Teddy Pruett's Finds
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 09 22:57:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


Heavens, Teddy! This last post really was worse than a Cinda Blog! I am
drooling at your wonderful finds, or should I call them "steals?" Good for
you. Thanks for the update. Now, where did you say you live, and where is
this shop, and how long will it take me, on a bicycle, to get there? Oh,
never mind! You have already scarfed up all the goodies. Sigh.

Pat Cummings
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fun Finds
From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 09 07:51:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Teddy,
Have you ever thought about compiling a book of your emails. They are
wonderful and would make the whole world laugh. I'll bet it would be a
best seller. Think about it.
Viv
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Pine COne Quilt
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 09 10:38:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3


<<<So Teddy how much does your Target quilt WEIGH?>>>



Enough that I could not hold it up to look at it without help from the cler
k!



I continue to call them Pine Cone quilts as that is the name I've known
all my life. But I am happy with all three names.



SOrry my posts come through garbled - I get a "" at each comma - extremel
y annoying and I can't seem to fix it.

ALso someone who shall remain nameless but whose initial is "X" commente
d on my last long post that was one endless paragraph. I assure you it was
perfectly paragraphed on the "send" end.


Teddy Pruett
www.teddypruett.com
Trying to live life from one "A-Ha!"
moment to the next.




_________________________________________________________________
Want to do more with Windows Live? Learn 9310 hidden secrets94 from Jamie
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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Irony
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 09 10:14:48 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

"The price of liberty is eternal vigilance."

This is the quote at the bottom of an article about a presentation in Dover,
DE at The Lewes Historical Society on the quilt code. By " Three members of
A Stitch in Time Quilt Guild of Dover - Ellen Harmon, Ann Martin and Ruth
Shelton - will combine their storytelling skills with quilting artistry and
song to tell how talented quilters showed the way for slaves to reach
freedom.

Martin, a retired Delaware State University family life educator and master
quilter, says, "The Underground Railroad quilt code was an oral tradition
that has been passed down from generation to generation. '

Their pattern info was different "She noted that different patterns meant
different things to the slaves. "A basket may mean that there was a basket
with food awaiting at a particular location or a britches pattern may mean
that a change of clothes awaited the weary slave to change into and provide
a disguise from the public description circulating to apprehend them," said
Martin."

The book is never mentioned, nor are alternative thoughts. Instead "In
keeping with its tradition of paying tribute to Black History Month, The
Lewes Historical Society will present "The Underground Railroad Code Trip,"
an account of how quilt patterns used by abolitionists told runaway slaves
what they would encounter as they made their way north to freedom."

http://www.capegazette.com/storiescurrent/0902/codequilts13.html

Sad.


Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
Women On Quilts
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pine cone quilts
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 09 08:28:16 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

Now Teddy, what would you call a quilt made like a pine cone but the little
triangles are laid down in overlapping straight rows. I saw it at a quilt
show in Robertsdale, AL and have a photo of it. I'm sure it weighed twenty
pounds! It was draped over a church pew so I'm not sure of its size, but it
was easily a generous lap size. I've seen many pine cones here in AL but
this was the first like this one.
They have part of the Cargo Collection in the Birmingham, AL Museum of Arts
right now, and one is a pine cone. All are African-American made, which is
the theme of the exhibit. The only quilts not from the Cargo Collection are
one from Gee's Bend and one huge quilt made by pounding catalpa leaves on
whole cloth, which are huge themselves and so the quilt is probably over
100" square.
Jean in MN, really getting into these Southern quilts



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fun Finds
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 09 13:07:51 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

Ditto to what Viven said. I was going to e-mail Teddy privately about her
obvious talent with words and how much a book would be welcomed in her
voice.
Stephanie Higgins (who writes as Stephanie Grace Whitson)
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: FVF (long)
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 09 16:29:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

