Subject: Re: Need a name for a quilt was from a Paragon Needlecraft Kit From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sun, 07 Dec 2008 22:11:33 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

> The following email was sent to me and with permission I am asking if anyone > here can help. A pictures is at > http://www.womenfolk.com/Paragon-Needlework-kit.jpg > Judy Ann,

Ask Merikay Waldvogel: she knows everything. At least, she has known everything I've ever asked about quilt kits, pattern publication dates, etc. No joke.

Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: kind of quilt history and funny, too From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net> Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2008 08:40:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Loved the cat photos on Pepper Cory's blog! For more fun photos of pets on quilts, check out the Quilt University site.. www.quiltuniversity.com as they are showing the annual display of student pets helping in the sewing room. You'll see everything from a Golden-doodle to a rag doll cat to a bird. It's a treat. And the quilts are nice, too. Nancy

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Crazy Quilt Border From: "Jennifer Perkins" <qltrstoreharlannet.com> Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2008 15:09:04 

Hi all,

I just was sent a crazy quilt to appraise that is bordered with a fabric I have never seen before, at least not in an antique quilt. It looks like fake fur, and the color changes like ombre fabrics. It has a one-way nap and is light tan to gold in color. Has anyone ever run into this before? The quilts earliest date is 1885 because of Garfield and Blaine/Logan campaign ribbons on it.

Jennifer in Iowa-expecting snow tonight

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Crazy Quilt Border From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2008 16:02:35 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

Hi Jennifer. I just happen to be reading "Vintage Fabrics - Identification & Value Guide" by Judith Scoggin Gridley, Joan Reed Kiplinger & Jessie Gridley McClure and remember a section describing "Plush, Pile" It says "Pile is 1/8" or longer than plush; from the French 'peluche' meaning shaggy. An old fabric dating back to at least sixteenth century .........Also called dogskin in the 1870's-1880's." The photographs show several capes. Maybe that's a clue to your fabric.

Yuk, cold weather. I remember now why I left northeast Kansas as soon as I grew up! Stay warm.

Best regards, Sharron.................. .....in Spring, TX where it's a balmy 69 deg. but we're expecting a norther come Wednesday...........

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Deb Roberts to Give Tour Proceeds to Alliance for American Quilts From: MegMaxCaol.com Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2008 15:06:45 EST X-Message-Number: 5

Dear QHL List: Many of you already know that Deb Roberts has an outstanding reputation for leading quilt tours and cruises to all kinds of wonderful spots around the world. We at the nonprofit Alliance for American Quilts just wanted to share the information that Deb is donating $100 to the AAQ for every person who registers for her "Journey of American Quilt History," a special mid-Atlantic tour beginning March 26. Stops include a special guided tour of the quilt collection at the DAR Museum in Washington, D.C.; several locations in Amish country in Pennsylvania; and a visit to New York City that covers both museum and personal quilt collections. This 13-day tour will be especially appealing to those lovers of quilt history who appreciate rarely seen and historically important American quilts. Since the mission of the nonprofit Alliance is to document, preserve and share the history of quilts and their makers, this generous gesture seems fitting. Not only that, but the magnificant DAR quilt collection was recently documented and posted on the Quilt Index (www.quiltindex.org), which is run in partnership by the Alliance along with Michigan State University Museum and MATRIX: Center for the Humane Letters, Arts and Social Sciences Online. To get a detailed itnerary and more information on the tour, go to Deb's site, www.worldofquiltstravel.com. Thanks again, Deb!

From Meg Cox, vice president, Alliance for American Quilts

**************

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Crazy Quilt Border From: Joan Kiplinger 

You beat me to it, Sharron. Also checked my 1912 Handyman's Dry Goods Glossary and listed is doeskin which is a finer plush, more like a panne. Also to be considered is regular panne which was popular in both fine wool and silk satin. Fabrics listed in this book were in effect at least for a 50 year period.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: cats on quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2008 14:51:34 -

HI all -- you know how some people say in their descriptions on eBay or els= wewhere, "from a smoke-free" home?? Well, II think the same should apply= to cat filled homes, because -- cute as they may look snuggled on quilts,= cat dandercould be fatal to me and others with cat allergies.  Iknow immediatelyif the quilt or rug or textile I am looking at ha= s been in a home with a cat, because once I touch it, I am a goner-- wheezi= ng, swollen red eyes, etc.  Wonder if Obama's daughter has same reaction when she's around a dog?!  It's a shame, because yes they look cute on textiles, but cat dander linger= s, lingers lingers, and if they were in Xenia's home, for example, where sh= e is lying down and not washing quilts!,those of us wth allergieswoul= dn't be able to handle some of those quilts. 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gypsies From: louise-b <vlbequetMCMSYS.COM> Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2008 16:44:48 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

I am a bit late in getting out one of our books, Freewheeling homes, by David Pearson. There are several gypsy vans/wagons in it. There was one featured in Fine Homebuildings annual issue of Homes in the early 90s that had one in it. Still would like to see the stove setup and the size that would work in such a small space.

Also Kaffe Fassett' Caravan of Quilts had a Gypsy wagon on the front that is beautifully and colorfully detailed. These were found in the English New Forest. I made the quilt featured on the cover in miniature - colorful enough but not as much as his!

Louise Bequette - in mid-Missouri

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: A contribution to quilt history - somewhat recent history! From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com> Date: Tue, 9 Dec 

I just posted to my blog about my very traditional quilt I made with a Gran= dmother Connection. When I had my last solo show this quilt was my little sister's favorite eve= n though she didn't know the story behind it. I've included the story for you, along with a puzzle with a Grandmother Con= nection.

