writers' loop I belong to.
Several bought them right away and every one I know is thrilled with the
quality of what they "see" and also the idea that they can now travel with
dozens of books inside one "cover."

Stephanie Higgins



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Horn of plenty quilts
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 17:14:22 -0500

I am currently exhibiting a rather stunning horn of plenty appliqud
quilt
that I am hoping to at least vaguely date. I don have time to get a
photograph for you all  but I was hoping there was a time when these
were
popular. I know there is a well known pattern from the 30s but this is
not
that  it is a grand and charming appliqu that has a bit of a folky
look to
it. The maker dates are 1861-1943; the printed cottons are the
typical
greens and reds and yellows that span so many decades85

Any thoughts working on these useless tidbits?

Candace Perry

Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center


------_NextPart_000_024E_01C94F21.43786AD0--


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Subject: Re: Horn of plenty quilts
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 16:36:35 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6


Do you see them in Baltimore album quilts? Wondering if this might help to
shape a time frame...... Marcia Kaylakie

Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Kindle: Amazon's Wireless Reading Device
From: "Lisa Evans" <kittencat3charter.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 19:27:20 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

I have a couple of problems with the Kindle: Amazon's Wireless Reading Device ...most notably, I like to read
in the bathtub, so clearly I can't use them for that. ;) Secondly, though,
I really am queasy about the idea of *all* the information in my reader
coming from Amazon. They've all but destroyed independent bookstores in
this country, and as vast as their selection is, I don't like the idea of
anyone deciding what is available for me to read and what is not.

Just my two cents....

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: the passing of martha skelton
From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 21:02:47 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 1

i got a note in my e-mail about 2 weeks ago that martha skelton had passed away on nov. 4th. it came with this link to a very nice article about her:
http://pennysanford.typepad.com/penny_sanford_porcelains_/2007/06/our_famous_quil.html
beautiful quilts, and a book was in the works -- that article was dated june 2007, so i checked it out and found that a book about her was recently published. she has quilts in the american quilter's society's permanent collection as well as the mountain mist quilt collection to name just a few. i ordered her book but in my rush these past weeks i forgot all about it until i went to the post office today and picked up my package. it is a very well done book with several pictures of beautiful quilts. i've only thumbed thru it so far but plan to begin reading it tonite.

i thot i would pass this along in case anyone is aware of her or would like to find out about her.

patti





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Norwegian translation
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 08:40:41 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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charset"iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I wrote to a friend in Norway and it took some time to hear back from
her. Here's her reply. If whoever posted originaly would share photos
she would appreciate seeing them. You can send them to me directly and
I'll send to her.
jeancarltoncomcast.net

--------------------
The expression "God kake vil alltid smake" (altid 3D old fashioned
spelling) means something like "It is always nice to serve a good cake"
- directly - a good cake will always "taste good" (with the connotation
- is always nice to have). It is one of these expressions that are more
like idioms or small proverbs. By the way - It would be really
interesting to see this embroidery, especially since I am about to write
a paper on quilting/ immigration - and it might be interesting to
include needlework if possible.

"Det er rokken som spinner i stuen" is a phrase from an old song -
meaning something like "It is the spinning wheel that spins wool in the
livingroom". I have tried to find the rest of the song, but haven't
succeeded so far (will make more tries though) I have, however, found
out that this is a song that many people think is Norwegian, but the
original text comes from an English text. I'll let you know if i find
it.

--------------

Jean



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Subject: [Fwd: Re: machine quilting man question]
From: areynolds220comcast.net
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 17:32:48 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3


Hi List,

My thank you note to Carolyn Ducey from IQSC in Lincoln wouldn't go
through the lyris filter, but she did, indeed, identify the person in
question: Ernest Haight. Thanks, Carolyn.

Andi

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 25, 2008
From: blackeyedsewsanyahoo.com
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 04:15:44 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 4

--0-652017020-1227701744:81320
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii


I believe Kim asked if anyone had read Frances De Pontes Peebles' The Seamstress or Breena Clarke's Stand the Storm. I requested both on inter-library loan and have just finished them both. The Seamstress is a lengthy historical fiction first novel of 641 pages! and quite a feat for a debut novel. There are many segments that could have been shortened or actually eliminated, but the reader's interest does last until the end. The novel takes place in Brazil during the 1920's/1930's.
Luzia & Emilia are sisters raised by their aunt who wants them to have avocation and teaches them hers, sewing. During that era, there were not many choices. As the story progresses, it is interesting to see how her teach
ings come back to aid them. Luzia, has a crippled arm from a poorly set bre
ak in childhood and is abducted by a group of cangaceiros at 18 I believe,
who force her to trek through the barren scrubland living a nomadic existence. Emilia, eager for the big city world of her fashion magazines, makes
a poor marriage to a wealthy doctor's son & moves to Recife. She is lonely
living in Degas' high society as a country girl with a mother-in-law truly
from hell! Each sister can only follow each other's exploits through the
newspapers as Brazil undergoes a massive political upheaval and each is
haunted by her sister's memory. It is interesting how each finds their own escape in sewing.