We spent Presidents Day in Myersville looking at beautiful quilts. The
thrill of the day was seeing Margaret Potts Album quilt made in York Co., PA
between 1851 and 1858. It is remarkably similar and includes many of the
same names that are inscribed on the 1854 Wickersham Album quilt in The
State Museum of PA which was made in the same township. The quilt, owned by
Margaret's great granddaughter is extraordinary.
Fran brought some of her super chintzes and a Centennial bandana in blue
with the Greek key border. Barb Garrett showed us a quilt she had unquilted
(she wanted the back and the front was pretty sad) that gave us a good look
at the amazingly thin batting used by so many PA quilters. She also had two
quilts bought at a Chester Co. farm sale. Each had the same 1930s cheater
back. One had a charm-like variety of 3rd quarter 19th century fabrics in
the top; the other was made of various 19th century blocks with 1930s
sashing. Barb talked about "century farms" owned by the same family for
over 100 years where women would have such a variety of fabrics collected
over many years.
A T-shape Touching Stars (Brackman 3777), c. 1860, in a single red on
white had partial blocks along the edges which appeared to curve the design.
A mid-th century Carpenter's Star was made in pink and blue prints. It
always surprises me to see a Carpenter's Star in this time period. A
1950-60 giant, scrappy pieced Tulip had a zigzag set. An interesting
Schoolhouse (red on white with green sashing) used a red piping to outline
the edge of the roof.
We poured over a 1933 Sears catalogue and were fascinated by an NRA
(National Recovery Act) Stamp. We each got a sample on muslin, "Packed
under NRA member We do our part" with the eagle holding the cogwheel and
lightening bolts.
There were two interesting Double Wedding Rings. One had a pink print
binding, the other, much smaller, had sixteen pieces in the arcs. There
were wonderful quilts made in Frederick County, MD including a Broken Dishes
(1840-50) with an exceptional blue floral in the setting blocks and border.
A Franklin Co., PA Pineapple Log Cabin was surprising for its lavish use of
magenta. A single huge Carpenter's Star in red, green and orange made by
either Mennonite or Brethren women in the early 1900s was described as the
iconic Franklin Co. quilt. There is going to be a book from the Franklin
Co. documentation that we will all want to add to our libraries.
Poor Nancy Hahn suffers from old quilt deprivation when she heads south
in the winter. She's home for a "fix" and showed us some of the projects
she'll be working on back in SC. She does wonderful (and thoroughly
documented) marriages of old blocks and new sets in small quilts. She has
an Amish Postage Stamp, Pomegranate, Amish Baskets and Stars with a picket
fence border ready to quilt.
There was a "snaky-looking" Streak of Lightening, c. 1870. A lovely
yellow Rose had a real Marie Webster look. A free spirited Prince's Feather
in red, green and yellow (probably West Virginia, c. 1890) had a totally
whacky border with odd shapes appliqu├ęd randomly.
An Album from Washington Co. MD was made of 9 large blocks (24"), 2
Pomegranates in pieced baskets, 2 of the blocks we heard referred to as
'Happy Hands" at the AQSG Seminar in Columbus, 2 Crossed Tulips and a Rose
Wreath in the center, c. 1860. A 3rd quarter 19th century Prince's Feather
(32" blocks) alternated plumes with branches of tulips.
An English paper pieced Hexagon from the 1830s had a linen sheet dated
1808 used for the back. An incredible Mathematical Star (MD's name for Lone
Stars with fancy stuff added) with a sawtooth edge had the shield with
arrows chintz between the star points, a tape binding and a beautiful blue
Chinoiserie chintz border. It came from Baltimore.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: punctuation consolation
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 09 19:40: -0600
X-Message-Number: 9

Re paragraphs and punctuation:

As a teaching assistant at Auburn University, I was cured of being overly c
ritical of neglected punctuation. For a time, I became downright grateful f
or the odd mark of punctuation----a comma here, a period there, sometimes e
ven a dash used correctly. Anything at all.

I was  years old, just embarking on graduate studies in English. Auburn h
ad a selective admission policy, and the students in my classes were except
ionally well prepared for the study of composition and the essay form. They
were courteous young people, asked questions, introduced alternative point
s of view into class discussions. With one exception, they were no older th
an 17 or 18 years old---eager, bright, nice kids.

The exception was a big one, however. He was in his early thirties, then un
common in college undergraduate classes. He had been a clerk in a drug stor
e, and being around chemicals evidently had determined him to became a phar
macist.

Alas, he wot not of punctuation. Any punctuation. Well, I take that back. I
did discern a general principle running through his work: he used at least
one period in every essay, usually at the end of the paper, and sometimes,
in bright fall weather, he also used a mark on each page of the essays the
class wrote every Friday morning.

He did not believe in paragraphs any more than he believed in punctuation.
He told me he found them "matters of opinion."

The English Department had a policy regarding the failure to use sentences
in written work: two of them merited an automatic "F" for a paper during th
e first 2 weeks of the quarter. Thereafter, only one was permissible for a
passing paper. Moreover, though grammar was taught only through composition
, with lessonettes on gnarley things like the dash, students had to pass a
departmental examination on basic usage and punctuation in order to pass th
e course. The students I taught had no problem either with writing sentence
s or with the examination.

Except for the thirty-something wannabe pharmacist. He had problems with bo
th.

And he took very personally the inevitable "F" that appeared on the papers
he received each Monday morning. I did not like him because he was older th
an I and knew more than I, he told class members. How could I be qualified
to teach Alabama students? I was from another state! Each Monday, he would
riffle furiously back and forth through his paper, making faces and peculia
r noises. After a time, he would sit back in his seat, narrow his eyes, and
fix me with a pharmaceutical smirk. I knew it was only a matter of time be
fore he exploded with observations on my marks. Usually in the first half o
f the class, when we had begun discussing the new essay assigned for the we
ek, he raised his hand and said, "Why did I get a low grade on my essay?" I
always referred him to the comments at the end of the paper and invited hi
m to talk with me after class. Students exchanged knowing glances, and we r
eturned to the subject at hand.

By then, however, he usually was riled up. I began to note that three or fo
ur boys always lingered in the room until he had finished his diatribe aft
er Monday class meetings. I realized they thought bodily harm might occur,
either from me, I suppose, or my irate older student. Nothing I could say d
aunted him. "Well, I didn't INTEND to write more than one sentence! THAT's
why I used only one period. THAT happens to be my style. I've told you that
!" he would say. I invited him to my office for private instruction. He ref
used my offer.

