Subject: Ebay tops and H-mong quilt makers
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2009 22:57:12 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Go to Pat Cummings website and scroll all the way to the bottom to find the
link to the newspapers series that was done in 2005 about the quilts these
very accomplished H-mong needleworkers are now making for the Amish. I came
across this series a couple of years ago ands have them on file. These
articles show you how the Amish have taken the opportunity to hire very
skilled needleworkers to assist them because of the tourist demand. In this
instance, the demand became so great that eventually some of the women in
America were sending instructions back to their homeland in order to get
more quilts made.

This same article gives us a clue as to how all of this activity on eBay may
be able to take place as a business right here within the US as well. Word
gets around very quickly within non-native born communities when a talent is
financially successful in creating something that is much in demand in their
new homeland. It surely does add an interesting twist to American quilt
history for many of the women who came here following the Vietnam War are
now Americans. Judy Grow, it sounds like you may have received a response
from a woman leading one of these groups or at least buying tops and quilts
from within such a community.

Of course they may each be doing their own work in their own individual home
and then selling it to "Brenda". The fact that she says that 13 of them
are related and 3 are best friends is a pretty significant clue that these
quilt tops are coming from a very close community. But is it also possible
that this is a native-born community that has taken on this task? Could it
be a close church community of some kind? Inquiring quilt historians will
have to dig deeper to find the answers.

Karen in the Islands




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Names, websites, pantihose
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2009 10:07:51 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


Lonnie Schlough at www.fixquilts.com said:


<<<I used 'what I do' in my website name.
> People would NEVER remember my name!! and they all think I am male=2C whi=
ch
> I am not.>>>



Well=2C with a name like Teddy I often have the same response. "Dear Mr. P=
ruett..."

I decided to use my name for my website=2C as I thought it would be easy to=
remember. SO=2C of course=2C people call and fuss at me for not having a =
website=2C and they say "I searched for Trudy Pruitt and I can't find you a=
nywhere." Truthfully=2C at least half of south Florida calls me Trudy. Wh=
en Lori East was here=2C she had a variation of the same problem- everyone =
wanted to call her Lori West. So she and I devised a fictitious business t=
hat we called Trudy West Productions. Then she moved away.



Many times=2C when people meet me after reading the posts here on QHL they =
look a bit stunned and stammer "Oh - ah - you don't look anything like I ha=
d imagined". SO I will tell yall right now=2C just go to the Food Channel =
and watch Paula Deen and you will see me. Only I'm not quite so photogenic=
- and I dont smile as prettily - and my hair is short and a bit spikey - a=
nd my purse is not as heavy with filthy lucre. But we could be sisters=2C=
even I can see it. ANd we sound exactly alike. I hear that all the time.=
But only from northerners=2C doncha know=2C because to southerners I just=
sound like everybody. My hubby looks like he could be her hubby's brother=
. I appraised quilts in Punta Gorda last week=2C and went to two parties w=
hile I was there. (Great work if you can get it!!) My hostess just wrote a=
nd said some of the gals there had decided I was really Paula=2C but I woul=
dn't admit it because I wanted some time off without the admirers! R-i-g-=
h-t......



And I daresay it has been a while since my look alike Paula has fought the =
battle of pantihose. I fought that good fight last weekend. It has been y=
ears since I've had ill-fitting pantihose=2C as I finally found a brand and=
size that worked properly. But I must have had some odd ones in my drawer=
unbeknownst to me. I was swamped with appraisals on Friday=2C so I arrive=
d at the show on Saturday early early early and banged on the doors and beg=
ged til they let me in. By the time I got to the second quilt=2C I knew I =
was in trouble. I was getting to be just a wee bit hobbled. Before I coul=
d get back to my table=2C I was walking with my knees strapped together=2C =
and found it necessary to throw my feet out to the side to perambulate. SO=
=2C thinks I to myself=2C what the heck to do???



I can't take the panithose off=2C because 1. My thighs will rub together a=
nd start a fire=2C which could be dangerous for my person and other living =
things - not to mention the convention center was brand new=2C having repla=
ced the one that was destroyed in the year of neverending hurricanes. and =
2. I have on new shoes=2C which require that I wear hose. What to do=2C w=
hat to do???



I carry scissors in my briefcase=2C so I got the scissors and waddled to th=
e ladies room=2C thanking Gawd that no one was there to see me. I sat on t=
he john=2C pantihose intact=2C and cut them at the knee=2C which was a heck=
uva chore=2C seeing as how the things were still on my body=2C which means =
cutting around my knee/treestump. But cut I did. The pantihose immediately=
developed an 18" gap and I was left with a version of spanx - my thighs w=
ere covered and all was well. They were support hose. They would probably=
actually stay where they belonged. SO far so good.



