Subject: Re: Seven sister's hexagon on Ebay
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 06:48:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Nan wrote:

<<Jean, I am a longarm quilter and I believe this is a current quilting
job,
done at least within the last 10 years on a longarm quilting machine,
freehand quilted and is a less than excellent job.>>

RESPONSE:
Sorry, Nan. I completely disagree. I have a Singer 201 machine, which has
been a workhorse machine for longer than I have been. (That suggests there
was God, there was dirt, there was electricity and then there was this
Singer 201.) There is a lever for lowering the feeddogs for darning. A
creative quilter could quite possibly take on a project like this for
free-motion quilting. And she should be so proud, IMHO.

The quilting shown on this eBay quilt (#380113666578) is very possible to do
on a domestic machine and could have been done many years ago.

I know neither of us can prove our point for SURE, but I offer that the
technology was available in the 30s (when this quilt might have been
made/long before longarm machines) to free motion machine quilt.

Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have made a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research. Cheer me
on at: www.AlzQuilts.org





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Factory Cutaways still available
From: joysbeesyahoo.com


I made a quilt this year using shirting scraps I bought last year at Talbott's Outlet store in Carmel Valley. These shirts sell for up to $200+ r
etail, and the fabric is nice, some of it Italian and English cottons.

Jackie Joy




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Albert Small, Bertha Stenge and Hexagons
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 07:14:08 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Here is a link for the Illinois State Museum and Hexagon quilts

http://www.museum.state.il.us/muslink/art/htmls/ks_piece_hex.html

Enjoy

Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Seven sister's hexagon on Ebay
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 08:35:45 EDT
X-Message-Number: 4



In a message dated 4/9/2009 7:49:27 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
cptvdeosbcglobal.net writes:

I know neither of us can prove our point for SURE, but I offer that the
technology was available in the 30s


Barb, I completely agree that machine quilting is as old as the invention
of the sewing machine, but having been a longarm quilter doing only
freehand work during the past 8 years, this is very, very typical of the designs
we use and would be very difficult to replicate on a sit down DSM.

Nan in FL

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 08, 2009
From: quiltsmuseum.msu.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 12:57:54 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 5

More hexagons...
Go to the Quilt Index, http://www.quiltindex.org/index.php, and in the search box at the top of the page type "hexagon". After you've enjoyed the over 100 quilts, go back to the search box and type "flower garden". Over 400 quilts are found, some are the same as the hexagons, but most are different. As I was flipping through the results of hexagon, I found one that I had made! It's called "The Red One" and is a charm quilt.
Have fun and enjoy the show.

Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant, Great Lakes Quilt Center, MSU Museum
quiltsmuseum.msu.edu


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question re: dating 4-H fabric
From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmvyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 06:40:09 -0700 (PDT)

Hi! I found a lovely piece of vintage cotton fabric (high quality cotton
) with a 4-H clover and the words "4-H" printed in dark green on a white ba
ckground. It is a scatter style print. From selvage edge to selvage e
dge it is 33" wide. I am guessing that it is from 1940 or so. Maybe e
ven the 1950's. There have been additional prints similar to this commem
orating 4-H, but the fabrics were very wide--from 1990's. Any one have a
guess as to when this was printed? My guess is 1940-1950's.
Thanks--C. Ark
Urbana, Ohio
--0-236420697-1239284409:6011--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Question re: dating 4-H fabric
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 08:55:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Connie,
Would you be able to put this up on the Eboard so that we can see it? I
would love to see it! Marcia Kaylakie

Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Question re: dating 4-H fabric
From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmvyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 07:11:13 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8


--0-356825742-1239286273:31074
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


Hi Marcia! Yes, I can, but I do not know how to post it to the eboard.
 I have been off the QHList for 2 years due to job changes & moving.
Are there insturctions on the eboard?
Thanks-C. Ark
---

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gallery and quilts
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 07:22:53 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 9



To get to our E-board, just go to http://quilthistory.com and click on gallery. That takes you right to it.

Click on the post/edit link in the upper right hand corner underneath Vintage Pictures. The password is vintage. Then click on the tab where you want to put your picture and click on the add a note link again in the upper right hand corner under Vintage Pictures. Add your explanatory note with the picture as an attachment.

To delete or edit the photo, just do the same thing and click on the delete or edit button as appropriate. If you ever lose these instructions, they are at http://quilthistory.com/subscribe.htm

For my cutter quilts - I really wasn't trying to SELL them to the list, so please respond to me directly. I just want to find a good home for the one with the homewoven batting.

Thanks!

Kris


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hexagon quilts
From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 07:29:08 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 10


Would anyone know where/how I could obtain a copy of the hexagon quilt pattern that appeared in Godey's in 1835? (It was noted on the Quilt Index.)

Thanks.

Mary Anne






----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mystery block
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 11:27:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

--001636c5a8d1e42a75046720e258
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I have just created a *blog* entry titled, "Grapes and Grape Leaves As
Symbols of Christ." Within the text and photos is an appliquE9 block that
I've never seen before. I've checked various sources and can't seem to come
up with anything similar. Some of the fabrics may be "Nile green." I have
scant information to go on.

Please take a look and see if you recognize this second of three photos
posted. Thanks.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

Life is a quilt made up of many shapes, colors, and threads that together
tell one story.

--001636c5a8d1e42a75046720e258--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Question re: dating 4-H fabric
From: "Sherry Cook" <sas.cookgmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 09:15:10 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

Hi! I have scraps & a small amount of yardage from fabric I used when
my
husband, Darwin, went to Vietnam, Oct. 1963 to Oct. 1964. I bought the
4-H
fabric (exactly as you describe, at JC Penneys in Moses Lake, WA (his
home
town)while he was gone. I made blouses for his sisters who were in 4-H
that
summer. The fabric might have been in the store for awhile before I
purchased it early in 1964. Hope this helps! Sherry Cook, San Antonio
(babysitting Grandkids) & Stevenson, WA.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Seven sister's hexagon on Ebay
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 11:07:51 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

When I was a dealer for about 5 minutes 10 years ago), I saw many quilts of
all ages quilted this way by machine when I shopped the malls in Missouri.
Enough that I began to wonder about the machine quilting industry in
Missouri. It was not uncommon to see a lovely old top (1800's) machine
quilted this way, either.

Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Newapaper and fabric - sort of, but not really
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 11:07:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 14

In my childhood the rag man collected used clothing. I believe it was for
rag-content paper. He did come around our neighborhood outside NYC, but with
a hand-cart as I recall. We also had the sharpener who drove slowly through
the neighborhood to sharpen knives and shears. They were both popular with
our mom.
However, "being in the rag trade" meant working in the clothing industry,
especially on the west side of NYC. A very different sort of "rag."
Jean Loken, MN



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Question re: dating 4-H fabric
From: Sheryl Till <sheryl.tillgmail.com>
Date: Thu, 09 Apr 2009 12:18:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 15

Ark Quilts wrote:
> Hi! I found a lovely piece of vintage cotton fabric (high quality cotton) with a 4-H clover and the words "4-H" printed in dark green on a white background. It is a scatter style print. From selvage edge to selvage edge it is 33" wide. I am guessing that it is from 1940 or so. Maybe even the 1950's. There have been additional prints similar to this commemorating 4-H, but the fabrics were very wide--from 1990's. Any one have a guess as to when this was printed? My guess is 1940-1950's.
>
I don't have an answer to your question but I do have a feedsack that
sounds like the same print.

--
Sheryl in South Louisiana--- Zone 8b
Garden Favorites: Calla Lily--Daylilies--Hosta--Iris
http://quiltingtizzy.wordpress.com/
http://louisianaquiltworks.com/Gardening.htm



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: grape block
From: "Rose Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 12:33:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 16

Patricia,
The grape block is a pattern from Mountain Mist called Martha's Vineyard.
From the early 1930s - #28.
Rosie Werner



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Another query
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 15:48:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 17

Now that we've established a lack of concensus re the hexagon Seven Sisters quilt about which I asked, I have an even better question.

This one has been nagging me even before I saw this item on eBay: please look at item 290306988986 .

Has anyone a copy of the book shown with that quilt, "Country Quilts" by Linda Seward? I have a copy of the book, but the cover on my copy, a lst edn, shows a big Seven Sisters quilt (big sisters, really!) which I take to be from the Museum of Appalachia, though I see no attribution..

I am seeking attribution for the quilt shown on the cover of the copy shown with the quilt that is for sale.

I have never seen a quilt in this pattern in real life and would appreciate hearing from anyone who has.

I've always noted the lack of quilting, the exceedingly narrow sashing and borders on several of the quilts photographed for this book, and the attribution of a "mid-nineteenth century" date to quilts made with solid fabrics, especially reds.

Are these regional features? result of later assembly? other?

Enlighten me, please.

Most of the quilts for this book were located and photographed at Atlanta Historical Society campus, Bob Timberlake's collection (much of which was sold at auction in Ashville two years ago), John Rice Irwin's Museum of Appalachia, and a Sunday house in Fredricksburg, TX. The writer herself did not see the quilts, so I've already explored that line of inquiry.

Gaye Ingram

P.S. I never cease to marvel at the spellcheck on this Suddenlink webmail. This time, instead of "concensus," it suggests "con census." Think of that one while you're going to eBAy<g>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: machine quilting pattern on quilt on Ebay
From: Mary Waller <mwallervyn.midco.net>
Date: Thu, 09 Apr 2009 20:03:04 -0500
X-Message-Number: 18

I agree with Jean L. from MN; these are early machine quilting motifs, like 1930 era. I have seen this three-leaf clover design and a scroll design that is the same or very similar to the motifs on this quilt on ebay, #380113666578. Maybe was looks like a scroll to me is what Jean describes as a rounded Greek key; it scrolls in, and then back out. I have a couple of quilts with these designs. I suspect there are jigs or some other guide, although I have never seen them.

Mary Waller
Vermillion, South Dakota, USA





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Another query
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 19:03:21 -0700
X-Message-Number: 19

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------_NextPart_000_007D_01C9B945.DA080350
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset"utf-8"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Gaye
I too have the seven sisters quilt on the cover of my copy of Country
Quilts. Take a look at p. 69 for a great hexagon....wish it was shown in
full rather than on a table. In fact I've thumbed through the book twice
and don't even see the quilt featured on Ebay anywhere in my copy.

jean


------_NextPart_000_007D_01C9B945.DA080350--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question...
From: kittencat3charter.net
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 20:47:52 -0400
X-Message-Number: 20


Does anyone know of a library in Massachusetts or Connecticut with the 1983 issue of Quilt Digest? The library in the next town over used to
have a complete set but the 1983 issue has vanished over the years and
there are a couple of articles I'd like to consult for an assignment.
Does anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks in advance
Lisa Evans
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Question re: dating 4-H fabric
From: djd52hotmail.com
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 20:31:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 21

--_4fd956b5-fe5b-4d21-ad82-0ae6d673ccfa_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


Hi! I belonged to the 4-H in the early 60's and own an apron out of that material. I made it for a project badge. Don't remember how where the materia
l came from probably my 4-H group leader but it was definitely the early 60's.

Janie D.

Troy2C IL

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Another query
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 22:22:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 22

I checked around on the web, and the only other edition of that book seems
to be a paperback published abroad, a couple of years later than the
hardcover version published in the US. I couldn't find a picture of the
cover.
Kim


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Seven sister's hexagon on Ebay
From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 22:48:39 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

>The quilting shown on this eBay quilt (#380113666578) is very possible to do
>on a domestic machine and could have been done many years ago.

