Subject: Library speaker, Plaistow NH
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2009 06:57:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

I asked a week or so ago if anyone knew of a quilter/speaker who was
travelling around to various libraries.
Here is information about her:
http://www.unh.edu/users/unh/acad/libarts/cnec/exhibit1/savageau.html

Her name is Cheryl Savageau. She is a quilter/poet.
She is lecturing at the library in Plaistow NH on June 10, 2009 at 6:30 pm.
The lecture is free to the public and there will be refreshments served. I
hear from my librarian she is thrilled that there will be quilters in
attendance and she will have Native American quilts on display.
If I am provided with more details before this event, I will post them. I
know several members of QHL live close enough to think about attending. I
plan on being there, myself.
Linda Heminway
Plaistow, NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: English paper piecing question
From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net>
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2009 13:17:26 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Does anyone know when the name "Grandmother's Flower Garden" was first used
for this pattern or the technique of paper piecing?

Thanks, Peg




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fw: request for quilt information
From: jocelynmdelphiforums.com
Date: Sun, 05 Apr 2009 18:30:46 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3


As a matter of fact, Mark is the ONLY person I'll buy from on Ebay any more- too many people who don't know how to describe what they've got, or who take pictures to minimize showing the damage.

Every quilt I've bought from him has been accurately described with photos of the damage. The one exception was a quilt that looked like it might have been folded while still damp, from the bleeding of the dye. I emailed Mark to let him know, in case there was a possibility that other quiltsmight have been stored under similar circumstances, and he immediately o=
ffered me my money back. The damage was so minimal that I kept the quilt,anyway.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: English paper piecing question
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 05:05:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Peg asked:
<< Does anyone know when the name "Grandmother's Flower Garden" was first
used for this pattern or the technique of paper piecing?>>

You might go to
http://www.patternsfromhistory.com/colonial_revival/flower_garden.htm for
some historical information. Brackman cites a pattern origin as Needlecraft
Supply, No. 93. She also says it was a very popular pattern after 1925. I
had to smile when I read the quote from Brackman: "...many women who never
made another quilt finished a Grandmother's Flower Garden."

I beg to differ about "finished." My claim is that the GFG is the most
UNFINISHED quilt, if eBay offers any evidence. VBG

My original research has found that while the hexagon quilt was made with
English paper piecing before the 20s (often with silk), the English paper
piecing method was NOT the most popular way to stitch this pattern during
the era of the 30s, when a LOT of these quilts or tops were made. I have
several GFG or Mosaic variations of GFG tops and quilts, and none of them
was made with English paper piecing. I have found that the EPP method was
used in England and Canada during the 30s, but not in the US except in
regions close to Canada. All of the GFG quilts I own were hand pieced with
no marking of the stitching lines. And the seam allowance was about 3/16"
and not our usual 1/4". (When did the 1/4" become the standard? None of my
vintage 30s quilts have a 1/4" seam allowance. These were pieced usually by
hand though sometimes by machine.)

I hand pieced a queen size GFG with no seam marking, and found it can be
done, it's addicting, easy, accurate, very portable, and faster to do than
EPP. I cut hexagons from fabric strips with a rotary cutter, so I did not
have to trace around a template and cut with scissors. True to tradition,
the top awaits quilting.

Barb Vlack
Who lives just west of Chicago, where it was 45 degrees during the rainy day
yesterday followed by a temperature drop and 2" of snow overnight! Oh, I
love Chicago for its (character building) weather. VBG


barbbarbvlack.com
I have made a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research. Cheer me
on at: www.AlzQuilts.org




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Children's Quilt Books Bibliography
From: blackeyedsewsanyahoo.com
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 05:07:36 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

--0-987286968-1239019656=:87356
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

To All: I have completed the bibliography on children's quilt books that I =
promised to do when I retired. I have sent it to the list 3 times this week=
end, but there is a continual format problem even in plain text. I have div=
ided it by non-fiction and easy picturebooks; YA books are not included. I =
think the easiest thing to do at this juncture is to email me off list and =
I will send you the bibliography as an=A0attachment unless Chris can figure=
out another method...* signify books with stories containing UGRR/quilts. =
Show Way received the Caldecott Honor Award; I spoke with Jacqueline at Sim=
mons about her story, but she said it was her family history. Truly, how ca=
n you argue with that after a point? Hope you will find the bibliography he=
lpful! Susan Riley, Hingham MA


=A0=0A=0A=0A
--0-987286968-1239019656=:87356--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Children's Quilt Books Bibliography
From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 08:57:01 EDT
X-Message-Number: 3


-------------------------------1239022621
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

This sounds interesting, yes, please send it to me.

Thank you,

Alma Moates
AQS Certified Appraiser-Quilted Textiles 2008
Pensacola, Florida
(850) 944-3334 Home
(850) 324-1510 Cell


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: English paper piecing question
From: pegbinghamatt.net
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 09:43:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks for the help, Barb! This is great!


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: English paper piecing question
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 08:20:41 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5

I have to agree with Barbara.
I have always said there are more unfinished Grandmother's Flower Garden qu=
ilts than there are unfinished quilts of any other pattern.
I own several - not of them started by me!
And I have sold several from my collection.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

From: Barb Vlack [mailto:cptvdeosbcglobal.net]


I beg to differ about "finished." My claim is that the GFG is the most
UNFINISHED quilt, if eBay offers any evidence. VBG




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: English paper piecing question
From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 11:58:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

In the Northeast the Crazy Quilt has the title of the "most unfinished
quilt".

Vivien in MA
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: English paper piecing question
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 09:07:57 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

I only have 1 unfinished Crazy quilt!
But I dearly LOVE them.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: English paper piecing question
From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 11:07:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

Hmmm. Perhaps both are correct. I think Brackman is saying that many woma=
n whose first quilt was a GFG, she never made another. And, there are SO m=
any GFGs that didn't even get finished. Perhaps the women Brackman is feat=
uring are those with perseverance!
Maretta
-------

Subject: RE: English paper piecing question
From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 09:19:34 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 9


--0-1143395318-1239034774=:95640
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Very funny!
I just acquired a pair of 1930s GFG quilts.=A0 All I kept thinking was...wo=
w! she didn't stop at the one!=A0 Maybe 2 sisters encouraging each other on=
?
My best,
Dana

Material Pleasures, LLC =A0Antique and Vintage=A0Textiles - Wrap Yourself =
in History www.materialpleasures.com



--- On Mon, 4/6/09, Miller, Maretta K <millermkuww.edu> wrote:
From: Miller, Maretta K <millermkuww.edu>
Subject: [qhl] RE: English paper piecing question
To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Date: Monday, April 6, 2009, 12:07 PM

Hmmm. Perhaps both are correct. I think Brackman is saying that many woma=
n
whose first quilt was a GFG, she never made another. And, there are SO man=
y
GFGs that didn't even get finished. Perhaps the women Brackman is featurin=
g
are those with perseverance!
Maretta



--0-1143395318-1239034774=:95640--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: English paper piecing question
From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 12:30:42 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

The first quilt I made was a GMFG and I won first prize in my category and
also viewer's choice. It is still my favorite quilt.
Shari in NC



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Most unfinished quilt
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 11:55:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

My dear departed mother-in-law made one quilt in her liftetime. She was
married in the 30's, but her chosen pattern was an around the world. She
told me once that it took hours in the fabric store to find the right
fabrics that would properly "blend" from the center out and she did a good
job of that. The orange fades to green and the row in between the two pure
colors has both orange and green in the print, etc. etc. This was the only
quilt she ever made and she didn't like quilts at all by the time she
finished. She used to ask me to please put blankets on her beds when she
visited instead of "those old quilts."

So. . . an "Around the World" ended quilting for at least one woman. I doubt
she would have finished a Double Wedding Ring or a Grandmother's Flower
Garden. Trying to piece those would have likely been the end of her :-).

Interestingly enough, she was an extremely creative woman who loved doing
crafts and was director of a nursery school for nearly thirty years. But
needlework just wasn't her thing.

Stephanie Whitson Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Grandmother's Flower Gardens & Hexagons
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 11:57:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

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Years ago in southeast Nebraska there was an estate auction that =
included box after box after box of carefully cut hexagons. I don't =
recall whether there were any finished quilt tops on that sale (I wasn't =
there, only heard the story), but it wowed all of us at that guild =
meeting to hear about the obsession with hexagons. Tables covered with =
boxes of hexagons.

Stephanie Whitson Higgins
------=_NextPart_000_0117_01C9B6AE.EB29F510--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Washington, DC quilt exhibit
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 13:04:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

All:

I just returned from a visit to DC with my mother to see the cherry trees
and the art ... and I did persuade her to come with me to the Textile Museum
on Saturday (opening day for the exhibit). The quilts are spectacular ... I
highly recommend that anyone in the area visit them. But be sure to turn
RIGHT, not LEFT, if you take the metro to Dupont Circle. We wandered on
Embassy Row, up and down hills, for many blocks ... but the museum is easy
to find if you head north on Connecticut to 23rd St.