Below the knee=2C I was left with a fairly decent pair of what yall would c=
all "knee-hi's" but I personally call them "weenie wilters."

Don't ask. My expectations were that they would immediately puddle around =
my ankles=2C but they did not. They behaved quite nicely=2C actually=2C an=
d I was thankful beyond words that I was wearing a very very long black ski=
rt and the hidden-in-the-bathroom-stall tailoring would not be evident. SO=
far so good.



But eventually I had to go to the ladies room to tend to more expected thin=
gs. I grabbed the top of my pantihose and went to pull them down - and the=
y would not budge. The elastic in the top had "sprung" itself so it lowere=
d readily - until it got to the top of my leg. The hose had crept up to th=
at point=2C and created a tourniquet of sorts. For one frightening moment=
=2C I thought I might have to call for help - preferably someone bearing sc=
issors. Finally=2C the dam gave way and all was well.



I was beyond busy all day - slammed up against the wall=2C actually=2C in a=
minor panic that I would not be able to get to all the quilts that were wa=
iting to be appraised. Yet no one suspected the turmoil that my legs and t=
highs had been through all day. I remember Pepper telling us one time that=
she never ever wore pantihose here in the south. All I can say is: Way t=
o go=2C Pep - you must have great thighs!!


Teddy Pruett
www.teddypruett.com
Trying to live life from one "A-Ha!"
moment to the next.




_________________________________________________________________
Hotmail=AE is up to 70% faster. Now good news travels really fast.
http://windowslive.com/online/hotmail?ocid=3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_70faster_03200=
9=

--_0d4d9b8d-9b04-40e1-81f5-6399c04d3654_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Names, websites, pantihose
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 10:17:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

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Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Teddy, you are in the wrong line of work. SNL needs script writers like
you. Thanx for my morning chuckle.



Teddy Pruett wrote:

And I daresay it has been a while since my look alike Paula has fought the battle of pantihose. I fought that good fight last weekend. It has been years since I've had ill-fitting pantihose, as I finally found a brand and size that worked properly. But I must have had some odd ones in my drawer unbeknownst to me. I was swamped with appraisals on Friday, so I arrived at the show on Saturday early early early and banged on the doors and begged til they let me in. By the time I got to the second quilt, I knew I was in trouble. I was getting to be just a wee bit hobbled. Before I could get back to my table, I was walking with my knees strapped together, and found it necessary to throw my feet out to the side to perambulate. SO, thinks I to myself, what the heck to do???


I can't take the panithose off, because 1. My thighs will rub together and start a fire, which could be dangerous for my person and other living things - not to mention the convention center was brand new, having replaced the one that was destroyed in the year of neverending hurricanes. and 2. I have on new shoes, which require that I wear hose. What to do, what to do???



>

--------------020507020201030503020705--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Paula and panty hose
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2009 08:19:37 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4



I think you WILL be as rich as Paula when you put your new style pantyhose =
into production.
Good bye Spanx - Hellos Teddy Trims!

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com




I can't take the panithose off, because 1. My thighs will rub together and=
start a fire, which could be dangerous for my person and other living thin=
gs - not to mention the convention center was brand new, having replaced th=
e one that was destroyed in the year of neverending hurricanes. and 2. I =
have on new shoes, which require that I wear hose. What to do, what to do?=
??



I carry scissors in my briefcase, so I got the scissors and waddled to the =
ladies room, thanking Gawd that no one was there to see me. I sat on the j=
ohn, pantihose intact, and cut them at the knee, which was a heckuva chore,=
seeing as how the things were still on my body, which means cutting around=
my knee/treestump. But cut I did. The pantihose immediately developed an =
18" gap and I was left with a version of spanx - my thighs were covered an=
d all was well. They were support hose. They would probably actually stay=
where they belonged. SO far so good.



Below the knee, I was left with a fairly decent pair of what yall would cal=
l "knee-hi's" but I personally call them "weenie wilters."

Don't ask. My expectations were that they would immediately puddle around =
my ankles, but they did not. They behaved quite nicely, actually, and I wa=
s thankful beyond words that I was wearing a very very long black skirt and=
the hidden-in-the-bathroom-stall tailoring would not be evident. SO far s=
o good.



But eventually I had to go to the ladies room to tend to more expected thin=
gs. I grabbed the top of my pantihose and went to pull them down - and the=
y would not budge. The elastic in the top had "sprung" itself so it lowere=
d readily - until it got to the top of my leg. The hose had crept up to th=
at point, and created a tourniquet of sorts. For one frightening moment, I=
thought I might have to call for help - preferably someone bearing scissor=
s. Finally, the dam gave way and all was well.



