Subject: Re: qhl digest: March 16, 2009
From: LinusDonnaaol.com

I'm preparing the mini lesson for the IA/IL Quilt Study Group's meeting
April 4, 2009, at the Kalona, IA Quilt and Textile Museums. Study topic
is Civil War. I am trying to find a picture of the triangle quilt that
has the chained slave asking "Am I not a man and a brother?" I remember
reading that it was cut in half and then found and put back together.
Thank you. Thank you. Catherine Noll Litwinow

Hi Catherine- I'm not sure if you're referring to the Coates family quilt
from Lancaster PA. They were Quaker abolitionists. It's much like you describe.

There is a full page color photo of this wonderful silk quilt, cut in half
and sewn back together as you described, in the book Hearts and Hands by Pat
Ferrero, Julie Silber, and Elaine Hedges. It's Birds in the Air pattern, lots of
plaids, stripes, and foulard prints, in those warm, yummy early 19th century
Prussian blues, quercitron, and browns.

There is an inked image of a slave with the words "Deliver me from the
oppression of Man," sliced right down the middle of a block. Yikes!

The book includes a closeup of the block with that image cut right down the
middle. The story goes, it was cut in half because two children wanted the
quilt, so to be equal, each got one half.

Let this be a lesson to us all: be specific in your will and include
disposition of your quilts!

Bright blessings!

~Donna Laing
www.NorthStarQualityQuilting.com
Bright blessings!


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: hmong quilt on ebay
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Mar 2009 12:28:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

--000e0cd48214dd5a8504653eef24
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I enjoyed the movie, "Gran Torino" as a character study and a look at how
the main character's thoughts (and actions) evolved over the course of time.
The film is well done, and the violence, nasty words, and ethnic slurs are
well-placed, within a greater context of cultural meaning. I wondered about
the authenticity of the Hmong gang who had "gone bad," so to speak. It
seems, culturally, outside of the parameters of what one usually thinks as
typical Hmong behavior (because it is).

Pat

--000e0cd48214dd5a8504653eef24--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: FW: [ALHFAM] Deaccessioning Textile Equipment
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2009 09:11:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear List
From the Association of Living History, Farm and Agricultural Museums list
serve.
Newbie Richardson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Slave quilt: Deliver me from the Oppression of Man
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2009 07:51:41 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 4

I believe the quilt information requested is about the Deborah Coates Aboli
tionist Quilt.

It contains a stamped figure of a slave and the words "deliver me from the
oppression of man"; and was divided in half at sometime during its long lif
e.

It was mad ein 1840 by Deborah Coats, Lancaster, Pennsylvania and is owned
by the Heritage Center of Lancaster County.

You may see a photo of the stamped figure and info on the quilt on page 78i
n the recently published, outstanding book called THE QUILT, A HISTORY AND
CLEBRATION OF AN AMERICAN ART FORM, Voyageur Press, 2007, by Elise Schebler
Roberts.

And a Home of the Brave Quilt made by me appears on page 72. best, Don
--0-1452617725-1237301501:30990--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: someone to prepare quilt for display in Dallas
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2009 14:39:20 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5


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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi all - sold a quilt to someone in Dallas who would like to hang it up. Ca
n anyone give me names of either framer who can do a quilt stretcher, or qu
ilt person who could sew velcro and provide materials to hang it with. Clie
nt doesn't want to ship it back up here for Tracy Jamar or an area framer t
o prepare it.

thanks

LauraFisher
--0-698882832-1237325960:25610--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 19th C Spiritualism & Quilts
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2009 18:42:07 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

About a year ago I sent this list pictures of 2 American Reform costumes
which belonged to Ann Bartlett Taylor, Quaker, of Collins, New York.
The costumes made their way to the Springs through descendants of Ann
and George W. Taylor. George was a Spiritualist minister who died in
NY but Ann lived to travel to CO and on to San Francisco where she
died. The two spent time in the company of many of the mid, late-19th
century reformers of every kind. Does anyone know of studies done about
the relationship, "inspirations", pattern names and such of quilts and
'rappings', seances, spirit visions, etc. from that time period? I'm
keeping an open mind about this.