Dale Drake, footsore in cold and snowy Indiana now

Nancy Hahn said:
> "Constructed Color: Amish Quilts" an exhibition on loan from the
> International Quilt Study Center of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, of
> 25 quilt varieties representing 3 Amish communities. April 4-Sept. 6.
> Textile Museum, 2320 S Street, NW, Washington, DC. Website:
> www.textilemuseum.org. Suggested donation, $5.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 18:51:32 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 14


While we're discussing the once ubiquitous Grandmother's Flower Garden (and=
do I detect a hint of dismissiveness of it?:) it's worth recalling that in=
the hands of Averil Colby, the renowned English patchworker and teacher, i=
t became a work of art. In her quilts she used a method of meticulously cho=
osing and 'fussy cutting' fabrics to produce stunningly beautiful results.

So, what I think is: if you like using hexagons like this,the CAN be used i=
maginatively and thereby confound any detractors!

Oh, and by the way, my step-sister, who had never sewn a patch in her life=

until a few weeks ago, selected GFG for her first effort WITHOUT me saying=

a word for or against - so I guess it still does have some attractions. Of=

course, it may indeed end up as one of those 'most unfinished' quilts!

Celia Eddy
The Brown House
Fleming Place
Maryport
Cumbria CA15 6ES
Tel: 01900 814959





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 12:34:45 -0700
X-Message-Number: 15

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I would suggest that though the GFG may be the most unfinished quilt it =
is also the most FINISHED quilt -tons and tons are on the marketplace =
and every show I appraise I can bet on at least one coming to my table; =
usually more! And there are some spectacular examples among the many =
ordinary ones. They seem to have in common with crazy quilts the fact =
that the owner is in awe of the work involved. I also see mostly =
handpieced - not the paper method - in 20th century examples.
The Lone Star may also vie for the most unfinished pattern....when all =
those diamonds sewn together create something resembling Madonna's bra =
at the center- they get 'put away'
:)
jean

------=_NextPart_000_01B3_01C9B6B4.11033080--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Grandmother's Flower Gardens & Hexagons
From: "Brenda Groelz" <brendahandiquilter.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 11:19:49 -0600
X-Message-Number: 16

I was there (Friend, Nebraska) and I bought as many quilt tops as I could
afford. This was an auction on a Tuesday afternoon. There were only six
quilters in attendance and I brought four of the six in my van. We each
bought a couple of tops. There were hundreds of tops on this auction. There
was on antique dealer at the sale and she bought all of the remaining quilts
and tops.

I bought a big garbage can full of cut hexagons that were carefully
separated by fabric type into multiple plastic bags, mostly carrot bags. The
largest hexagons were 1/2" and the smallest were just over 1/4" (finished).
Hexagon sizes are referred to by the length of one side.

The quilter bought her fabric from ads in the backs of magazines from
garment factories. She had cardboard templates of several different sizes of
hexagons. She would hold four layers of fabric in her left hand, with the
template on top and cut with a scissors around the template. The hexagons
were placed into half-pint, cut-down cardboard milk cartons or snuff cans,
separated by fabric. These containers were then put into orange crates or
beer flats. She was very organized.

We spoke with her son (the quilter was deceased and he was selling off all
her stuff). He said she would sit at her kitchen table and hand-piece
"flowers". Those would go into a box until she had a whole bunch of them.
Then she started added hexagon paths around the flowers and continued until
she had an entire quilt top. She did some traditional scrappy GFG quilt
tops, but most of what was at the auction were her own settings. I have a
couple of those original designs and they were quite pretty.

We were told that she made these for sale. The son said they could barely
get her out of the house because she was obsessed with making her quilts.
She did go to church and would join them at a restaurant for lunch
afterwards, but otherwise, she sat in her home and sewed her quilts.

There were basically just two types of quilts at this auction, the hexagon
ones and gigantic log-cabin strippy-styles

She cut the same factory cut-away fabrics into strips of consistent widths
(about 2" finished, if I remember correctly). She sewed these end to end and
rolled them like bandages. The center strip was cut from this roll, and then
more strips were sewn to the center strip in log-cabin style, with the quilt
growing and growing. Some of these quilts had the scrappy print strips
alternating with solid white strips, giving the final quilt a little more
contrast. Many of these log-cabin style tops were used back to back with no
batting as a summer-weight quilt. They weren't especially pretty, so most
sold for $5 or less each. My children used them on their beds. When I saw
the Gees Bend quilts for the first time, they sparked memories of these
strippy quilts.

I think at the end she only pieced tops and sent them out to be hand-quilted
by others.

I don't remember her name right now, but I know we could figure it out.

Stephanie, thank you for mentioning this quilter. I hadn't thought about her
lately, and often wished we'd done a better job of documenting her life. She
was remarkable.


Brenda Groelz
Director of Marketing & Education
Handi Quilter

BrendaHandiQuilter.com phone: 801-335-0837 mobile: 801-867-9332 toll
free: 877-697-8458 x117
PLEASE NOTE NEW ADDRESS: 445 N 700 W, North Salt Lake, Utah 84054
http://www.HandiQuilter.com
http://www.HQComputerizedQuilting.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Most unfinished quilt
From: "Brenda Groelz" <brendahandiquilter.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 11:21:54 -0600
X-Message-Number: 17

You don't suppose she tried to make her "Around the World" quilt with set-in
seams, do you? So many first-timers can't see the diagonal rows.

Brenda Groelz
Director of Marketing & Education
Handi Quilter

BrendaHandiQuilter.com phone: 801-335-0837 mobile: 801-867-9332 toll
free: 877-697-8458 x117
PLEASE NOTE NEW ADDRESS: 445 N 700 W, North Salt Lake, Utah 84054
http://www.HandiQuilter.com
http://www.HQComputerizedQuilting.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:02:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 18

Jean--

I have to add my vote for Lone Star as most unfinished. There are a lot os
bumpy stars out there!
Kim
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 20:38:07 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 19


Had to grin at Jean's comment on Lone Star - the memory of my first attempt
haunts me yet. And nothing was going to flatten it, ever. Fortunately, it=

was one of those UFOs I had the sense to chuck out.

Celia Eddy
The Brown House
Fleming Place
Maryport
Cumbria CA15 6ES
Tel: 01900 814959





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:45:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 20

I don't feel dismissive about GFG all. It truly amazes me that anyone could
manage all those angles and come up with a flat quilt :-). I'd only make a
mess of it. I have a GFG top that I keep saying I will quilt someday. I
adore it and use it to illustrate a couple of lectures I do and can't
imagine ever parting with it. It has the green "garden path" between the
flowers.

There was a gorgous old honeycomb mosaic out in the collections care area of
the Lincoln quilt museum when I did a tour last Friday and we ooh-d and
aah-d for quite a while over it.

I think they're all stunning and am going to put one in my next novel. A
research partner and I saw one not long ago and were dying to know what
exactly was on the papers still crinkling inside the finished quilt. Sigh.

Stephanie Whitson Higgins






----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Most unfinished quilt
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:50:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 21

I didn't know enough about the quiltmaking process at the time to ask her
but I bet you've just explained EXACTLY why she hated doing it so much! Oh.
. . my. . . poor. . . Jane. If only she'd known.

Stephanie




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:53:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 22

Y'all have no idea how comforting it is to know that even QHL members have
created "volcanoes".

There are a couple of quilts hanging in the chintz exhibit at the IQSC at
the moment that make me stare with unabashed awe because of those diamonds
and the exquisite piecing.

I have some old madder pieces that were intended to be one of these stars
but never got put together. They were part of the saga that launched me into
the antique quilt world (I stood in hot Nebraska sun all day once to buy
them--at the bottom of a box of rags at a sale)...and then took them to a
Barbara Brackman class and learned they probably pre-date my state's
existence. Did THAT ever get my imagination going!

As of this date, my unfinished star pieces remain unfinished and probably
always will be (because I'd likely get a volcano), but how I wonder what
"she" was like. . . .