Quiltingly, Kay Sorensen

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Any of these in your quilt From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2008 07:50:21 -0500 

More swatch IDs. Part III of the what's in your quilt series is now live. These are 1937 Marshall Field selections from Dumari Textile's Powder Puff muslins and Kaycraft's Day-Lee unglazed chintz which are actually fine muslin prints. Click on images to get actual size.

And for you eagle-eyed readers who catch the cutline typo chick, it is being corrected to chic. Some days the little grey cells take a spelling holiday.

Joan Any Powder Puffs or Day-Lees in Your Quilt http://fabrics.net/joan109.asp

--------------020500050508040805070908--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilters Hall of Fame Triple Anniversary Challenge From: karenquiltrockisland.com Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2008 14:29:57 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

The Quilters Hall of Fame Triple Anniversary Challenge

Challenge Title

They Left Their Mark...Celebrating the Honorees of The Quilters Hall of F= ame

To participate in the TQHF 2009 Quilt Challenge, select one of the Honorees of The Quilters Hall of Fame who has influenced you or your work in some special way and interpret this influence in a new work. Your challenge will be a salute one of our Honorees. The winning quilt will become the property of The Quilters Hall of fame and be accessioned into the Education Collection. The quilt maker will receive a $500 purchase award and the honor of having a quilt in the TQHF collection, which is usually only reserved for Honorees. It is a great opportunity to use your own creative instincts. Go to the link below and scroll to the bottom of that page for a down-loadable copy of the Contest form http://www.quiltershalloffame.net/celebration.html

Karen Alexander

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Crackers everybody! From: KJB139aol.com Date: 

OKAY! Does anyone have a pattern source for this quilt? I'm interested to know what size blocks an what types of fabrics were used down south. Thanks for any help.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: kindle From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2008 11:43:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I had a chance to checkout the kindle. I was impressed but not sold. Like all first generation technology it's very expensive ($359.00 on amazon). Remember when digital cameras cost $700? I wish there were a couple of larger font print choices available. The New Yorker and Newsweek are not among the periodicals available (if I could get the New Yorker in large print I would have jumped on it). Cinda

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cool, New Interactive Resource at Quilt Index Site From: MegMaxCaol.com Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2008 10:57:24 EST 

Dear QHL list: Most of you are familiar with the Quilt Index, the nation's largest online showcase for vintage and significant quilts, and many probably know it's currently undergoing a major expansion. The Index now boasts more than 18,000 quilts and quilt-related documents, free to anyone who wants to browse and study them. But the next phase of expansion includes adding features that allow quilt historians and others to supplement the database with their own knowledge. Now the Quilt Index has launched a new tool called a "wiki," which works like the popular online encycopedia Wikipedia. The wiki is in a pilot program, introduced with three quilt-history areas: documentation projects, museums and oral histories. In each area, the listings are arranged alphabetically and geographically. For example, under Documentation Projects, there are already listings for more than 50 state documentation projects in the U.S. (there are multiples for some states). Within each documentation project, you'll find the number of quilts documented, when the project was finished (if it's done), an institution to contact for further details, and a listing of any publications related to that project. This will be an incredible boon to those researching quilts, whether scholars, appraisers, collectors or quiltmakers, and much more is planned for the future. In the case of documentation projects, as well as quilt museums and oral histories, the Quilt Index staff recognizes that knowledge is widely scattered among a great many people and that this resource will become much deeper and richer with wide participation among interested individuals. Each page on the wiki has been initially posted with information from the Index staff and from books and other sources they deem trustworthy. Anybody at all can go to the wiki and browse, but in order to add or edit the information, users must create an account (there's no cost) with a user name and password. The Index will maintain an editorial eye on this resource, monitoring the quality of added content and edits. The link to the wiki is www.quiltindex.org/wiki/. The Quilt Index has been developed and is operated by the nonprofit partners Alliance for American Quilts, Michigan State University Museum and MATRIX - The Center for Humane Arts, Letters and Social Sciences at MSU. We hope that users of this list will help build and grow this new resource, and give us feedback along the way. Enjoy! Meg Cox, vice president, Alliance for American Quilts

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gypsy textiles From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2008 22:52:01 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

I have received the following from the V&A, from the desk of the curator who is organising the 2010 exhibition. Her email restricts me from passing on the image she sent, and in any case the picture quality and detail is not good. It appears to be a quilt made up of images of gypsy life in blocks laid out looking rather like a deck of cards laid out in a diamond pattern, but I can't make out whether it is embroidery or applique. It will apparently be in the exhibition, so we will see it then and hopefully in detail in the accompanying book.

The information is not very exciting either. The lack of information on gypsy quilts can't be taken to mean they didn't exist, for reasons already discussed, but disappointingly we don't yet have anything showing that they 'did' exist either. If I hear more from the Prints and Drawings department I will let you know. I'll also contact Beamish and St Fagan's.

Sally Ward

<Dear Sally,

Thank you for your email, which my colleagues in Textiles and Fashion have forwarded to me to respond to. You may also have a separate response from our Prints and Drawings department, who will probably be best placed to recommend any images in our collection.

In terms of our quilt and patchwork collection, we do not have any with a known provenance relating to Romany culture, but it may be worth sending a quick email to museums such as Beamish or St Fagan's. Both of these have excellent quilt and patchwork collections, and are very strong on social and regional history, particularly in relation to the early twentieth century. They may be able to identify objects in their collections that may be of interest, or recommend relevant resources.

We do have one coverlet in the collection with a panel that may be of interest. The quilt was created in around 1875, and has several embroidered scenes relating to a love story. I have attached an image for reference. Please note that this image is for research purposes only and should not be reproduced.

We think that the scenes shown in the centre may have been taken from contemporary print sources, or possibly a children's game. Although the quilt does not relate directly to your research, I thought you might be interested in the panel at the bottom which is entitled 'Zingari' (an archaic term meaning 'gypsy'). We do not have a named maker for this object, but according to the donor, she believed that it was made by an ancestor while at sea.