Thanks, Jan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "Deliver me from the oppression of man."
From: "Roberta (Bobbe) Benvin" <quiltsndogsaol.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2009 21:52:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

There are excellent photos/story (pgs. 45-47) of this quilt in Trish
Herr's book "Quilting Traditions," which is the result of the Lancaster
County documentation project.
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Slave quilt
From: Trishherraol.com

Donna and Don are totally correct about the Deborah Simmons Coates quilt. It
is in the collection of the Heritage Center Museum of Lancaster. Our website
is: _www.lancasterheritage.com_ (http://www.lancasterheritage.com) . The
curator is Wendall Zercher, should you have questions about use of photos,
history, etc.

Yes, this quilt has many messages for the viewer, not only about slavery,
but preserving pieces from the past. It is also pictured in the book we did by
that name "Quilting Traditions: Pieces from the Past" published in 2000 by
Schiffer. It is on pages 46-47 with pictures and pretty complete write up.

Trish Herr
The Herrs Antiques
_www.theherrsantiques.com_ (http://www.theherrsantiques.com/)
2363 Henbird Lane
Lancaster, PA 17601
717.569.2268

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "Deliver me...." ~ a tale of discovery
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2009 07:20:41 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Elaine Hedges, Pat Ferrero and I used Deborah Coates' quilt as
part of the COVER design of our book, "Hearts and Hands," as well
as within the pages...

(The book is now long out-of-print but we have a few "new" copies
that we bought from the publisher. Now signed).

I must tell you about first seeing the quilt.

When Pat and I first saw the quilt (about 1987, at Jonathan and
Gail Holstein's home in Cazenovia, N.Y.), it was in two pieces,
having years before been cut directly down the middle.

Each of the two "new" edges (on each half) had then been bound,
years before, probably whenever the quilt was cut.

The inked piece (a small triangle) had been right in the center
of the full quilt -- and so it was cut in half! The tiny inked
image of the bound slave (and the words) -- now on two halves --
had been almost entirely covered over by the new bindings.

It was Pat ("Eagle Eye") Ferrero who first noticed the mere wisps
of ink on the two halves of the split triangle. The owner of the
quilt (a descendant) gave us permission, right on the spot, to
carefully remove a few stitches holding the binding in place. No
one had ever noticed those little marks before...

It was then that the family saw evidence, for the first time,
that their ancestor, the quilt maker, Deborah Coates, had indeed
been firmly committed to the abolitionist cause.

Her husband was a well known activist, fully dedicated to the
cause of Abolition. His name appears frequently in a "public"
way -- in newspaper articles on the abolitionist cause, and
frequently in the minutes of abolitionist meetings. These
"documents" remain, and are part of the official "historical
record."

But his wife ... how was anyone to know where she "stood"?

Until that amazing moment in 1987, when a few snips of a scissors
revealed what she had added in ink, the family had not known,
with any certainty, where Deborah's heart was. What a moment!

The family then took the ball and ran ... and soon discovered
another fact previously unknown to them: The Coates' home in
Cazenovia had been a stop on the Underground Railroad!

A lesson about how fragile and elusive women's history (in
textiles) can be -- and how respect, careful observation, and an
understanding of historical context can benefit and enrich us
all.

Julie Silber
www.thequiltcomplex.com
quiltcomplexhughes.net

Subject: kit quilt on ebay
From: <bearspawcox.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2009 15:09:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Qhlers,

There is a kit quilt on ebay #370174010675 that I would like to know more about. Do any of you know the name of this pattern or anything else about it? The seller calls it American Beauty Rose, but that may not be the original name. Thanks for your help,

Donna Skvarla
AQS Certified Appraiser





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QHL Rose Quilt
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2009 15:25:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I have been researching LeeWard Mills and LeeWards for a good long spell and
I recognize this kit.