When I got Stand the Storm and saw the cover with 'particular quilt blocks'
, I thought uh-oh..however the signals play a veryminor part. Other sign
als include curtains & aprons & how to study whites without their knowing it. Slaves with special skills were last to be sold,so Sewing Annie is determined to teach her two children, Gabriel and Ellen, everything she knew about sewing, weaving, knitting, dyeing & scissors and cloth. At 10, Gabriel is hired out to Georgetown tailor Abraham Pearl & the majority of the novel takes place in DC during the Civil War. It is interesting that the protagonist is a black male during this era; the only other book with a male protagonist during the Civil War era that I've read lately is arch,having spent my teens reading historical fiction of southern heroines. Basically this novel's central theme is freedom from the legacy of slavery. I don't think anyone on the list would
feel any screaming urges to pontificate~enjoy. Yours in Books, Susan Riley
Hingham MA




--0-652017020-1227701744:81320--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kindle: Amazon's Wireless Reading Device
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 08:27:39 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 5

Does a Kindle: Amazon's Wireless Reading Device have (allow) pictures and diagrams? I know they are bringing out a version for students, so I would think so...

Kris


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Kindle: Amazon's Wireless Reading Device
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 08:41:19 -0800
X-Message-Number: 6

The books I have read have photos - not necessarily the clearest.
It does NOT have color.
I know they are working on the next version but I have no idea what that wi
ll have.


Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: not quilts but....
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 12:25:26 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Every year at this time I decide to clean up my "wish list" by buying
all the books I want for myself. This avoids the obvious question "have I
been naughty or nice." Among my recent purchases is "Rag to Rugs: Hooked
and Handsewn Rugs of Pennsylvania" by Trish Herr.
I'm assuming that like me nothing textile is alien to you. This book,
the result of the Heritage Center (Lancaster Co., PA) Museum's Rug Harvest,
is a delight. I had to wrestle it away from John a couple of times so that
I could finish reading. I'm sure I'll find him hunting for rugs the next
time we go antiquing.
The section on Amish-made rugs is especially interesting. The rugs are
so much more whimsical and personal than the classic quilts. The all-time
wackiest textile I've ever seen is included. It's a fabric sculpture table
rug made to simulate (in three dimensions) a dinner setting. I remember
laughing out loud when I saw it at the Schwenkfelder Library.
Happy Thanksgiving.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore but not for long off to PA and NY in the a.m.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Calling pattern sleuths
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 12:24:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

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Hello all-Am trying to track down a pattern called Cracker. It's listed in
Brackman's as #2380 and says that it came from Woman's World in 1931. My
research so far: Woman's World magazine today is not the Woman's World
magazine of the 1930s. Different company, format etc. So searching vintage
magazines. Maybe Cracker came from a patchwork pattern pamphlet Woman's
World issued? If any of you have such a creature in your collection, might
you sniff it out and send me a photocopy or scan?
Here's the interesting sidenote: A Cracker variation has been adopted by
Ocracoke Island, North Carolina as "the native island quilt pattern."
There's even mythology about one of the center strips always being red since
red fabric, much prized, was brought back to the island by sailor husbands.
The Ocracoke version has four strips in the middle section. Here's a link to
the island blog which unfortunately won't take here so cut-n-paste this
http://soundsiderecords.blogspot.com/2008/09/rather-blustery-week.html and
read down to the Quilters' news part where you'll see an ocracoke-style
Cracker quilt. My thought: the term for native Ocracoke islander is Ocracker
and the alliteration was too similar to resist.
Would appreciate any info on Cracker and have a great Thanksgiving-
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: treadles & sewing skills
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 13:47:31 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9

Hand crank machine. I have a huge green and red applique quilt entirely made
by machine. Oral history says it was made with a hand crank. I've always
wished it could talk to me.
Stephanie Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New exhibition in Nebraska
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>

Yesterday I attended a walk-through of the new exhibition at the
International Quilt Study Center & Museum led by the curator of the
chintz exhibit, Carolyn Ducey.

What I want y'all to know is. . . . wow. I stepped into the gallery
where the chintz is on display and my jaw dropped. Amazement and a sense
of being overwhelmed by the history represented, the women "living" in
those incredible creations, and the stunning beauty. If you get even a
whisper of a chance to see the Chintz exhibit and the twenty-one
masterpieces, please do so.