I'm afraid that the quilt itself is currently in Conservation in preparation for our exciting Quilts Exhibition in 2010, but if you would like any further information on it or any of the other quilts in our collection then please do get in touch.

With all good wishes,

Claire Smith

Research Assistant (Quilts Exhibition 2010) Victoria & Albert Museum>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Gypsy textiles From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2008 22:02:43 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

I think this quilt is on the web page: http://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/future_exhibs/Quilts/index.html

Kim

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Gypsy textiles From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2008 08:55:58 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

Haha! Well done Kim. So much for her stern warning to me <G>. The picture she sent me is barely better quality than that one, so not a lot of use for 'research' anyway <G>

Sally Ward

On 13 Dec 2008, at 04:02, Kim Baird wrote:

> I think this quilt is on the web page:

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: An interesting auction From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2008 11:27:36 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

--Apple-Mail-1--395130169 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed; delsp=yes Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

At Christies in the UK. Remains of the collection of Roger Warner, under the hammer at Christies. Lots of different textiles. Three quilts, nothing world-shattering. Some curiosities ('felt pictures') and a few pieces of chintz and other textiles.

For those of you who came to see the Cora Ginsburg chintz at Temple Newsam near York some years ago, Roger Warner was the donor who gave the textile samples in the drawers in the side room.

Happy browsing.

http://tinyurl.com/66jau8

Sally Ward --Apple-Mail-1--395130169--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gypsy textiles From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2008 06:23:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------040903040403050908050609 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Kim and Sally -- thanx for research. I copied quilt to scanner and enlarged to some extent; it appears many of the images could be gypsy motifs -- a few hats which appear to be Indian wraps, some colorful fancy short jackets, what appears to be a horse. However, original photo is so out of focus that difficult to get any quality enlargment.

I've also given some thought to the fact that given gypsy origins and that during their wanderings the desire to integrate in gorigio communities was a worldwide practice. Therefore, in this case, the needlework they picked up would that be learned from the heritage of those many countries -- Persian, Hungarian, Greece, you name it -- and not necessarily reflect gypsy art per se . Perhaps their work is not "lost" but rather housed in national museums as part of a country's legacy rather than gypsy legacy. Just a though on a chilly morning threatening snow.

Kim Baird wrote:

I think this quilt is on the web page: http://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/future_exhibs/Quilts/index.html

> > > >

--------------040903040403050908050609--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The "MOM" or "WOW" quilt From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2008 10:01:56 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

In 2006, there was some discussion on this list about an Ebay quilt with the letters "MOM" or "WOW" in red appliqued letters. If the buyer of the quilt lives in QHL land, please contact me privately. I might have some additional information for you. Thanks, Sue Reich -- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: The "MOM" or "WOW" quilt From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2008 12:13:45 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Now I ask you, is this kind? Is this nice?

You are leaving the rest of us hanging! We are hungry for information, too!

Share please!

Kim

-----Original Message----- From: suereichcharter.net [mailto:suereichcharter.net] Sent: Saturday, December 13, 2008 12:02 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] The "MOM" or "WOW" quilt

In 2006, there was some discussion on this list about an Ebay quilt with the letters "MOM" or "WOW" in red appliqued letters. If the buyer of the quilt lives in QHL land, please contact me privately. I might have some additional information for you. Thanks, Sue Reich -- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: kbairdcableone.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1650237Ylyris.quiltropolis.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "WOW" or "MOM" From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2008 15:44:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Kim, You are right. It was unfair of me to leave you all hanging. Sorry about that.

I am researching for a book on WWII quilts with a deadline in the Spring of 2009. The newspapers from 1942 to 1945 have article after article about Women Ordinance Workers also known as WOWs. I had hoped the buyer of that quilt would be on QHL and could take a really close look at the red fabric for me.

I am so grateful for the opportunity to write about the quilts made between 1941 and 1945, the WWII years. I hope to make this as comprehensive as possible. The generosity of the people on this list has always been amazing. If any of you have a quilt or ephemera that you would like to share, I would be most grateful.

The WWII quilts in my collection are currently on exhibit at The Grout Museum in Waterloo, Iowa until April 30. There are 38 on display with ephemera! Here is the link. http://www.groutmuseumdistrict.org/ The Museum is also planning a big quilt event for the end of January. Sue Reich, from Connecticut, where it's beginning to look a lot like Christmas.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "WOW" or "MOM" From: Jccullencrewaol.com Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2008 22:10:25 EST X-Message-Number: 7

-------------------------------1229224225 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 12/13/2008 3:45:06 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, suereichcharter.net writes:

about Women Ordinance Workers also known as WOWs. Would you be referring to the gals who worked in the factories making airplane parts or only ammunition? My mother helped make planes (Rosie the Riverter so to speak) and I was just curious.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: thanks for EXCEL help! From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2008 23:21:43 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

As always, I got some great help with my request for assistance with an EXCEL issue. QHL Rules! You all are the greatest!

Julie Silber

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: WOW quilt r US! From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2008 23:19:35 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

Julie Silber Hi Sue,

Julie Silber here. My partner and I own the "WOW" quilt. Since people have asked, please give information here on QHL.

I also have some information on it -- and if you don't cover what I know, I will add.

Xenia knows quite a bit about this too, I think.

Meanwhile, I will see if I have photos of it to add to the eBoard.