Stephanie Whitson Higgins (shamlessly procrastinating her real work)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Granny's Gardens
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 21:00:50 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1


--0-1840499169-1239076850=:55368
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Loved the tale of the lady and all those boxes of hexagons--wonder what she=
would be doing compulsively in today's culture --same thing?!
=A0
From all that I've seen since I have been selling quilts, I think the Grand=
mother's Flower Garden is (exhausted) hands down THE most plentiful pattern=
, even more than Wedding Rings and Dresden Plates, from the 1930s. And I do=
n't think I've ever seen one mismeasured- they all=A0appear to=A0lay flat, =
no bumps or cattywampus misshapes.
=A0
As a non quilter, I am amazed at the precision piecing in what seems like s=
uch a difficult to cut pattern. Kudos to all early 20th c quilters of this =
design, especially those who had an artistry about the fabric choices.
=A0
I am curious how many variations=A0of the 20th c.=A0GFG pattern exist--I ha=
ve seen flower baskets straight on in rows, or baskets all around (I have o=
ne on my website now); cubes sort of like Field of Diamonds pattern; double=
hexagons (concentric rows expanding from the center; maybe they=A0are=A0ju=
st hexagons rather than GFG, but -- in contrast to 19th c hexagons or mosai=
cs, which are usually clusters of fabrics, or concentric arrays of color,, =
the 20th c hexagons more often=A0have some further geometry or even pictori=
al solutions not seen earlier. Has anyone=A0written about=A0this?
=A0
Thanks
=A0
Laura Fisher
--0-1840499169-1239076850=:55368--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Granny's Gardens
From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 16:34:38 +1000
X-Message-Number: 2

Some of the best hexagon designs I have seen are in Japanese quilting
magazines (of which I have a small collection). At one time I dismissed EPP
hexagons as boring but the little devils worm their way into your
consciousness. Perhaps it is the many variations that can be achieved with
just one patch. And once diamonds and triangles are added to the mix, there
is more than enough to occupy the mind and the fingers. Hexagons are a great
portable travelling project.
Thank you so much to the person who posted the 'patterns from history' link
yesterday - I learned something new about hexagons and how they are put
together.
Janet O'Dell
Melbourne Australia




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagon Obsessions!
From: Hiranya Anderson <nomad0101gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 16:48:57 +1000
X-Message-Number: 3

--000e0cd1a676bd42310466f16898
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Dear All,

I am afraid I can totally identify with my Sister Hexagon Obsessionist over
the oceans blue. For I too so enjoy hexagons and I "fussy cut" as its said.
I like them to be 1/2'' or slightly bigger and make them all over card
board, so use old Christmas cards and ready made cards etc. I do collect
Antique quilts and fabric, but for my hexagons I am reproduction fabrics mad
so only ever use reproduction fabrics. I have made one huge quilt thus far
based on a famous Australian Antique quilt - a medallion style. I have
wonderful flowers of little animals and birds and a suffragette on a goose,
toile etc - all forming the centre of the hexagon. The surrounding row has
either ombres or various other designs. These hexagons are set on off white
cotton fabric, we call it calico here in Oz. Remember the fab Smithsonian
collections that came out yonks ago, they are what got me started. I tend to
see fabric in hexagons.

I can get 6 stitches in at a traffic light, whilst waiting for them to
change. I just do not get worked up in traffic jams, I just sew! My quilt
top is very precious to me, as going around it the various pieces signify
crucial times in my life. When I lost my babies, when I sat in hospital with
my son after a diving accident, doctor's surgeries, swimming carnivals,
sports carnivals, long trips inter-state whilst my husband drove, on ships
and planes etc.

I do not have much time to make quilts, however now and again I get some
therapy by making hexagons. So when I fall off the perch they will find
pretty containers full of hexagons too! : >

Here's to more hexagons! Hiranya Anderson from Sydney, Australia : >

On Tue, Apr 7, 2009 at 2:00 PM, Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>wrote:

> Loved the tale of the lady and all those boxes of hexagons--wonder what she
> would be doing compulsively in today's culture --same thing?!
>
> F

--000e0cd1a676bd42310466f16898--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Grandmother's Flower Garden
From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 06:02:43 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

I love hexagons and have made a variety of quilts using this shape,
but I do some tricky sewing techniques to not have to sew in the
y-seams. My favorite quilt of hexagons came from a set of 45 GFG
blocks I found at an antique store in Cape May while on vacation with
my family years ago. My kids were small and our money was tight. It
was about 10 minutes before closing time and I really felt I needed
to check with my husband to see if I could lavishly spend $50 like
this. I hid them behind a pile of other textiles (gasp!) and dashed
home. My husband approved, of course (he didn't want a pouting
quilter on his hands) and I was there when the shop opened in the
morning. Bought them and then wondered how in the world to finish
them! I don't do y-seams! I came upon an easy trick of straightening
two opposing sides and sewing them into long vertical rows. Then I
machine appliqued them onto a green vertical strip of fabric; then
the vertical strips into rows. The whole thing looks like I laid them
onto a bed of green grass. Added a floral border and had it longarm
quilted (this was about 15 years ago!) It is beautiful, finished and
VERY heavy. It is folded up in a bedroom closet, but I am going to
bring it out and place it on a bed so I can enjoy it - thanks for the
reminder about that quilt, because I want to see it again!

Debby, who never met a hexagon I didn't like
--
Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil
www.quilterbydesign.com
Programs & Workshops


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Grandmother's Flower Garden
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 11:25:09 +0100
X-Message-Number: 5

I confess to being a hexagon convert. I used to say I never met a
hexagon I liked, *particularly* the GFG configuration. I was scarred,
I think, by witnessing grotesque large hexagons made 'for speed'
during the 70s and onwards. Only when I started to see the older
quilts, with small hexagons, ingenious mathematical configurations and
'pathways', and wonderful fabric blends, did I start to appreciate
that they could indeed be beautiful.

And yes, when I was teaching (in the UK), the opener for the start of
every new class was to produce some unfinished hexagons I had found in
a charity shop and ask 'how many of you have some of these in the back
of a drawer?'. I always got the same response, laughter and almost
unanimous recognition. I was grateful to that unknown maker, it was a
great ice-breaker.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Granny's Gardens
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 06:36:40 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

I've never made a hexagon project ("I'd rather buy than build"<g>),
but a lot of GFG have passed through my antique quilts brokerage. My
two favorites were: one made in the late 1930s by a woman who told
me it was the only quilt she ever made, and she made it as a wedding
gift for her husband. She worked at Woolworth's Dime Store, and made
it while sitting on the only "seats" available in the women's
restroom, on her lunch breaks.

The other was one I guessed at: a quilt with a nicely made center,
but the hexagons became larger and less precise as the edges grew,
and it was finished with fabric slapped around the edge and machine
stitched on top (held to the light, an irregular row of hexagons
showed under the borders). On the back was a boy's name, clumsily
written in ink, and a day, month and year - with the word
"Finished!" I surmised that this was a school sewing project that
got left too late and was finished in haste. I expect that he chose
it thinking that if girls could make quilts, so could he...and
discovered it was not as simple as it looked. And it was tied, not
quilted. (It's one I wish I had kept.)

Xenia

(Hi, Hiranya!)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Grandmother's Flower Gardens & Hexagons
From: ad <adamroninetvision.net.il>
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 14:14:51 +0300
X-Message-Number: 7

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

--Boundary_(ID_Jm7fhNXt8Ma5c7adQVngqw)
Content-type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Just in case you thought GFG's, hexagons and English Paper Piecing are all
dead or in their dying throes, or (perish the thought) are still putting
hapless women off quilting for good, have a look here:



http://hexagonquilt-along.blogspot.com/



A very popular (and justifiably so) new blog that has gathered so much
momentum and such a large following the founder had to split it in two.

Ady (now on her 2nd Thirties style GFG plus 2 more EPP quilts)


--Boundary_(ID_Jm7fhNXt8Ma5c7adQVngqw)--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fabric Production Question
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 17:39:59 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

--00151750d9b884db900466e9bd86
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I am wondering when fabric companies may have started printing panels to be
cut and made into pillows?

Since this is not a quilt related question, please write to me directly at:
patquiltersmuse.com

Thanks.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

Life is a quilt made up of many shapes, colors, and threads that together
tell one story.

--00151750d9b884db900466e9bd86--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hexagon Mosaics
From: qwltpromsn.com
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 21:31:45 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9

--_8250de91-bd8a-411c-bd84-bc43c8ee60a5_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


I have a French hexagon mosaic dated 1851. It is NOT a GFG. I have plenty=
of those!

As far as "those" are concerned when I was an antique quilt dealer I
ran out of Amish women who would quilt GFG because they required quilting
"by the piece."

BA

Bobbie A. Aug Author=2C lecturer=2C teacher=2C AQS Certified Quilt Appraise=
r qwltpromsn.com www.BobbieAug.com P.O. Box 9654 Colorado Springs=2C CO 80=
932-0654



--_8250de91-bd8a-411c-bd84-bc43c8ee60a5_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: GFGs and other unfinished quilts
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 08:08:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

I think stories about our own quilting experiences help us to explain or
understand the processes that our ancestors used to make these quilts.

I'm very interested in Brenda's and Stephanie's stories about the auction of
GFG tops, pieces, and other tops. I was especially taken by Brenda's recount
about the fabric being bought from garment manufacturers. This is what I
report when I give my trunk show of 30s quilts. We have believed that the
quilters of the 30s were very resourceful and recycled clothing to make
their scrap quilts, but where did they get all those _different_ fabrics?

