Subject: quilt in movie
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2009 19:05:57 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4


I am watching the film, "Miss Potter" (Renee Zellwegger, etc.)
set in the 1880s and 1890s, it seems.

There was just a scene, when Beatrix and her brother Bertram are
children, when they are being put to bed. The quilts on the win
beds sure look like authentic, early English quilts ~ scrappy one
patch hexagon quilts.

It appears they got it right!

Julie Silber




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Birmingham Museum of Arts Quilt Exhibit - FYI
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2009 22:07:22 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

Jan--

I can't get amuwhere with that URL. Is there a better version?
Kim

-----Original Message-----
From: Jan Thomas [mailto:textiqueaol.com]
Sent: Sunday, January 04, 2009 8:36 PM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] Birmingham Museum of Arts Quilt Exhibit - FYI

This looks like an interesting exhibit but I do take exception to the
author's definition of a 'true quilt'.

Jan


blog.al.com/scenesource/2009/01/*birmingham*_*museum_of_arts*_fabr.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Unusual 4-block Q sad condition
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2009 20:46:14 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Ebay item number: 150318931999

No affiliation but really unusual 4-Block quilt.

Karen in the Islands





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Researcher needs input
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2009 23:41:48 -0800
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi All,

I am sending this question on behalf of a woman living outside of the US,
who is getting her EdD. She is making a quilt that corresponds to her
journal entries about her research thesis. She would like to know if there
are any quilters who have made a quilt using a similar reasoning or manner
to hers. It is abstract, but interesting.

She said " My issue is that I am making a quilt as a response to my research
project and I am hunting to find if there are any others who have done this.
I am currently using creative methods to symbolize a study of a medical
procedure. However one of the things I am doing is to make a quilt. I have a
research diary and every time I make a written entry in the diary I make a
square for a quilt. Like the quilts you have mentioned it is partly telling
a story. I have not come across any researchers who have made quilts as part
of their research in this way- which is why I came to you to ask My
question is whether anyone has made a quilt as you say, reflecting,
or as part of a study into something else. "

>From pictures she sent it appears she either sketches or makes a block
representing a person she meets in the study or the block may represent her
and her experience of the interview etc. The blocks are not patchwork as
much as they are embroidered and embellished to reflect her experience with
a person. She uses beads, yarn, fabric, stitches and so on. The blocks are
placed together to form a quilt. "The central square will be the eventual
title of the thesis and the squares run round it as a spiral, which
represents the 'journey' of the study. "

If you have done a similar quilt metaphor (my words), send a brief email
offline and I'll forward it to her. She has only found one other person
doing this.

Happy New Year everyone!

Kim


Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
Women On Quilts
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.antiquequiltdating.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com
www.antiquequiltdatingguides.com





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Birmingham Museum of Arts Quilt Exhibit - FYI
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 05:50:45 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 3

Not sure where the *'s came from. I tried it without the *'s and it worked. Try this:
http://blog.al.com/scenesource/2009/01/birmingham_museum_of_arts_fabr.html

From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>

This looks like an interesting exhibit but I do take exception to the author's definition of a 'true quilt'.
Jan

blog.al.com/scenesource/2009/01/*birmingham*_*museum_of_arts*_fabr.html






----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "It was a dark and storm night"
From: "Pepper Cory" <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 08:58:19 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

------=_Part_186366_2219710.1231163899507
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline

http://blog.al.com/scene/2009/01/birmingham_museum_of_arts_fabr.html
<http://blog.al.com/scene/2009/01/birmingham_museum_of_arts_fabr.html%20%20%20>

After reading the Birmingham story, I thought, "Great-more publicity for a
quilt exhibition-" but then the critic took over and I mused, "Shine-ola,
that's a load..." As the article goes on, the reporter, obviously a disciple
of the 'dark and stormy night' school of writing, fancies himself a
commentator on quilt history. Rather histrionic you mean. Love it when
someone who doesn't quilt and doesn't know quilt history spreads their
particular version of the truth about our craft. Using synthetics (I presume
he meant polyester) is part of quilt history and if it wasn't for those
women who fashioned Missouri Daisy and Lone Star quilts from doubleknits in
the 60s and early 70s, the craft of quiltmaking might not have made it
through to the Bicenntennial! In other words, we should embrace those quilts
as a particular branch of our history and not look down our noses. He also
decries simple linear design. Well, welcome to the 21st century where Retro
rules...at least for right now. As in any craft the pendulum will swing and
we'll see new trends for patterns any day now. Real quilt, indeed-I'm going
to go oil my sewing machine and stitch up a storm!
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com

------=_Part_186366_2219710.1231163899507--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: "It was a dark and storm night"
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 09:31:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

I was a tad nauseated myself, and agree with the dark and stormy night
thing, Pepper!
I find it quite disheartening to realize we live in a drab and dreary world.
Candace Perry

-----Original Message-----
From: pepcorygmail.com [mailto:pepcorygmail.com] On Behalf Of Pepper Cory
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2009 8:58 AM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] "It was a dark and storm night"

http://blog.al.com/scene/2009/01/birmingham_museum_of_arts_fabr.html
<http://blog.al.com/scene/2009/01/birmingham_museum_of_arts_fabr.html%20%20%
20>

After reading the Birmingham story, I thought, "Great-more publicity for a
quilt exhibition-" but then the critic took over and I mused, "Shine-ola,
that's a load..." As the article goes on, the reporter, obviously a disciple
of the 'dark and stormy night' school of writing, fancies himself a
commentator on quilt history. Rather histrionic you mean. Love it when
someone who doesn't quilt and doesn't know quilt history spreads their
particular version of the truth about our craft. Using synthetics (I presume
he meant polyester) is part of quilt history and if it wasn't for those
women who fashioned Missouri Daisy and Lone Star quilts from doubleknits in
the 60s and early 70s, the craft of quiltmaking might not have made it
through to the Bicenntennial! In other words, we should embrace those quilts
as a particular branch of our history and not look down our noses. He also
decries simple linear design. Well, welcome to the 21st century where Retro
rules...at least for right now. As in any craft the pendulum will swing and
we'll see new trends for patterns any day now. Real quilt, indeed-I'm going
to go oil my sewing machine and stitch up a storm!
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory

Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com


---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: candaceschwenkfelder.com.
To unsubscribe send a blank email to
leave-qhl-1770637Clyris.quiltropolis.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Birmingham Museum of Art Exhibit
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2009 07:23:10 -0700
X-Message-Number: 6


--------------000103080904000509080504
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sorry Kim, The resident computer plays jokes on me sometimes. I tried
the link myself before sending
it to the list and it worked fine. Actually, now that I read it again,
there is more than one statement with
which I take issue.