Thanks,

Julie Silber quiltcomplexhughes.net

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The WOW quilt From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2008 5:15:28 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Please share. Thanks, sue -- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "Stand the Storm", a novel by Breena Clarke From: Jackie Joy <joysbeesyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2008 14:54:53 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

--0-220817797-1229295293=:19927 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I was drawn to this book at the library by the quilt blocks on the cover.=  Published July, 2008. It's an interesting story about African Americ= ans in Georgetown during the 19th century. I'm not a literary critic, bu= t I liked it and would recommend it.  However, on p. 58, I came across the following: ". . .Annie rose to get = her talking quilt from a place beneath the floorboards. She folded the q= uilt just so and set it over the sill of the window facing out back of the = shop. It was the Log Cabin pattern with black in the middle. He would= know the signal. If he had run and if he had helped others, he would kn= ow what the quilt meant to say."  Will it never end? Oh, and on p. 155, a bride and groom are presented wi= th a Double Wedding Ring quilt, made presumably c. 1830. I did send a me= ssage to the author and recommend that she do more research on the history = of the American quilt.  Jackie Joy

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: look at a Marion Cheever quilt on ebay From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 08:39:01 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

--0-2004983280-1229359141=:88649 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

here

I can't afford the price it will command, but someone on this list might....arden

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

--0-2004983280-1229359141=:88649--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt fabric, travel to Florida From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 09:20:07 -

Hi, everyone -

Does anyone know if the on-line division of Quilts by the Bay (Galveston, T= X) is actually up and running??? I know the store got closed by Hurrican= e Ike, and that website states that. But, I was able to actually place a= n order for a fabric through the on-line site; it was acknowledged, but = hasn't arrived, and phone # doesn't work. Sigh. I'm concerned that th= e order confirmation was an automatically generated one, with no one actual= ly "home" to fill it. Seemed like a great idea at the time, as they list= ed a special fabric as in stock.

Also, my DH and I will be driving to Florida (Orlando) - he and a couple= of friends will attempt the "Goofy" - a 1/2 marathon on Saturday, Jan 13, = and a whole marathon on Sunday, the 14th. (I think those dates are right= .) Any great shops or exhibits that might be pretty much local to that a= rea or to I95? He'll be pretty much lame on Monday, but might be conv= inced to indulge me in a little fabric bliss.

Yes, yes, I know. They don't call it the Goofy for nothing. Love h= im anyway!!! Susan

--0-1400709186-1229361607=:14844--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: look at a Marion Cheever quilt on ebay From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 09:20:47 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

--0-935016320-1229361647=:8136 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

I would love to see it. What is the number?

Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> wrote: here

I can't afford the price it will command, but someone on this list might....arden

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: donna.stickovichyahoo.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1820784Dlyris.quiltropolis.com

--0-935016320-1229361647=:8136--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "Stand the Storm", a novel by Breena Clarke From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 12:28:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I gave up on Stand the Storm when the talking quilt was mentioned. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ***SPAM*** quilt fabric, travel to Florida From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 12:18:16 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

I am not the person to do this, but it seems to me that there is room in the marketplace for a web site that is "the place" to go when a quilter/quilt historian/etc. is traveling and wants to know about exhibits/museums with good textile collections, etc. at their destination.

We ask each other, and that's great. . . but for each one of us on the QHL who thinks to ask, there are probably dozens who don't ask and don't know but WOULD go. If they knew.\

So there's my idea. . . . and I hope someone takes it up. Of it if "has been done" please clue me in so I can get in the habit of checking it before I leave for travels.

Thanks. Stephanie Higgins

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: quilt fabric, travel to Florida From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 13:13:49 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi Susan! I don't know for sure about Quilts by the Bay but I've received emails from them recently. The phone number from the most recent email is 409-740-9296. It's hard to believe the destruction they've been through and many buildings and homes still haven't been rebuilt. They have a long road ahead of them.

Hope you get your shipment soon.

Best regards, Sharron....................... .......in Spring, TX where we woke to 60 deg. weather and now (noon-time) it's 40 deg..........................

-----Original Message----- From: Stephen Schreurs [mailto:schreurs_ssyahoo.com] Sent: Monday, December 15, 2008 11:20 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] quilt fabric, travel to Florida

Hi, everyone -

Does anyone know if the on-line division of Quilts by the Bay (Galveston, TX) is actually up and running??? I know the store got closed by Hurricane Ike, and that website states that. But, I was able to actually place an order for a fabric through the on-line site; it was acknowledged, but hasn't arrived, and phone # doesn't work. Sigh. I'm concerned that the order confirmation was an automatically generated one, with no one actually "home" to fill it. Seemed like a great idea at the time, as they listed a special fabric as in stock.

Also, my DH and I will be driving to Florida (Orlando) - he and a couple of friends will attempt the "Goofy" - a 1/2 marathon on Saturday, Jan 13, and a whole marathon on Sunday, the 14th. (I think those dates are right.) Any great shops or exhibits that might be pretty much local to that area or to I95? He'll be pretty much lame on Monday, but might be convinced to indulge me in a little fabric bliss.

Yes, yes, I know. They don't call it the Goofy for nothing. Love him anyway!!! Susan

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: quiltnsharroncharter.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1812780Flyris.quiltropolis.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Massachusetts quilt book From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 14:21:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Dear All,

I want to let you know that I have an advance copy of _Massachusetts Quilts: Our Common Wealth_ in my hot little hands, and it's beautiful! Hardbound, 336 pages, over 200 color photographs, and lots of great essays--a bargain at $60. The book will be generally available in about three weeks.

Put in your order today at the MassQuilts website: www.massquilts.org.

With my best wishes for the holidays, Lynne

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Massachusetts quilt book From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 12:47:18 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 8

Wow - it's $37.80 on Amazon (http://tinyurl.com/5hxlrp), quite a savings but still an expense - can you tell us a little more about it?