I was beyond busy all day - slammed up against the wall, actually, in a min=
or panic that I would not be able to get to all the quilts that were waitin=
g to be appraised. Yet no one suspected the turmoil that my legs and thigh=
s had been through all day. I remember Pepper telling us one time that she=
never ever wore pantihose here in the south. All I can say is: Way to go=
, Pep - you must have great thighs!!


Teddy Pruett
www.teddypruett.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: SOUTH:sweet potatos, pantyhose
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 11:19:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I've been gardening all day and just came in for lunch break. So maybe I didn't read Trudy West's post clearly. Trudy, what I don't understand is how the legs of the hose did't fall down. Did you make garters like those in WW II movies? Or just dare them to move?

I know this is not a cooking list, but I need help from the Southern contingent. One of my favorite after-school treats was a dish that my mother also prepared for meals---candied yams or candied sweet potatoes. Somewhere in all my recipes I have her handwritten recipe. Somewhere. But I "disremember" where. Besides, as I recall, she did not describe her real-life cooking process, improved on it as she wrote.

Can anyone provide guidance?

All the contemporary cookbooks call for boiling the potatoes first, and I know very well, that is not what my mother did. I checked out Mrs. Dull's SOUTHERN COOKING last night, and she also gave instructions for cutting the raw potatoes in strips


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pantyhose
From: deedadikatt.net
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 19:18:47 +0000
X-Message-Number: 2


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Teddy, I truly think you should consider writing stories as a side line. You might be able to surpass Paula in the pocket book category. I laughed till I cried. You are what we need in these sometimes trying days. Love to you, Dee
--
Dee Dadik
Certified Appraiser of Quilted
Textiles
5689 Concord Hill Dr.
Columbus, Ohio 43213
614-861-0478
Web site: deedadik.home.att.net

--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_10815_1236539927_0
Content-Type: multipart/related; boundary="NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_10815_1236539927_1"

--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_10815_1236539927_1--

--NextPart_Webmail_9m3u9jl4l_10815_1236539927_0--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: pantyhose
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 15:55:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3


--608db8cd-56e7-4274-a17f-5cfe33cfa054
Content-Type: TEXT/plain; charset=us-ascii

I agree - the panyhose story hit home with me too - keep it up Teddy - that one made my day!
Mitzi from Vermont

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Found online
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 17:56:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

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A bargain hunter's delight--be prepared to troll ebay--
http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com
<http://quiltflapper.blogspot.comPepper>
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--0016364ee316022cc20464a29856--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: compass quilt
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2009 08:47:14 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

If you notice, the first half of the photos show the top safety pinned to
the back, so it couldn't be an import. That still makes it a copy, although
domestic. It's not very well quilted, but is hand-made, and the seller was
involved because she has "before quilting photos." But she didn't get her
money's worth if she thought she would. The fabrics would have had to cost
almost that much.
Jean in MN



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Movies
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 20:36:46 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

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Can yall think of a good movie=2C G rated=2C with a relationship to quiltin=
g=2C sewing=2C or anything else that we=2C on this list=2C might enjoy. Our=
downtown merchants always show a free outdoor movie on the last Friday of =
the month. Families come to sit in the grass=2C or bring lawn chairs - it'=
s quite the adorable thing. But we are going to have the quilt walk ( barr=
ing forest fires that close the county down=2C jackhammered sidewalks and h=
otels with no name) going on at the same time=2C and if I could find one th=
at would relate it would be nice.



"How to Make an American Quilt" has too much semi-nudity=2C so it is out. =
I thought of the old Jane Fonda movie=2C "The Dollmaker"=2C but it was mad=
e for TV and I dont know if it something the organization can get. Any ide=
as??

Teddy Pruett
www.teddypruett.com
Trying to live life from one "A-Ha!"
moment to the next.




_________________________________________________________________
Windows Live Contacts: Organize your contact list.
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/marcusatmicrosoft.spaces.live.com-Blog-=
cns!503D1D86EBB2B53C!2285.entry?ocid=3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_UGC_Contacts_032009=

--_955895b6-f77e-440a-9ae4-3729ef96bc9e_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Movies
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 01:00:55 +0000
X-Message-Number: 7

7 Brides for 7 Brothers? Those quilts cut up for dresses? You could
preface it with a 'do not try this at home'?

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Movies
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 20:17:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

---- Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> wrote:
Can yall think of a good movie, G rated, with a relationship to quilting, sewing, or anything else that we, on this list, might enjoy. Our downtown merchants always show a free outdoor

There is a film of "Everyday Use" that can be rented/purchased. But it's a half-hour film and, in my view, does not do a good job with Walker's story. Misses point.

I know it's not quilts, per se, but what about the Horton Foote play/move "Tender Mercies"? The respect for one's heritage and for hard work are the same. It's of an earlier time. (Foote died this past week). I bet there's a quilt in there.

gaye

p.s. HOW did the legs of the cut panty hose stay up?