Jan


Birmingham Museum of Art's 'Fabric of Life' quilts human connection


Posted by James R. Nelson -- Birmingham News
<http://blog.al.com/scene/about.html> January 04, 2009 8:53 AM

News File/Tamika Moore Lisa Stewart prepares for the "Fabric of Life"
exhibit.


*Fabric Of Life: African Textiles And Quilts From The American South.
Birmingham Museum of Art, 2000 Eighth Ave. North. Through March 1.*

The exhibition of quilts and textiles from the Birmingham Museum of Art
collection show the basic drive in the human spirit to create things
that carry purpose and meaning. Selected from the permanent collection,
these African textiles and American quilts differ in fundamental ways,
yet there is a human connection that cannot be denied.

The African textiles reflect tribal powers and beliefs. They tend to be
monochromatic, using dyes such as indigo or vegetable juices to create
strong, geometric patterns. The fabrics are often woven on small hand
held looms that produce a woven ribbon about five or six inches wide.
These long strips are then stitched together to make an article of dress
or a signature drape worn by authorities in various tribes.

When European fabrics were introduced, the African people quickly
assimilated these new materials into their cultures. Intricate
needlework was employed to create elaborate designs.

A chief's wrapper from the Abran people is a large piece of dark fabric
with traditional designs stitched into block areas. Using a chain stitch
with brightly contrasting thread, the embroidery designs of fish,
turtle, bird, lion, rabbit, elephant, crocodile and winged insects are
fancifully depicted. An astonishingly minimalist-looking blanket from
Ghana, using cotton and synthetic dyes, consists of thirteen strips of
canvas-like woven fabric that have alternating blocks of bright colors,
each block having two horizontal slits of golden hue.

The American quilt phenomenon grew out of necessity and expedience.
Originally a product of the poorest of the poor, they have become
collector's items and have achieved a unique status in folk art. The
need to use everything until it literally disappears is a fundamental
impetus in the creation of quilts. Made to serve a need and designed to
please the eye, patchwork quilts served the purpose of making life a bit
more comfortable. Bits and pieces of fabric salvaged from the worn and
torn articles of clothing are cut into simple geometric shapes such as
squares, rectangles, triangles and circles and then stitched into a
rectangle large enough to cover a bed. A plain backing made of uncolored
material was fitted and batting of some sort was inserted between the
two panels and stitched into place.

The true quilt is always done completely by hand. The piecing of fabric
bits follows a strict plan and then a final stitching that often crosses
over the design in curving patterns forming a subtle secondary design
element. Today some quilts are made using sewing machines, but these
works cannot replicate the delicate hand stitching and can never have
the intrinsic value of the hand-stitched quilt.

A number of standardized patterns evolved. Stars, pine cones and flowers
were the most popular. Five-, six- and eight-pointed stars are common,
while flowers and cones vary more by the fabric used than the technique,
which is to take small pieces of fabric, fold it into a triangular
shapes and then sewn into place. These patterns are abstract variations
on geometric shapes, and the quilts vary primarily by the different
kinds of colorful fabric available.

More recent quilts can take on strong asymmetric designs and newer
fabrics, such as synthetics, and can give a quilt a kind of folksy
opulence that is a tad flashy in contrast to the traditionally patterned
quilt.

Quilting bees were a common social factor, particularly in the Southern
rural areas. Whole families would partake in the making of a quilt and
as many quilts as families involved would be produced. Pride in tiny,
even, stitching and care in ensuring each piece of fabric would appear
in an appropriate corner or square or other design element insured these
quilts a kind of vibrant logic. The American quilt is a honest
reflection of life. They are a family history of birth, love, illness
and death. They have provided warmth and color to a room. Above all,
they became a source of entertainment and pride in the lives of many who
treasured these bits of pleasure in an otherwise drab and dreary world.

/James R. Nelson is visual arts critic for the Birmingham News./



--------------000103080904000509080504
Content-Type: multipart/related;
boundary="------------050803020705000609020302"

--------------050803020705000609020302--

--------------000103080904000509080504--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Birmingham Museum of Arts Quilt Exhibit - FYI
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2009 08:22:35 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

Kim, I always check a link myself before sending it to the list so I
looked at my sent mail and the
address left Colorado Springs *without* the stars. Drop them and try
again.

Thank you Pepper! for catching, instantly, why I sent the link. Mr.
Nelson's article is a 'tad flashy',
don't cha think? We report, you decide.

Jan



Kim Baird wrote:
> Jan--
> blog.al.com/scenesource/2009/01/*birmingham*_*museum_of_arts*_fabr.html
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: cinnamon, shinnamon
From: lrobinsscharp.org
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 08:14:55 -0800
X-Message-Number: 8

Excellent points, Pepper.
I too was surprised when I first heard it (80s) because it would have
been too expensive to use that way. Back then, we didn't realize it was
ok to question conventional quilting wisdom <g>. Can't remember where I
heard or read it and hope you can find more information. It would make
an interesting creation-of-a-myth article. Please keep us informed.
Laura, in snowy/rainy Seattle




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: I defer to our learned collegue, Ms. Pepper Cory
From: hknight453aol.com
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2009 12:01:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

I don't know nearly what she does about quilts, but I feel quilts
made on sewing machines are just as real as those made by hand.
Machine quilting was used as soon as machines were practical. Machines
let one finish a quilt faster, and make more quilts. I do tops both by
hand and by machine. Inset patchwork like Bow Tie and some forms of
applique are easier by hand. It's all a matter of personal choice.
Synthetics also have a place in quilts. One wonders what this rather
romantic writer would think of fusible applique.

Heather


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: It was sultry and silly day: Bad Writing
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 11:44:26 -0600
X-Message-Number: 10

Nobody can write so bad as a southerner trying to prove himself/herself "ku=
ltured." I think that is ordained somewhere in the Old Testament of the Chr=
istian Bible.=20

Probably the rule is general, applying to all engaged in such a pursuit, si=
nce the need to prove oneself "kultured" itself implies a lack of cultural =
depth (See Moliere, e.g.).=20

But southerners do things so exuberantly and are so driven to articulate th=
ings verbally that 'nobody does it better' than we.

It's a gift for those of us who read local newspapers down here. We look fo=
rward to descriptions of "fetes" and such. We literally go out of town for =
a day or so when our names appear in a particularly enthusiastic piece of b=
ombast, hoping our friends will get the laughter out of their systems in ou=
r absence. We clip the best bad print and cherish it for dark and stormy ni=
ghts when after-dinner talk flags.