I agree with Barb Vlack that this was likely quilted on a home
machine, although not necessarily as early as the 1930s. The quality
of the designs hardly looks professional - if any long-armer charged
money for that job she had a lot of nerve! To me, the quilting looks
like that of many ambitious, but not quite accomplished, home
quilters.

While machine quilting in general likely dates back to the invention
of the sewing machine, very few "antique" machine quilted quilts have
survived, relative to the numbers of hand-quilted ones. One
certainly doesn't see very much free-motion quilting from before the
1980's when using a sewing machine for this task became widely
popular and "aceptable". Also, darning feet are a relatively modern
accessory for home machines. I tend to collect such bits and have
yet to see any from before the 2nd half of the 20th century (although
I have one German machine ca 1904 with a built-in darner - obviously
an idea wayyyyy ahead of its time). In my machine quilting
experience, a functional darning foot is much much more important
that any ability to disable the feed dogs. My dedicated FM machine
is a 1904 Singer 27 treadle equipped with a modern plastic darning
foot, and its original feed dogs in their original configuration.

Jennifer Hill
--
'Winds of inspiration. . .'
Quilt Canada 2010
Telus Convention Centre, Calgary, AB
April 26 - May 1 2010


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: I confess!
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 22:07:06 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

I confess! I machine quilted on my Singer 201 in 1966.
It was a queen size to the floor bedspread made from a thick decorator fabr
ic with thick batting.
I quilted with the regular foot and just slid the quilt around or went arou
nd curves in the flowers printed on the fabric by lessening the pressure on
the presser foot.

No one told me I couldn't do it - so I just did it!
And I am sure there are many others who went before me.

We just didn't talk about it because it wasn't an acceptable thing to do.
Quilting was "supposed" to be done by hand.

Whew! It feels good to come out of the "quilting" closet.

Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Another query
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 0:44:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Jean,

That's because the quilt is not in the book you and I have. I've seen it in a magazine, however. Same pic.

Yes, I saw that hexagon on p.69. Feared mentioning it 'lest everyone vere off to hexagons again.

Okay, look on p.33, lower left quadrant and tell me what you think about that
label. My Gujarati friends say, "Huh?"

Any ideas about the quilt on eBay? It seems to have been shot in Texas and might have been made by same person who made the Seven Sisters. That contains little quilting. Both look too puffy. I'd love to get ahold of that batting!

Gaye

I have the magazine pic it in my files because of the long-lasting love affair I'm having with the Whigs Defeat pattern.

Gaye
I too have the seven sisters quilt on the cover of my copy of Country Quilts. Take a look at p. 69 for a great hexagon....wish it was shown in full rather than on a table. In fact I've thumbed through the book twice and don't even see the quilt featured on Ebay anywhere in my copy.
Jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Machine quilting
From: Mary Waller <mwallervyn.midco.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 09:34:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I have seen a photo of an early machine quilting frame, set up with an
early 20th Century sewing machine. The frame was similar to John
Flynn's frames, but longer. I have done similar designs freehand on my
home sewing machines, and although they take some practice, they're very
doable. I believe the similarity between contemporary quilting designs
and the c. 1930 ones is because they're the types of designs that work
for continuous lines of quilting. I attribute the three-leaf clover and
scroll designs to machine quilting in the early 20th C, and that these
quilts were quilted soon after the tops were made.

For more on early sewing machines, visit the TreadleOn list and Dick
Wightman's website. I think it's www.treadleon.net.
And Barb, I'm with you on the Singer 201, I love mine. It's just feels
so right and so good to sew on it.

Mary Waller
Vermillion, South Dakota, USA




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: MO as a hotbed of machine quilting
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 13:26:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

--001636c599a6f811fd046736a8d9
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

From my experience, some inventive person in Missouri was machine-quilting
long before the rest of the country. I read somewhere about the beginnings
of the longarm industry and seems people were making frames and stretching
the abilities of their Singers in the 1930s. I have a wool quilt from MO
made in the 40s that was machine quilted in the waves pattern. Good thing
too since some of it is khaki wool army blankets!
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--001636c599a6f811fd046736a8d9--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Seven sister's hexagon on Ebay
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 10:25:25 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6


--0-250949611-1239384325:80225
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii

I have a 201 (dating from the 50's) which is the "Cadillac" of those old Singer machines and I've always planned to use it to machine quilt some items. It just purrs along....arden


(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR




________________________________


RESPONSE:
Sorry, Nan. I completely disagree. I have a Singer 201 machine, which has
been a workhorse machine for longer than I have been. (That suggests there
was God, there was dirt, there was electricity and then there was this
Singer 201.) There is a lever for lowering the feeddogs for darning. A
creative quilter could quite possibly take on a project like this for
free-motion quilting. And she should be so proud, IMHO.


Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have made a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research. Cheer me
on at: www.AlzQuilts.org
--0-250949611-1239384325:80225--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Crazy Quilt by Don Blanding
From: "Louise" <ltiemannstny.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 18:20:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

I found another poem called Crazy Quilt by Don Blanding. Is is from his
book Memory Room published in 1935 by Dodd, Mead & Company, New York.

Here is the first stanza, I like that he rhymed quilt with spilt. The
rest of the poem is posted on my blog. I also posted the title poem
Memory Room - it is written for pack-rats like me. Enjoy, Louise

http://quiltpapers.blogspot.com

Crazy Quilt by Don Blanding

In Memory Room there’s a crazy-quilt
As gay as a truant rainbow spilt
In shreds of shimmers of brilliant tints,
Silvery gleams and golden glints,
Gray and garnet and lizard-green,
Maroon, magenta and tangerine,
Ochre, orchid and plushy fawn,
Flame of sunset and rose of dawn,
Square of amber and patch of red
Stitched together with memory-thread.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: machine quilting pattern on quilt on Ebay
From: Gloria hanrahan <gloriaak.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 23:23:17 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

No jigs were needed for those early scrolls. With the quilt in a 3 pole
frame, suspended from the ceiling and sliding under the bed of the
industrial machine, the quilter created the pattern. Practice was the jig
and after a good amount of practice, the motions for the pattern just
flowed.