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Movies
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net>
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 21:16:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Just some ideas -- not all have extensive sewing scenes, but there are a few
that have some in them.

Almost all of the Jane Austin movies have some sewing in them.

There is also a tv series called Christy that might feature some sewing and
quilting

All the Hallmark movies are G.

Gone With the Wind

Little Women

Sarah Plain and Tall Series

********************
This might not be G

The River -- Mel Gibson and Sissy S -- she wants to sell one of the family
quilts to pay Sears, but he won't let her. It is upbeat towards the end.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re compass quilt
From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net>
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 06:11:36 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1


One would normally think that having the before quilting photos is proof that it is not an import but I believe that is part of the con. I studied the imported QVC $33 quilt and the completed compass $120 quilt from quiltingqwomen and they are the EXACT same quilt (both have all the same fabrics in the same placement with the same quilting). There is no way that could happen unless she is dealing with the same people/factory as QVC.

I'm guessing she either had them photograph a top before it was completed or send a her top so that she could make it look like a home sewing project. Or maybe she removed the quilting and binding from a completed quilt. Guess it was worth it because it definitely creates that home sewn illusion.

And since she is selling hers for 4 times the QVC retail price, I'd say she is getting her money's worth; even if she paying retail and she is probably paying less. Again, very sneaky.

Sandra Starley
AQS certified quilt appraiser
Moab, Utah
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com
http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com


---------------------


Subject: compass quilt
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2009 08:47:14 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

If you notice, the first half of the photos show the top safety pinned to the back, so it couldn't be an import. That still makes it a copy, although domestic. It's not very well quilted, but is hand-made, and the seller was involved because she has "before quilting photos." But she didn't get her money's worth if she thought she would. The fabrics would have had to cost almost that much.
Jean in MN

--
Sandra Starley
AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser
Moab, Utah
my antique and vintage quilts
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts
http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 2nd try - Names, pantyhose in Plain Text editor
From: schreurs_ssyahoo.com
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 20:55:56 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

--0-984067812-1236570956=:68485
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I have a last name that you can either spell OR say. Actually, for all
practical purposes, it is an eight syllable name: S - C - H - R - E - U
- R - S. That's if I don't have to make the person start all over from
the beginning, because they raced ahead after S - C - H - and skipped
over the - R - because it is kind of quiet, but without it you and I
will be on the phone trying to guess which way it was misspelled THIS
time because even if the - R - is there, most likely the E and U were
turned around, and in any case, the person at the polling place,
security check, or reservation desk has already given up and started
reading the list of everyone's name beginning with "S".

Which is
to say, compared to that, my best friend in high school, whose last
name was Kwasniewski, had a name I can now envy because it was
pronounced exactly the was it was spelled. ;-) And to think I started
out in life with Clement. Love made me do it!

As
for pantyhose, Teddy, I gave them, and high heels, the heave-ho when I
turned 40, having decided that if I was really that old, I was
certainly old enough to know a stupid idea when I met one!! Certainly
not fashionable, but no more wrestling with elastic boa constrictors in
the bathroom!!!! Susan

PS Kris, please let me know if this is readable... I have figured out ho=
w to toggle between plain and rich text, and it clearly says it is on plain=
text now. If this doesn't work, it is a different problem. Thank you=
for letting me know.

--0-984067812-1236570956=:68485--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hmong textiles
From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu>
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 09:41:03 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Some additional info on Hmong textile resources...

Michigan State University Museum has, since c. 1976, been engaged in
the documentation and presentation of Hmong textile traditions. We've
mounted several exhibitions, presented artists in the museum, awarded
them traditional arts apprenticeship grants and one state Heritage
Award. We also have amassed a lovely collection of textiles,
including several "quilts" that show stories in thread as well as
reflect the changing nature of Hmong textiles in America. Go to the
Quilt Index (search for Hmong under "Ethnic background") and you can
see several bed-sized pieces from our own museum collection as well
as another one documented in the Michigan Quilt Project.

One of the exhibition publications sold out, but you can still
purchase "Stories in Thread", a teachers guide on our MTAP Store
website (http://museum.msu.edu/, then click on MTAP Store at top).

Over the course of our annual Festivals of Michigan Folklife (now
called the Great Lakes Folk Festival) we have also presented many
Hmong traditions and always textile artists. In 1993 we presented
Hmong quiltmakers and I wrote an article for the festival program
book "Old Techniques of Paj Ntaub, New Patterns of Expression." The
program is also available on the MTAP Store site and all of the above
are currently on sale.