Here in North-Central Louisiana, we are particularly gifted because we have=
a nearby city newspaper and a monthly free "style" paper in addition to ou=
r local newspaper, which abound in knock-down laughing headlines and cliche=
s. Folks all over the region await the Sunday city paper for the week's sty=
le story, written by a man who is just "fabulous." His specialty is enterta=
ining and table settings, and one of his best settings was for Easter sever=
al years ago. It got full-page coverage and color. The theme, he said, was =
"appropriate" to the Christian holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jes=
us Christ, though he did not explain why exactly. It featured a blue-and-wh=
ite porcelain version of very very fat Indian god resembling Buddha (the go=
d with children emerging from his pores, I think) as the centerpiece, surro=
unded by clearly British rabbits (Easter bunnies) also in blue-and-white po=
rcelain, and painted Easter eggs made through the years by the author's Ita=
lian mother, whose artistic virtues were extolled at some length. The shops=
in NYC where these items had been obtained and were available were detaile=
d along with the superb service in those establishments (like folks from R=
ocky Branch were in and out of NYC weekly). The history of the cloth coveri=
ng the table was also noted, as was the glee he knew his grandchildren woul=
d experience in consequence of all this. The menu was your sort of generic =
"Chinese" trans-seasonal meal, preceded by a drink that would prepare famil=
y members for the table and the over-sized god that dominated it and preclu=
ded service plates.=20

Each week this writer notes those citizens who have been "seen" and "also s=
een" in "the right sort" of places---or, really, any places at all. To this=
day, one of my former students lords over her friend that the friend was o=
nly an "also seen" while the young woman herself, the honoree at a sixteent=
h birthday party held in the writer's restaurant, was "seen." People still =
"motor" and "enplane" in this column, and women are "adorable" and everybod=
y who is either Junior League or JL alum and sets foot out of the state (es=
p. if they go to NYC) is noted and her history and reason for traveling exp=
lained. Next to NYC is San Francisco, the source of the enormous porcelain =
god, actually. Sorry, Bostonians and Philadelphians.

Evelyn Waugh at his best cannot do better than this writer.=20

I had thought this column could only run in the particular city where it ru=
ns. But this past weekend I was trying to locate an address for a friend an=
d former student who lives and works as interior designer in Austin, Texas,=
where I've always found citizens to be more plain-spoken. But no: Google c=
alled up column after column of internet-preserved columns mentioning the p=
erson in a "fashion" section of the Austin newspaper, written by a fellow w=
hose imagination seemed to extend mainly to name-dropping. But it was a wor=
ld where men were "adorable" and women were dressed in "drop-dead" designer=
clothing as they drank strange concoctions and were just so everso everso =
"in" and where "ennui" with the whole lively social scene drove the writer =
to plan to stay home at evening. Because it was Texas and Texans know their=
own places are more interesting than those abroad, locals' perambulations =
about the state and especially to their weekend ranches came in for conside=
rable mention, though leaving Austin did not seem too highly admired, frank=
ly. Less imaginative than our writer, but same strain. I was disappointed i=
n Texans.=20

I personally regard these as sort of unintended send-ups of the grander mun=
icipal society sections, and I seek them out when I am in southern cities.=
=20

Okay, having said all this, I am going to suggest a New Year's Vocabulary R=
esolution. Strunk & White beat me to it, of course, but it is an example of=
pretentiousness in language that we could help eradicate from our sundry p=
ublications.

Here it is: let's resolve to avoid the word "utilize" and to use instead th=
e good simple word "use." I know that we see "utilize" everywhere, but so d=
o we see a lot of stuff everywhere. Ubiquitous does not equal good. The pri=
nciple from which the recommendation derives is this: if given the choice b=
etween a Latinate word or an Anglo-Saxon-Jute derived word, use the Anglo w=
ord. It is always more widely known and more readily processed by English s=
peakers. (Such words make up more than 80 percent of our daily vocabulary) =
The sub-principle is this: given the choice of a long word and a short word=
, use the short word. Same reason. Adding the Latinate "ize" is pretentious=
--- and not adorable, either. It seeks to make something appear somehow sci=
entific and thus more important than the thing normally is. A euphemism, pu=
tting distance between reality and the reader. Embalmers become morticians,=
garbagemen become sanitation engineers, and, in another day, the person wh=
o had cut your hair became a "beautician."=20

From Louisiana, where it is a dark and overcast day,
Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: It was sultry and silly day: Bad Writing
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 17:04:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

Ah!
Gaye's New Year's present to the list.
Eagerly anticipated.
It beats all other presents.

Thank you Gaye.

More, please.

Judy


----- Original Message -----
From: "Gaye Ingram" <gingramsuddenlink.net>
To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2009 12:44 PM
Subject: [qhl] It was sultry and silly day: Bad Writing


Nobody can write so bad as a southerner trying to prove himself/herself
"kultured." I think that is ordained somewhere in the Old Testament of the
Christian Bible.

Probably the rule is general, applying to all engaged in such a pursuit,
since the need to prove oneself "kultured" itself implies a lack of cultural
depth (See Moliere, e.g.).

But southerners do things so exuberantly and are so driven to articulate
things verbally that 'nobody does it better' than we.

It's a gift for those of us who read local newspapers down here. We look
forward to descriptions of "fetes" and such. We literally go out of town for
a day or so when our names appear in a particularly enthusiastic piece of
bombast, hoping our friends will get the laughter out of their systems in
our absence. We clip the best bad print and cherish it for dark and stormy
nights when after-dinner talk flags.

Here in North-Central Louisiana, we are particularly gifted because we have
a nearby city newspaper and a monthly free "style" paper in addition to our
local newspaper, which abound in knock-down laughing headlines and cliches.
Folks all over the region await the Sunday city paper for the week's style
story, written by a man who is just "fabulous." His specialty is
entertaining and table settings, and one of his best settings was for Easter
several years ago. It got full-page coverage and color. The theme, he said,
was "appropriate" to the Christian holiday celebrating the resurrection of
Jesus Christ, though he did not explain why exactly. It featured a
blue-and-white porcelain version of very very fat Indian god resembling
Buddha (the god with children emerging from his pores, I think) as the
centerpiece, surrounded by clearly British rabbits (Easter bunnies) also in
blue-and-white porcelain, and painted Easter eggs made through the years by
the author's Italian mother, whose artistic virtues were extolled at some
length. The shops in NYC where these items had been obtained and were
available were detailed along with the superb service in those
establishments (like folks from Rocky Branch were in and out of NYC
weekly). The history of the cloth covering the table was also noted, as was
the glee he knew his grandchildren would experience in consequence of all
this. The menu was your sort of generic "Chinese" trans-seasonal meal,
preceded by a drink that would prepare family members for the table and the
over-sized god that dominated it and precluded service plates.