By mid-term, I recognized that I could do no more, and so I encouraged him
to visit the Director of Freshman English with his complaints. Perhaps Dr.
Littleton would make an exception for him. I made the appointment for him a
nd saw his "corrected" papers were on hand for the occasion. He told my sup
ervisor I was a "smart aleck" who "had it in" for him and who didn't even r
ead his papers. He observed that I wore suits and "ladies' clothes" plus hi
gh heels to class to give the impression I was older than I was, but he had
good reason to believe I was younger than my students and that I didn't kn
ow a thing. Except maybe The Odyssey. And maybe "Huck Finn." He expounded h
is beliefs regarding useless marks of punctuation that mattered not a whit
in "real life." He happened to know his own IQ, he said, and he believed hi
s superior intelligence "threatened" me. Or perhaps I had a "crush" on him
and was angry at his failure to pay attention to him. Whatever my motive,
I could not read his papers objectively. The Director stood up for my virtu
e and for my informational background and pedagogical skills, and he sugges
ted the fellow simply humor me and the department by accepting my offer of
private instruction . His wife would not stand for his being alone with me,
the budding pharmacist retorted. She too suspected my motives were not who
lesome.

Did I mention this fellow was prematurely balding and tubby? that I was mar
ried to someone who wasn't and who believed in periods and commas?

After the conference, he took a new tack. When he received his paper, he as
ked me to explain every "p" that appeared in the margins. One day, he read
the "sentence" and I explained that introductory participial phrases were s
et off by commas. Moreover, they always had to modify the noun that followe
d. "Participle?" he bellowed. "What is a participle?"

And in that moment my mind went blank. Oh I got the basic definition more o
r less correct, but I made up a lot of stuff along the way. I was bluffing,
and I knew it, but I thought I had stumbled through it well enough to get
me through the class. The next day I did the wise and right thing: I admitt
ed my ignorance and taught a mini-lesson on participles.

That's when I learned that every single day of the quarter, that goofy "old
man" who sat at the back of the class and didn't "believe in" commas had b
een regaling the most populated boarding house in Auburn, Alabama, each noo
n with tales of his English teacher's ignorance, prissiness, and suspected
passion for him and his own superiority to her. He had imitated my voice,
reported my fear of his greater knowledge, cited the participle incident an
d my admission of ignorance. Every single noon, my English class had been t
he subject of his act at the boarding house.

I learned this from a friend and fellow T.A, an usually dear ex-Marine who
in his cups one evening had wrestled to the ground two Mormon missionaries
who had made the mistake of calling on him one Saturday evening when a part
y was in progress. We laughed and he offered to defend my honor, but assure
d me no one paid attention to the fellow.

For some reason, that did it for me. I had been embarrassed for him all qua
rter and had humored him, tolerating insolence I never would have tolerated
from a "real" student. The next Monday when he began his ritual, I told hi
m to leave the classroom. He was surprised, but I cocked my left eyebrow, l
ooked him in the eye, and he left, rather sheepishly.

Thereafter, at the end of every single line in his papers, he placed either
a comma or a semi-colon. Either would do; he had no preferences. He used a
period on every page. He failed the departmental examination and the class
, of course, and a student later told me he knew less about chemistry than
he knew about composition. No doubt he went on to dispense drugs to folks i
n north Alabama.

But he taught me to value nearly any reasoned effort at correct punctuation
. After reading his papers, I rejoiced to see the standard marks of punctua
tion, even when used only partly correctly or for that matter, downright in
correctly. I had seen the bottom, the worst case. Nothing could ever be wor
se. After that darkness, even a glint of light would brighten my teacher's
heart, would endear a student to me.

Those who would cluck their tongues at long paragraphs and questionable pun
ctuation have never seen that darkness, I suspect. As one who has, I sugges
t you tell your friend that you "don't believe" in paragraphs, Teddy.

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Brags--Great Finds and Quilter's Hubbies
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 09 19:29:56 -0800
X-Message-Number: 10

It is not often I feel like the luckiest quilter going... but Teddy's excellent shopping adventure reminded me of 2 great finds I have to share. Last year around this time I was at a quilt show and found Waldvogel and Brackman's "Patchwork Souvenirs of the 1933 Worlds Fair"... for a unbelievable price of $2.00. I scooped it up so fast, I didn't even look to see if there was anything else I might be interested in., (Stephanie, it was in St Louis, MO)

Not sure if it was QHL or AQSG with a string about Great Quilter Hubbies, but I'll share anyway... Gary is so supportive of my pursuit..(Like many other quilt guilds, my guild mostly, is also not enamored with "old quilts" although they allow me to do a bed turning at the gui ld quilt show, so who can complain). As a result, he takes me to most long distant events, which he affectionately calls it "Driving Miss Pam". It was three years ago, Hubby and I were in Milwaukee, we had just attended the Schaumburg Mancuso Quilt show and headed north to Milwaukee.. We found a great used book store, I came across a few of the usual quilt books, but Gary looking in the books on antiques, found Clues in the Calico and wait for it..... price $6.95.

Oh, happy day! Teddy thanks for reminding me of my lucky shopping finds.