Read description of our Hmong and other Southeast Asia hill tribe
textile collections. Only the ones intended to be quilts are
registered in the Quilt Index.
http://museum.msu.edu/ResearchandCollections/Collections/Cultural/hmong.html

See info on Ia Moua Yang, Michigan Heritage Awardee,
http://museum.msu.edu/s-program/mh_awards/awards/2005IY.html
One of Ia's quilts in our collection has blocks of the different
traditional patterns she makes. See Quilt Index
http://www.quiltindex.org/basicdisplay.php?pbd=MichiganMSUMuseum-a0d4o7-a

-- Marsha MacDowell


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hmong textiles
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2009 10:39:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

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Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Thanx for the information, Marsha. It must be the reason why Gran Torino
was filmed in Michigan. Also, I could swear that the 4th work of art
shown on the research and collections site was the wall hanging in the
movie. The quilt on quilt index is quite exquisite.


Marsha MacDowell wrote:

Some additional info on Hmong textile resources...

Michigan State University Museum has, since c. 1976, been engaged in the
documentation and presentation of Hmong textile traditions. We've
mounted several exhibitions, presented artists in the museum, awarded
them traditional arts apprenticeship grants and one state Heritage
Award. We also have amassed a lovely collection of textiles, including
several "quilts" that show stories in thread as well as reflect the
changing nature of Hmong textiles in America. Go to the Quilt Index
(search for Hmong under "Ethnic background") and you can see several
bed-sized pieces from our own museum collection as well as another one
documented in the Michigan Quilt Project.

One of the exhibition publications sold out, but you can still purchase
"Stories in Thread", a teachers guide on our MTAP Store website
(http://museum.msu.edu/, then click on MTAP Store at top).

Over the course of our annual Festivals of Michigan Folklife (now called
the Great Lakes Folk Festival) we have also presented many Hmong
traditions and always textile artists. In 1993 we presented Hmong
quiltmakers and I wrote an article for the festival program book "Old
Techniques of Paj Ntaub, New Patterns of Expression." The program is
also available on the MTAP Store site and all of the above are currently
on sale.

Read description of our Hmong and other Southeast Asia hill tribe
textile collections. Only the ones intended to be quilts are registered
in the Quilt Index.
http://museum.msu.edu/ResearchandCollections/Collections/Cultural/hmong.html


See info on Ia Moua Yang, Michigan Heritage Awardee,
http://museum.msu.edu/s-program/mh_awards/awards/2005IY.html
One of Ia's quilts in our collection has blocks of the different
traditional patterns she makes. See Quilt Index
http://www.quiltindex.org/basicdisplay.php?pbd=MichiganMSUMuseum-a0d4o7-a

--------------060106090808060903020004--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "Mikado" cheater cloth
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 07:46:48 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5


Hello Friends,

Some time ago, there was a discussion on this list of Gilbert and
Sullivan's opera, "The Mikado" which opened in 1885. The comic
opera was wildly popular ran a hugely long time, and inspired a
great deal of what we would call today "merchandising."

One such "product" was cotton "cheater cloth" - printed in crazy
quilt style with images and scenes from the opera. Charming.

We have a piece of it for sale, printed sometime around 1885 or
1890 -- and measuring about 25 x 36 inches.

E-mail me directly for more information: quiltcomplexhughes.net

Julie Silber
www.thequiltcomplex.com






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Subject: Re: qhl digest: March 08, 2009
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 9:54:52 -0700
X-Message-Number: 6

Teddy,

Try"THE TALL MEN", 1955 Western: Clark Gable and Jane Russell, and the sta=
r of the show a Red and Green appliqu=C3=A9 ( this is my favorite movie) =
the scenery is great and little is mentioned about the quilt however it ap=
pears in several scenes. But it is the end of the movie where Clark Gable =
pulls the quilt off the covered wagon buckboard and spreads it on the groun=
d and beckons Jane Russell to join him. Ahhhh! Must be true love!

My hubby enjoyed the movie as well.

Enjoy,

Pam Conklin
O'Fallon, IL

> Subject: Movies
> From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 20:36:46 -0400
>
> Can yall think of a good movie=3D2C G rated=3D2C with a relationship to q=
uiltin=3D
> g=3D2C sewing=3D2C or anything else that we=3D2C on this list=3D2C might =
enjoy. Our=3D
> downtown merchants always show a free outdoor movie on the last Friday o=
f =3D
> the month. Families come to sit in the grass=3D2C or bring lawn chairs -=
it'=3D
> s quite the adorable thing. But we are going to have the quilt walk ( ba=
rr=3D
> ing forest fires that close the county down=3D2C jackhammered sidewalks a=
nd h=3D
> otels with no name) going on at the same time=3D2C and if I could find on=
e th=3D
> at would relate it would be nice.
>
>


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Subject: Harriet Powers being honored this month
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 10:23:02 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

Harriet Powers is being inducted in the Georgia Women of Achievement Hall of
Fame for her two quilts! This is an annual event during the Women's history
month for Georgia. It's not specific to quilters, as we have that wonderful
org, but to all women of achievement in GA and Harriet is now in it! Yeah
for everyone- to think she was a slave for some time of her life.

Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
Women On Quilts
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com



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Subject: Artfull Bra Project
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2009 14:49:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8


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Check these out. It is a great cause!
http://www.quiltersofsc.org/index.html


Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
The Creative Caregiver
New Bern, NC
palamporeaol.com

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Subject: Quilt Mania II
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 20:35:33 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9


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The group that gathered in Dallas for Quilt History Weekend, an event
within the currently on-going Quilt Mania II, was treated to almost
non-stop quilts in a whirlwind tour of 11 of the 17 historic sites,
museums, and private collections, plus three quilt shops and some
quilt-focused evening entertainment over 3 days last weekend. Those
who attended the first Quilt Mania in Dallas in 2003 will have some
idea of the magnitude of the project, conceived, organized and
promoted by Dr. Marian Ann Montgomery.

The offerings varied from the brilliant Texas flora and fauna textile
arts of Carol Morrissey at the Museum of Nature and Science to the
examples of political affiliation by unenfranchised women, on loan
from the International Quilt Study Center & Museum at the Women's
Museum, and from dramatic works by contemporary Texas quilt artists
at the Irving Arts Center to a private collection of molas a the
Latino Cultural Center. The works of sewing school students in
disadvantaged third world communities, made under the direction of
American aid workers contrasted nicely with the lush Crazy quilts and
cheerful traditional pastels by women of privilege and leisure from
the Dallas area; one was a never-before-seen Marie Webster "Clematis
in Bloom" by the mother of one of Texas' governors.

There were antique quilts galore, shown in context in the houses of
several small living history museums at Farmers Branch Historical
Park and at Historic Mesquite Inc., including those by the Florence
and Lawrence families, researched and published by Marian Ann
Montgomery and Charlene Orr ("Quilted Gems by the Jewels of the
Lawrence Family" in Uncoverings 2005, Volume 26 of the Research
Papers of the American Quilt Study Group, 33-63). The quilt shops
treated us to refreshments, fabric shopping, and a large private
collection of antique quilts ranging over 100 years from the early
19th century to the 1930s. Appraisers and fabric historians in the
group sparked spirited discussion on construction techniques and
dating clues as we participated in an impromptu bed-turning. And the
collection was augmented by examples of calico infant dresses from
the 19th century, and a fine grouping of 19th century toiles and
chintzes.

Throughout the exhibits, signage invited viewers to compare and
contrast the quilt on display with another visually or culturally
related quilt from one of the other venues, tying the exhibits
together in a unique and meaningful way. A catalogue and notecards,
showing a large representative sampling of the exhibited quilts, is
available from Quilt Mania (see below).

Time spent being whisked from place to place on the bus was filled
with stories, growing friendships, recommendations on reading
materials, memberships, and coming events - and a lot of laughter.
Sadly, this is the final appearance of Quilt Mania, the largest
collaboration of quilt exhibits ever. Exhibits end at different
dates over the coming weeks and months, but a lot of the quilts (and
related cultural events) may still be visited. Contact
www.quiltmania.org, or 214-979-6476.

Finally, Quilt Mania sponsor the Quilters Guild of Dallas has its
annual quilt show March 13-15, 2009, at the Dallas Market Hall;
information is available from www.quiltersguildofdallas.org. If you
are going to be in the Dallas area any time soon, these events are
not to be missed!

Xenia
--Apple-Mail-2-640095781--


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Subject: Mamma Mia movie question
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 19:35:33 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

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I have not seen the movie, "Mamma Mia." Someone wrote to say that she saw
what appeared to be Redwork (on a bed? - I don't think she said). She asked
if the Greeks in Greece have a standing tradition of Redwork. Since I don't
know, I thought perhaps someone here might be able to answer the question.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com

--000e0cd56b083650fa0464b817d7--


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Subject: Update on Montana book
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 20:57:28 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

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I just received notice from Amazon that the Montana quilts books will be
delayed:

Annie Hanshew "Border to Border: Quilts and Quiltmakers of Montana"
[Hardcover]
Estimated arrival date: 08/12/2009 - 08/18/2009



--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: March 09, 2009
From: "Marlene O'Bryant-Seabrook" <marlobsbellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 11:38:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Kim, thank you for sharing the wonderful information about Harriet Powers.
I did considerable research on her several years ago and communicated
regularly via telephone with one of her direct descendants, Daisy Powers,
until we lost contact after she entered a nursing home.