Each week this writer notes those citizens who have been "seen" and "also
seen" in "the right sort" of places---or, really, any places at all. To this
day, one of my former students lords over her friend that the friend was
only an "also seen" while the young woman herself, the honoree at a
sixteenth birthday party held in the writer's restaurant, was "seen." People
still "motor" and "enplane" in this column, and women are "adorable" and
everybody who is either Junior League or JL alum and sets foot out of the
state (esp. if they go to NYC) is noted and her history and reason for
traveling explained. Next to NYC is San Francisco, the source of the
enormous porcelain god, actually. Sorry, Bostonians and Philadelphians.

Evelyn Waugh at his best cannot do better than this writer.

I had thought this column could only run in the particular city where it
runs. But this past weekend I was trying to locate an address for a friend
and former student who lives and works as interior designer in Austin,
Texas, where I've always found citizens to be more plain-spoken. But no:
Google called up column after column of internet-preserved columns
mentioning the person in a "fashion" section of the Austin newspaper,
written by a fellow whose imagination seemed to extend mainly to
name-dropping. But it was a world where men were "adorable" and women were
dressed in "drop-dead" designer clothing as they drank strange concoctions
and were just so everso everso "in" and where "ennui" with the whole lively
social scene drove the writer to plan to stay home at evening. Because it
was Texas and Texans know their own places are more interesting than those
abroad, locals' perambulations about the state and especially to their
weekend ranches came in for considerable mention, though leaving Austin did
not seem too highly admired, frankly. Less imaginative than our writer, but
same strain. I was disappointed in Texans.

I personally regard these as sort of unintended send-ups of the grander
municipal society sections, and I seek them out when I am in southern
cities.

Okay, having said all this, I am going to suggest a New Year's Vocabulary
Resolution. Strunk & White beat me to it, of course, but it is an example of
pretentiousness in language that we could help eradicate from our sundry
publications.

Here it is: let's resolve to avoid the word "utilize" and to use instead the
good simple word "use." I know that we see "utilize" everywhere, but so do
we see a lot of stuff everywhere. Ubiquitous does not equal good. The
principle from which the recommendation derives is this: if given the choice
between a Latinate word or an Anglo-Saxon-Jute derived word, use the Anglo
word. It is always more widely known and more readily processed by English
speakers. (Such words make up more than 80 percent of our daily vocabulary)
The sub-principle is this: given the choice of a long word and a short word,
use the short word. Same reason. Adding the Latinate "ize" is pretentious---
and not adorable, either. It seeks to make something appear somehow
scientific and thus more important than the thing normally is. A euphemism,
putting distance between reality and the reader. Embalmers become
morticians, garbagemen become sanitation engineers, and, in another day, the
person who had cut your hair became a "beautician."

From Louisiana, where it is a dark and overcast day,
Gaye


---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: judy.growcomcast.net.
To unsubscribe send a blank email to
leave-qhl-1834918Slyris.quiltropolis.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: "It was a dark and storm night"
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 23:50:47 +0000
X-Message-Number: 12

Hmm... can't help wondering if Mr Nelson writes his 'real prose' using
quill pen and ink?

Sally Ward



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: I missed one!
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2009 13:06:52 -0800
X-Message-Number: 13

Dear QHL Members,

I have to correct myself in my last post about the passing of Honorees of
The Quilters Hall of Fame. We also lost Honoree Cuesta Benberry in the last
18 months!! That makes 4 Honorees who have passed on since late 2006: Mary
Schaffer's passing December 21, 2006; Cuesta's on August 23, 2007; Helen
Kelley's Sept 1, 2008 and now Shiela Betterton's, Dec 26, 2008.

Karen Alexander




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: TQHF Honoree Shiela Betterton
From: karenquiltrockisland.com
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2009 12:57:45 -0800
X-Message-Number: 14

Dear QHL Members,
Our pioneers of the late 20th century quilt revival continue to depart from
us. All the more reason for all of us to be capturing the stories of the
living while they are still with us! With the passing of Shiela Betterton in
Great Britain on Boxing Day, The Quilters Hall of Fame has seen three of its
Honorees pass in one year=B9s time: Mary Schafer, Helen Kelley and now Shiela
Betterton. I had the good fortune to meet Shiela for the first time when I
visited Bath in August 2007 while one of Deb Roberts=B9 Quilt Study Tours. I
had contacted Shiela ahead of time and she made special arrangements to meet
us at the museum that day. What a delightful person! How I wish I could
have spent hours with her interviewing and recording her stories! She was so
pleased that her good friend Helen Kelley was to be inducted into the hall
of fame in July 2008. She shared with me how they first met, of their many
visits together over the years and of their many letters of correspondence.
(What a treasure trove of quilt history those letters must contain!) Shiela
was so pleased that Americans were still coming to Bath to see the quilts
and that the interest in quilting history was stronger than ever.
If you would like to send a note to the family, you may email Kate Hebert,
Collections Manager at the American Museum at Bath,
katherine.hebertamericanmuseum.org.

Quilters of the U.K. can be proud of the legacy Shiela has left for all of
us to build upon
Karen B. Alexander
Past President
The Quilters Hall of Fame
Www.quiltershalloffame.net


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 05, 2009
From: elpaninaroaol.com
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2009 00:31:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


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Karen- thank you for posting this. I enjoyed seeing it since this is in the general scheme of what I collect- and yes, very unusual. It kills me to see quilts falling apart like this given the work that went into their making. It is about 100 years too soon to tell, but it is my great fear that in time all quilts?that otherwise survive?natural?and?human disasters?may well?suffer the fate of this piece- at least the ones from early eras of textile-making in the US. Here is hoping I am wrong...

Any thoughts on that QHLers? What are your big picture long term prospects for 19th Century quilts as a whole? There is certainly a great disparity now in how different fabrics are holding up. Will they all succumb in the end?

Ebay item number: 150318931999
No affiliation but really unusual 4-Block quilt.
Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Re: "It was a dark and storm night"
From: SoldierGrrrl <soldier.grrrlgmail.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 07:34:29 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

On Mon, Jan 5, 2009 at 7:58 AM, Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com> wrote:
> http://blog.al.com/scene/2009/01/birmingham_museum_of_arts_fabr.html
> <http://blog.al.com/scene/2009/01/birmingham_museum_of_arts_fabr.html%20%20%20>

OH, what twaddle. I'm sure that he wouldn't know a "real" quilt if it
walked up and introduced itself. My grandmother, my mother and I, all
certainly seem to think what we make are "real" quilts, despite being
machine pieced (and sometimes quilted).

