Subject: Question about Cinnamon Pounce
From: "pines" <pinesearthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 06:08:53 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

During December I visited the Abby Aldrich Museum and during a video shown
at the quilting exhibit, it was mentioned that a cinnamon pounce was used to
mark quilting lines. Does anyone know anything about this, and if it is a
safe way to mark quilts now?
Thanks in advance
elaine



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Subject: Re: Question about Cinnamon Pounce
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 07:34:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2


Cinnamon pounce is an old time method of marking quilts. I am reticent to
use any "food" additives that might attract chewing rodents or insects, down
the line, or require that the quilt be washed after finishing the quilting.
Personally, I prefer other ways of marking - and those vary with the
particular quilt being made.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Texas Gulf Coast Quilt Study Group
From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 11:45:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

If anyone is in the Houston area the end of February, you’re cordially
invited to drop in for the first meeting of the Texas Gulf Coast Quilt
Study Group. We’ll meet at the Robinson Road Community Center, 27434
Robinson Road, Spring, TX 77386 on Tuesday, February 24, 2009, 9:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m.(or whenever we get tired). This is for anyone interested in
quilts or quilt history. Everyone’s welcomed. For more information
contact Sharron Evans, Phone 281-350-3498 or email at
quiltnsharroncharter.net.

Thanks and best regards,
Sharron----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cinnamon, shinnimon
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 11:50:42 -0500

Hello friends-I consulted the four earliest books I could find
(1915-Webster's *Quilts-Their Story and how to make them*, 1929 Finley's *Old
Patchwork Quilts*, 1931 McKim's *101 Patchwork Patterns, *1935 Hall and
Kretsinger's *The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America) *and could find
no historical reference to the notion that quilt marking was done with
cinnamon pouncing. However, I heard that idea almost as soon as I started
quilting in 1971. So where did it come from?* *My personal opinion is that
the cinnamon thing got started via two different conclusions after
observation. #1 is a conclusion that I could have drawn myself since I have
seen old quilts with reddish-brown markings still visible. These old quilts
even smelled little sweet. But according to one red-marked quilt's owner
(the great-granddaughter of the maker) the Pennsylvania quilt was marked in
cocoa powder years earlier. And yes, her family lived in Hershey and various
members of the family had worked for the chocolate manufacturer for years.
The cocoa-marked quilt was never washed and the marks became permanent. The
#2 possibility: carpenters and masons sometimes use a pounce bag filled with
red chalk dust (possibly ground up brick dust) and a quilter could have
'borrowed' her husband's pounce, marked her quilt, and meant to wash the
markings out.
Why I don't believe cinnamon pouncing was ever widely used as a quilt
marking method: the stuff's too darn expensive! Very few people could have
afforded using a ground spice to mark their quilts. Plus, Cinnamon powder is
quite oily and likely doesn't wash out easily.
Perhaps a few quilt markers mixed cinnamon with flour (flour-marked quilts
are known here in the South) to make a dark powder but I can't draw on an
historical reference and would be delighted if anyone could dig up a
pre-1900 source for this myth.
But, somewhere this thing's got in print. And if it's in print, it must be
true, right? I've seen gals demonstrating quilting at Pioneer Days
celebrations as they merrily dumped cinnamon on their quilts exclaiming to a
credulous public, "That's how they did it in the old days!"
C'mon.
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com

------=_Part_169529_6662239.1231001442385--


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Subject: RE: Cinnamon, shinnimon
From: "pines" <pinesearthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 16:14:51 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Pepper
Thanks for the background information. I will now email Colonial
Williamsburg and ask for them why they are providing the information.
elaine

------------------------------------

Subject: Cinnamon, shinnimon
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com>

Hello friends-I consulted the four earliest books I could find
(1915-Webster's *Quilts-Their Story and how to make them*, 1929 Finley's *Old
Patchwork Quilts*, 1931 McKim's *101 Patchwork Patterns, *1935 Hall and
Kretsinger's *The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America) *and could find
no historical reference to the notion that quilt marking was done with
cinnamon pouncing. However, I heard that idea almost as soon as I started
quilting in 1971. So where did it come from?* *My personal opinion is that
the cinnamon thing got started via two different conclusions after
observation. #1 is a conclusion that I could have drawn myself since I have
seen old quilts with reddish-brown markings still visible. These old quilts
even smelled little sweet. But according to one red-marked quilt's owner
(the great-granddaughter of the maker) the Pennsylvania quilt was marked in
cocoa powder years earlier. And yes, her family lived in Hershey and various
members of the family had worked for the chocolate manufacturer for years.
The cocoa-marked quilt was never washed and the marks became permanent. The
#2 possibility: carpenters and masons sometimes use a pounce bag filled with
red chalk dust (possibly ground up brick dust) and a quilter could have
'borrowed' her husband's pounce, marked her quilt, and meant to wash the
markings out.
Why I don't believe cinnamon pouncing was ever widely used as a quilt
marking method: the stuff's too darn expensive! Very few people could have
afforded using a ground spice to mark their quilts. Plus, Cinnamon powder is
quite oily and likely doesn't wash out easily.
Perhaps a few quilt markers mixed cinnamon with flour (flour-marked quilts
are known here in the South) to make a dark powder but I can't draw on an
historical reference and would be delighted if anyone could dig up a
pre-1900 source for this myth.
But, somewhere this thing's got in print. And if it's in print, it must be
true, right? I've seen gals demonstrating quilting at Pioneer Days
celebrations as they merrily dumped cinnamon on their quilts exclaiming to a
credulous public, "That's how they did it in the old days!"
C'mon.
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com

------=_Part_169529_6662239.1231001442385--


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Subject: RE: Cinnamon, shinnimon
From: "pines" <pinesearthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 16:14:51 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Pepper
Thanks for the background information. I will now email Colonial
Williamsburg and ask for them why they are providing the information.
elaine
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Shelburne website problem
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2009 15:07:15 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Is anyone else experiencing problems with the Shelburne website?

http://www.shelburnemuseum.org/

When I try too access anything beyond the Home page under What's On or
Collections, I get an Error page.

Karen in the Islands


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Subject: Re: Shelburne website problem
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2009 20:41:01 -0500
I just checked and I too found problems so maybe it isn't you - they might be updating their site or something.


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Subject: Birmingham Museum of Arts Quilt Exhibit - FYI
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2009 19:35:40 -0700

This looks like an interesting exhibit but I do take exception to the
author's
definition of a 'true quilt'.

Jan


blog.al.com/scenesource/2009/01/*birmingham*_*museum_of_arts*_fabr.html 

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