Now, there were a LOT of scrap quilts made in the 30s. But there is no way
one person, in my opinion, could collect hundreds of different scraps from
clothing alone. Not unless she was working with an entire nation of people
giving her used clothing. But to buy scraps by the pound from a clothing
manufacturer could increase the stash exponentially, and we have the birth
of all those scrap quilts. I have a Triple Irish Chain that would be a
fabric collector's dream. I have a string pieced scrappy quilt that is made
of diamonds sewn together in vertical strips. Beth Hayes showed one of these
in an issue of Vintage Quilts a few years ago, and imagine my surprise to
find out there are at least TWO of them! Mine has this really goofy fabric
with cartoons of Confucius and funny plays on words in his "sayings." The
fabric pieces are scattered, so I copied them on my copy machine and jigsaw
puzzle pieced some together. "Girls who walk on toes stay away from heels."
"Man who get in stew is small potato." "Tailor who love harem press plenty."
Something about "Woman listen ... money talk."

I wonder how makers of many GFGs plotted their design. There are several
variations of the gardens. Some have hexagon pathways between the flowers.
Some have diamond pathways. Some don't have pathways but rather green
diamond or triangle shapes made of hexagons that separate the flowers.
Others present themselves as stars.

I used a computer to plot the design of my GFG. Because of that, I could
edit the color placements when I found a very special reason to make this
quilt. I had started to hand piece the quilt one morning as I was visiting a
friend in New Jersey. I had given a lecture to a guild there the night
before. We had plans for an outing on that beautiful day, when TV reports
shattered everything. It was 9/11/01. As reports of the day went on, it was
believed over 3000 victims were killed that day. I wondered how to visualize
that number and used my computer rendering of the GFG to count patches.
Around 3000. I was intending to piece around some vintage GFG blocks with
some reproduction solid green and white fabrics. I tweaked the design and
repeated a slightly different flower motif as an integrated border. Those
flowers are blue with a yellow center and represent Forget-Me-Nots. This GFG
has become a memorial quilt, and piecing it was a reverent experience.

This GFG I hand pieced has 3/4" hexagons, which means each side measures
3/4". That also means that the point-to-opposite-point measurement is twice
that, or 1 1/2".

Originally, I did have a hesitation that I might not be able to keep the top
flat with my piecing with no sewing guidelines. No problem. You can train
yourself to do a reasonable seam allowance consistently. My top lies very
flat.

That is not the case for the Lone Star top my mother, sister, and I pieced
together 25 years ago. This was before rotary cutters were popular. We did
strip piece and subcut for the star, but all was done with lines drawn on
the fabric. With three of us working together to do a quick job, we were not
as mindful of seam allowances as we should have been. "Close enough" was
considered good. Wrong. We have this volcano that has never been quilted out
--- or finished. I can relate to those vintage tops that were never
finished.

I am constantly impressed with Trip Around the World quilts from the 30s
that were hand pieced of individual (probably die cut) squares (from a kit).
I've made several Trip quilts with Blanche Young's strip piecing method and
can whip a top out rather quickly. Square by square? By hand? Lots of time
involved.

Thanks for this discussion. I am gathering some new insights.

Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have made a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research. Cheer me
on at: www.AlzQuilts.org




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: fabric source in the 30s
From: "Rose Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 09:00:17 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

Grandmother's Flower Garden has really generated chatter on this list.
Here's my two cents.
Someone wondered how women got so many different fabrics for their scrappy
quilts. Old issues of HOME ARTS NEEDLECRAFT are full of advertisements for
bundles of scraps. Sometimes they were silks and velvets for crazy quilts.
Some were probably the remnants left after cutting out ready-made clothing.
Often they were sold by the pound, and very cheaply. The Grandmother Clark
company sold a kit of about 16 strips of different cotton prints (less than
1/8 yd.) along with cardboard templates for the most popular patterns,
including a hexagon. The John C. Michael Co. (Mickey's) used to sell or give
away the remnants from cutting out aprons, until they realized that they
could make money by cutting out shapes from them and selling them as kits.
Rosie Werner



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Grandmother Garden, Crazy Quilt - Fabric Sources
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 09:07:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

I have a piece of quilt ephemera entitled "The Lure of Patchwork" which was
a publication produced by the Union Specialty Works 218-256 Grove Street,
Boonville, NY. I have not researched this publication's origin yet, but it
is a circa 1920-1930 pamphlet. In this piece they advertise bundles of
fabrics -- in pound lots. There are testimonials from satisfied customers on
the back. There are also quilt patterns and an article reaching out to
quiltmakers called "Timely Tips for the Patchworker." This book really
pushes the velvet and silk bundles, but there is also cotton (figured and
plain fabric) and flannelette (as they refer to it) as well.

Also -- 1920-1930 companies like Virginia Snow Studios, W.L.M. Clark and
others sold bags and boxes with fabric (pieces and remnants) in them - some
were kits and others were bags of remnants sold by the pound. I have a
sample of a Virginia Snow Studio box kit and I have seen a W.L.M. Clark one.
I have never seen one of the unopened remnant bags in its original
condition.

Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hexagons
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 10:18:26 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

--000e0cd3070a3a59300466f7b008
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

How odd that this discussion should pop up, on the heels of just having been
asked how to make hexagons! Last night, I started writing a preliminary file
last night, and will round up more images to add today.

If anyone has photos they would like to share, I would welcome them, and of
course, provides a full photo credit, etc.

I can't help but think of the time when an elderly friend was trying to sell
me a hexagon top (1930s vintage). This poor thing had been through a battle
of its own! It started out life as a perfectly good quilt top until she
"hired" the ladies of her local church to "put it together." That they did!
For fifty bucks, they sandwiched a backing, a thick polyester batting, and
the top, and tied the layers together.

In looking at it, several points were immediately clear. The backing fabric
was too small and did not reach the edges, which is probably the reason the
edges were never finished!

They had also "washed" the top, when it was still a top, and the small seams
had split. Remember, this was made during the Great Depression and some
folks economized by sewing 1/8" seams. The fibers were hanging in shreds and
could not be repaired without being replaced. I was not feeling that
ambitious!

Her price was high, and some of the vintage prints were sweet and appealing,
but I could not bring myself to deal with this line of errors. Too much,
already! At her funeral, I was again approached about buying this "thing"
that the family did not want. They, too, seemed to have an overinflated
idea of what it might be worth.

That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

Life is a quilt made up of many shapes, colors, and threads that together
tell one story.

--000e0cd3070a3a59300466f7b008--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: More about the Nebraska auction
From: "Brenda Groelz" <brendahandiquilter.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 08:15:00 -0600
X-Message-Number: 14

There were many stacks of these garment-factory fabrics at the auctions. You
could tell that the factory stacked fabric at least 3" deep (how many layers
would that be? 20? 30?). Then cutters used a giant electric rotary cutter to
cut out bodices, skirts, etc. You could recognize the shapes that were left
from cutting sleeves and necklines by the curved edges of the fabric stacks.


The fabrics this woman used were a mix of 100% cotton and cotton/poly
blends.

One thing we know, she wasn't pre-washing her fabrics.

One sad story I remember from this auction: As the auctioneer held up a
crib-sized quilt, (embroidered, not hexagon, blue and white) the son stood
up and said, "I can tell you that this quilt is 50 years old, for sure! It
was my baby quilt." Collectively, the crowd told him, "Keep it." But he
seemed to be more interested in the money and allowed it to be sold.

I heard later that he tracked down the antique dealer that acquired it and
bought it back from her.


Brenda Groelz
Director of Marketing & Education
Handi Quilter

BrendaHandiQuilter.com phone: 801-335-0837 mobile: 801-867-9332 toll
free: 877-697-8458 x117
PLEASE NOTE NEW ADDRESS: 445 N 700 W, North Salt Lake, Utah 84054
http://www.HandiQuilter.com
http://www.HQComputerizedQuilting.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: GFGs and other unfinished quilts
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 15:29:06 +0100
X-Message-Number: 15

> . You can train
> yourself to do a reasonable seam allowance consistently.

This always bemuses me. Until my DS bought me an orphan GFG block on
the internet one Christmas (with certificate of adoption) I had no
idea that anyone would piece hexagons with an ordinary seam rather
than over papers. I have never yet seen an English example made that
way, old or newer (but as ever am ready to stand corrected).

Big, Big Respect to anyone who can make that work. Give me papers any
day.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fabric Production Question
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 10:01:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 16

Pat--
I suspect it was as soon as fabric printing was invented. I doubt it's
anything recent. No proof, of course!
Kim


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: answering the paperpieced question
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 12:10:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 17

Dear list,
I think we may have missed Peg's original question.
The pattern was variously known as "mosaic" or "hexagon" and appears - as
pieced over papers - as early as the late (very late) 17th century and early
18th century. The technique was more popular in Britain than in the US -
though we do see many of them in the early 19th c from the American southern
states. The pattern resurfaces in popularity as one of the early silk show
quilts of the Victorian era on the Atlantic seaboard.
After that, it seems to me, that most of the quilts done in that pattern
revert to being pieced (not over papers) sometimes as "charm" quilts of the
early 20th c.; then it morphs into the GFG of the depression era and beyond.