From another hate to shop gal,

Pam
O'Fallon


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilter's husband
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 09 10:07:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

--00163646bf8a0e747b046346e690
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

One of the most important things my husband does is tell me to remember to
breath. We were in Southport, NC and went into an antique shop. I spied a
very unusual cheddar-brown-teal (the official NC quilt color scheme) quilt
and started to hyper-ventilate. He said my face got very red, my eyes got
big, and I started to stutter and whisper, "Oh-oh-oh my godthisis
great,supersuper..." etc. He took the quilt gently out of my hands and
wouldn't let me move until I'd started to breath naturally and my eyes
focused. "Breath, Pep, breath," he said softly. After calming down I went
and bargained with the shop owner and walked out with the beauty clasped to
my breast. I wouldn't lay it on the back seat-it was in my lap the whole way
home. You can see the cause of my excitement since I've added a gadget to my
blog about antique quilt. Go see Quilt Flap. Click on this link
http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com and scroll all the way down till you see
this title: My Favorite Quilt-today. I'll be putting up new pictures when I
write in the blog. Enjoy and nobody drool on the screen.
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
3 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--00163646bf8a0e747b046346e690--


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Subject: Re: Quilter's husband
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 09 10:29:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Pepper,
WOW! What a beauty! I understand why you stopped breathing.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Quilter's husband
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 09 09:53:38 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

UNBELIEVABLE!!! No wonder you hyperventilated!
Best regards,
Sharron..............
..........in Spring, TX where it's another Chamber of Commerce
day!...............

-
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Apologies to the English majors
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
In my former post: the verb is breathe. "I'm out of breath but need to
breathe..."
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
3 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: My Favourite Quilt Today
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 09 18:18:45 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5

What a super quilt Pepper. I don't usually like those colours, but
that quilt just sings its way into my heart.

There's something else about it which resonates with a conversation
I've been having recently with a quilting friend. Those crossings in
the circle centres are not all perfectly aligned. Several of them are
ever-so-slightly squiffily-twisted in their blocks, and it gives a
wonderful vitality to the whole thing. In conjuction with the fabrics
and pattern it produces liveliness and sense of movement. I can't
help but think it would be 'marked down' by show judges, but it would
get my best of show vote any day.

Thanks for showing us.

Sally Ward



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt History Study Groups
From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533frontiernet.net>
Date: Fri,  Feb 09 07:47:19 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello everyone,
Kim Wulfert conducted a follow-up discussion for Karen and I regarding the
Vintage Quilt Study Group-NY. We had a good time, sharing ideas with
people participating from across the U.S. who are interested in or
currently running similar small focus groups, which center on antique
quilts and history.
Kim has now posted the outline from the discussion on her website, which
lists ideas for topics and running a successful group. You can comment on
these or please bring up your own subject regarding study groups to
discuss.
http://womenonquilts.blogspot.com

You can also listen to both of the interviews and view the slide show
under the picture of antique picture on the left hand side, the column
titled "Interview Library of WOQ", click on Entering Listening Library and
check out the Beth Davis and Karen Parrett interview.

Regards
Beth Davis & Karen Parrett
Vintage Quilt Study Group-NY
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Art Barbie Quilts?
From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com>
Date: Fri,  Feb 09 05:40:17 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 2

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Hello -A0
A0
I've been reading about the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Barbie doll.
A0 Several years ago I stitched a Barbie quilt and have been wondering if
there are other art Barbie quilts.A0 Is anyone familar with such quilts?
A0
Best,A0 Kyra, who will still admit to owning a couple Barbie dolls (smile!
)
A0
A0
--0-511733028-1235137217:89186--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt exhibition notes
From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
Date: Fri,  Feb 09 13:25: -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

I returned late yesterday from a visit to the living history museum at
Winedale in Roundtop, Texas. It is a division of the University of Texas
Center for American History and they have a small collection of quilts, some
of which are currently on display. The quilts at Winedale are part of the
larger quilt collection held by the UT Center for American History where
Joyce Gross's quilts are currently being cataloged.

Cinda Cawley not withstanding, I will attempt to give you a brief
description of what I saw.

It was a beautiful day for a drive through East Texas farming country and
the countryside was delightful. Barbeque at the City Meat Market in
Giddings, Texas, was step back in time. The food was delicious and the
ambiance was unlike anything this Texas city gal has ever experienced.
That's another story.

The quilts are in one large room and are tastefully and professionally
arranged. The lighting is carefully set so as not to overexpose the quilts,
some of which are fragile and were on slantboards or tables. Most of these
quilts can be seen on the Quilt Index. You have to click on the Winedale
collection and scroll through a large collection of pictures. If you get
curious about any of my descriptions, it might be worth your while to check
out the Index.

The first quilt was an indigo glazed wool calimanco "Tree of Life" dated c.
1800-18. It was exhibited flat on a large table near the front door. The
wool was still shiny. It was backed with a coarse nut brown fabric that
looked like it could have been woven of wool and linen. It has a darker nut
brown twill-like binding that bound about 4/5ths of the quilt. There was a
wide gap where there was no binding across one edge where the quilt was
bound in a knife-edge finish. A beautiful example of calimanco, the top has
several patches of dark blue wool that looked to be scraps of the original
fabric. I believe I saw this quilt on display at the new Bullock museum in
downtown Austin several years ago. I believe this quilt is on the Index.