I could always tell which pattern my mother was quilting, just from the
rhythm of the machine.

Gloria



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: machine quilting pattern on quilt on Ebay
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 09:09:21 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2


-------------------------------1239455361
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Gloria, Can you tell us more about those early quilting machines? Also, in
response to another post about machine quilting in MO, Gammill, the
largest longarm company is located in MO and was started in 1980. And Hart
Cottage Quilts website has a good article on 19th century quilting machines.
_http://www.hartcottagequilts.com/his9.htm_
(http://www.hartcottagequilts.com/his9.htm)


Nan in FL
_www.mooreandmoorequilts.com_ (http://www.mooreandmoorequilts.com)





**************Feeling the pinch at the grocery store? Make dinner for $10
or less. (http://food.aol.com/frugal-feasts?ncidemlcntusfood00000001)

-------------------------------1239455361--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Annette Gero's book
From: audreycameronmadasafish.com
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 18:54:44 +0100
X-Message-Number: 3



Hi All,
Annette Gero's new book (The Fabric of Society Australia's Quilt Heritage from Convict Times to 1960) an opulent and lavish book with
much information. A quick perusal reveals at least 8 hexagon quilts including 2 Grandmother's Flower Garden from 1935 & 1942-9. The earliest
one is splendid 6 sided miniature hexagon (c. 1857) made on a ship to Australia. The rest are mosaic hexagon styles, triangular hex units, or
hexagon single petal flowers with no path between.

This book is large with tons of information that would need careful studying. This brief offering is the least of it.

Audrey Cameron is wet cold Lincolnshire

------_NextPart_000_0010_01C9BA0D.D034EB40--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: kit quilt
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 09:52:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

--001636c5b52bc535cd046747cac6
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

There was something about that quilt block (grape leaves and grapes) that
just screamed "kit quilt" to me. I don't know why. Thanks again, Rosie, for
identifying it. Is there a known year when the pattern was first available?

I have added two more images to that particular blog file, as well as a link
to see an example of a whole, finished kit quilt containing the former
"mystery" block.

On this chilly, rainy weekend, it does not seem that Easter will be
tomorrow.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

Life is a quilt made up of many shapes, colors, and threads that together
tell one story.

--001636c5b52bc535cd046747cac6--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Annette Gero's book
From: kathie holland <kathiehollandoptonline.net>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 10:59:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5



This came as a blank message to me, I would love to hear about Annette's
book! Looking forward to owning a copy one day.
Kathie

On 4/10/09 1:54 PM, "Audrey Cameron" <audreycameronmadasafish.com> wrote:

>




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Early Machine Quilting
From: Polly Greene <pjgreeneeastlink.ca>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 12:13:24 -0300
X-Message-Number: 6

In the Shelburne Museum collection there is a machine-quilted
whitework quilt proudly signed in machine stitching "Singer Machine
Work by M J Foster, Ottawa, Illinois" which was done in the late 19th Century.
Polly in Nova Scotia



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Machine quilting
From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 08:59:45 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7


People were machine quilting by the 1870s; the first movable quilting frame for use with a sewing machine was patented by Augusta Hoover in 1871.

See my paper in UNCOVERINGs 2005 and Barbara Brackman's book, PATTERNS OF PROGRESS: QUILTS IN THE MACHINE AGE for more details on early machine quilting.

Anita

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: kit quilt
From: "Rose Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 16:17:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Patricia, and anyone else interested;
The Mountain Mist pattern "Martha's Vineyard" was sold only as a pattern,
not as a kit. The earliest date I have for it is 1931, but it has
been sold for a long period of time. (Does anyone know if Mountain Mist
patterns are still available?)
Since the MM designs (especially applique) are so similar to some of the kit
designs, they are often mistaken for kits. For this reason I am including
them in my documentation of kits - just to point out that they were not
kits.
Rosie Werner



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: kit quilt
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 21:33:51 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Yes they are available today.
TO find out more go to:

http://www.mountainmistlp.com/default.htm


Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: question about dyes NQR
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>

Dear list,
Happy Easter!

My daughter's best friend is geting married. Her dress is ivory over pale
peach. She asked that all of her nieces wear ivory - with peach sashes.
(This is not a "big deal" wedding but she does want things to be somewhat
co-ordinated..) She asked me a question I cannot answer.
Two of her nieces already own nice polyester satin "best" dresses (which
still fit) in bright, Clorox white; the lable says they are washable. She
wondered if the dresses could be dyed ivory. I am not sure if the poly will
take the dye - or if there are finishes which will get in the way.

Do any of you have the answer?

Much obliged.

Newbie Richardson
on a cool gorgeous Easter ( which means we will get to enjoy our tulips a
few days longer before they get cooked by the sun!)

------_NextPart_000_000A_01C9BB61.9758C990--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Annette Gero's book
From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 16:07:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Blessings to you all on this Easter afternoon.

Just finished reading my QHL posts from the last couple of days. I recently
obtained a copy of Annette's book and can verify previous posts. It is
loaded with wonderful images and good information. It's truly a feast for
the eyes and the mind.

If you can find a way to obtain a copy, I can recommend it to those of you
who make a habit of collecting books of this kind. Unfortunately, I know
that it is very heavy and costly to send which will add to its already dear
price, so expect to have it cost a bit more than the usual quilting history
book.

AND, trust me, this is not your usual quilting history book.

Best wishes,

Kathy Moore
Lincoln, NE



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Annette Gero's book
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 17:19:55 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

I am taking names and email addresses from those who hope for a copy
of Annette Gero's book; aside from those who got the few copies she
brought to Lincoln/IQSC&M symposium last week, only those who sign up
through me will be able to get a copy in the US. The book is
massive: US priority flat rate postage is $10.35. I am still
waiting for a US price for the book itself, but expect it to be
around $95.