I am doing this from memory - so don't slam me if I am off by a decade

As to why it was so popular (or reviled). It makes a great "stay put, busy
work" project - you all know the kind: it sits by your chair ( or the bag
that goes in the carpool/swim meet/hockey practice, etc) and gets picked up
and eventually (maybe) gets finished. In such a fashion did my mother
needlepoint 12 dining room chairs in the midieval "mille fleurs" pattern. It
took her 6 years. I am still impressed 40 years later.

I am doing this from memory - so don't slam me if I am off by a decade!

Newbie in suddenly freezing - (yikes, my budding bushes!)- Northern VA.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Thoughts on hexagons
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 13:06:26 -0400

Way too many of those unfinished GFG's on ebay describe the shape of the
pieces as 'octagons' and that offends this former Classic major since hex is
Latin for six, thank you. I've often thought that the early 19th century
English versions owe much to imported boxes from the Middle East.
More musing: why are so many 19th (and into 20th) century Kentucky quilt
patterns hexagon-based? The Rainbow Diamond comes to mind and Mosaic. Then
there's lots of six-pointed stars too. Seemed to be a specialty of the
bluegrass state. Anyone from KY take a shot at this?
My first quilting mentor, Marie Moore (who ended up being Nancy Crow's
special handquilter) remembered fondly her first quilt--a Grandmother's
Flower Garden she pieced at age 7!
Re:Trip Around the World as a 'blended' pattern. McKim Studios in the early
1930s sold a precut kit and described it as "beautiful blending of floral
prints in a rainbow of pastel colors." Ms. McKim set artistic standards that
prevail to today.
Nuff for now-I'll get back to taxes...
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--001636c599a60a19d40466fa09ee--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: answering the paper pieced question
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 10:25:14 -0700
X-Message-Number: 19

Your reference to charm hexagons jogged my memory.
I have a great one of those - top only from I would say the Victorian era. =
(not English paper pieced)
I'm in FL and it's in WI so I can't check it.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com


From: Newbie Richardson [mailto:pastcraftsverizon.net]

After that, it seems to me, that most of the quilts done in that pattern
revert to being pieced (not over papers) sometimes as "charm" quilts of the
early 20th c.; then it morphs into the GFG of the depression era and beyond=
.
Newbie in suddenly freezing - (yikes, my budding bushes!)- Northern VA.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagon Mosaics
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 10:19:50 -0700
X-Message-Number: 20

I tried for years to machine piece a GFG. I finally did it, but it was too
much work. See it here:
http://winnowings.blogspot.com/2009/02/grandmothers-vegetable-garden.html

Christine Thresh
on an island in the California Delta
http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog
and
http://www.winnowing.com <-- website



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question
From: artalanrkelchner.com
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 13:51:49 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 21

I have a question for all you people.

I had an auction up for a piece of fabric taken off a c.1880's summer
spread. It matches with the top. The kicker is that piece is unseamed
and meaures 72"x72". I tried to ebay it with no luck. The auction number
is 110365734711. Would someone take a look and tell me if they made extra
wide fabric then. Thanks

Alan
lurking again


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: thanks for all the good info on hexes & GFG's
From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 16:24:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 22

Thanks to everyone!!
Newbie, I think you are right on or at least close enough in terms of the
decades. And, yes, I think that hexes would make a great research project.
I am working on a quilt timeline for a Dr. Gunn course to finally graduate -
well, that is, once I finally finish my thesis, too. For this timeline, I
have been doing a compilation of quilting trends and fashions of time
periods. Just as intriguing as the trends of a specific time, if not more
intriguing, are the patterns found in all time periods - and the hex is one
of them! Peck cites 1780 as the oldest date in Great Britain. Orlofsky has
a print of an unfinished 1830 piece. Janet Rae has an 1840 Star hex. There
are bunches in the late 19th century - most are called Honeycomb or Mosiacs.
Then comes the GFG of the Depression, through the 50s to today. Though we
can find all kinds of examples there doesn't seem to be good research on the
topic - which led to my question about the pattern naming. Maybe this is
one of those things that is so ubiquitous, so perennial that we just take if
for granted.

Several years ago, I shocked my quilting friends by taking to EPP after a
guild lecture. I have been a machine quilter since my first quilt in 1977
and they thought I didn't really know how to sew! Not only were they
shocked that I would do it, but that I did it well! As Newbie said, it is a
wonderful carry-along project. Mine was started when my boys were playing
little league baseball. Those games would never end! Well, like too much
in my life, that project is still not done and my oldest is in grad school!

Thanks again!

Peg




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 16:30:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 23

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------030302010906040801050809
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Indian Head cloth was made in 72" at that time, actually about from the
1850s into early 1900s; also bed sheeting.


artalanrkelchner.com wrote:

I have a question for all you people.

I had an auction up for a piece of fabric taken off a c.1880's summer
spread. It matches with the top. The kicker is that piece is unseamed
and meaures 72"x72". I tried to ebay it with no luck. The auction number
is 110365734711. Would someone take a look and tell me if they made extra
wide fabric then. Thanks



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hexes
From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu>
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 15:49:24 -0500
X-Message-Number: 24

Do I remember correctly that the first published quilt block pattern was
a honeycomb or mosaic in Godey's Ladies Book in the 1840s?

Mary

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Nimble Needle Treasures editor passes
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 14:04:47 -0700
X-Message-Number: 25

It has just come to my attention that Patricia (formerly Almy) Randolph
passed away in May of 2008. Patricia founded and published Nimble Needle
Treasures magazine from 1971-1975, one of the earliest such magazines at the
dawn of the late 20th century quilt revival. Almy/Randolph was the first to
publish a quilt article by Cuesta Benberry, who subsequently wrote many
articles for NNT, not all of which contained her by-line because Cuesta was
so modest. Click on the link below to read an article that TQHF founder,
Hazel Carter, wrote about Randolph for the newsletter of TQHF in the spring
of 2002.

http://www.nimbleneedletreasures.com/patricia_almy_randolph.htm

All back issues of this delightful early magazine are now available on CD.

Karen Alexander in the Islands




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NNT date correction
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 14:17:33 -0700
X-Message-Number: 26

Nimble Needle Treasures began publication in 1969.....NOT 1971 as my
previous post stated. I was looking at the wrong number and thinking of two
things at once. Doesn't work well.

http://www.nimbleneedletreasures.com/

You can occasionally find back issues in antique malls. I first stumbled
across a STACK of back issues while driving to Marion, IN, in 1996, I
believe. Luckily Hazel Carter and I were traveling together because she
immediately told me about NNT's ties with TQHF Honoree Cuesta Benberry. I
also found a stack of Tumbling Alley.

Boy, you would have thought I had hit a mother-load of gold to see my
excitement. I had the the great privilege and many hours of fun hitting the
road quilt sleuthing with Hazel from 1995 and 2004 when we lived within 5
miles of each other in Virginia. How I miss those opportunities since moving
to the farthest northwest corner of the USA! Hazel is a fountain of quilt
history.

Karen A. in the Islands




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hexagons Gone South
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 18:08:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 27

Re hexagon/gfg discussion:
I noted an interesting variation on eBay----item 380113666578.

Contrary to the seller's title, in this quilt the hexagons have gone South, possibly Gone to Texas. the maker has organized them in the manner of the Seven Sisters pattern, an old favorite among southern quiltmakers.

Gaye Ingram

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: GFGs and other unfinished quilts
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 22:01:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Barb raises an interesting question about the fabrics from the 30's scrap
quilts and the source of the variety. I wonder how many feed sacks an
average size family would have used up in their normal consumption of flour,
etc., in a year. . .
Stephanie Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: garment manufacturers selling scraps, paper piecing
From: laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 22:31:07 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2


--0-1489076487-1239168667=:1138
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


Thanks Sue and=A0Barb and Rose for all the information about garment manufa=
cturers selling=A0 scraps=A0after cutting out clothing. I recall seeing a q=
uilt fashioned with long triangular shapes narrower at one end and wider at=
the other. I thought they were neckties--albeit in unusual fabric for such=
--but=A0the=A0seller said they were actually the side scraps lremaining whe=
n A-line skirt pattern=A0pieces=A0were cut out!
=A0
Concerning scraps, I suspect the information you all have found=A0shows cot=
ton or silk scraps as the offerings, not woolens or cotton uniform fabrics.=
=A0Has anyone found=A0ads or other information offering scraps from men's c=
lothing manufacturers', or did sellers=A0assume quilters would be intereste=
d in only in cotton or silk? And what about fabrics from=A0upholstery/drape=
ry/home furnishings textile=A0companies; were those materials offered like =
that? I have seen lots of 'barkcloth' quilts, assuming they were from swatc=
h books, but perhaps=A0the makers had access to the upholster's table scrap=
s!
=A0
And about paper piecing, not only hexagons were done in that fashion. I hav=
e several quilt tops=A0in which the random shape pieces in each string squa=
res blocks are anchored to old newspapers or papers from catalogs. I even h=
ave one done on=A0an old=A0TV guide! If I think about it, more have come to=
me from the south than anywhere else.
=A0
When in 19th c quilts the paper templates remain inside, did the makers nev=
er anticipate having to clean them, or that the paper would crumble? And ho=
w does one deal with the crumbles today--can they be removed in any easy wa=
y?
=A0
Laura Fisher
--0-1489076487-1239168667=:1138--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hexagon dates in UK references
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 10:56:17 +0100
X-Message-Number: 3

In 'North Country Quilts, Legend and Living Tradition', Dorothy Osler
shows a pieced and applique framed centre medallion coverlet in which
one of the frames is a GFG setting of pieced hexes, made by a Martha
Jackson, c 1790-1795.