This quilt appeared for the first time in a LeeWard Mills Catalog in 1953
and was called American Beauty. That does not mean that is the earliest
incarnation of this quilt kit, but it gives you a working date. It also
appeared in later catalogs after the company changed their name to LeeWards
and the quilt kit was renamed and called American Beauty Rose in 1956 and
1957.

This quilt kit might have also been in Herrschner catalogs under a different
name and different dates.

Hope this helps

Sue

****
Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: rose kit
From: "Rose Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2009 15:44:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Sue Wildemuth is right. The kit was sold by Lee Wards in the 50s and by
Herrschners in the 1960-61 catalog. It is a Progress design (#1366).
Progress named it American Beauty but it was in Lee Wards catalogs as
American Beauty Rose. It's a beauty - but aren't all roses? :-)
Rosie Werner



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: kit quilt on ebay
From: <bearspawcox.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2009 17:39:55 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Dear Sue and Rose,

Yes, all roses are beautiful! Thanks to both of you for the excellent information.

Donna


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: kit quilt on ebay
From: "deb" <debquiltingposs.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2009 17:44:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

I have a picture of the kit packaging showing this to be Progress Kit
#1366 - brown paper wrapper with drawn illustrations. The name on the kit
is The American Beauty. No date that I can see.

Debbie
Quilting Possibilities
Bayville NJ

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Rose Quilt: another kit.. one
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2009 22:55:06 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1


--0-16283539-1237442106:25473
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii

Hi there:
This same person has another rose design quilt for sale in her store. My mom had a kit and had almost finished this same quilt, before she died a couple years ago. She probably got the kit from Herschnerr's in the 90's sometime. Have these patterns/kits been around for a long time, under different names?
http://cgi.ebay.com/STUNNING-Vintage-ROSE-APPLIQUE-QUILT-MINT_W0QQitemZ370171166040QQihZ024QQcategoryZ2221QQcmdZViewItemQQ_trksidZp1742.m153.l1262

I wonder just how "vintage" these are.....arden

p.s. I now have to finish hand quilting it....


(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR




________________________________
From: Susan Wildemuth <ksandbcwgeneseo.net>
To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 1:25:44 PM
Subject: [qhl] QHL Rose Quilt

I have been researching LeeWard Mills and LeeWards for a good long spell and I recognize this kit.

This quilt appeared for the first time in a LeeWard Mills Catalog in 1953 and was called American Beauty. That does not mean that is the earliest incarnation of this quilt kit, but it gives you a working date. It also appeared in later catalogs after the company changed their name to LeeWards and the quilt kit was renamed and called American Beauty Rose in 1956 and 1957.

This quilt kit might have also been in Herrschner catalogs under a different name and different dates.

Hope this helps

Sue

****
Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: rose quilt kit
From: "Rose Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Mar 2009 08:06:40 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Quilt kits have been around for a long time - a few in the 1920s, lots of
them from the 30s through the 70s, and less in the time since.
This rose quilt (from Arden's message) has the look of a later one, verified
by her mother's purchase in the 90s. Another clue is in the quilting, which
has wide-spaced lines and simple designs. Earlier kits had more elaborate
designs and more quilting.
I don't have information on the name or company. My documentation is in
progress. I sort by theme or style and I haven't done the file on quilts
featuring bouquets yet. Perhaps someone else out there can give you that
information.
I am continually amazed by the number of quilt kits. Even though I have
documented close to 2000 of them, I still come across new ones on a regular
basis. It was a tremendously popular concept.
Rosie Werner



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: kit quilts
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 19 Mar 2009 08:26:13 -0500

Sometimes I like to think of them in the same way I do the paint by
number kits. I must have painted a million of them as a child. I am sure
my parents lovingly pitched those in the trash. I did love them, though.
One got a completed painting (of sorts) and the guesswork was
eliminated. In that sense, kits were (are) the same. No guessing about
colors or placement of fabrics in kit quilts. Just musings on this early
Thursday AM.20
Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com
------_NextPart_000_001B_01C9A86C.5D58E110--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: kit quilts
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Thu, 19 Mar 2009 09:45:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

One might advance the theory that Mary Evans created early kits;
apparently some of the BAQ blocks she designed were kitted for their
makers.