Please click to view my 1995 tribute to the remarkable Harriet Powers whose
life and quilts truly defied stereotypes.
http://www.MarleneOBryantSeabrook.com/powers2.html

Marlene
Marlene O'Bryant-Seabrook, Ph.D.
Educator, Lecturer, Fiber Artist
E-Mail: marlobsbellsouth.net
URL http://www.MarleneOBryantSeabrook.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Introducing myself and sharing a link
From: "Brenda Groelz" <brendahandiquilter.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 14:55:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

My name is Brenda Groelz and I live in Utah. I am a returning member and
am looking forward to some quilt-history interaction once again. I've
always been interested in quilt history and I'll bet I already know many
of the members of this list. It's nice to be back in your company.
Frankly, I thought about all of you today because of a story I read online
this morning. I have nobody to talk to about this where I live, so I
decided to join QHL again and find some like-minded folks.

At the risk of beating a dead horse (the Underground Railroad quilts
myth), I want to share with you a disturbing news story that appeared in a
Pittsburgh area paper today.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/dailycourier/s_615386.html

I would love to write a letter to the editor to set the record straight,
but don't wish to embarrass the young teacher, who has bought into this
myth, hook, line and sinker. Besides, I'm not an "expert" in the field
(though, I probably know more about this subject than this poor teacher
does). Perhaps some of you who are teachers in the public school system
could tell me, is this topic one that is being presented as a curriculum
item? Oh, I bet if I read your archives, I'd find my answer, and so I
shall.

Is there something that we, as quilters, can do collectively to help these
teachers realize they've been duped? Obviously, they love the story
because it's interesting, it offers intriguing African-American history
and it gives them a great hands-on project for their classes. Wouldn't it
be wonderful if we could get them to make blocks based on the Harriet
Powers Bible-story quilts instead? We're pretty good about getting the
word out to quilt magazines, but how many 7th-grade social studies
teachers are reading those? Surely there's a social studies/history
education group newsletter that could be contacted.

I just don't understand how historical fiction got into the social studies
curriculum.

If this topic has been cussed and discussed at length on this list, I
shall soon discover that when I go back through the archives. If so, just
ignore my rantings this morning and just wave hello to me and I'll go back
to petting my fabrics.

Nice to be back!

Best regards,
Brenda Groelz
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Introducing myself and sharing a link
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 20:17:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

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Brenda,

Thanks for the tip. We appreciate the chance to put out one forest fire at a
time. I think I'm going to need bigger boots, though. <grin>

I wrote a letter, and hope others did, too.

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings, who is going through a closet of quilts and
finding that all the acid-free paper is NO LONGER acid-free!
http://www.quiltersmuse.com

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/dailycourier/s_615386.html
>
> Best regards,
> Brenda Groelz
>

--0015174c19962144bc0464ccca6b--


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Subject: Odd Request
From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 20:20:28 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

This doesn't quite fit on this list but here goes. I've been asked to
design the huge angel's wings for a local (imagine Green Valley AZ
golf course retirement community) production of The Laramie Project.
Does anyone have any experience in designing these large wings? Do you
know anyone who has designed angel costumes on a production of this
play? The play book gives absolutely no direction. Please respond
offline. Linda Laird

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pantihose-- Not Quilt related
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Mar 2009 00:33:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Teddy and all-----

A trick for the panty hose impaired -- cut out the center seam, from belly
button to tramp stamp, so you have two separate legs joined only by a
waistband. I can't count the number of times that trick has saved me.
You can also wear the un-runnered leg from two different pair with this
trick, ( after cutting away the messed up leg) thus saving gobs of money!
Turn one leg inside out to move it to the correct side of your body.

Also, for the knee sock impaired, try a product called "It Stays! Roll-On
Body Adhesive." I buy mine at the local hospital supply store. It is also
good for holding a low-cut decollatage close to the body. It washes right
off your skin and out of the clothing. I don't know how I lived without
this! I've given it as Christmas presents to people who now worship the
ground I walk on!

Judy Grow

>I can't take the panithose off, because 1. My thighs will rub together and
>start a fire, which >could be dangerous for my person and other living
>things - not to mention the convention >center was brand new, having
>replaced the one that was destroyed in the year of >neverending hurricanes.
>and 2. I have on new shoes, which require that I wear hose. >What to do,
>what to do???






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Subject: Acid-free
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Mar 2009 09:26:13 +0000
X-Message-Number: 2

>
> finding that all the acid-free paper is NO LONGER acid-free!

How/why does that happen? Is the paper absorbing something from the
atmosphere/the quilts? Or spontaneously becoming acidic because of
something in its make-up? And is it happening to the packet of acid
free tissue I've had under the bed for some years now, or only to the
tissue I've used to wrap things? And presumably if non-acid-free
tissue has been used in the first place it is gradually becoming more
acidic?