Before I submit the order to Annette, I will email everyone with the
exact cost, and give everyone a chance to accept or decline.

Xenia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 12, 2009
From: Trishherraol.com
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 08:50:15 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1


-------------------------------1239627015
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Great work Xenia. You are always thinking ahead. Yes, count me in on
Annette's book. Trish

Trish Herr
The Herrs Antiques
_www.theherrsantiques.com_ (http://www.theherrsantiques.com/)
2363 Henbird Lane
Lancaster, PA 17601
717.569.2268


In a message dated 4/13/2009 12:17:15 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

QHL Digest for Sunday, April 12, 2009.

1. Re: kit quilt
2. Re: kit quilt
3. question about dyes NQR
4. Annette Gero's book
5. Re: [SPAM] Annette Gero's book

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: kit quilt
From: "Rose Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 16:17:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Patricia, and anyone else interested;
The Mountain Mist pattern "Martha's Vineyard" was sold only as a pattern,
not as a kit. The earliest date I have for it is 1931, but it has
been sold for a long period of time. (Does anyone know if Mountain Mist
patterns are still available?)
Since the MM designs (especially applique) are so similar to some of the
kit
designs, they are often mistaken for kits. For this reason I am including
them in my documentation of kits - just to point out that they were not
kits.
Rosie Werner



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: kit quilt
From: Kay Sorensen <kaykaysorensen.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 21:33:51 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Yes they are available today.
TO find out more go to:

http://www.mountainmistlp.com/default.htm


Quiltingly,
Kay Sorensen
kaykaysorensen.com
My blog: http://quiltspluscolor.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: question about dyes NQR
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>


Dear list,
Happy Easter!

My daughter's best friend is geting married. Her dress is ivory over pale
peach. She asked that all of her nieces wear ivory - with peach sashes.
(This is not a "big deal" wedding but she does want things to be somewhat
co-ordinated..) She asked me a question I cannot answer.
Two of her nieces already own nice polyester satin "best" dresses (which
still fit) in bright, Clorox white; the lable says they are washable. She
wondered if the dresses could be dyed ivory. I am not sure if the poly
will
take the dye - or if there are finishes which will get in the way.

Do any of you have the answer?

Much obliged.

Newbie Richardson
on a cool gorgeous Easter ( which means we will get to enjoy our tulips a
few days longer before they get cooked by the sun!)

------_NextPart_000_000A_01C9BB61.9758C990--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Annette Gero's book
From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 16:07:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Blessings to you all on this Easter afternoon.

Just finished reading my QHL posts from the last couple of days. I
recently
obtained a copy of Annette's book and can verify previous posts. It is
loaded with wonderful images and good information. It's truly a feast for
the eyes and the mind.

If you can find a way to obtain a copy, I can recommend it to those of you
who make a habit of collecting books of this kind. Unfortunately, I know
that it is very heavy and costly to send which will add to its already
dear
price, so expect to have it cost a bit more than the usual quilting
history
book.

AND, trust me, this is not your usual quilting history book.

Best wishes,

Kathy Moore
Lincoln, NE



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Annette Gero's book
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 17:19:55 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

I am taking names and email addresses from those who hope for a copy
of Annette Gero's book; aside from those who got the few copies she
brought to Lincoln/IQSC&M symposium last week, only those who sign up
through me will be able to get a copy in the US. The book is
massive: US priority flat rate postage is $10.35. I am still
waiting for a US price for the book itself, but expect it to be
around $95.

Before I submit the order to Annette, I will email everyone with the
exact cost, and give everyone a chance to accept or decline.

Xenia

(xenialegacyquilts.net)




---
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Libby's New Email Address
From: Libby Wallis <libquiltsgmail.com>
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I'm making the switch to Google's Email, gmail. It appears to be more
accessible from anywhere than what I've been using. Please change in your
address book so we can stay in touch.

Libby Wallis
LibQuiltsgmail.com

--001485f6d2a478d008046770e257--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Grandmother's Flower Garden quilts
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 20:35:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

When I read the following post from someone on a general quilt list I
belong to, I thought of our discussion about the abundance of hexagon
quilts, and GFG in particular --

Begin quote --
...when I was a little girl my grandmother made many quilts, but only
one pattern....Grandmothers Flower Garden, so I thought for a long time
quilts were all alike.... grandmothers flower garden. I was in for a big
surprise!!

End quote.

The writer is a grandmother of an 8 year old (to help give her an age
range), currently living in PA.

Barb in southeastern PA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Annette Gero From: palamporeaol.com Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 08:10:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

----------MB_8CB8B1127AF9958_1300_5ED1_WEBMAIL-MZ12.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"

I was in the dark with the Annette Gero post, so I assumed others would be as well. Here is?the website for the book that is being talked about. It is beautiful. http://www.annettegero.com/ Enjoy, Lynn

Lynn Lancaster Gorges New Bern, NC

----------MB_8CB8B1127AF9958_1300_5ED1_WEBMAIL-MZ12.sysops.aol.com--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Newspaper article From: "Brenda Groelz" <brendahandiquilter.com> Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 09:31:47 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

You might find this interesting. A review of article written 100 years ago. http://tinyurl.com/ddtvhu

Brenda Groelz Director of Marketing & Education Handi Quilter

BrendaHandiQuilter.com phone: 801-335-0837 mobile: 801-867-9332 toll free: 877-697-8458 x117 PLEASE NOTE NEW ADDRESS: 445 N 700 W, North Salt Lake, Utah 84054 http://www.HandiQuilter.com http://www.HQComputerizedQuilting.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Article for NE Quilt Museum From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 14:51:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------__NextPart_001_01C9BD32.AE3BF067 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

 Hi Lynn,

Sorry this took so long. I was swamped with last minute appraisals for quilts that were being sent off to several big shows. Attached is my article. Please read it and let me know if there is anything you would like changed.