Closer to the present, one Esther O'Neill of Indianapolis had stamped
applique tops (no quilting lines on them) for sale as early as 1914.
At that time she had 6 designs in production; others followed later.

The benefit of kits was that the artistic work was basically done,
the fabrics in harmonious blends selected, and the sewing relatively
simple if one had sewing skills. There was no fabric waste, and the
maker could be assured of a quality product upon completion. Some
kits were, of course, beyond the skills of their purchasers, who may
have been seduced into buying by glorious illustrations of the way
the final product was supposed to look. That may explain why so many
unfinished or still virginal kits are found today!

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: kit quilts
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Mar 2009 09:35:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

As a quilt lover who loves to quilt but has a complete absence of design
ability, I'm thankful for things like kits and patterns that I can copy. If
I'm going to go to all those hours of work, I really really really want to
know I'm going to like what I made. And I don't have the artistic ability to
"see" the result of color combinations in my head.

I'm a very creative person, but it is expressed in wordplay, not in design.

So I say thank God for kit quilts and pattern designers. The woefully inept
like me need them, so we can move on to the part we love. The hand quilting.

Stephanie Whitson Higgins (hushing now for real)




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "Deliver me...." ~ a tale of discovery
From: Trishherraol.com
Date: Thu, 19 Mar 2009 11:10:54 EDT
X-Message-Number: 6

Thanks so much Julie for the story about the discovery of that quilt. Gets
me all excited all over again. The reason the quilt is in the Heritage Center
Museum is because the family realized its importance and Jon Holstein directed
them to us. The Coates family actually lived in Lancaster Co. PA near the
town of Christiana, Sadsbury Twp. (known for the "Christiana Riot"--a big deal
in the history of slavery hereabouts). I believe the museum also has a photo
of their house. It was known in this area as stop #5 on the Underground
Railroad. So far it is the earliest Quaker quilt we can date to Lancaster Co. But
I am sure there must be other earlier silk whole cloths we have not yet
found.
Trish Herr
The Herrs Antiques
_www.theherrsantiques.com_ (http://www.theherrsantiques.com/)
2363 Henbird Lane
Lancaster, PA 17601
717.569.2268



In a message dated 3/19/2009 12:25:27 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

Subject: "Deliver me...." ~ a tale of discovery
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Wed, 18 Mar 2009 07:20:41 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Elaine Hedges, Pat Ferrero and I used Deborah Coates' quilt as
part of the COVER design of our book, "Hearts and Hands," as well
as within the pages...

(The book is now long out-of-print but we have a few "new" copies
that we bought from the publisher. Now signed).

I must tell you about first seeing the quilt.

When Pat and I first saw the quilt (about 1987, at Jonathan and
Gail Holstein's home in Cazenovia, N.Y.), it was in two pieces,
having years before been cut directly down the middle.

Each of the two "new" edges (on each half) had then been bound,
years before, probably whenever the quilt was cut.

The inked piece (a small triangle) had been right in the center
of the full quilt -- and so it was cut in half! The tiny inked
image of the bound slave (and the words) -- now on two halves --
had been almost entirely covered over by the new bindings.

It was Pat ("Eagle Eye") Ferrero who first noticed the mere wisps
of ink on the two halves of the split triangle. The owner of the
quilt (a descendant) gave us permission, right on the spot, to
carefully remove a few stitches holding the binding in place. No
one had ever noticed those little marks before...

It was then that the family saw evidence, for the first time,
that their ancestor, the quilt maker, Deborah Coates, had indeed
been firmly committed to the abolitionist cause.

Her husband was a well known activist, fully dedicated to the
cause of Abolition. His name appears frequently in a "public"
way -- in newspaper articles on the abolitionist cause, and
frequently in the minutes of abolitionist meetings. These
"documents" remain, and are part of the official "historical
record."

But his wife ... how was anyone to know where she "stood"?