Next to this was a really sweet smaller quilt of pink calico on white made
up in an unusual "Delectable Mountains" strip setting. It is very worn but
still a lovely example of a strip setting using the saw-toothed triangles in
pink and white. All the fabrics were the same, so someone had a lot of pink
calico to use for making this quilt. It was dated c. 1830 and is on the
Index.

Then, a pink and green cotton calico scrap "Double Wedding Ring" on white.
Very 1930's. It was dated c. 1925-1935.

Next, a Pansy kit quilt, c. 1950-1975; Progress kit #1365; a medallion with
a lovely colorful floral spray with flower bouquets in each corner and a
scalloped border.

Now for the piece de resistance! On a table, minding it's own business, was
a very unusual star medallion with quite an amazing story. The quilt was one
5-pointed star on white. The star (not the block) was bordered entired by
small appliqued scallops. The block may be approximately 16- inches
square. This block is bordered by a series of small inner borders maybe 3
inches wide. They are in a precise order: red, green, white. On the last
border set the white outer border is much wider, approximately 6 to 8
inches, and it has a very unusual applique of green scallop-like leaves to
imitate a vine. Each scallop-leaf has a little posey of one stem, with a
leaf and a round red or blue/green "flower" on the top of the stem. This
improvisational border is only on two contiguous borders. In other words,
this border goes down one side and turns the corner, continuing up the next
side. Then it stops. But wait, it gets more interesting. One of the sides
without this border has the shadows of the vine on its narrow borders. It's
anybody's guess how the shadows got there, but if it was folded with the top
on the inside (right sides together) and sat like that in salt water for a
week or two, that might have contributed to the transfer of the image. Also,
I imagine it was probably stored for many years in varying temperatures and
humidity, and we all know what that can do.

But there's more! You ask why it sat in salt water for some weeks. The
stories given at the museum and on the Quilt Index are slightly different,
but the gist of the story is that the quilt was made in 1858 by Amanda
Pairlee Hammonds in Texas. She married a Mr. Linn in 1860. At the end of the
Civil War they joined a band of people - the McMullan Colony - hoping to
relocate in South America. Their ship, the Derby, foundered and sank off the
coast of Cuba. After some days or weeks the quilt floated to the surface,
washed ashore, and was found by the Linns. It seems to have been the only
thing they salvaged. They apparently did make it to Brazil but returned to
the U.S. some time later. The maker's granddaughter (I think) donated it to
the Texas Memorial Museum in the 1950's.

This quilt can be seen on the Quilt Index. One of it's accession numbers is
TMM791-1. If the Q. Index information is correct, it can also be seen in
Bresenhan's first volume on Texas quilts, Lone Star...pp. 125-127. Here's an
interesting research project for someone -- any takers??? Let me know.

Then, a scrappy "Goose Tracks" dated 1930-1949. It is basically a 9-patch
with the goose tracks in each corner of each 9-patch. It is also on the
Index.

A "Ladies Fancy Variation" in yellow calico on white dated 1880-1910
followed. Nothing to write home about!

This was followed by an amazing white floral embroidery/crewel work quilted
counterpane made by a Mrs. Westcott of New Jersey, c. 1800-1814. The floral
embroidery is very elaborate and extensive with lots of graceful branching
in arcs and S-curves. It includes lovely flowers scattered among the
branches, leaves, berries and tendrils. It looks like someone was
embroidering images they saw on wallpaper or chintz. It was closely quilted,
a characteristic that is consistent with its estimated date.

Then, a 1930's Grandmother's Flower Garden. Nothing to write home about!

Followed by a "Sunburst/Sunflower" variation with an embroidered date of
1818 and the words "Sterling and Mary Orgain" and the state, "Tennessee." It
is made of chintz and calico prints in blues and browns. One of the fabrics
is a red and white stripe, the red stripe being made up of very itsy-bitsy
tiny little flowers and vines. It is trapuntoed in the white setting squares
and there's a little quilting: scallops around the roundels and inner
circles are slightly quilted. The small amount of quilting puzzles me. Most
quilts from this era are heavily quilted. Maybe it was meant to be a summer
quilt and the maker didn't think a summer quilt required more quilting???
Haven't we had this discussion before, some time back?

A "Rose of Sharon/Rose Cross Variation" followed. Dated c. 1840-1860. The
interesting thing about this solid red, green, yellow on white was that it
included an indigo print for parts of the flowers and vines. The vine goes
all the way around, but it has flowers on it on only two sides. It's an odd
duck, but very pretty and cheerful. There are several communities in central
Texas settled by German immigrants, Fredericksburg being the best known of
them. Could there be a connection????

This was followed by a "Rocky Mountain/N.Y. Beauty/Crown of Thorns" dated c.
1840. It had a green calico print with yellow and dark green designs on it
and was on white background. It was heavily trapuntoed and had very heavy
shadow quilting.

No show is complete without a crazy. This one has a large black sateen
ruffle border. It can be seen on the quilt index. It was dated c. 1886-1888.
I saw the date 1888 embroidered on it. Also included is a silk souvenir
square from the 1888 Dallas State Fair and lots of Victorian embroidery:
chenille lamb with a banner, flowers, Kate Greenaway figures, umbrellas, an
oriental figure appliqued and embroidered in one spot. It is also on the
Quilt Index.