The earliest hex quilt shown in 'Through The Needle's Eye', quilts of
the York Castle Museum collection, is put at 1800-1820, although the
hexes are in rows not GFG, but there are several more in that book
which are GFGs, from 1820 through to 1900, and then a pair of GFG
cushions dated 1950-60,

It might also be worth trying to see a copy of Annette Gero's
definitive new book on Australian quilts.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: more hexagons
From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 06:27:49 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

OK, that's it! I have to pull out all of my hexagon quilts and
projects. I have at least a dozen, from traditional to innovative, to
folded hexagons becoming flowers to teardrops and other things that
don't have a name. There were two quilts featured in my first book
(now out of print, but I have the pictures and one of the projects
left). Alas, there is nothing in my second book (out this month), but
I do have one or two planned for my next book. I NEVER thought of
putting all this together. I have a neglected blog and I'm going to
put up pictures of all of these and when it's public, I'll post a
link. I thoroughly loved the link to the Hexagon blog web site -
marvelous.

Now that brings me to this HUGE box of giant sized yo-yos that I
bought at a guild show last month. Seems a lady passed away and
willed her things to her guild. This lady was obsessed with cutting
circles. I also bought a box of GIANT circles cut from cardboard
templates. She loved to make GIANT yo-yos! Hundreds of them. I'll
take a picture of them and post it. Now, have I started a new thread
about yo-yos? I'm still not done reading about hexagons!

Debby, who never met a circle I didn't like
--
Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil
www.quilterbydesign.com
Programs & Workshops


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: GFG
From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 06:54:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

All the hexagon talk prompts me to tell you about my one and only GFG
quilt. I started it in the early seventies using scraps from my elder
daughter's clothing and finished it to give to her for her thirtieth
birthday. I fussy cut (before we used that expression) the flower
petals from her dresses and then surrounded each with three rows of
hexes in three shades of blue, light close in, medium and then almost
navy as the ring that connected the units.
I EPP them on used early computer print outs from my husband's
engineering work, those huge heavy sheets with holes and perforations
along each side. I had them in four baskets: one for the flowerlets
and one for each shade of blue. I hauled a basket everywhere I went,
had one by phone, one by TV, etc. They went to soccer games, meetings,
doctor's offices, etc. The only place they did not go was church.
My daughter had asked me to make her a yo-yo quilt and I said heavens
no, I don't want to mess with all those pesky little pieces. What was
I thinking when I chose GFG instead?
My son, the mathematician kept asking me how many hexes it would have
and I said I'll kill him if he figured it out and told me. We moved
from California to Alabama and the baskets went, too, and EVENTUALLY
the top was assembled and finished. As we drove to Texas one year my
son and younger daughter sat in the back seat of the family station
wagon and removed all the papers. They were as deep as the seat height
when they finished and we dumped them at a "filling station" (remember
those?) trash bin.
I appliqued the whole thing (king sized!) to another shade of blue
strips which I cut into huge scallops to fill in the indentions along
the edges. I hand quilted "pictures" of events in Cindy's life in
those areas. Then I hand quilted it by the piece, taking FOREVER, and
it was much harder to haul around than the baskets had been. I'm sure
daughter still has it, and I know it got a cigarette hole burned in
it at one point. She doesn't use it on any of the beds in her home,
will have to ask where it is. It was my constant companion for well
over a decade!
And I've never done hexagons again!

Pat in Alabama where we've had two nights below freezing, with all the
dogwoods in bloom.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hexagon File
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>


Forgot to add the exact url:
http://www.quiltersmuse.com/how-to-make-a-hexagon-quilt.htm

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

Life is a quilt made up of many shapes, colors, and threads that together
tell one story.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Factory Cut-away Fabrics
From: blackeyedsewsanyahoo.com
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 16:23:52 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

--0-1491502395-1239146632=:66663
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii




To ALL: reading Brenda's description of the factory cut-away fabricsI realized I had just seen something on line; Moda's cut-aways fromtheir production of Turnovers/Jelly-rolls/Honeybuns were being thrownaway. Near the print plant, they were being destroyed. "Moda swooped in & came up with a clever way to save a scrap!Each bagcontains strips of 40 fabrics & varies from 2" to 4" in width& 32" long."Hancock Fabrics sell these in color coordinated bags for $10. What's old isnew again! Susan Riley, Hingham MA
Brenda: the same factory cut-away fabrics into strips of consistent widths
(about 2" finished, if I remember correctly). She sewed these end to end
and rolled them like bandages. The center strip was cut from this roll, and then
more strips were sewn to the center strip in log-cabin style, with the quilt
growing and growing. Some of these quilts had the scrappy print strips
alternating with solid white strips, giving the final quilt a little more
contrast. Many of these log-cabin style tops were used back to back with no
batting as a summer-weight quilt. They weren't especially pretty, so most
sold for $5 or less each.
I don't remember her name right now, but I know we could figure it out.

Brenda Groelz
Director of Marketing & Education
Handi Quilter

BrendaHandiQuilter.com phone: 801-335-0837 mobile: 801-867-9332 toll
free: 877-697-8458 x117
PLEASE NOTE NEW ADDRESS: 445 N 700 W, North Salt Lake, Utah 84054
http://www.HandiQuilter.com
http://www.HQComputerizedQuilting.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Most unfinished quilt
From: "Brenda Groelz" <brendahandiquilter.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 11:21:54 -0600
X-Message-Number: 17

You don't suppose she tried to make her "Around the World" quilt
with set-in
seams, do you? So many first-timers can't see the diagonal rows.

Brenda Groelz
Director of Marketing & Education
Handi Quilter

BrendaHandiQuilter.com phone: 801-335-0837 mobile: 801-867-9332 toll
free: 877-697-8458 x117
PLEASE NOTE NEW ADDRESS: 445 N 700 W, North Salt Lake, Utah 84054
http://www.HandiQuilter.com
http://www.HQComputerizedQuilting.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:02:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 18

Jean--

I have to add my vote for Lone Star as most unfinished. There are a lot os
bumpy stars out there!
Kim

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 20:38:07 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 19


Had to grin at Jean's comment on Lone Star - the memory of my first attempt
haunts me yet. And nothing was going to flatten it, ever. Fortunately, it=

was one of those UFOs I had the sense to chuck out.

Celia Eddy
The Brown House
Fleming Place
Maryport
Cumbria CA15 6ES
Tel: 01900 814959





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:45:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 20

I don't feel dismissive about GFG all. It truly amazes me that anyone could

manage all those angles and come up with a flat quilt :-). I'd only make a
mess of it. I have a GFG top that I keep saying I will quilt someday. I
adore it and use it to illustrate a couple of lectures I do and can't
imagine ever parting with it. It has the green "garden path" between
the
flowers.

There was a gorgous old honeycomb mosaic out in the collections care area of
the Lincoln quilt museum when I did a tour last Friday and we ooh-d and
aah-d for quite a while over it.

I think they're all stunning and am going to put one in my next novel. A
research partner and I saw one not long ago and were dying to know what
exactly was on the papers still crinkling inside the finished quilt. Sigh.

Stephanie Whitson Higgins






----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Most unfinished quilt
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:50:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 21

I didn't know enough about the quiltmaking process at the time to ask her
but I bet you've just explained EXACTLY why she hated doing it so much! Oh.

. . my. . . poor. . . Jane. If only she'd known.

Stephanie




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagons and GFG
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 15:53:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 22

Y'all have no idea how comforting it is to know that even QHL members have
created "volcanoes".

There are a couple of quilts hanging in the chintz exhibit at the IQSC at
the moment that make me stare with unabashed awe because of those diamonds
and the exquisite piecing.

I have some old madder pieces that were intended to be one of these stars
but never got put together. They were part of the saga that launched me into
the antique quilt world (I stood in hot Nebraska sun all day once to buy
them--at the bottom of a box of rags at a sale)...and then took them to a
Barbara Brackman class and learned they probably pre-date my state's
existence. Did THAT ever get my imagination going!

As of this date, my unfinished star pieces remain unfinished and probably
always will be (because I'd likely get a volcano), but how I wonder what
"she" was like. . . .