Spring is just arriving in the northeast. Our first spring flowers are beginning to bloom, but the trees have not even begun to bud yet. I'll bet your neck of the woods is in full bloom now. Easter was very cold but sunny....we were thankful for that at least.

Hope all is well with you and yours, and I look forward to seeing you again sometime soon. You're a great lady!

Vivien

------__NextPart_001_01C9BD32.AE3BF067--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Article for NE Quilt Museum From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 15:11:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Sorry list. This was suppost to go to Lynn only. Vivien

-----Original Message----- From: Vivien Sayre [mailto:vsayrenesa.com] Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 2:51 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Article for NE Quilt Museum

 Hi Lynn,

Sorry this took so long. I was swamped with last minute appraisals for quilts that were being sent off to several big shows. Attached is my article. Please read it and let me know if there is anything you would like changed.

Spring is just arriving in the northeast. Our first spring flowers are beginning to bloom, but the trees have not even begun to bud yet. I'll bet your neck of the woods is in full bloom now. Easter was very cold but sunny....we were thankful for that at least.

Hope all is well with you and yours, and I look forward to seeing you again sometime soon. You're a great lady!

Vivien

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilts on tv From: "sewsewsarah" <sewsewsarahverizon.net> Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 19:59:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Yesterday my daughter and I were watching an episode of Family Matters. The granddaughter was having a yard sale and came across an old quilt in a plastic bedding bag. Later in the show, the grandmother explained how the quilt, a crazy quilt, had been in the family for over 200 years and meant so much to her. If it meant so much, why did she keep it in a plastic bag??? She ended up giving the quilt to her granddaughter for her bedroom. Argh!!! Has anyone else seen this show?

Sarah in WV

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 14, 2009 From: CRantquiltaol.com Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 00:41:16 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

-------------------------------1239770476 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Language: en

HI Sarah,, In regards to the TV show with the crazy quilt stored in the plastic ,

it was TV for one , and they hadn't consulted with someone about quilts . Also I personally have found many people store them in plastic bags think ing that is the safe way to protect/store them. They really just don't know

any better and other storage methods hadn't been considered. I recall an estate auction where quite a few antique quilts had been stored in plastic bags with cedar chips and then stored in an old freezer.

Actually they had no damage and several were circa 1880's. Another memor able auction, there were quilts folded with pattern turned in and stored in pillow cases.. The "pillows" sold for just a few dollars and the buyer came forward and brought it to the attention of the auctioneers and the bidder s there were quilts inside the pillowcases, not what was expected. Wow,,, nice honest person and then the bidding began. I helped of course.. Even with all the information out there on textile and quilt care , many

quilts will still be stored that plastic bag. Cindy Rennels

Cindy's Antique Quilts _http://www.cindysantiquequilts.com_ (http://www.cindysantiquequilts.com/)

Cindy Rennels PO Box 1212 Clinton, Ok. 73601 Phone 580-323-1174

**************Great deals on DellE28099s most popular laptops E28093 Starting at $479 (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100126575x1220631252x1201390195/aol?redir 3Dhttp:%2F%2Fad.doubleclick.net%2Fclk%3B213968550%3B35701427%3Bh)

-------------------------------1239770476--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Interesting eBay Offer From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 12:35:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

--001636c5bb71687e930467866b8f Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

130300019672 I was surprised to scroll down the page, in the auction noted, and see that these were strips of fabric, sewn onto magazine pages, with scenes from the war. No wonder some of the fabrics are "stained," (from acid leaching from the paper), but interesting to see. No affiliation.

-- Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

Life is a quilt made up of many shapes, colors, and threads that together tell one story.

--001636c5bb71687e930467866b8f--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: mounting or framing quilts in Israel and in Dallas From: laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:25:47 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

--0-623219521-1239812747:39670 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Ady or anyone else on the list from Israel---I just sold a small quilt to p eople from Kadima, Israel who want to have it mounted for hanging. I sugges ted framing in a lucite box, because of the dust there, or having a framer  make a stretcher. The quilt will first have to be sewn to a backing or have fabric around borders from behind to mount. Can you email me off list if y ou know anyone in the vicinity to refer them to??  Anyone on the list in Dallas Texas, same need--sold a quilt to someone who  wants it mounted or framed. Can you recommend someone who has experience do ing this, or someone who can at least sew velcro or a rod pocket down there so they don't have to send it back up here?!.  Thanks  Laura Fisher --0-623219521-1239812747:39670--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Interesting eBay Offer From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 16:19:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Pat:

What a wonderful surprise ... to scroll down and see the article on the Higgins landing craft! My grandmother was chief telephone operator at the Higgins Boat Factory in New Orleans during WWII - the Higgins Boats were instrumental during the D-Day invasion. The new World War II Museum was located in New Orleans because of the importance of those boats in the war.

Thanks for brightening my day - I'm sending the picture of the one block back to my mother.

Dale Drake in Indiana

----- Original Message ----- From: "Patricia Cummings"

> 130300019672 > I was surprised to scroll down the page, in the auction noted, and see > that > these were strips of fabric, sewn onto magazine pages, with scenes from > the > war.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 14, 2009 From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 19:05:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I don't think the storing in a plastic bag is willful disregard. It's ignorance. How many times have you had to tell someone that a cedar chest is no place for a quilt? But that was "the way" years ago to preserve what you loved, so the idea persists. Stephanie Whitson Higgins

Subject: TV show and quilts From: "sewsewsarah" <sewsewsarahverizon.net> Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 12:49:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

<<I don't think the storing in a plastic bag is willful disregard. It's ignorance. How many times have you had to tell someone that a cedar chest is no place for a quilt? >>>

It wasn't so much the plastic bag but that the African-American grandmother said that the crazy quilt was over 200 years old and was started by her great-great-grandmother. Didn't crazy quilts come about during the Victorian times?