A "Rose Wreath" dated c. 1908-1940, but judging from the colors and minimal
quilting, it looks like a 1930s piece. The flowers were several shades of
solid melon orange and the wreath and leaves were Nile green-ish. The
background was an off-white solid cotton.

A "Carolina Lilly" from Kentucky dated 1850-1900 followed. It is on the
Quilt Index, also. Stems are dark blue-green and flower petals are a
pink-red. It's on white and quite lovely. The quilting is a complicated and
stylized fluer-de-lis in the setting squares. The label said it may have
been made for the 1855 wedding of Mary Ann Ellington to Lauren Alexander in
Kentucky after which they moved to Texas.

Lastly, a "Drunkard's Path" possibly the "Falling Timbers" setting in indigo
print on white. The indigo has a raised yellow print on it. Dated c.
1890-1910. It was folded into a small square and hard to judge, but I think
it is also on the Quilt Index.

Hope you all enjoyed this little tour. If you can, get to Winedale before it
closes this exhibition. You can Google Winedale and find all kinds of
information about it and how to get there.

Best wishes,
Kathy Moore
Lincoln, NE
(currently in Austin on family business)












----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: continuation of Flora post
From: laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com
Date: Fri,  Feb 09 10:27:58 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 4

--0-1312387563-1235154478:72586
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

After hearing it was worth $10,000, I just had to consign it to auction (no matter how good a friend she was!). I hadA0made a very professionalA0ful
size photo of the quilt for her instead. At auction, the quilt sold for just $4,400 because right before the sale, the stock market had crashed sli
ghtly, and of the two dealers competing, one stopped bidding as a courtesy
to the other. The buyerA0mounted it and took it to the Winter Antiques Show, where it sold for $11,000. Flora now has the photo in her dorm room at c
ollege.
Laura Fisher
--0-1312387563-1235154478:72586--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt History Speakers
From: Smb4incaol.com
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 09 13:34:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

The Tompkins County Quilters Guild in Ithaca, NY, will be celebrating our 35th anniversary this year and have discussed inviting someone to speak during our show in October.? We are looking at applying for a grant to do this, so there are certain restrictions.? Since the Ithaca show in 1976 played a role in the quilting revival,?some thought a quilt historian would be a good choice.? Any?suggestions on quilt historians who can still captivate the general public?? I think folks on the committee?would like the person to have knowledge of Ithaca's role in the 1976 quilting revival.?
Thanks,
Suzanne Broderick

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Finds
From: laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com
Date: Fri,  Feb 09 10:23:29 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 6

HI all - taking a break from emailing photos.....loved reading the recent posts about finds. Ah yes, I remember some of mine so well. The experience o
f finding a treasure unknown to the seller is a thing of the past for the most part, today everyone is informed, and everything is "museum quality"
A0
But, I do recall one fun experience about  years ago. I had been shopping an antiques show with a very pregnant friend, whose only purchase for $35
was a charming 1930s feedsack, small scale Economy Patch crib quilt, which
she draped over her belly as we walked the show. Five hours later, she gave birth to Flora.

That weekend at the 26th Street flea market in NYC, I found --- a real floral album applique crib quilt dated in bold applique numerals 1874, and sign
ed in bold applique letters FLORA!A0Imagine my glee! As I was handling it,
gathering the packaging material to make it a gift to her, I kept looking and thinking "IHmmm, IA0think this is something quite valuable, perhaps to
o valuable for Flora to sleep under and spit up on. So, I had my assistant take it to Sotheby's just to see what it might be worth, she returned with
the Americana curator's estimate that it might fetch $10,000 at auction, an
d could she have it for the January sale.
--0-1817324348-12351549:77750--



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Quilt History Speakers
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Fri,  Feb 09 17:02:54 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9

We brought in Robert Shaw, who gave a very good talk.
http://www.roberteshaw.com/

Kim



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Quilt exhibition notes
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Fri,  Feb 09 17:54:52 -0600
X-Message-Number: 10

Kathy, I'm so glad you got to go to the exhibit while you're in Austin. I
had the priviledge of seeing it last Sunday and was thrilled. Your
descriptions were wonderful and allowed me to revisit the exhibit all over
again. Since we couldn't take pictures, it was nice to read about the
quilts again.

Hope you have a great time while you're in Texas.

Best regards,
Sharron...........................
.............in Spring, TX..................




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 1995 Exhibition
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Fri,  Feb 09 21:58:02 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

no connection - just FYI

http://valley.vcdh.virginia.edu/quilts/quilt.html


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fw: Finds, the FLORA post sent again in one piece Hope it's readable now
From: laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com
Date: Fri,  Feb 09 22:39:36 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 2

HI all - I'm taking a break from emailing photos. I loved reading the recent posts about finds. Ah yes, I remember some of mine so well. The experienc
e of finding a treasure unknown to the seller is a thing of the past for the most part; A0today everyone is informed, and everything is "museum quali
ty."

But, I do recall one amazing experience about  years ago. I had been shopping an antiques show with a very pregnant friend, whose only purchase --
for $35 --was a charming 1930s feedsacks, small scale Economy Patch crib quilt, which she draped over her belly as we walked the show. Five hours later, she gave birth to Flora.