Hmmm...perhaps a sharply-worded comment on his "opinion" is needed.

Jen
--
Blonde. It's not just a hair color; it's a way of life.

http://soldiergrrrl.livejournal.com/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: She Left Her Mark - quilt contest challenge
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2009 20:17:36 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

Thank you, Kim Wulfert, for doing such a great job letting your subscribers
know about The Quilters Hall of Fame 2009 Challenge!

I hope many QHL and AQSG members will enter. This is your chance to possibly
get your quilt selected for inclusion in the TQHF collection!

http://quiltersspirit.blogspot.com/2009/01/historians-quilt-challenge-for-20
09.html

Karen Alexander
ww.quiltershalloffame.net




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "It was a dark and storm night"
From: "Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 09:19:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

OK - that means well over half of the quilts I've made in the last 40+ years
are just figments of my imagination! And the imaginations of those who keep
warm under them too I suppose.

I considered a comment on the website but restrained myself. It is possible
the writer would benefit from a list of suggested reading about quilts to
help him understand them better. But then, the bottom line is everyone is
entitled to their opinion and now that his has been printed its fact, right?

Enough time wasted on this, I need to get back to working on both my
imaginary quilts and the real ones too. But then is it 'real' if the hand
quilting doesn't cross over the design in curving patterns forming a subtle
secondary design element?

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle
Pretending to make quilts in PA



-----Original Message-----
From: SoldierGrrrl [mailto:soldier.grrrlgmail.com]

Hmmm...perhaps a sharply-worded comment on his "opinion" is needed.

Jen



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 05, 2009
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 10:34:49 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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charset="iso-8859-1"
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Elpaninero said:
>>What are your big picture long term prospects for 19th Century quilts =
as a whole? There is certainly a great disparity now in how different =
fabrics are holding up. Will they all succumb in the end?

Yes. I guess they will as will we! I recall someone saying once, =
"textiles have a life" . Nothing else lasts forever so why do we think =
quilts will. The quality of the goods in pieces from the 19th century =
varies and even things like workmanship will affect their lifespan. A =
poorly appliqued or pieced quilt will start coming apart before one that =
is well done. General care and handling of each piece will also vary.=20
It's okay, though....why should it last forever? Who can define a good =
life for a quilt? Hopefully it's served many purposes already; the joy =
of making it, warming someone on a cold night, a shroud, a tent for a =
child, blocker of drafts, touch of color and beauty in a home and on and =
on.=20
jean



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Subject: RE: Birmingham article
From: "Robins-Morris, Laura A" <lrobinsscharp.org>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 08:20:37 -0800
X-Message-Number: 6

I'm certainly not the Quilt History Maven, but this article was just too
much and needed a response.
I couldn't find the author's contact info, but I wrote this to the art
editor of the Birmingham News:


***
Dear Mr. Marshall,
I would like to comment on a piece written by James Nelson on the al.com
blog. He is listed as an art critic for the Birmingham News. =20
http://blog.al.com/scene/2009/01/birmingham_museum_of_arts_fabr.html#pre
view
I can not find a way to contact him directly, but I found your email
address on the Birmingham News website.

I would like to point out to Mr. Nelson some inaccuracies in his
article. Presumably an art critic has some background in art history but
few seem to know much about the history of quilts. Mr. Nelson relied on
the standard romantic stories about poor pioneers making quilts by hand
out of tiny worn out scraps of old clothes. He also made a judgement,
stated as fact, on hand-made versus machine-made quilts without
understanding either history or current trends.

It is fine when an art critic writes a subjective review of art, but
another thing when he perpetuates historical errors as this article did.
I would hope that Mr. Nelson might do further research on the subject
and even write a correction.=20

Below the signature is my comment that was added to the web page. I
would welcome any further comments from you or contact from Mr. Nelson.=20

Sincerely,
Laura Robins-Morris =20
****


The comment is on the blog page. I hope I didn't make any egregious
errors myself. It is scary writng such a public thing. =20
Oops, just saw a typo. And I tried sooo hard...

I won't even comment on Nelson's purple prose <g>.
Will let the group know if there is a response.
Laura


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "A True Quilt"
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 12:14:12 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

My bedtime reading last night was "Lone Stars: A Legacy of Texas Quilts, 1836-1936" by Karey Bresenhan and Nancy Puentes.

On pp. 110-111 of the book is the most faux of faux quilts, if judged by the B'ham blog writer's standards----a family tree quilt made entirely by machine. It is red-red wholecloth and stitched in white thread on the machine. The writers guess that its maker, a Mr. J.B. Roberson, a sewing machine salesman and demonstrator, might have used a device that had just then come to market, a quilting attachment, to write the entire family history, including a couple of proverbs. The genealogy is detailed and revealing, reflecting the early peopling of Texas by southerners from Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia, with stops along the route. Mr. Roberson's script had frills. No mean achievement for a faux quilt.

I love this book and always discover something new in it. It first made me aware of how pervasive the Scots-Irish ancestry is in the South and to recognize the relentless movement of this people first to the Old Southwest in the 1830's and 40's, thence westward to Texas, a state that in many ways finally defined the South. When James Knox Polk was elected President in 1844, his victory effectively ratified the doctrine of Manifest Destiny, which was the key element in the election campaign, and guaranteed Texas statehood ---thereby increasing the profit motive for cotton production and assuring the attendant expansion of slavery. Land---one can never overestimate the importance of land in the South.

The authors of this book capture so much in a succinct manner. Last night I was taken again by an elaborate indigo and white Carpenter's Square quilt Mrs. Martha Harriet Kincaid Wilson made in McKinney, TX. Her granddaughter, who owned the quilt at the time the book was written, was asked how she came to possess it. She said she didn't rightly recall, but allowed, "It's possible I sort of 'latched' on to it!'" That's a woman who knows how to use language to both conceal and reveal! I won't even ask for a show of hands of members who have "latched onto" a quilt.

In the maker's mother's name---Miss Temperance Rattan---one sees both the Ulster Scot cultural link and the effects of the Second Great Enlightenment on that culture, another key influence on Southern culture. (She herself left much of her estate to the Methodist Church). Her poignant "history" is a reminder of how prolific these farming folk were and how women's lives were measured at the time: "She was born February 20, 1839, moved to Texas in 1841, married in 1855, had fourteen children (one stillborn), and died in 1899."

And JudyJudyJudy, on pp. 30-31 is a quilt similar to one you own, the name of which we've always debated. (We thought of that odd musical instrument with the bells---the Glockenspiel) Here the pattern is called Lotus Blossom. 1835 date, though the solid green makes me wonder about that.