Kris

--- On Mon, 12/15/08, Lynne Z. Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> wrote:

> I want to let you know that I have an advance copy of _Massachusetts Quilts: Our Common Wealth_ in my hot little hands, and it's beautiful! Hardbound, 336 pages, over 200 color photographs, and lots of great essays--a bargain at $60. The book will be generally available in about three weeks.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: interesting museum (non quilt) From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 15:56:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I just returned from a tour of a spectacular new museum -- which has free admission by the way. It's the Chemical Heritage Museum on Chestnut Street in Philadelphia, basically in the historic area. What is very cool, in addition to the wonderful information about the history of science, is the fact that the curators included an exhibit on the history of dyes. It's only one small part but it is really super. I learned what Perkin's mauve is, which is important to my Berlin work studies! I rarely get this excited about museums anymore...I am a tad jaded and I don't like museums that must address vast audiences -- meaning everything is written on a 6th grade level (this is personal issue with me but a necessity for museums, I know). This museum targets high school and up (it is not a bells and whistles science center) and is written appropriately. It is also a traditional museum that incorporates one very extraordinary piece of technology. You have to see it. It's presently only open weekdays. If you are in Philly, do a science tour -- this museum, the American Philosophical Society, the Mutter Museum, and Bartram's garden -- these are amazing gems in the history of science, and in a small way, science (at least chemical dyes and synthetic fabrics!) affected quilting. I'm really proud of Philadelphia. Places like the Chemical Heritage Foundation remind me of that. Candace Perry A proud Pennsylvanian since 1962!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: looking at BAQs From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 16:14:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Polly Mello's advice re. Baltimore Album quilts is "You have to see them when they're out" so I went to the Baltimore Museum of Art on Saturday and saw "Baltimore Album Quilts Revisited: A Matter of Style," a small but wonderful exhibit in the textile gallery. A selection of 8 of the 21 squares donated to the museum by the granddaughter of Mary S. Slater is used to focus on different techniques. The blocks are virtually pristine and are hung (framed) at eye level so that you can get up really close. The first block highlights the use of inked details with outline and shading on white and yellow roses in a woven basket inside an open wreath. A block with poinsettias and tulips in a simple cornucopia has chintz appliqué (a butterfly and a phoenix). Other blocks show stuffed flowers, reverse appliqué and layered appliqué. The exquisite purple ombre eagle which was in the last big BAQ show is also in the lineup. There are only four quilts, but they are breathtaking. The Captain Russell quilt and the Samuel Williams quilt can both be seen in Dena Katzenberg's "Baltimore Album Quilts." The Samuel Russell quilt has the very best border ever, a triple floral vine, and the Captain Russell has a huge eagle in the center surrounded by 12 classic Designer 1 blocks. The Album crib quilt has 20 heavily stuffed six inch blocks (2 wreaths of birds, single flowers and birds). The border is stuffed swags and roses. It was probably made a member of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. It is very like quilts with proven Jewish provenance (see Ronda McAllen's article in Uncoverings 2006). It's always exciting to see a new Album quilt. Last year the Museum received the James W. Harvey quilt made by the "Ladies of Prince George's County and quilted by his sisters." Once you get outside of Baltimore City the quilts tend to take on a less formal, more folky look. This quilt has none of the high style Baltimore blocks but it's a delightful collection of 42 twelve inch blocks exhibiting various levels of design and execution skills. May favorite block, of which there are two, had eight diamonds radiating from a center circle, each tipped with an appliquéd star. The border is a simple tulip and vine. I think that there will be a different rotation after the first of the year. Polly, please let us know. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gypsy textiles - nothing to report From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 21:08:40 +0000 X-Message-Number: 11

I got this today from the Curator of Textiles at Beamish museum, and will continue to follow the trail.

<<Your enquiry has been passed on to me by Simon Woolley. Regarding quilts made by gypsies, we do not have any quilts in our collections which are specifically made by gypsies, however it would not surprise me that they were excellent needlewomen. Quilts were made by many working folk, some being basically utilitarian and others works of art! The interiors of the gypsy wagons were very ornate and full of expensive pottery and other such items. It might be useful for you to contact the Worcestershire County Museum at Hartlebury Castle as they had quite a collection of wagons and may have the textiles to go with them. I'm sorry not to be much more help, so best of luck with you researches.>>

Sally Ward

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt fabric, travel to Florida From: "Sarah Hough" <dougandsarah1gmail.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 15:20:44 

A good site for info on quilting in Florida is www.ssqa.org, the Sunshine State Quilters Association.

Sarah

------=_Part_6243_7572459.1229376044353--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Massachusetts quilt book From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 17:53:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

_Massachusetts Quilts: Our Common Wealth_ is broken up into three sections: I: "History," which looks at early silk, wool, and cotton quilts (including the earliest documented patchwork in America--c. 1740s), then quilts representing regions across Massachusetts, then quilts representing Massachusetts cotton mills; II: "Community" looks at cooperative quilting in Massachusetts, quilts made by different immigrant groups, quilts from the towns inundated by the Quabbin Reservoir, family quilts, anti-slavery quilts, agricultural fairs and quilts, and quilts in war time; III: "Memory" examines friendship quilts and the colonial revival.

All of the quilts (there are about 112, if I remember correctly) date pre-1950.

Here are a couple of reviews: "A wonderful medley of quilt history and New England history. Situating each object in its own time and place, the authors ahve documented both the ubiquity and the vairety of Massachusetts quilting--from the sheen of eighteenth-century 'whole-cloth' quilts to the geometric virtuosity of the early nineteenth century and the imaginative story-telling of the colonial revival. Like the quilts it celebrates, this book shows the power of cooperative labor." - Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Pulitzer-Prize winning author of A Midwife's Tale

"A spectacular 'Flower Garden' of Massachusetts textile history, regional folklore,and family genealogy researched and written by a ground-breaking group of scholars, curators, and quilt makers." - Peter Benes, Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife

"Solidly grounded in impeccable scholarship, yet written in an accessible and engaging style, the authors skillfully use quilts to provide another lends into the history of Massachusetts. ...It is an important contribution to the literature on quiltmaking in America and on the lives of New England women." - Patricia Crews, Director, International Quilt Study Center & Museum

Let me know if you have any other questions!