The third gallery is a splendid display of the red and green quilts
inspired by antique beauties and exhibiting the stellar gifts of the
American Quilt Study Group participants. It, too, is jaw-droppingly
gorgeous.

I drove to St. Louis twice this past year from Nebraska to see Quilts in
a Material World. If I lived in St. Louis I'd drive to Nebraska at least
twice to soak in these beauties. It's just beyond words. In fact, I'm
such a sap for old quilts I actually teared up walking through the
gallery thinking about all those women's lives and their enduring legacy
to. . . . me.

Hope you get to see it.

Stephanie Higgins
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Subject: A new book
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 14:09:21 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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charset"iso-8859-1"
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Just got a copy of Aurora, An American Experience in Quilt, Community,
and Craft by Jane Kirkpatrick. Here's my endorsement: "Fascinating and
memorable, Jane Kirkpatrick's Aurora gives voice to the enduring spirit
of our pioneer foremothers and the work of their hands. Anyone
interested in our pioneer heritage will love this book. Quilt lovers and
historians will want to add it to their libraries."

It shares the crafts/quilts, etc. of the Aurora Colony of Oregon and is
endorsed by Sandra Dallas and Mary Bywater Cross among others.

Stephanie Higgins (who must now actually return to the work at hand. . .
. which, sadly, has very little to do with quilts)
------_NextPart_000_00AC_01C94FD0.94097750--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [Fwd: Re: machine quilting man question]
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 13:46:01 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12

Andi, you might be thinking of Ernest Haight of Nebraska. He did machine
quilting. Lots of it and it was beautiful work.
Stephanie Higgins




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Subject: RE: Kindle
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 13:45:05 -0600
X-Message-Number: 13

Amazon flexes its muscle in many ways that sometimes make writers feel like
they are at the mercy of yet another giant in the land. An example is that
Amazon has threatened to carry ONLY POD books that were produced throught
THEIR POD publisher. (those are "publish on demand" books that may be self
published for one reason or another). In other words, the books I recently
put back in print with iUniverse because I got the rights back would NOT be
listed on Amazon. Unfair? You bet.

Kindle: Amazon's Wireless Reading Device is another example. There is also a Sony reader, but the technologies
don't match and of course Amazon only sells the books that can be read on
their machine.

As a writer, I can also tell you that that HUGE "BUY IT USED" option so
blatantly displayed to the right of my "new books" just plain hurts. I don't
think there's anything wrong with used books. I buy many myself. I just wish
Amazon would let a book be out for a few months before they undercut the
writer and take even more of our pitiful royalty away from us by promoting
used book sales so prominently concurrently with a new release.

Amazon gets a piece of used book sales. But the author? Not a penny.

End of whine.
Stephanie Higgins



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sample fabric?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 20:15:27 +0000
X-Message-Number: 14

I have put two pictures on Flickr of some fabric I'm interested in. I
tried the eBoard but apparently it is full at the moment.

The fabric forms one of the borders in an English frame quilt. It is
printed in one colourway, purply-brown, in a series of squares. Each
square has its own narrow stripe border, the squares are not pieced
into the background, it is all printed in one. At approx 8" the
squares are too small to have been intended to be handkerchiefs. In
some places you can see that there must have been what looks like a
printed circle beneath each square, apologies for the photo of that
being rather out of focus.

My question is, has anyone seen a full width of fabric printed like
this, and if so do we know what its purpose might have been? Would
these have been samples of prints? It seems quite a complication to
put all the patterns on one fabric, and in a small print, rather than
just running off a few yards of each and cutting up swatches.

Any information gratefully received.

Sally Ward

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sallytatters/3061250803/sizes/l/in/set-72157610143900569/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sallytatters/3062094744/in/set-72157610143900569/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kindle: Amazon's Wireless Reading Device
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 12:37:13 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 15

I am curious about Kindle , too, and have heard mixed reports. I am looking forward to hearing from you, Cinda, when you get your chance to try it out.

I still love books; having owned almost none as a young person, I am a huge fan of libraries, but also of owning my own books. Kindle , in the end, did not appeal for now, because I enjoy holding an actual book, and I have that choice.