I have a friend who is Hindu, and we sometimes imagine how we would like to come back if we get recycled. I vacillate between several items from my mother's cookery list, Blue Bell Homemade Vanilla ice cream, a second child, a wild azalea, and one of several Rocky Mountain Road/Crown of Thorns/Railroad Around the Mountains quilts. One of those quilts is shown in this book. My friend says one cannot be recycled into something lifeless, but then she's never seen these quilts.

A slow but "true" quilter,
Gaye Ingram


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "It was a dark and storm night"
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 12:35:45 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle wrote:
" But then, the bottom line is everyone is
entitled to their opinion and now that his has been printed its fact, right?"

I know you speak ironically, Greta, maker of imaginary quilts. The writer himself is entitled to any opinion privately, but in the position he holds, he has the responsibility to get his facts right.

While I believe in making writers and editors aware that informed people read what they write and that their positions in the Fourth Estate require them to write from knowledge, I never overestimate the good that will come from it. Just the reminder, however, is often salutary.

We should not confuse the Museum with the newspaper, in any case. Gail Andrews T., who was textile curator of the museum and now, I think, is director, is no doubt more disgusted than any of us could be. Surely it is disappointing to see misunderstood the exhibit one has worked so hard to mount.


Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 05, 2009
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 14:42:20 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

What are your big picture long term prospects for 19th Century quilts as a
whole? There is certainly a great disparity now in how different fabrics are
holding up. Will they all succumb in the end?

I agree with Jean. Textiles are by their nature ephemeral. Sure some
examples survive from ancient Egypt and pre-Columbian Peru, but these are
rare indeed.
I think I am a good caretaker of my 19th century quilts, but I don't
think of myself as a museum. The operative word here is "my." Preservation
is not my primary goal. I want to enjoy my quilts and I want to share them.
I do some things which I know will shorten their lives. I display them (in
rotation) and I share them with other lovers of old quilts. Each time I
take a quilt to a lecture or study group I am stressing it. Most of my
quilts will probably outlive me.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fun textile find!
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 16:01:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

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How the heck did it get to be 2009?? I know I was only recently listening =
to Prince=2C when he still had a name=2C belting out a song about "Let's Pa=
rty lLike it's 1999" and wondering if 1999 would ever get here. I guess it=
did. WIth gusto.
=20
SO=2C let me tell yall about my latest fun find. A few weeks ago=2C I was =
rummaging through a 25 cent box of junk at a Humane Society Thrift Shop=2C =
mostly old upholstery samples and real crap=2C when I pulled out something =
that made my fat little heart go thumpety thump. I knew - or at least I TH=
OUGHT I knew what it was immediately=2C but I couldn't be sure until I look=
ed at the bottom - sure enough=2C there was the date of 1944. It was one o=
f those silk (rayon blend actually)
scarves that the War Dept gave to pilots in WWII. It is printed with a di=
fferent map on each side=2C and includes wind currents among other info. T=
hey were actually escape maps=2C and pilots carried several of them in the =
emergency kits. Each map was different=2C so if the pilot was captured=2C =
the enemy wouldn't know which map - therefore=2C which direction - the pilo=
t was using. Officially AAF CLOTH CHART. =20
=20
I looked them up on e-bay=2C and they sell for $25-$30=2C so they aren't pa=
rticularly valuable=2C but it was a wonderful historic find for a quarter. =
=20
=20
Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com"All God's Children got the Blues"XM Satell=
ite Radio=2C #74=2C Bluesville
_________________________________________________________________
It=92s the same Hotmail=AE. If by =93same=94 you mean up to 70% faster.
http://windowslive.com/online/hotmail?ocid=3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_hotmail_acq_broad=
1_122008=

--_95d39e42-240e-4c0c-8a46-caaf94e858b3_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "It was a dark and storm night"
From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 18:28:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

As a former journalist, let me say, that right now you are not getting the
best and the brightest in journalism. All newspapers are losing great
heaps of money. Veteran writers have been laid off by the thousands. Many
papers have already closed and some really big names are in bankruptcy,
Even in the best of times, journalists are plucked out of the newsroom and
sent on stories of which they have no knowledge and if it is a guy, he
probably couldn't care less about quilting unless he had some personal
experience with it.. He would much rather be covering politics or a murder.
LOL
I did a lot of long term projects and daily news as well, and let me tell
you , it really didn't matter which one I was working on , the time I had
for each story was limited. I remember once getting 20 minutes notice that
I had to do a phone interview with Nobel Prize winner Ellie Weilsel, and I
had never read anything by him. I was so embarasssed.
So I would suggest if you haven't already written to this guy and told him
why what he said upset you, do so nicely. Everybody likes to hear from the
public. Maybe even suggest another story he could do- maybe not quilting.
LOL.

Shari in NC



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Antique quilt was dry cleaned- what now?
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 22:44:28 EST
X-Message-Number: 12


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Antique quilt was dry cleaned- what now?

A friend from guild had a flood in her home over the holidays. The insurance
people came through to save and restore and repair. Unfortunately, their idea
of saving her antique quilt was to dry clean it.

My friend now is faced with the dilemma. Should she clean it to remove the
dry cleaning chemicals? I was going to suggest that she soak it, rinse, soak,
and rinse, then gently press as much water as possible and lay out flat to dry,
maybe on shower curtains and towels on the floor in her guest room.

Thought I'd ask you experts first. How should she proceed?



Many thanks and bright blessings!

~Donna Laing
www.NorthStarQualityQuilting.com


**************
New year...new news. Be the
first to know what is making headlines.
(http://www.aol.com/?ncid=emlcntaolcom00000026)

--part1_cbb.30dfc670.36957f1c_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Antique quilt was dry cleaned- what now?
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 20:22:00 -0800
X-Message-Number: 13

Good evening and Happy New Year to all - First, has there been any physical
or visual damage to the quilt because of the drycleaning process? Which
drycleaning process (solvent) was used? These days some 'drycleaning' is
actually wet-cleaning. Especially if the drycleaning business touts itself
as a 'green' drycleaner. What kind of quilt (materials used, age, condition
before the flood)?