Stephanie Whitson Higgins (shamlessly procrastinating her real work)




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New file
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 20:19:05 -0400

There is always "more to say," but I have added to the preliminary file on
hexagons that I'd started writing yesterday, in response to a reader's
questions. I have added more photos tonight, and have more information "in
my head" to add at a later date. The laundry calls ... unless we want to
become nudists, but it is a little cold in New Hampshire, right now, to do
that! Although, there is a nudist camp in our state. Okay. More than you
ever wanted to know! Bye.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

Life is a quilt made up of many shapes, colors, and threads that together
tell one story.

--000e0cd47cd2556dfd046700147c--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: paper in quilts
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 09:36:41 -0400

Laura wrote:

When in 19th c quilts the paper templates remain inside, did the makers
never anticipate having to clean them, or that the paper would crumble? And
how does one deal with the crumbles today--can they be removed in any easy
way?

I suspect that at least for some of the quilts using paper as an underlay,
warmth was the motivation - paper is a good insulator and was used on walls
and on floors for that purpose. I also don't think that washing was a
consideration as so many household fabrics were taken out and shaken and
beat, comforts were taken apart and redone every year. Washing everything is
more a twentieth century thing. No one was thinking these items would be
here a generation later; in many ways these kinds of covers were/are
ephemeral like political campaign materials.

How to take out crumbling paper - my answer is : TWEEZERS!



Newbie in chilly - but not freezing - Northern VA: my camelias survived!!




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Newapaper and fabric - sort of, but not really
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 09:11:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

This is a side note. I read a book detailing the life of actor Kirk
Douglas. In the story, I believe he said his father was a rag man by trade.
Was talking to a group of friends and we each had a different theory on
exactly what that job entailed? Some good and some not so good. One person
said it was a fancy term for a rubbish man, one fellow in the group was a
newspaper man and he said he thought it mean he picked up rags and sold them
to the newspapers, something to do with the print -- another said it was
used by people to heat their homes - someone else said didn't they wrap
their hands in rags during Dickens times -- so you see we got a lot of ideas
thrown out there, but no answer. My m-i-l makes rugs - via rags and a
neighbor with a loom, has for years, but that is another story all together.
Does the term "rags" mean the same thing as it did back then - -newspaper
guy insisted it had something to do with newspaper print? Does anyone know
the real answer?

Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Newapaper and fabric - sort of, but not really
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 10:19:45 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------010508060204010604090709
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The paper-rag man in our neighborhood collected just that, bellowing
papah rags as he moved his truck slowly down the street. Newspapers then
were hot type [linotype as compared to tape and digital of today] so
were very recyclable into paper cloth.and other paper products.

I vaguely remember he paid for whatever was given to him; not much
certainly but a dime got us streetcar fare and a movie ticket!!


Susan Wildemuth wrote:

This is a side note. I read a book detailing the life of actor Kirk
Douglas. In the story, I believe he said his father was a rag man by
trade. Was talking to a group of friends and we each had a different
theory on exactly what that job entailed? Some good and some not so
good. One person said it was a fancy term for a rubbish man, one
fellow in the group was a newspaper man and he said he thought it mean
he picked up rags and sold them to the newspapers, something to do with
the print -- another said it was used by people to heat their homes -
someone else said didn't they wrap their hands in rags during Dickens
times -- so you see we got a lot of ideas thrown out there, but no
answer. My m-i-l makes rugs - via rags and a neighbor with a loom, has
for years, but that is another story all together. Does the term "rags"
mean the same thing as it did back then - -newspaper guy insisted it had
something to do with newspaper print? Does anyone know the real answer?


--------------010508060204010604090709--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Textile ID day
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 10:24:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_006E_01C9B834.2F3BD3F0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


MEDIA ADVISORY


Dear List,

I attach the announcement of a Textile ID Day in Alexandria,VA. if any or
you or friends of yours in the Washington DC area - have pertinent textiles
to bring to this, this is a wonderful opprtunity for a great scholar to have
a look see at your - or your institution's - items.



Newbie Richardson







For Immediate Release
Contact: Kris Lloyd, The Lyceum


Alexandria, VA's History Museum


703.838.4994




Alexandria and District of Columbia Needlework Identification Day at The
Lyceum


Public Invited to Bring Samplers for Examination by Team of Experts on May
15




Do you have a wonderful old piece of needlework stowed away in a closet?
Have you ever wondered where it might have come from or whose hands may have
stitched the piece? Then don't miss this opportunity to have a team of
experts identify your sampler or pictorial needlework.



The Lyceum, Alexandria's History Museum, is hosting Alexandria and District
of Columbia Needlework Identification Day on Friday, May 15, from 12:30 p.m.
to 4:30 p.m. An outstanding team of needlework and textile historians,
including former DAR Museum director Gloria Seaman Allen, Ph.D., will
educate participants about what makes a sampler valuable and how to properly
care for and conserve their pieces.



The team is especially interested in identifying 18th- and 19th-century
samplers and pictorial embroideries from this geographic area. From 1801
through 1846, the ten-square mile District of Columbia included the port
towns of Alexandria and Georgetown, as well as the newly surveyed Washington
City. More than 240 teachers offered instruction in needlework in the
District during this time. Do you have a sampler stitched by a girl working
with one of these teachers? This is your chance to find out!



Advance reservations are required and can be made by calling 703.838.4994. A
contribution to The Lyceum of $5 per needlework is requested and includes
full museum admission. The Lyceum is located at 201 South Washington Street
in Old Town Alexandria and has free off-street parking.



Dr. Allen is the author of A Maryland Sampling: Girlhood Embroidery
1738-1860 and was the guest curator for The Lyceum's exhibition, "Equally
Their Due: Female Education in Antebellum Alexandria."



For more information, please contact Kris Lloyd, assistant director of The
Lyceum, at 703.838.4994 or visit <http://www.alexandriahistory.org/>
www.alexandriahistory.org.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Newapaper and fabric - sort of, but not really
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 07:19:05 -0700
X-Message-Number: 13

To me it means he worked in the textile business in NY - quite possibly in =
the garment district.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Newapaper and fabric - sort of, but not really
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 10:36:58 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14


I should add that paper rag men were especially prevalent during the
war. Sometimes there would be 2 or 3 canvassing at the same time, often
erupting into street wars LOL. But paper was in demand due to war
restrictions at this time. And if I remember correctly, at some later
date, maybe in the early 50s, paper rag men were banned from street
soliciting. There were many complaints about them; often their scales
were "lightened" to decrease weight, thus shortchanging those selling to
him. And many were not legit; just scammers who kept clothes and/or sold
clothes to second hand stores.


Joan Kiplinger wrote:

The paper-rag man in our neighborhood collected just that, bellowing
papah rags as he moved his truck slowly down the street. Newspapers then
were hot type [linotype as compared to tape and digital of today] so
were very recyclable into paper cloth.and other paper products.

I vaguely remember he paid for whatever was given to him; not much
certainly but a dime got us streetcar fare and a movie ticket!!


Susan Wildemuth wrote:

This is a side note. I read a book detailing the life of actor Kirk
Douglas. In the story, I believe he said his father was a rag man by
trade. Was talking to a group of friends and we each had a different
theory on exactly what that job entailed? Some good and some not so
good. One person said it was a fancy term for a rubbish man, one
fellow in the group was a newspaper man and he said he thought it mean
he picked up rags and sold them to the newspapers, something to do with
the print -- another said it was used by people to heat their homes -
someone else said didn't they wrap their hands in rags during Dickens
times -- so you see we got a lot of ideas thrown out there, but no
answer. My m-i-l makes rugs - via rags and a neighbor with a loom, has
for years, but that is another story all together. Does the term "rags"
mean the same thing as it did back then - -newspaper guy insisted it had
something to do with newspaper print? Does anyone know the real answer?

>
>
>

--------------070202040302070806040704--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: garment manufacturers selling scraps, paper piecing
From: "Katt" <katlingcastletv.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 10:20:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15

My grandma worked as a sewer in one of those factories right around
1900 -1910. I can remember her saying that the factory let the girls take
the scraps home, and her family made the younger children's clothing from
them. So (a) they must have been fairly large scraps, and (b) they were
probably everyday fabrics like cotton, linen and wool. I know one of the
things the factory made was men's shirts. I really wish I had asked all the
questions THEN that I would love to ask her NOW....

Katt

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rag man
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 16:23:50 +0100
X-Message-Number: 16

In the 1960s when I visited my Grandma in the north east of England
there was still a 'rag and bone' man who collected with his horse and
trap once a week. As a child I was more (ghoulishly) interested in
the destination of the bones ('to make glue'?) but reading textile
history much later I learnt that the rags went to the large concerns
which shredded and recycled the fibres into 'shoddy', mostly based in
Yorkshire. This was the ideal place for the trade because the
manufacture involved combining the recycled fabrics with virgin
wool. Far from its present use to describe inferior stuff, the
original shoddy (and its superior version 'mungo' ) was of such good
hardwearing and water-repelling quality that it was used in contracts
for military and police wear.