Sarah in WV

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts - Rochester, MN From: Sarah Hough <dougandsarah1gmail.com> Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 13:52:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Would appreciate knowing of anything quilting-related going on in the Rochester MN area April 23-25. My husband and I are going to be at the Mayo Clinic and would love to do something fun while there -- any quilt shops in the area?

Thanks

Sarah Hough

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New England Regional Day summary From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 18:47:08 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

New England Regional Quilt Day Posted by: "mjfarquharson" marjfarquharsonverizon.net mjfarquharson Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:20 am (PDT)

The New England Regional Quilt Day on April 4th took us back to the 18th an d 19th centuries at Historic Deerfield in Massachusetts. We began our day i n the Flynt Center where we spent time in the textile gallery with a docent . One of the items that many enjoyed seeing in the gallery was a c.1830 who le-cloth pillar print quilt from New England. Another beauty was a hexagon  quilt from Newport, Rhode Island that appeared to be pieced in strips. Emil ine Ellery signed and dated the quilt 1821, and she also added "732000 stit ches, 9750 squares". The groups also spent time with Lynne Bassett and view ed and discussed other items that were not currently on exhibit. There was  a lengthy discussion about quilted petticoats, the depth of their quilting  and their designs. One gold silk petticoat was c. 1750. There is also a cen ter medallion, pieced cotton quilt that is probably from Massachusetts, c.  1820. The quilt's colors are vivid with their original glaze, and the prints are a combination of block and cylinder prints.

Stephanie Drake shared part of her collection of darners with the group. Sh e owns many in various woods and finishes, and she not only showed sock dar ners and eggs, but those that were used to mend gloves.

Stephanie Hatch moderated our "roadshow" or show-and-tell. What treasures t he group brought E28093 small sewing items and recently acquired antique quilts!

During the final session of the day, we visited two of the historic homes o wned by Historic Deerfield. The guides tailored our tours to the quilts and textiles in the homes. Many were interested to see the daring colors that  were used in paint, wallpaper, and fabric during particular periods of the  19th century.

Thanks to all who helped to plan the day. Special thanks to everyone who ca me!

Marge Farquharson

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: books available From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 17:13:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I'd like to let people know about two new books that may be of interest to those who like show catalogs and books about museum collections. However, to avoid messing up on the list with a commercial, as I am definitely affiliated, I thought it best to just suggest that if these areas interest you, you might want to look at the AQS Publishing Blog, located at www.americanquilter.com.

Andi in Paducah, Kentucky, where the annual Dogwood Trail has been cancelled due to remaining debris piles and dangerous hanging limbs from January's epic ice storm, but next week's AQS show will go on

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Red and Muslin Quilt From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 19:49:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

--001636c5bb714a6d6b0467b4b554 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Tonight, I posted a photo of a tied quilt. It is located on the front page of my website. I am not familiar with this design and wonder if any of you have seen this as a published pattern?

Thanks in advance for any information.

-- Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

Life is a quilt made up of many shapes, colors, and threads that together tell one story.

--001636c5bb714a6d6b0467b4b554--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Wallpaper and textile design From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 09:56:50 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Marge Farquharson wrote: < The guides tailored our tours to the quilts and textiles in the homes. Many were interested to see the daring colors that were used in paint, wallpaper, and fabric during particular periods of the 19th century.>

Speaking of wallpapers and color, I just discovered a very interesting book in our wonderful little island library -- <Fabrics and Wallpapers: Sources, Design and Inspiration> by Barty Phillips with Mary Schoeser as Consulting Editor and the forward by Gill Saunders, curator of wallpaper collection at Victoria & Albert Museum.

In Aug of 2007 while visiting the Whitworth Art Gallery associated with the University of Manchester on Deb Robert's Textile Study Tour, we were fortunate to encounter not only textiles but a special exhibit titled <Featuring Walls: Celebrating Three Centuries of Wall Paper Decoration>. This exhibit lent itself nicely to the study of what could have inspired certain textile and even quilt patterns. They have another wall paper exhibit going on right now. http://www.whitworth.manchester.ac.uk/whatson/exhibitions/glitz/

Check out another exhibit as well <Cloth and Culture NOW>. http://www.whitworth.manchester.ac.uk/whatson/exhibitions/clothandculture

Karen in the Islands

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Machine Quilting From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 13:32:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

I've been way behind on reading posts but the discussion about machine quilting has been interesting and I just had to add my two cents.

How many times have we discovered what was thought to be a new technique has actually been done before? The same can be said for machine quilting.

I have to agree with those who believe the GFG/Seven Sisters quilt on Ebay was probably quilted at the time it was constructed. I have in my files information about many early 20th century machine-quilted quilts with similar designs, and based on the wear it is clear the quilting was original to the time period of them.

Someone said recently that we learn about our predecessors by doing and I've always believed the same thing; which is why I have a collection of 19th century sewing machines, all in working order, and the original manuals that came with these machines. I use these machines as a method of better understanding the sewing technology available to women (and men) in the 19th century.

Every machine in my collection has instructions for doing braided embellishments (i.e., letters and curves) which is a free-motion technique, as well as other ornamental work. My 1871 Howe manual explains for braiding, "... start the machine, guiding the material according to the pattern already marked out. In turning square corners, have the needle about half way down." My Wheeler & Wilson 8 (c.1880) braiding instructions read, "By having a pattern first stamped or marked upon the goods, the braid may be stitched on in beautiful designs." It is not a far stretch to think that using the idea of free-motion to apply braided initials and other embellishments would not have inspired free-motion quilting.

I like to think that 19th century women were at least as creative in their thinking as the men who were designing these machines. While I've found no proof yet, I suspect at least a woman or two may have been behind some of the ideas that were patented and incorporated into sewing machines.