Did the quilt survive the physical trauma of being tumbled (with a whole
bunch of other household textiles) in a drycleaning machine, subjected to
high heat to drive off the solvent and without dye bleed/transfer from the
chemicals and from the subsequent pressing (usually with steam)? If the
drycleaner actually used a petrochemical (such as perchloroethylene or
Stoddard solvent) and the quilt smells like it, the drycleaner didn't do a
good job of recovering the solvent like they are supposed to (for air
quality purposes, for health & safety and for their bottom line - the
solvent is expensive!), she can just allow the quilt to off-gas in a warm
clean place with a fan blowing towards an open window (dilution of the
solvent coming off of the quilt). Unfortunately, if the drycleaner used
detergents, perfumes and optical brighteners in the solvent (standard
practice), really the only way to remove those residues/contaminations is to
re-clean the quilt using the same solvent WITHOUT those additives. The
additives for drycleaning solvent usually aren't water-soluble - it's the
chemistry of drycleaning versus the chemistry of wetcleaning.

As has been mentioned before, wetcleaning a quilt is a whole 'nother
headache, fraught with all sorts of perils and problems.

And she should take a couple of aspirins for her sore foot (from kicking the
insurance people!)
Regards,
Meg
._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______
Margaret (Meg) Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator & Consultant
Professional Associate, AIC
mgmooneymoonware.net


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 1980s-90s japanese quilt magazines for sale
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 21:14:40 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello Friends,

I have run out of room on the shelves of my quilt library!

I have decided to sell:

1. My small collection of vintage Japanese Quilt Magazines --
originally published in the 1980s and 1990s.

Included are issues of "Patchwork Quilt Tsushin," "Quilts Japan,"
and "Patchwork Quilt Senka." E-mail me directly for a list:
quiltcomplexhughes.net

2. I also have copies of all five "Quilt Digests," 1983-1987.

Thanks,
Julie

Julie Silber
www.thequiltcomplex.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Schwenkfelder watercolor fraktur
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 21:49:58 -0800
X-Message-Number: 2

Thought of you Candace- a circa 1840 Schwenkfelder watercolor fraktur
probably from Worcester Township, Montgomery County PA is on the current
2009 sales catalogue from Austin T. Miller, American Antiques Inc.They say
it relates closely in many ways to several examples done by Sarah
Kriebel..daughter of fraktur artist David Kriebel"


Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
Women On Quilts
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Civil War Conference
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2009 09:50:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3


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Just read about a Civil War Conference in Harrisburg,PA in March via the Cos=
tume Society of America Newsletter. (=C2=A0http://www.genteelarts.com/=C2=
=A0)=C2=A0 Sounds very interesting. Many of you might like to check it out.=20
There is one particular interesting session that many of you would be intere=
sted in. Sounds like she is=C2=A0going to do a good job with presenting diff=
erent opinions. Probably (my opinion=C2=A0only)=C2=A0using Barbara Brackman'=
s book as a basis for much of her presentation.


Code to Freedom or Con Job? The Use of Quilts in Helping Slaves Escape to Fr=
eedom=20

Susan Lyons Hughes=20

A 1999 book, Hidden in Plain View, shared a story by a South Carolina Africa=
n-American quilt-seller, who claimed that quilts were used to give signals t=
o slaves attempting to escape using the Underground Railroad. After appearan=
ces on numerous public forums, including Oprah, the authors of Hidden in Pla=
in View and the authors of several children=E2=80=99s books have taken one f=
amily=E2=80=99s oral tradition and converted it into an antebellum landscape=
with quilts dotting every fence and porch rail from Alabama to Canada.=20
This presentation will explore the facts and myths of "Quilt Codes," and the=
million dollar industry that has resulted since the secret codes were final=
ly revealed. Then we will focus on the stories of real fugitive slaves, and=20=
those who assisted them, to discover the methods and motivations of those wh=
o risked their lives to escape slavery.=20

Hidden in Plain View, shared a story by a South Carolina Africa
n-American quilt-seller, who claimed that quilts were used to give signals t=
o slaves attempting to escape using the Underground Railroad. After appearan=
ces on numerous public forums, including Oprah, the authors of Hidden in Pla=
in View and the authors of several children=E2=80=99s books have taken one f=
amily=E2=80=99s oral tradition and converted it into an antebellum landscape=
with quilts dotting every fence and porch rail from Alabama to Canada.=20
This presentation will explore the facts and myths of "Quilt Codes," and the=
million dollar industry that has resulted since the secret codes were final=
ly revealed. Then we will focus on the stories of real fugitive slaves, and=20=
those who assisted them, to discover the methods and motivations of those wh=
o risked their lives to escape slavery.=20



Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

----------MB_8CB3EEE78F1B74D_1128_478_webmail-dx07.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: drycleaned quilt
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2009 10:21:14 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I second everything Meg said - only I would add much stronger language
against the insurance folk!

Let this be a lesson to us all, when it comes to antiques and family
heritage articles always verify with impartial specialists what the best
"restoration" practices are for that artifact. The insurance folk take the
path of least resistance ( and therefore the least expensive).

Newbie Richardson

------=_NextPart_000_0000_01C970B1.AC117F80--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Schwenkfelder watercolor fraktur
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 11:55:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

I took a look Kim -- And yes, it is definitely Schwenkfelder but may be a
later copy (meaning 1860s-70s) of Sarah's work. That orange is always
suspicious to me!
If anyone is interested, this is what we are talking about:
http://usfolkart.com/product_info.php?cPath=28&products_id=466

I am actually doing an exhibit of this kind of drawing (which is very common
in our little Schwenkfelder world) as a compare and contrast to Berlin
needlework...same period, many of the same motifs...opening in March. I
love Berlin work, and am probably one of the few!
Candace Perry
www.schwenkfelder.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Kimberly Wulfert, PhD [mailto:quiltdatingjetlink.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 12:50 AM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] Schwenkfelder watercolor fraktur

Thought of you Candace- a circa 1840 Schwenkfelder watercolor fraktur
probably from Worcester Township, Montgomery County PA is on the current
2009 sales catalogue from Austin T. Miller, American Antiques Inc.They say
it relates closely in many ways to several examples done by Sarah
Kriebel..daughter of fraktur artist David Kriebel"


Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
Women On Quilts
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com



---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: candaceschwenkfelder.com.
To unsubscribe send a blank email to
leave-qhl-1770637Clyris.quiltropolis.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 06, 2009
From: MMiller138aol.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 12:28:36 EST
X-Message-Number: 6


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Ladies...I want to know if any of you have read this article and what your
response is. I fear we are in big trouble if it becomes the law of the land. I
have received this article from 2 different sources...one in AZ and one from
Australia, which I find very interesting! How did this get passed????

_h_ (http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/264507#tab=article&sc=0&loca)
ttp://www.digitaljournal.com/article/264507#tab=article&sc=0&loca


Mary M. in Ohio

**************New year...new news. Be the first to know what is making
headlines. (http://www.aol.com/?ncid=emlcntaolcom00000026)

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Subject: homecraft law
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2009 12:58:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

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The law is for real. It has been on the news channels. However, as these
reports note, most of the products used have already been tested by
manufacturers before buying for intended retail usag. It is mostly
children's products and clothes under age 12 which will be hit the
hardest as that is what the law is zeroing in on. Guess it will pay to
save labels from now on.