According to this article, the 'rag man' was the first link in a chain
which then went to the rag merchant and the shoddy and mungo producers.

http://maggieblanck.com/Land/Shoddy.html

And I love this quote, from the above site:

<<Sir George Head wrote:

"The trade or occupation of the late owner, his life and habits,
or the filthiness and antiquity of the garment itself, oppose no bar
to this wonderful regeneration; whether from the scarecrow or the
gibbet, it makes no difference; so that, according to the change of
human affairs, it no doubt frequently does happen, without figure of
speech or metaphor, that the identical garment to-day exposed to the
sun and rain of a Kentish cherry orchard or saturated with tobacco
smoke on the back of a beggar in a pothouse, is doomed in its turn to
grace the swelling collar, or add dignified proportion to the chest of
the dandy".

Yorkshire Scenes Lore and Legends, M Tait, 1888


Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Rag man
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 11:44:12 -0400
X-Message-Number: 17

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------040304040904080007060104
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Wow, I ran out of breath by the time I finished reading that LOL.

The New York Times with its 20-word paragraph max would have a ball
editing that.

Sally Ward wrote:

"The trade or occupation of the late owner, his life and habits, or
the filthiness and antiquity of the garment itself, oppose no bar to
this wonderful regeneration; whether from the scarecrow or the gibbet,
it makes no difference; so that, according to the change of human
affairs, it no doubt frequently does happen, without figure of speech or
metaphor, that the identical garment to-day exposed to the sun and rain
of a Kentish cherry orchard or saturated with tobacco smoke on the back
of a beggar in a pothouse, is doomed in its turn to grace the swelling
collar, or add dignified proportion to the chest of the dandy".

Yorkshire Scenes Lore and Legends, M Tait, 1888


--------------040304040904080007060104--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: more hexagons
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 11:37:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 18

It seems clear that someone out there needs to do a book on hexagon quilts.
. . . . .
Stephanie Whitson Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: GFG
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 11:40:12 -0500
X-Message-Number: 19

Grace Snyder's Mosaic (lots of tiny hexagons) will be hanging at the museum
in Lincoln soon. . . . come visit!
Stephanie Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Newapaper and fabric - sort of, but not really
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 11:47:26 -0500
X-Message-Number: 20

Newspapers began to be called "rags" (an insulting term according to
etymonline.com) in 1734. HHHMMMM...

Stephanie Higgins




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Newapaper and fabric - sort of, but not really
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 12:57:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 21

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Newspaper was and still is made from pulp. Hence also the name for pulp
magazines which were cheap detective stories. US paper currency is also
made from rag as is good writing stationery.



Stephanie Whitson wrote:

Newspapers began to be called "rags" (an insulting term according to
etymonline.com) in 1734. HHHMMMM...


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Subject: origin of feed sacks
From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 12:58:26 -0400
X-Message-Number: 22

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Alot of the feed sacks came from chicken feed as well as flour. When I =
was
a kid almost everyone had chickens in their back yards. Now people are
talking about doing that again. I just found out that it is legal to =
keep
chickens in our little town, but the coop has to be a certain distance =
from
the property line. Too bad the food doesn't come in pretty fabric bags =
any
more.
I should add that my grandmother bought her singer treadle machine with =
her
egg money.


Shari in NC
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Subject: Chicken-keeping (totally off-topic)
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 18:06:00 +0100
X-Message-Number: 23


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>
> chickens in their back yards. Now people are
> talking about doing that again.

Chicken keeping is certainly getting trendy again in the UK. Checkout
these designer 'chicken pods'.

http://www.omlet.co.uk/homepage/homepage.php

Sally Ward
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Subject: Re: Chicken-keeping (totally off-topic)
From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 13:27:18 -0400
X-Message-Number: 24

Wow, that is a wonderful little coop. I know we don't have anything like
that around here.
ss
> Chicken keeping is certainly getting trendy again in the UK. Checkout
> these designer 'chicken pods'.
>
>


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Subject: RE: Chicken-keeping (totally off-topic)
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 12:25:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 25

Good grief! After seeing that, Sally, my chickens are down right abused!

Best regards,
Sharron.........................
............in 72 deg. & sunny Spring, TX........days like today remind me
why I moved here!.............


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Subject: Re: New file
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 13:58:50 -0400
X-Message-Number: 26


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Now come on Pat - nudity might get interesting - now you can come to VT and share equally with everything boy-boy- or girl-girl, same sex bathrooms - but I still like you guys in clothes -specially at this time of year. Had 3" of snow last night here in Burlington, and today is rain.....nice day to stay home and nurse my annual cold and do some hand quilting - what else can make one feel better.....
Mitzi from Spring-forgotten Vermont
Oh! Hi! to Polly in NS.....
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Subject: Seven sister's hexagon on Ebay
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 13:07:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 27

I'm intrigued by the machine quilting pattern of the Ebay #380113666578. I
have a crib quilt that's a small lone star, appears to be early 20th Century
which has the same quilting design. Is this a common machine pattern from
the early days of machine quilting? Mine are somewhat irregular so they
couldn't have been a jig, but freehand. Sort of a rounded Greek key thing.
Jean Loken, MN



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Subject: Re: Seven sister's hexagon on Ebay
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 15:34:47 EDT
X-Message-Number: 28


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Jean, I am a longarm quilter and I believe this is a current quilting job,
done at least within the last 10 years on a longarm quilting machine,
freehand quilted and is a less than excellent job.

Nan in FL
_www.mooreandmoorequilts.com_ (http://www.mooreandmoorequilts.com)


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Subject: GMFG Article
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 15:34:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 29

Hi folks,

I just added some terrific photos that Don Beld sent me to include in the
file I set up about "How to Make a Hexagon Quilt." The quilt is a "fussy
cut" one, with great old fabrics from the 1820s. I smile when I say that. My
house was built in 1821. You can read about that in an online file on my
website, too, if you'd like to see the typical new construction of Federal
style homes in New England at that time. The file is called, "This Old
House." What else?

We have been to Vermont and back today. One always senses when they cross
the "border." Love it there. Definitely not for flatlanders. Needless to
say, I have not read any of the posts to the list today (yet), but will
later. If anyone has any specific links they would like me to include or
other information, I'd be happy to do so. This is fun!

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

Life is a quilt made up of many shapes, colors, and threads that together
tell one story.

--001636c5a7e8ac057d04671036ca--


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Subject: cutter quilts
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 14:03:14 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 30


Now THAT's a subject line sure to cause controversy!

Seriously, I am paring down my collection of less-than-perfect quilts. These are ones I collected with the idea of taking them apart and redoing them, or as using them as donor parts for other quilts.

I ran across one that appears to have a signed homewoven sheet in the center. I am not even going to pretend to be an expert on this, so I would like to offer it free (for shipping) to anyone who knows about these quilts. I put a picture of it at http://quiltbug.com/quilts.htm

The rest of the pictures are quilts I will be putting on Ebay this weekend. There are two others that are free-for-shipping if anyone is interested.

Kris


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Subject: Earthquake knitter
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 16:45:04 -0500
X-Message-Number: 31

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Did you hear about the true account of the 98-year-old woman in Italy who
knit for 30 hours while waiting to be rescued from the rubble of her home?
She probably had to knit because she didn't have any hexagons cut to hand
piece.



Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have made a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research. Cheer me
on at: www.AlzQuilts.org


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Subject: Hexagon quilts
From: louise-b <vlbequetMCMSYS.COM>
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 17:35:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 32

Last night's messages made me think of two books that I have: Garden
Party, GFG quilts and more, by Dorothy Kinsley Wray, published in 1997
that is full of ideas. The other is: Mosaic quilts, paper template
piecing in the South Carolina Lowcountry, published in 2002 by the
Charleston Museum. Several essays including one by Laurel Horton. Again
wonderful pictures of an exhibit.

The other item was a quilt pictured in Traditional Quilter, perhaps in
95, of a wonderful applique panel in reds, blues, creams, etc.,
surrounded by a framework of hexagons in reds, blues, creams, some tans.
This was made by Anna Marie Tucker of NY. That one I am going to do some
day; even have the hexagons cut out to go around a small Chinese panel
that I have.

Louise - in mid-Missouri


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Subject: Re: Hexagon File
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 23:58:18 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 33

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I saw so many hexagon quilts on ebay that I made a list, which I can not locate at the moment, of the names that people used to describe these quilts. All of the common names GFG, Martha Washington's Flower Garden, mosaic, honeycomb, etc. But my favorite was a guy that called it an "oyster cracker" quilt.

Polly Mello

Trees are in bloom but cold in Maryland
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Subject: Re: Chicken-keeping (totally off-topic)
From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 18:25:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 34

Now this is keeping chickens to the nth degree. Love it.
Debbie Hill-Russell
russhillbeecreek.net