All best, Lynne

> Wow - it's $37.80 on Amazon ( ), quite a savings > but still an expense - can you tell us a little more about it? > > Kris >

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Massachusetts book From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 15:07:42 -0800 X-Message-Number: 14

Congratulations to our neighbors to the north! A state documentation book is an amazing accomplishment representing years of dedication by countless volunteers in love with quilt history. My best to all of you, Sue Reich -- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ***SPAM*** quilt fabric, travel to Florida From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 1

Hi there: Here is a directory of costume and textile collections which we have at my library. It's not perfect, but a start. ...arden

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

________________________________ From: Stephanie Whitson <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, December 15, 

I am not the person to do this, but it seems to me that there is room in the marketplace for a web site that is "the place" to go when a quilter/quilt historian/etc. is traveling and wants to know about exhibits/museums with good textile collections, etc. at their destination.

We ask each other, and that's great. . . but for each one of us on the QHL who thinks to ask, there are probably dozens who don't ask and don't know but WOULD go. If they knew.\

So there's my idea. . . . and I hope someone takes it up. Of it if "has been done" please clue me in so I can get in the habit of checking it before I leave for travels.

Thanks. Stephanie Higgins

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: I caved From: "Lisa Evans" <kittencat3charter.net> 

Not only did I just order the Massachusetts quilt book, I also = pre-ordered Lisa Monnas' upcoming book on silk textiles in Renaissance = paintings. 

*urk*

Lisa Evans ------=_

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gypsy textiles - nothing to report From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 21:45:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 17

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------030708030900000307000800 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Thanx for your efforts, Sally. Someday out of the blue someone will run across a reference in the most unlikely place. Well, at least we know gypsies contributed to the quilt world so that's a start LOL.

Sally Ward wrote:

I got this today from the Curator of Textiles at Beamish museum, and will continue to follow the trail.

<<Your enquiry has been passed on to me by Simon Woolley. Regarding quilts made by gypsies, we do not have any quilts in our collections which are specifically made by gypsies, however it would not surprise me that they were excellent needlewomen. Quilts were made by many working folk, some being basically utilitarian and others works of art! The interiors of the gypsy wagons were very ornate and full of expensive pottery and other such items. It might be useful for you to contact the Worcestershire County Museum at Hartlebury Castle as they had quite a collection of wagons and may have the textiles to go with them. I'm sorry not to be much more help, so best of luck with you researches.>>

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Gypsy textiles - nothing to report From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 09:19:06 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

I do keep thinking about the Gypsy textiles Joan, and yesterday I was pondering their fabric sources. I wondered where they might actually get hold of pieces of lush fabric for crazy quilts, as they wouldn't be likely to have exotic household scrapbags like the Victorian ladies. I also recalled the strict codes they had/have with regard to hygiene - I seem to have heard that they keep different bowls for washing different items of clothing or household textile. I wondered if this might impinge on how they re-used or re-cycled textiles into quilts if some would be considered 'unclean' next to others.

Sally Ward

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: MA Quilt book From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 04:26:10 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

For those of you on the list who came to our quilt symposium in Huntsville, AL in March: Dale Rhoades' presidential signature quilt you saw 'in the flesh" is supposed to be included in the Massachusetts book. Will be anxious to see the book. Pat Kyser

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: The Massachusetts book From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2008 22:06:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Thank you, Sue! It was a labor of love, as you well know, of many, many people. And we could not have done it without the enthusiastic participation of all the quilt owners. We are honored that the reviewers found merit in it, and *delighted* that it will soon be available to everyone.

Hooray!!

Lynne

> Congratulations to our neighbors to the north! A state documentation book > is an amazing accomplishment representing years of dedication by countless > volunteers in love with quilt history. My best to all of you, Sue Reich > -- > Sue Reich

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: The Massachusetts book From: <kittencat3charter.net> Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 5:43:53 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

Can't wait to get my copy - I'm especially interested in the 18th century quilts. Looks like a terrific resource!

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gypsy textiles - nothing to report From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 09:01:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------020304000703020305040501 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sally -- I can think of several sources for obtaining quality goods: accumulation through centuries of wandering, marriage with non-gypsies which was quite common, exchange or barter for services -- help a person with horse buying in exchange for a nice piece of velvet for instance.

There were very strict hygiene observances which varied in camps or families. During pregnancy, birth and menstrual periods women had to sleep in tents far removed from the camp, and use only certain utensils for eating. Often these were thrown away after the required duration. And women had to pass behind men when serving them as a sign of cleanliness.

Possibly treatment of good cloth might be given special dispensation??

Sally Ward wrote:

I do keep thinking about the Gypsy textiles Joan, and yesterday I was pondering their fabric sources. I wondered where they might actually get hold of pieces of lush fabric for crazy quilts, as they wouldn't be likely to have exotic household scrapbags like the Victorian ladies. I also recalled the strict codes they had/have with regard to hygiene - I seem to have heard that they keep different bowls for washing different items of clothing or household textile. I wondered if this might impinge on how they re-used or re-cycled textiles into quilts if some would be considered 'unclean' next to others.