You can google cnn, fox or nbc for archived information from their
newscasts.



MMiller138aol.com wrote:

Ladies...I want to know if any of you have read this article and what your
response is. I fear we are in big trouble if it becomes the law of the land. I
have received this article from 2 different sources...one in AZ and one from
Australia, which I find very interesting! How did this get passed????

_h_ (http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/264507#tab=article&sc=0&loca)
ttp://www.digitaljournal.com/article/264507#tab=article&sc=0&loca



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Subject: quilt's lifespan
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 14:02:47 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8

My thoughts exactly. That's why I tell those I make quilts for to USE them.
Jean Loken in MN


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Subject: Re: Fun textile find!
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 19:10:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

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Dear Teddy,

Thanks for sharing some fascinating information. One never knows what
information lurks in textile land.

Happy 2009!

Pat Cummings


On Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 4:01 PM, Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> wrote:

>
> Officially AAF CLOTH CHART.
> I looked them up on e-bay, and they sell for $25-$30, so they aren't
> particularly valuable, but it was a wonderful historic find for a quarter.
>

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Subject: Re: Antique quilt was dry cleaned- what now?
From: "Patricia Cummings" <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 23:03:34 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

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The trouble with dry cleaning is that sometimes carcinogenic agents are used
and these get into the batting. I guess you should find out what chemicals
were used, and if they are water soluble. If they are not, then there
doesn't seem to be much point in washing the quilting in water.

Patricia Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com


On Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 10:44 PM, <LinusDonnaaol.com> wrote:

> Antique quilt was dry cleaned- what now?
>
> A friend from guild had a flood in her home over the holidays. The
> insurance
> people came through to save and restore and repair.

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Subject: Re: homecraft law
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2009 20:15:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

Hi MMiller -

I just learned of this law moments before your post -- from a non-quilt
source. There appears to be concerns that "home businesses" -- the
people who make and sell everything from diapers, wooden toys, crib and
children's quilts, boutique children's clothing, etc -- will be the
hardest hit, as they don't do a volume large enough to absorb the cost
of the testing. I haven't heard "an official listing" of everything
that is covered, but the interpretation I'm seeing is that "all" items
intended for use by children under 12 will be affected -- whether they
are imported or made domestically, and numerous cottage industry groups
are concerned about their ability to sell at flea markets, bazaars and
craft shows. A large percentage of the items for sale in local
"tourist" shops in Lancaster County are of the "home cottage industry"
type, so I am curious to learn the "facts.". If anyone knows of
details about this law, I'd love to read the link, as after googling
some sites, I can't tell what is truth and what is over reaction.

h_ (http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/264507#tab=article&sc=0&loca)
ttp://www.digitaljournal.com/article/264507#tab=article&sc=0&loca

Thanks,
Barb in rainy (with ice covering all non-road surfaces) PA


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Subject: "real quilts"
From: "S Waddell" <swaddellhvc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 21:51:22 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

The recent discussion on what makes a "real quilt" has brought to mind
another issue in my area. Our largest local annual quilt show has just
decided to restrict quilts that were quilted by someone who was paid. The
quilts can still be entered for display, but will not be judged. The stated
rationale for this change are "concerns about the fairness of competition
and to encourage the development of personal quilt-making skills". The
general feeling around this change is that commercially-quilted quilts are
less of a quilt since someone was paid to quilt it.

While I respect the guild's right to conduct their show any way they see
fit, the change has put a damper on many local quilters who love to
piece/applique but do not have the time, room, or skill to quilt it
themselves. The commercially quilted quilts were always judged in their own
category; they were never in direct competition with anyone who created the
entire quilt. Rather than encourage the art of quilting, I feel this change
may hurt participation in the art. Several of our local shows have had
trouble in recent years getting enough quilts to make a nice show; not
judging commercially quilted quilts my cause even fewer participants. From
my experience running quilt shows, most folks want to get comments back on
their skills, not just show off their quilts.

Is this bias against commercially quilted quilts a general trend around the
country? Any thoughts on judging of commercially quilted quilts? Women
have paid others to quilt their tops since early in the 20th century. Do we
value less quilts that have been quilted by someone who was paid to do so?

Sharon in the Hudson Valley






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Subject: Quilts for Obama's Inauguration
From: karenquiltrockisland.com
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2009 15:46:28 -0800
X-Message-Number: 13

Here is a great piece of history about 44 quilts that I hope someone may do
a book about. There is a video included.

http://www.starnewsonline.com/article/20090107/ARTICLES/901070306/-1/ENTERTA
INMENT06?Title=Wilmington_resident_s_quilt_on_display_for_Obama_s_inaugurati
on


"Quilts for Obama: An Exhibit Celebrating the Inauguration of our 44th
President" at The Historical Society of Washington, D.C. The exhibit,
coinciding with Obama's inauguration as the 44th president on Jan. 20, opens
Jan. 11 and will be on display through Jan. 31.



Karen in the Islands




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Subject: Re: homecraft law
From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 20:20:51 -0600
X-Message-Number: 14

I can remember 30 or so years ago when they passed a law for Home business
toy makers. For example pull toys had to have a string that wasn't over so
many inches. Well no toy maker I know was inspected but they followed the
rules and it hopefully kept them for being sued if a kid got hurt on the
makers toy.
Debbie Hill-Russell
russhillbeecreek.net




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Subject: Re: "real quilts"
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 22:22:45 -0600
X-Message-Number: 15

I find this to be interesting since we have had women who quilted others'
quilts for pay and even did quilting desing marking for pay at least as
early as the mid-1700s in the US. Having someone else quilt your quilt for
pay is certainly nothing new. Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, TX



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Subject: OT - Martha Washington's painted gown?
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2009 21:23:01 -0700
X-Message-Number: 16

Hi all;

This was posted to one of my material culture lists and has me drooling
for more information.
I just know they won't explain it in the luscious way y'all would.
Anyone know about this
gown?

Jan

Subject: Martha Washington's painted silk faille gown?

Press accounts of last month’s return of the “First Ladies at the
Smithsonian” exhibition included a brief description of Martha
Washington’s silk gown, reportedly decorated with hand-painted native
flowers and insects. I understand that there has been a fair amount
written about the exhibit itself, and this dress in particular, but my
preliminary research has yielded little. Any guidance from the list on
where I can learn more will be very gratefully received.