That said, I can see where such a device would be very desirable for some - travelers and vacationers, persons in smaller homes where library shelving is dear; and even people who enjoy the read, know that they won't return to certain books, and just save the paper by reading it on Kindle! But, if it turns out to be especially helpful to persons like Cinda who find long reads for pleasure too tiring, then more power to the people who invested so much effort into its development. I like the idea that people with these challenges might find aids that are easily and commercially available so that they don't need to rely on the clunkiness of expensive and special devices. It isn't very fun to have your choices limited by any kind of problem. To me, it's the obverse of the discovery that what is good for the handicapped - such as curb cuts and ramps being so helpful to parents pushing strollers. If what is marketed to the general public is also useful and
helpful to people with vision limitations, then bring it on!!! Susan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Sample fabric?
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 15:17:02 -0600
X-Message-Number: 16

I don't know, Sally, it looks to me like you may have hit the nail on the
head when you suggested that these may have been intended for hankerchiefs.
It looks to me like they've been cut in half to make them 8". If they were
still in one piece, a 16" square would be just about right for a man's
handkerchief.

Best regards,
Sharron Evans.............................
......in sunny but cool Spring, TX .......................................


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Sample fabric?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 22:24:05 +0000
X-Message-Number: 17


On 26 Nov 2008, at 21:17, Sharron wrote:

> I don't know, Sally, it looks to me like you may have hit the nail
> on the
> head when you suggested that these may have been intended for
> hankerchiefs.


I wasn't very clear, the intact side is 8", so that would have been
the size of the square. I took it to a textile expert who told me
that even ladies hankerchiefs of the time would have been considerably
larger. She was puzzled by it too.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Sample fabric?
From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 13:58:33 -0800
X-Message-Number: 18

Dear Sally and QHL,
Sally wrote:
"My question is, has anyone seen a full width of fabric printed like
this, and if so do we know what its purpose might have been? Would
these have been samples of prints?"
Could these 8" printed squares have been designed to be cut apart and
finished into little mats or perhaps potholders? I have never seen
these printed in the 19th century but I have seen 20th century
pre-printed panels and squares designed for this purpose.

It is such fun to see what turns up on our list. It is one of the
blessings that I give thanks for every year.

Happy Thanksgiving to all,
Julia Zgliniec, Poway, CA where is rained last night - first time since
June.
>



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Subject: Thanks giving
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 17:00:07 -0600
X-Message-Number: 19


This year I've been reminded by her absence how thankful I am to have known
and had the advice and insight of Cuesta B. I cannot count the number of
times I've turned to zip off an e-mail question to her, then realized she is
not at the same e-mail address.

I'm also reminded how grateful I am to Kris, our list mom, for hosting this
forum. I wouldn't even attempt to consider who'd I'd be without it. More
ignorant, that's certain. With many fewer friends with active minds and
shared interests, that's also sure.

As this fall draws to a close, I think what a good job she's done with us.
In the midst of a terribly prolonged and often rancorous election, I can
think of no one who has intruded her or his political opinions into the
saner and surer world of textiles, quilts, and history. And in a time when
one checks the evening news to see if her bank is still open, harmony and
good will count doubly. Kris, you've trained us well.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: New Book on the Aurora Colony
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jworldnet.att.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2008 23:36:20 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Aurora: An American Expereince in Quilt and Craft by Jane Kirkpatrick

I got my copy as well and plan to write a review after the holidays.
Meanwhile if anyone is curious about Aurora I wrote a bit about the Aurora
Colony Museum at
http://www.historyofquilts.com/aurora_colony.html I spent some time there
this summer, the whole story of the community is so fascinating.

Jane Kirkpatrick also has a fictional series on Emma Geisy and the
community. On visiting the museum I found out that Jane does a great deal of
research even for her fiction.
http://usualdays.blogspot.com/2008/09/emma-giesy.html

Judy Breneman



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Subject: Cracker Block
From: "Audrey Cameron" <audreycameronmadasafish.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2008 14:06:20 -0000
X-Message-Number: 2

Dear Pepper,

The "cracker" block was explored (as show in Barbara Brackman's version) in
a copy of"Editor's Choice from Lady's Circle Patchwork Quilts" Winter 1988.
(Wasn't that a grand old magazine!)

In the J. Remmel's The Quilt I.D. Book it also is the same version which is
3 center rectangular blocks with triangle corners to make a square.

I made a cracker quilt in 1930's reproduction fabrics in the 1990's. It's
still a favorite.
Sorry this doesn't bring any new information.

Audrey Cameron in Lincolnshire, England on a dark cold dreary day but at
least not wet - yet.
audreycameronmadasafish.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Cracker Block & movie Crimes of the Heart
From: KJB139aol.com
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2008 11:01:23 EST
X-Message-Number: 3


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Has anyone seen the movie Crimes of the Heart? There is a great quilt on
one of the beds which I was told is a cracker block quilt. Does anyone know
if that is correct?

Kathy B