That weekend at the 26th Street flea market in NYC, I found... a real floral album applique crib quilt, dated in bold applique numerals 1874, and signed in bold applique letters FLORA!

Imagine my glee! As I was handling it, gathering packaging material to make it a baby gift to her, I kept looking and thinking "Hmmm, I think this is something quite valuable, perhaps too valuable for newborn Flora to sleep under and spit up on.

So, I had my assistant take it to Sotheby's just to see what it might be worth. She returned with the Americana curator's estimate that it might fetch $10,000 at auction, and could she have it for the January sale.

After hearing it was worth $10,000, I just had to consign it to auction (no matter how good a friend she was!). I had made a very professional full size photo of the quilt for my friend instead.

At auction, the quilt sold for only $4,400 because right before the sale, the stock market had crashed and scared everyone, and of the two dealers seriously competing, one stopped bidding as a courtesy to the other.

The winning bidder mounted it, took it to the NYC Winter Antiques Show, and sold for $11,000.

Flora now has the photo in her dorm room at college. FLORA was published years ago in the calendar (22 years, I guess, as Flora just had a birthday, so probably its the 1987 Quilt Engagement Calendar).

Laura Fisher


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: This is the FLORA post
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 09 05:53:19 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 3

Laura's original post came through in MIME so I tried to clean it up and resend it, but obviously only created a blank post. Fortunately, I took a copy of it before letting it go, so here is Laura's post:

HI all - I'm taking a break from emailing photos. I loved reading the recent posts about finds. Ah yes, I remember some of mine so well. The experience of finding a treasure unknown to the seller is a thing of the past for the most part; today everyone is informed, and everything is "museum quality."

But, I do recall one amazing experience about  years ago. I had been shopping an antiques show with a very pregnant friend, whose only purchase - for $35 --was a charming 1930s feedsacks, small scale Economy Patch crib quilt, which she draped over her belly as we walked the show. Five hours later, she gave birth to Flora.

That weekend at the 26th Street flea market in NYC, I found... a real floral album applique crib quilt, dated in bold applique numerals 1874, and signed in bold applique letters FLORA!

Imagine my glee! As I was handling it, gathering packaging material to make it a baby gift to her, I kept looking and thinking "Hmmm, I think this is something quite valuable, perhaps too valuable for newborn Flora to sleep under and spit up on.

So, I had my assistant take it to Sotheby's just to see what it might be worth. She returned with the Americana curator's estimate that it might fetch $10,000 at auction, and could she have it for the January sale.

After hearing it was worth $10,000, I just had to consign it to auction (no matter how good a friend she was!). I had made a very professional full size photo of the quilt for my friend instead.

At auction, the quilt sold for only $4,400 because right before the sale, the stock market had crashed and scared everyone, and of the two dealers seriously competing, one stopped bidding as a courtesy to the other.

The winning bidder mounted it, took it to the NYC Winter Antiques Show, and sold for $11,000.

Flora now has the photo in her dorm room at college. FLORA was published years ago in the calendar (22 years, I guess, as Flora just had a birthday, so probably its the 1987 Quilt Engagement Calendar).

Laura Fisher




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ***SPAM*** This is the FLORA post
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 09 10:50:53 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

Kris thank you for re-sending this. What a wonderful story. I dabbled in
antique buying/selling years ago and just love "treasure-hunt" stories.

My mini-version is buying a basket of sewing junk at a sale in Iowa for $1
back in the 1980's and finding a vegetable ivory measuring tape with a
Stanhope viewer in the junk :-). I resold it because that was my job, but
I've always regretted it!

I wonder where Flora's quilt lives now. . . .

Stephanie Whitson Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Reply to Suzanne's Tompkins Co. QG query
From: Linda Hunter <hunterljroadrunner.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 09 00:17:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Suzanne,
I believe I was at your 1976 quilt show in Ithaca. It was one of
the first quilt shows I attended, as I had only been quilting about 2
years then. I was very impressed with the BiCentennial (I believe)
quilt that was made by your guild with lovely lettering on it describing
the quilt blocks, if I remember correctly. Was this your guild's
quilt? Since I can still see it clearly (and may even have a photo of
it someplace), I would say it was memorable. Linda
Hunter

--
Linda Hunter
AQS Quilt Appraiser, Instructor and Lecturer
lindahunters-stars.com
www.hunters-stars.com





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: using Internet for quilt research
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
I have begun teaching a workshop on this vbery topic and have used it
quite successfully on a number of quilts. It's a great deal of fun and
humanizes the quilt for me in a special way! Marcia Kaylakie
Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com
------_NextPart_000_001E_01C994CD.646D48E0--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Article about Bedhangings
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 09 09:17:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

--000325574c3eca180e0463828b85
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The latest issue of *Early American Life* magazine showed up in our mailbox
on Friday. I really do think that someone at the post office really likes
this magazine. Delivery of issues is sporadic, and in a year's subscription,
we actually get about three copies at best, but I digress.

There is a lovely article about bedhangings and their history, with examples
from Winterthur, Colonial Williamsburg, etc. This is the April 09 issue,
pages 60-70. Makes me wish I lived in those days, before central heating
that made bedhangings obsolete. The article by Janet Cass is called, "A Most
Valuable Accessory."