Until that amazing moment in 1987, when a few snips of a scissors
revealed what she had added in ink, the family had not known,
with any certainty, where Deborah's heart was. What a moment!

The family then took the ball and ran ... and soon discovered
another fact previously unknown to them: The Coates' home in
Cazenovia had been a stop on the Underground Railroad!

A lesson about how fragile and elusive women's history (in
textiles) can be -- and how respect, careful observation, and an
understanding of historical context can benefit and enrich us
all.

Julie Silber
www.thequiltcomplex.com
quiltcomplexhughes.net


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: kit quilts and paint-by-number
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Mar 2009 09:31:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

And there are "kit quilts" and then there are "kit quilts". . . . I'm
thinking of the Baltimore Album research that has proposed a kind of "kit
quilt" approach to the similarities in some of those astounding quilts.

At my age (57) I'm beginning to think that anyone who actually finishes a
hand-quilted quilt, kit or not, deserves to be in a hall of fame somewhere.
But then I'm still trying to finish a quilt I started about nine years ago.
Never tell your daughter who works in a quilt shop you'll make her anything
she wants. 35 Elly Sienkewicz applique blocks later. . . . at least it's in
the frame. But now I have all those feathers in the plain setting blocks and
those feathers twining through the applique border we borrowed from a photo
of an 1810 quilt. . . . I think my other 4 kids may have to be happy with
inheriting a TOP Mom made. . . YIKES!

The paint-by-numbers mention made me think of a small town restaurant here
in Nebraska that once had a room that was decorated with paint-by-number
paintings of Jesus. Talk about "kitsch"!

Stephanie Whitson Higgins (who is being entirely too chatty today and
apologizes)




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Needed for this website to go-
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Mar 2009 17:07:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

--001636426b39721bfd04657f2e72
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello all-Several weeks ago I posted about Ami Simms' new website called
www.findaquiltteacher.com. Because I posted, I'm now getting inquiries, "Do
we send our $15 registration fee to you?" The answer is No! Go to
findaquiltteacher.com and if you're a guild or shop, you can register there.
Then you can see each other's postings and all the teacher's info.For a
paltry $15 you're up on the web for a year and can include links and info
there. What a deal.

Are you a quilt teacher? Get moving! You don't need to be a
nationally-known, book-writing, globe-trotting guru (although there are
those too on the teacher list!) C'mon, if Ami doesn't get 100 teachers up
soon, the site will go down so don't wait!

Why should that interest non-teaching members who read this list? Because,
if you're interested in finding/hiring a teacher, then
findaquiltteacher.comis a central place for that specialized
information. My advice: register on
the guild part, add links to your guild's site, and include your guild's
show calendar so people can look for you. Note: realize you need a short and
snappy informational paragraph about your guild. Who are you? Take some time
(OK-ten minutes) to compose this. What's special about your group?
Time to strut your stuff--what makes your group special?

By the way, shops can register too! Call your local shop and tell them about
this bargain opportunity--$15 and you're up in lights for a year.

Go tell the quilting world on www.findaquiltteacher.com .
Pepper
PS-not affliiated with the site--I just think it's great idea whose time has
come.

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Esther O'Neill
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Fri, 20 Mar 2009 09:39:24 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

First, happy National Quilting Day everyone!

Xenia wrote about<<Esther O'Neill of Indianapolis had stamped 20
appliquE9 tops (no quilting lines on them) for sale as early as 1914.
>>20

Is Rose O'Neill, the woman who designed the Pixie characters seen in
redwork and illustration in books etc, related to Esther? The years
correlate. I documented a pixie redwork child's quilt, dated in
embroidery
1911, as I recall. And 5X6" flannel premiums were given by Chiclets
gum,
24 in the set, in 1914 and 1915. Has anyone seen a quilt made of those?


Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
Women On Quilts
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com20



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Esther O'Neill
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>

Esther O'Neill and Rosie O'Neill were not related; Esther was the
youngest daughter of Michael and Mary O'Neill, who had immigrated
from Ireland in the 1840s and lived in Greenfield, Indiana. Esther
was born either in 1858 or 1860. Cecelia Rose O'Neill was a
daughter of William Patrick and Alice Asenath O'Neill of Wilkes
Barre, Pennsylvania; she was born in 1874.



Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Esther O'Neill
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:46:25 -0400

Kim,

The "pixies" are actually called "Kewpies." I have quite a bit of
information about them, and show one of the flannels you mention, in my
online e-book called Redwork Embroidery and Needlework Traditions in Europe
and America, free to read on my website.

FYI: The creator of the Kewpie doll and derivative products is most often
referred to as simply "Rosie O'Neill."

Patricia Cummings
Quilter's Muse Publications
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

--000e0cd6a9420cd0ea0465922cf0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: history of quilting
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sat, 21 Mar 2009 00:44:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1


----------MB_8CB77F6CFCAA630_11EC_3AB8_WEBMAIL-MB04.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"


If you have on your site or any where the History of Quilts or the History of Quilting in a?ONE?PAGE?summary. I would love to read it and maybe use it. I will give full credits. I am trying to help someone put this on a website. I am not doing a good job with it. Too much to say! I am not good at being a concise minimalist.
You can send directly to me if you like ---- palamporeaol.com
Thanks, Lynn

Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
New Bern, NC

-


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: history of quilts
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sat, 21 Mar 2009 00:59:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Does anyone know Nelda Mohr? She has a nice SHORT write up ---- A BRIEF HISTORY OF QUILT MAKING on a google site. http://www.answerpoint.org/columns2.asp?column_id165&column_typefeature? I think she does a nice job. Any others out there that are better?
Thanks, Lynn palamporeaol.com

----------MB_8CB77F8E72DD500_A64_4A7B_webmail-mh48.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: history of quilting
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
 

Take a look at Kiracofe's The American Quilt - The History of Cloth and
Comfort. There's a nice timeline.
jean



------_NextPart_000_0013_01C9A9AE.90D76A50--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: history of quilts
From: Kittencat3aol.com
Date: Sat, 21 Mar 2009 07:35:30 EDT
X-Message-Number: 4


I spotted one disputable item given as fact (the Egyptian pharaoh carving)
and one mistake (the Saltonstall quilt was made in the early *19th* century,
not the early 18th; the oldest surviving patchwork quilt is probably still the
Levens Hall quilt, while the earliest surviving patchwork pieces that I'm
aware of are a late 14th century Hungarian throne hanging and a 15th century
Italian cushion). I'd also question the assertion that there are "numerous"
references to quilts in colonial inventories, although Lynne Bassett is probably
the person to speak to that; I'd gotten the impression that they were fairly
rare until well into the 18th century.

Otherwise it's not a bad one-pager - do you know the author?

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: history of quilts
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Mar 2009 11:50:28 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5

Always impossible to cover everything in one page, of course. But I
do get slightly uncomfortable with the common segue from known quilt
pre-history into American quilt history as if quilting in the rest of
the world came to A Full Stop once quilts had been taken to the New
World.

Sally Ward


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Subject: kewpies
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Sat, 21 Mar 2009 15:12:24 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7


Thank you Xenia and Pat for the info on Rosie O'Neill. Yes, kewpies is the
term, but all I could think of was pixie :) and then I thought of haircuts
and my first bad experience at the salon, age 5. (LOL)

Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
Women On Quilts
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com



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Subject: Rose O'Neill
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Mar 2009 19:15:09 -0400

I came across some neat facts regarding Rose O'Neill. Her first works were
signed "C.R.O." but she then changed her signature to be Cecil Rose O'Neill,
and sometimes just signed C. Rose O'Neill. The book points out that just
using initials would have disguised the fact that she was a woman
illustrator. No matter what name she assigned to herself, her drawings and
her dolls have become classic and high collectible on the American antiques
market.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com

--001517573ef65f4b830465a934f5--


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Subject: South Carolina quilt documentation?
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Mar 2009 22:27:43 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 9

Can anyone tell me if there has been or is a South Carolina quilt documentation project?

Nancy Hahn, Dataw Island, SC