> >

--------------020304000703020305040501--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Christmas and Chintz synopsis From: palamporeaol.com Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 09:48:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

----------MB_8CB2DA48F62FD30_27C_156B_webmail-md08.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I thought that y'all would like to know that we are all home and safe from Deb Robert's wonderful tour ---- Christmas and Chintz. I can't do a "Cinda version". Don't have the writing skills, most of all,?nor?the time. Have to catch up with Christmas and such, since I have been off playing. We (23 women/men --- some QHLers and some AQSG) began the trip in Switzerland and then headed to Mullhouse, France. Mullhouse is the home of the Printed Textile Museum. (Do a search on Mullhouse textiles. It will bring up several enjoyable sites.) We were there for the exhibit ----------?INDIAN MAGIC WORLD: Printed Fabric from the Coasts of India to the French Kingdom. It was a spectacular show of Persian kalamkaris and Indian palampores and other related textiles. The dates on the fabrics ranged from the 1600's to the 1850's. There is a lovely exhibit catalog that goes with the show. It is FEERIE INDIENNE:DES RIVAGES L'INDE AU ROYAUME DE FRANCE. It is written in French which is the only draw back. Also saw their printing area. And some folks did a printing workshop one day. ?In addition to the exhibit we were able to spend a great deal of time looking at their extensive collection of cotton prints (English and French) from 1790 to 1860. (And maybe later ---- I am doing this off of the top of my head with only one cup of coffee in me.) I only looked at fabrics up to around 1850 and then earlier. The fabrics were amazing. Think thousands and thousands of fabric samples.?We all realized how little we truly know about fabrics. The wide range of designs and?colors we saw were mind boggling. Often we would exclaim --- "But I was told that this wasn't around before the 1850's!" One of many comments regarding misinformation we had received. Innocent mistakes, but still there. And we also have to begin to consider how much earlier Europe might have gotten some things. But of course they were also getting things from the states. Commerce is the word!!! A few of us also went to the Wallpaper Museum in Mullhouse. It was also a wonderful experience in technique and color that was surprising and enlightening. We then went to Strasbourg and Cologne. Some had also gone over to Colmar.(Christmas Markets were also a focus of the trip, so we enjoyed many of those and bought some terrific items and ate and drank and walked.....) On the way to Cologne we?went to an outlet for French produced table linens and fabric yardage, but I can't think of the name of it. Someone else will have to supply that. Fabulous fabrics, but don't think it was "outlet prices" we are used to. Some of the fabrics were 37 Euros and more for 1 meter of fabric. But lovely........... They had a reproduction palampore that was purchased by several. Our next textile "fix" was in Tillburg. We went to a textile musuem that had a small area set up that was similar to the things one would see in Lowell but on a much smaller scale. There was also a rug exhibit of Colonbrander's (?)?designs from the turn of the last century. Another exhibit featured the Damask production that was done on jacquard looms. Check out the site for the museum and then this other site. Just doing a search for Tillburg or Tilburg textiles gives you lots of info. I saw it spelled both ways. http://www.designws.com/pagina/1textielmuseum08.html? http://www.loomandshuttleguild.org/textiletravel.html This museum also had a textile lab that is doing wonderful things with rug making and machine knitting. It was a bringing together of computer wizards with textile machines and incredible fashion designers. The gift shop was filled with creative scarves, blankets, toys, hats, bags, and linens. The next day we visited the Arnham Open Air Museum (a small recreated historical village) where we were able to view their collections of chintz clothing from the 1600's to early 1800's. All I can say is ----- AMAZING!, heart stopping, breath taking!!! We also were able to see quilted baby clothes, quilts, samplers, and an exhibit of their costumes. (Read the sites below if you would like the history of why their costumes were predominately made of chintz.) http://www.aaldhielpen.nl/english/frames_eng.htm

http://www.dutchquilts.com/chintz_fabric.html

http://www.gbacg.org/costume-resources/original/articles/printed_cottons.html? (Super great site)

The following day we went to the Fries Museum where we once more went back in the collection storage to see more fabulous chintz quilts, clothing, etc. and more white on white quilts and quilted pieces of clothing for adults and children. (These also made our hearts pound and we?felt a bit light headed.)?Next we?enjoyed the exhibits of period rooms with the intricate painting that is part of their heritage. Think Pennsylvania Dutch painting on furniture. Viewed another exhibit of?clothing. This one was over the top?with purses, laces, and silk dresses. ?Then we were treated to eye candy that was well over the edge ----- A Quilt Exhibit?overflowing with?quilted items of all types that were antiques and then on?up to?many made within the past year. We got to see the grand prize winner from the Paducah show last year. There were at least 8 rooms filled with old, new, ethnic, art quilts, WWII related textiles, on and on.?I purchased their?book on Quilts but it is not an exhibit catalog. QUILTS:UIT DE COLLECTIE VAN HET FRIES MUSEUM. There is also another wonderful book on costumes --- FASHION IN FRIESLAND 1750-1950. Both of these are written by Gieneke Arnolli who was the leader of the groups when we viewed the collections in storage. (Check out the Fries Museum sites.) From there we went to Hindeloopen. It was a quaint adorable town that had a museum dedicated to the textiles of that region and to the painted furniture, utensils, etc. More wonderful treats. There is also a lovely little shop in this town that had exquisite chintz fabrics. The name escapes me. He had scarves, yardage, fat quarters, Hindeloopen painted trays and bowls, and more. Our last day was spent in Amsterdam. Many people went to a fabric store there and found many treats. I opted for the canal ride. My textile brain was spinning too much. I do hope that my computer doesn't fill this with question marks to make it hard to read. Deb Roberts does a wonderful job. Her tours are well planned and thought out truly coming from the mind of a textile lover who also enjoys easy comfortable travel. This is not a paid promo ---- Deb has no idea I am doing this. I just wanted to share with all of you a new door to how Indian produced textiles influenced textiles in Europe and then also influenced us in the colonies and later the states. It is an interesting journey with many paths. As usual, I learned a great deal about palampores and Indian textiles, but also realized that I have even more questions.? I think the Calico Museum in India should be next on my quest. Haven't told my husband yet! Oh, it was funny when I met someone who found out I was palamporeaol.com on QHL. She said ---- "I thought you would have dark hair and be tall." What a giggle! So now for all of you who don't know me?---- I am 5 ft. 4 in. with graying red hair, age 55 and roundish. I do have a tall slender exotic woman who lives inside of me and wears designer clothes, but I am not that woman on the outside!