No affiliation, just think you may enjoy the article, too.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Brags and Great finds and Quilter's Husbands
From: LAHudlowaol.com
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 09 17:12:10 EST
X-Message-Number: 4


-------------------------------1235340730
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This brag is so tied into a Quilter Husband.......

For over 30 years now my husband has worked in the Washington DC area. A few
years ago he was lucky enough to be able to go to estate sales on a regular
basis. Well he had one of those days that antique people dream of. When you
go to an estate sale you sign up and wait for them to let you in........he was
in the first  people left in the house. We are collectors of late 18th and
early 19th century furniture.....he saw a wonderful grain painted blanket
chest in an upstairs bedroom. The chest was facing the wall and had tons of
stuff piled on top. He sat on it and waited for an attendant to come to help him
carry it down.......he never opened it. Once he paid his $100 out the door
he went. Inside was.......2 crazy quilts which I am sure have never seen the
light of day. 1 1850ish pineapple quilt made with very heavy cottons and wools
and a French fabric back........I think the front is just plain ugly but the
back is beautiful. Lots of late 19th and early th century lace collars,
gloves and hankies...........napkins and linens. Last but not least was a cast
iron bank.

Not bad for $100 and a days work HUH?

Lori in Sharpsburg, MD.......very windy

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 22, 09
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 09 07:35:17 EST
X-Message-Number: 1



Lori's post about the chest filled with quiltsreminded me of a similar
situation that changed my life for the better.

My husband used to refinish furniture to sell at local antiques shops. We're
in Bucks County PA, and folks come here from other states for antiques.

He did a brisk business in antique trunks, so he would often go to auctions
and buy poor abused beat-up old trunks. Most were missing their brass trim or
their leather handles, painted white, or shudder lined with Contac paper. He
would strip paint, remove Contac paper, refit trim, rebuild trays and
hatboxes, and when he was done, there was a beautiful old trunk.

Well, one day at auction, he bid $5 on a plain flat top trunk that looked
like it had been dragged behind a bus. It had dings in the wood, and no pretty
tin or lovely Jenny Lind shape to make me see why he would want it. No one else
bid so it was his for $5. He told me that flat tops sold well, because people
used them as coffee tables in small apartments that needed storage. As we
walked to the truck, he remarked how heavy it was --probably a well made trunk,
maybe lots of trays or something else inside.

When we got it home, he called me out to the garage. In that ugly duckling
trunk was a White sewing machine, in its case. And it worked! In the little
drawer with the alternate foot was the receipt: bought at Lit Brothers in
Philadelphia on September 1, 1949. That is MY BIRTHDATE! That machine was meant for
me!

I took it for servicing, and then I sewed on it for the next 13 years before
buying my Pfaff and giving the White to my daughter. I had been hand piecing
and hand quilting all my quilts before the White sewing machine showed up.
What a great gift! I will say, conservatively, that I made over 100 quilts on
that workhorse.

Bright blessings!

~Donna Laing
www.NorthStarQualityQuilting.com


**************
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: fabric widths
From: Gary Parrett <gparret1yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 09 12:27:35 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 2

I haven't sent a post for some time, but am having difficulty finding some information on fabric widths. I picked out some vintage fabric from a box at an estate sale the other day (I do try my hand at mending old quilts) and got a small stack for $1.00. If the man behind the table only knew... but I'm not telling him. I remember the 36" fabric I used to purchase some years ago, but can't find info. on 25" and 32" cotton. You'd think in all these books I own someone would have written about fabric width, but I'm not finding it. So, I'm asking the pro's who always have the answers.

Thanks so much,
Karen





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: fabric widths
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 09 15:54:24 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

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Our own Joan Kiplinger has pages about fabric widths in her book, Vintage
Fabrics. She did a great job of documenting all of that, so you might want
to give her book a try.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com

--0022153f6c2bb30d04639c359d--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The famous Laura Fisher
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 09 16:54:19 -0500


The Maine Antique Digest arrived in our mailbox today, and there on
pages 34-c and 35-c is a 2-page spread on our own Laura Fisher, New York
City quilt dealer extraordinaire. There are  photos in b/w, mostly of
quilts , but one with the lady herself, obviously caught unawares.

A visit to the web site www.mainantiquedigest.com brought no results
for the March issue yet.

By the way -- this is the premier antiques mag/newspaper in the country.
If you don't have a subscription yet, get one! It comes monthly, with
news of sales and exhibits all over the country.

Judy Grow
Flemington NJ
------_NextPart_000_0085_01C995D7.5E64A050--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: fabric widths
From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 09 16:00:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

If you have a copy of Brackman's Clues in the Calico, read what she
has to say about the many fabric widths that were available toward the
end of the 19th century. Also, early th century Sears catalogues,
original or repro, show many fabric widths in their domestic cottons
sections. Purpose and quality may affect those fabric widths.

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: fabric widths
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>


Karen -- generally, 25" width was common in cottons prior to early
thC, 32" width taking over through to mid-1930s. However, many
fabrics came in wider widths in the early 19th C. These were usually
staple cottons such as lawn which could be up to 60" wide and Indian
Head which ranged from 18" to 72" depending on sewing purpose. I have
an extensive width dating chart from 1880s to 1960 in my vintage fabric
book.