Early machines came with multiple accessories including a variety of presser feet, each designed to accomplish particular tasks. My WW8 has glass and metal inserts that fit into the main presser foot frame; each designed for a specific tasks. One of the glass feet is designed specifically for braiding and it works beautifully for free-motion quilting also. Yes - glass. It was a popular feature of the early Wheeler & Wilson machines because it improved visibility right up to the needle.

My Wilcox & Gibbs (c.1890) manual explains how to do embroidery - bearing in mind the WG is a chain-stitch machine and tambour embroidery was quite popular. The machine features an 'embroidery spring' that if not threaded for embroidery "the stitch will not be sufficiently loose for ornamental work."

Sewing machine manufacturers (it is estimated there were hundreds) were very competitive in the 19th century just as they are today and imaginations were running wild with ideas to trump the competition. It's not surprising that many of the features found in modern machines can be traced back to the last half of the 19th century. In addition to special features offered most early machine came with, or had available, a guide to attach for machine quilting almost identical to the guide that came with my Bernina (1998). Most manuals demonstrate with straight line, grid and or diamond quilting.

There are even early machines that can drop the feed dogs but the most common method to accomplish free motion work is to reduce the pressure of the pressure foot.

For anyone who is interested, there are two very good sewing machine sites to check out - http://www.ismacs.net/ and http://www.treadleon.net/. Both sites offer discussion lists about sewing machines and the wealth of information available is amazing. Also, the Smithsonian collections have a great deal of literature on sewing machines some of which can be accessed online at http://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollections/Trade-Literature/Sewing-Machines/CF /index.cfm.

Sorry this is so long winded, there's a lot more that could be said on the subject. But the long and short of it is, sewing machines revolutionized women's (and men's) lives and they are a significant and important part of quilt history.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle Still making imaginary quilts on both 20th and 19th century machines . . .

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rochester, MN From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com> Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 11:15:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Sarah, I don't see any quilt shows in the area that weekend, but I can recommend the greatest fabric shop ever. Ginny's fine fabrics is supported by the wealthy patrons of the Mayo Clinic, including the many Arab sheiks who come with large retinues. http://www.ginnysfinefabrics.com/News.html You'll find silks, cottons, batiks and anything else that appeals to you in the way of fabric. Last visit, I fell in love with the batik rayons. It's at 12 S. Broadway, near the city center. Rochester geography is no challenge if you remember your east, west, north and south. There are similar addresses in every quadrant so you need to remember the NE or SW, etc. We're in a nice weather stretch so have fun. Jean Loken, MN

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fasco fabrics From: Judy White <whitey06029sbcglobal.net> Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 13:23:54 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

--0-951903896-1239999834:5483 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Question: Does anyone remember the old Fasco line of fabrics first intro duced by Roberta Horton? They were woven plaids, stripes and checks of a ll colors but the ones I liked the best were the grays and oatmeals. The y were very lightweight and I loved working with them. My question is wh atever happend to those fabrics? Did the company go out of business, wer e they absorbed by someone else? Somewhere in the back of my mind, it se ems to me that Roberta Horton bought Fasco but I could have made that up.  Anyway, are they still being made somewhere? Just wondering because  I sure would like to have somemore.

Judy White

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fasco fabrics From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 16:26:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Fasco is now Clothworks, still selling fabric.

Do you realize it's been 25 years since Roberta's plaids came out?  They're just not made anymore. I suspect they were a little ahead of their time,  and slow sellers.

You might contact Roberta, see if she has any left to sell.

There are woven cotton plaids out there, if not in quilt shops, then  made for shirting.

Kim 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Windham Fabrics Launches Marie Webster-Inspired Line From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 17:24:20 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

The Quilters Hall of Fame is excited to announce the launch of a Marie Webster-inspired line of fabric by Windham Fabrics. With the launch of thei r Marie Webster line, Windham Fabrics is honoring MarieB9s thirty-year career as an early 20th century businesses woman who designed her first quilt patterns at age 52, patterns that would revolutionize applique in North America. Her patterns first appeared in Ladies Home Journal in Jan 1911 and her book on the history of the quilt was published in 1915. Marie lived in Marion, Indiana until 1942 when she retired from her quilt pattern business . She spent her last years with her son's family in Princeton, New Jersey, where she died on August 29, 1956, at the age of 96.

The majority of Marie's original floral patterns were done in solid colors but in this 150th anniversary salute to Marie Webster, Windham Fabrics has ventured into a collection of small prints inspired by MarieB9s overall quil t designs, in addition to the four solid colors offered. You can see many of them on the TQHF blog http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/ and click thru to the Windham line from the blog.

Be sure to ask your local quilt shop to order the Marie Webster line from Windham Fabrics and make something to celebrate Marie's 150th birthday. Sen d a digital photo to me at karenquiltgmail.com and I'll post the first 20 I receive on the blog.

Also, please help us celebrate this remarkable womanB9s life by asking your quilt guild or womenB9s group to throw a 150th birthday in her honor! You ca n see the details of the contest by clicking Marie Webster Birthday Party Blo g at http://quiltershalloffamebirthdayparty.blogspot.com/

Karen Alexander Public Relations Past President The Quilters Hall of Fame http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Websites From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 22:51:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

--_18c16ea8-cba6-4930-bf53-8d78cd8c3d76_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hello all - I'm making a handout for a class2C and I'd like to add a list  of quilt history websites. 

I've added Kim's2C Judy's2C Pat's2C Kris'2C Joan's and a couple of othe rs2C and I know I am forgetting some excellent info. Not because the site  or the person is less worthy2C but simply because I am of a certain age an d can't remember what I had for breakfast.

DId I have breakfast? If you have a site or two that you feel is particul arly worthy2C please let me know off list.

I do 'preshate it. 

Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com Trying to live life from one "A-Ha!" moment to the next.

_____________

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Websites From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 22:30:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

You didn't forget IQSC, did you?