Y'all have a Merry Christmas! Lynn in New Bern, NC where it feels like spring

Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio www.textilepreservation.com The Creative Caregiver www.creativecaregiver.com

?

Lynn Lancaster Gorges Historic Textiles Studio The Creative Caregiver New Bern, NC palamporeaol.com

----------MB_8CB2DA48F62FD30_27C_156B_webmail-md08.sysops.aol.com--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Textile collections book From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 08:11:05 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 7

-

Sorry, I haven't gotten knack of sending links: here is Amazon's link:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0896725723/quiltweb/ 

Clothing and textile collections in the United States : a CSA guide / edited by Sally Queen and Vicki L. Berger.

Lubbock : Texas Tech University Press, c2006.

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

________________________________ From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, December 15, 2008 4:26:22 PM Subject: [qhl] Re: ***SPAM*** quilt fabric, travel to Florida

Hi there: Here is a directory of costume and textile collections which we have at my library. It's not perfect, but a start. ...arden

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

________________________________ From: Stephanie Whitson <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, December 15, 2008 10:18:16 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: ***SPAM*** quilt fabric, travel to Florida

I am not the person to do this, but it seems to me that there is room in the marketplace for a web site that is "the place" to go when a quilter/quilt historian/etc. is traveling and wants to know about exhibits/museums with good textile collections, etc. at their destination.

We ask each other, and that's great. . . but for each one of us on the QHL who thinks to ask, there are probably dozens who don't ask and don't know but WOULD go. If they knew.\

So there's my idea. . . . and I hope someone takes it up. Of it if "has been done" please clue me in so I can get in the habit of checking it before I leave for travels.

Thanks. Stephanie Higgins

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Martha Skelton book From: "Robins-Morris, Laura A" <lrobinsscharp.org> Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 08:41:42 -0800 X-Message-Number: 8

Can anyone comment on the book "Martha Skelton, Master Quilter of Mississippi" ? Is the text interesting? I thoroughly enjoyed Laurel Horton's book on Mary Black and wonder if this is similar. (Though of course no one could really duplicate Laurel!) Thanks. Laura, in cold cold Seattle

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Pikes Peak Weaver's Guild and stuff From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 10:44:17 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9

Hi all;

Made the drive from OH to Colorado Springs last week and after 4 months away, I haven't stopped hugging my 'honies' (DH and kitty or should that be kitty and then DH). Now I miss OH - go figure. I just want to let those of you to whom I have promised information, from the AQSG conference or after, I'll be working on it over the next few weeks. I haven't forgotten.

I wrote in a post sometime earlier this year that I had done some volunteer work with the Pioneers Museum here in the Springs and the Pikes Peak Weaver's Guild on woven coverlets. I became involved after several years of work by the Guild and our dear museum curator Katie Davis-Gardner. My job was to stabilize the more fragile coverlets for display in an exhibit and to identify weavers. As I've always noticed with coverlets designs, so many are similar if not almost identical to certain quilt patterns. I learned a lot about weave structure and weaving from everyone. The work by the Guild is now incorporated into their website. There are photos, full and details, of all the pieces in the museum's collection. Included are documentation files on each coverlet. I added information to those files but the final product and its wording belongs entirely to the Guild and I applaud them for the hundreds of hours they put in to provide this very educational site. I hope it starts a trend. The National Museum of the Coverlet plans to link it to their website.

I have just seen the final product and want to share it with those of you who love coverlets as I do. A few errors did creep in but those will be corrected. Please check it out and share it with friends. The museum lacked an example of the ingrain carpeting woven by many of the same weavers who produced jacquards. Thanks to the generosity of Xenia Cord, they have one now. It should be included in the website sometime after analysis. A mystery package arrived on my doorstep while I was in the middle of a difficult health problem with DH and was feeling pretty down. Inside was a beautiful piece of what is most likely an Indiana-made ingrain. I'm sure that is what fixed DH (along with a different doctor!!!!). I'm full of tears right now thinking of how amazingly thoughtful, sharing and kind you all are and have been to me and others. Thank you Xenia and thanks to you all for everything you've helped me with over the past 60 years of my love affair with textiles. Thank you Grandma Elva Blanche Campbell Plummer for starting it all.

http://www.pikespeakweavers.org/

Jan Thomas - very tired

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: looking at BAQs From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 17:50:45 +0000 X-Message-Number: 10

Cinda, This group of quilts will be up through December. They next will go up the first part of January. Polly Mello --NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_12551_1229449845_0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: looking at BAQs From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 18:08:50 +0000 X-Message-Number: 11

I apologize my last post was not very clear. The currant group of Baltimore Album Quilts on display at the Baltimore Museum of Art will only be up until the end of December. They will be replaced in January by a different group of Baltimore Album quilts. If you have not seen the cuurant display, run don't walk, to Baltimore to see them. Give yourself a Christmas Quilt Treat. You never know when these quilts will be out again.. Do not miss them. Cold and Damp in Elkridge, Maryland, Polly Mello --NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_24701_1229450930_0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Chemical Heritage Foundation and Museum From: Carol 

Candace Perry recently posted about the Chemical Heritage Museum. If you are interested in dye history get on the subscription list of the Chemical Heritage Foundation's journal Chemical Heritage. It used to be free and has fantastic articles about dyes. I felt so guilty about getting it free that I finally sent a donation awhile back. I think it's a really well run foundation. Although I only have 10 hours of chemistry on my undergraduate transcript, I can understand the well-written articles with no trouble. You can even understand the articles with 0 hours of chemistry. Carol