I've always been told that the tissue in the boxes where I've
volunteered had to be changed for this reason, but never had the nerve
to show my ignorance and ask....


Sally Ward


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Subject: Re: Wax Cloth
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Mar 2009 10:12:58 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

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An -- it would apppear that a complete analysis of fabric would have to
be undertaken by a textile expert. According to highly repsected George
Linton in Modern Apparel Textile and Apparel Dictionary [he also was
chief editor for Fairchild], various waxes, paraffins, sizes and gums
were/are used to produce a glaze and waterproofing on cotton. It
involves calendering, pressing, lustering and other special treatments.

Possibly locating a textile book produced during the time of the cloth
in question would be beneficial.



Does someone know anything about the production of wax cloth in the 18th
and
19th century? And how to treat it NOW. In the 'dictionary of textiles' of
Fairchild's it says:

Wax cloth 1: a waterproof fabric treated with wax or paraffin, 2: a term
used for oilcloth in Great Britain.

The textile restaurator of the Dutch Openairmuseum at Arnhem is desperately
seeking for information, as well as production as methods of treatment.

If anyone can help and has information, please send a note to her directly:
l.vanravelsopenluchtmuseum.nl or to me.

Thanks a lot. Bye An Moonen


> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
>

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Subject: Acid-free
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Mar 2009 09:47:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

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Sally -- there was a discussion about this on Texcons list several years
ago. Archival tissue absorbs elements it is exposed to and in time loses
its effectiveness which is about 2-3 years. Tissue used in acid-free
containers lasts longer but eventually needs to be changed. However,
another expert posted that "lost" tissue still continues to protect.
What no one answered is how do you know when tissue has run its course;
apparently there is no testing gadget to determine that.

It got me to wondering when I order archival paper how long it's been on
the shelf and if in reality I'm getting nearly extinct paper LOL.

Hopefully Kay or Meg can provide some insight.



Sally Ward wrote:

How/why does that happen? Is the paper absorbing something from the
atmosphere/the quilts? Or spontaneously becoming acidic because of
something in its make-up? And is it happening to the packet of acid
free tissue I've had under the bed for some years now, or only to the
tissue I've used to wrap things? And presumably if non-acid-free tissue
has been used in the first place it is gradually becoming more acidic?

I've always been told that the tissue in the boxes where I've
volunteered had to be changed for this reason, but never had the nerve
to show my ignorance and ask....


--------------060208050206050607020407--


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Subject: Re: Introducing Myself and sharing a link
From: qltrathartaol.com
Date: Wed, 11 Mar 2009 10:35:42 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5


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Hi All

Thanks for the link Brenda.? It was interesting reading.? I teach middle school special ed as well as quilting (the first one pays for the second one!)

Each time I come across this misinformation, I try to correct it (I have printed out several of the posts from this wonderful group).? A recent county assessment in reading had a passage about it so I guess my job is not done - but my students know!

Helen Johnston in cloudy Southern Maryland

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Subject: Re: Wax Cloth
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Mar 2009 10:40:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

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I would have to re-read my own book about Ellen Webster, for details, but in
Hebron, New Hampshire, settled by Scots-Irish, there was a mill that
produced oil cloth. The owner burned to death, but his widow carried on with
the business and became a very wealthy enterpreneur. There is a photo of oil
cloth in my book.

Patricia Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com

Does someone know anything about the production of wax cloth in the 18th and
> 19th century?
> Thanks a lot. Bye An Moonen
>

--0015174c0eba8db5870464d8d83a--


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Subject: Re: Mamma Mia movie question
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Mar 2009 09:18:56 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7


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Hello all,
I emailed Dr. Linda Welters from the University of Rhode Island with this q=
uestion. Her reply:

"I saw Mama Mia, but don't remember any traditional redwork. It is, after a=
ll, a film. I do remember Meryl Streep jumping crazily on the bed.
"I understand redwork to be red cotton embroidery on white cellulosic (line=
n or cotton). There is a group of embroideries from the island of Naxos tha=
t is red silk on cream linen or cotton. The stitch on the Naxos embroiderie=
s is always darning stitch. It practically covers the ground fabric, and re=
sembles a woven fabric. These date from the 17th and 18th centuries, so I d=
oubt very much if Meryl Streep had one of these in her run-down Greek islan=
d house."

Judy Schwender

--- On Mon, 3/9/09, Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> wrote:

From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Subject: [qhl] Mamma Mia movie question
To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Date: Monday, March 9, 2009, 6:35 PM

I have not seen the movie, "Mamma Mia." Someone wrote to say that she
saw
what appeared to be Redwork (on a bed? - I don't think she said). She asked
if the Greeks in Greece have a standing tradition of Redwork. Since I don't
know, I thought perhaps someone here might be able to answer the question.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings