Subject: Re: Exhibition and shows and ?markets near NY?
From: Annette Gero <A.Gerounsw.edu.au>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2009 21:53:05 +1000
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello all,

I am coming to NY next week (all the way from Australia and its
only 30 hours!) and am asking if there is anything in the area I
should not miss. i.e markets, quilt shows , antiques..Anything in
the NY area or within an easy day's drive. ?? Will be around until
the 19th May

Thanks a mil

Annette Gero in suuny Australia
(free to travel now the Australian quilt book has been published)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cotton seeds
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2009 12:37:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2


I hope someone on the list can help me. I need a few cotton seeds.

For a fiber festival this summer, I'm planting a fiber garden. I have flax,
madder, weld and woad, but my cotton seeds refused to germinate.

I took them from some plants in a museum garden in AZ, and I have no idea if
they were hybrids, or too old, or I just planted them wrong.

Can anyone send me a few seeds, and/or info on how to grow them? I will
gladly pay postage, etc.

Kim
North Dakota



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Exhibition and shows and ?markets near NY?
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2009 12:35:04 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Annette--

You don't want to miss the Fashioning Felt exhibit at the Cooper-Hewitt:
http://www.cooperhewitt.org/EXHIBITIONS/

Kim

-
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Swastika Quilt Block
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>

Due to a letter I received today, from a reader of my website, I decided to
take some time tonight to put together a file about the history of the
swastika. I did this, in part, to come to the defense of another quilt
historian whom the reader thought had invented the swastika block,
apparently! The direct link is here:
http://www.quiltersmuse.com/swastika-quilt-block.htm

Half the time, I feel like I should have the shield of an armadillo to ward
off the "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune." I am happy to clear "our
names" of being the "evildoers" in this instance. We just report on ...
history!

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

--000e0cd1e2c48fd82c0468e411f2--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Cotton seeds
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2009 16:24:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Kim, must you grow these seeds yourself? in North Dakota?

Have you thought of enlisting a grower in the South or Southwest? of locating someone who grows cotton to share a few plants with you?

Cotton requires such a long growing season that I cannot imagine it will growwell in North Dakota. I wonder if your ground temperature has been high enough to germinate cotton seeds.

This is the month most of the cotton grower conventions are occurring, so you might try working through one of those. I note a Louisianan from Newellton, LA is president of the National Cotton Growers' Assn this year. Trust me, if you mailed something to Newellton, LA, he would get the mailing: it's wee-tiny. What about contacting your county agent?

Are you aware that cotton will not mature until the fall?

http://blog.nola.com/tpmoney/2009/02/louisiana_cotton_producer_to_c.html

Given agricultural double-think, you might be able to agree NOT to plant an acre or two in cotton, get a subsidy for letting your land lay fallow, and use the income to employ a surrogate grower in Arizona, Texas, California, or the Southeast.

Gaye Ingram


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Exhibition and shows and ?markets near NY?
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2009 20:42:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Annette,

On May 19th the Mid Atlantic Study Group is spending a day at the Mercer
Museum in Doylestown PA, not too far from New York, and I think it is
accessible by train -- the station is nearby, but we can work out
transportation for you.

The Mercer Museum does not have an exhibition space suitable for hanging
quilts, so much of this superb collection of mostly Bucks County quilts has
remained unseen.

We'll first meet at the museum at 10 AM, then car pool the few short blocks
to the storage facility where we will have a bed turning. We'll head back
to the museum for lunch and a short visit through the museum, then back to
the storage facility for more quilts and to see the rest of the facility and
the holdings of the Bucks County Historical Society..

As usual, we have surpassed the number of people we said we'd accept, but
since you have come so far, we'd be happy to accomodate you,as well if you
can fit the day into your schedule. We are charging $25.00 for each person
which includes lunch, the museum fee and a small donation to our study
group -- hosts of the 2011 AQSG Seminar.

http://www.mercermuseum.org/ for the Mercer Musem and directions to there.
You'll get directions to the storage facility when we meet at the museum.
At the web page you can find a list of 100 items of quilt interest, but no
photos yet.On the 19th the Mid Atlantic Study Group is spending a day at the
Mercer Museum in Doylestown PA, not too far from New York. We'll meet at
the Museum at 10 AM, and then car pool the very short distance to the
storage facility, where the curator will pull quilts out of storage for us
to see.

Judy Grow

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Cotton seeds
From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2009 18:56:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Kim Southern Seed Exchange has cotton seed. White and colored to choose
from. You can go on line just do a search for Southern Seed Exchange and it
will take you there.
Debbie Hill-Russell
russhillbeecreek.net
http://russellhillranch.blogspot.com/
-
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Exhibition and shows and ?markets near NY?
From: pollymellocomcast.net

Balitimore is a 4-5 hour drive from New York. You could go by train also an
d use a taxi to go to two near by displays of Baltimore Album quilts at the
Baltimore Museum of Art and The Maryland Hitorical Society. Call to make s
ure of the days that they are open. It is a great opportunity.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Exhibition and shows and ?markets near NY?
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 02 May 2009 22:01:05 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

Hi Annette -

Welcome to the mid Atlantic area of the US. My recommendation is to
leave NYC and come down to wonderful southeastern PA -- it's only a 3 to
4 hour trip, depending on where you stop first. I'm not a city
person, and our "countryside" has alot to offer, quiltingly.

1. Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum in Lancaster City -- exhibit of 32
antique Lancaster County Amish quilts plus a wonderful exhibit of Navajo
weavings circa 1880 to 1930
http://www.quiltandtextilemuseum.com/

2. Mennonite Historians of Southeastern PA -- exhibit of 30 antique
scrap quilts, most with family history
http://www.mhep.org/index.htm

3. Kutztown Historical Society -- exhibit of 30 antique quilts (1800s)
from one couple's collection -- lots of red and green applique and
typical "Dutchy" quilts -- click on the show logo for dates (Sunday only)
http://www.kutztownhistory.org/

4. Chester County Historical Society in West Chester -- exhibit of 45
pieces found during their documentation project.
http://www.cchs-pa.org/index.php

I am blessed to live in the middle of all this wonderfulness, and if you
are able to find your way out of NYC to this area, I'd love to show you
around a bit. And I can show you my local fabric stores -- Zooks,
Sauders, Hayloft. The prices and selection can't be beat.

Wishing you safe and happy travels,
Barb Garrett in southeastern PA
bgarrett421comcast.net


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Cotton seeds
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2009 21:50:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Thanks, I just ordered some.

Kim


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Annette's visit to NY State
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 3 May 2009 06:34:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Annette:
You might want to head over to Massachusetts to the Brimfield antique
show/sale:

http://www.brimfieldshow.com/

It's pretty close to the NY border.

It's considered the "best of the best" for things of this nature in the
Northeast USA. It's only one week per year, as I recall.
I actually plan on heading over that way if my schedule permits.

Linda Heminway
Plaistow NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Swastika Quilt Block
From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net>
Date: Sun, 3 May 2009 11:26:24 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 2

I wanted to share the comment I made on Pat's blog because this is an impor
tant issue. Knee jerk reactions and blaming historians for accurate report
ing are not acceptable. I came across a post a couple of years ago from a
person who was so proud of getting a c. 1900 swastika quilt removed from a
restaurant at Stone Mtn. Georgia, in the mistaken belief that it was made t
o support the Nazis. And Maggie (Malone) has had others return her pattern
book in outrage because it included the block.

'Thanks for addressing this issue, I know it isnE28099t the first time M
aggie has had this problem and it is important to educate the public about
the blockE28099s history. History shouldnE28099t be whitewashed or ed
ited for political correctness. The swastika has long been a powerful symbo
l which is why the Nazis appropriated it. Quilts made using that block patt
ern before the 1930E28099s should not be denigrated or hidden as they ha
ve nothing to do with Nazis.'

Sandra Starley
AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser
Moab, Utah
my antique and vintage quilts
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts
http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

----
Subject: Swastika Quilt Block
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>

Due to a letter I received today, from a reader of my website, I decided to
take some time tonight to put together a file about the history of the
swastika. I did this, in part, to come to the defense of another quilt
historian whom the reader thought had invented the swastika block,
apparently! The direct link is here:
http://www.quiltersmuse.com/swastika-quilt-block.htm

Half the time, I feel like I should have the shield of an armadillo to ward
off the "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune." I am happy to clear "our
names" of being the "evildoers" in this instance. We just report on ...
history!

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Exhibition and shows and ?markets near NY?
From: Annette Gero <A.Gerounsw.edu.au>
Date: Sun, 3 May 2009 22:03:52 +1000
X-Message-Number: 3

>
>Thank you everyone who kindly gave me such a wealth of infromation
>on shows to see and what to do!!. Just proves how excellent this
>site is. It really is great . Thank you all so much


Annette Gero in Australia



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt things to see in NYC
From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net>
Date: Sun, 03 May 2009 15:23:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

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Annette,
Be sure to visit the American Folk Art Museum in NYC which currently has a display of Paula Nadelstern Quilts (she does magnificent kaliedoscope (SP?) quilts.
Judy Knorr

--Boundary_(ID_SrBp/9R/gEhSyrbYrhavKg)--


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Subject: Re: Cotton seeds
From: swaddellhvc.rr.com
Date: Sun, 3 May 2009 10:49:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

You may have some difficulty growing cotton that far north. Last summer I
tried growing cotton here in NY with only moderate success. I had to keep
the plants in pots so I could move them inside when the weather grew cold.
I didn't get cotton until November. I gave some seeds to my
mother-in-law in Kansas; she had better luck in the terms of quality and
quantity. Cotton requires heat and a fairly long growing season. It was
a worthwhile experience; I really like the shape of the cotton bud and
flower.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Resources for Writers
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 3 May 2009 16:26:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

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I am giving a one-hour hands-on instructional presentation to historical
fiction writers this next week about the history of quilts in America.

I've compiled a list of resources so I can leave them with a hand-out,
but would appreciate your insights and will edit my hand-out
accordingly. What internet sites and books would you recommend to help
educate novelists about the world of quilt history?

(And just FYI I'll include a separate sheet about the UGRR issue.)

Thanks for your input.

Stephanie Grace Whitson

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: T-Quilts and New Englanders
From: "Julie Crossland" <quiltsappraisedcomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 3 May 2009 21:33:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

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I've only lived in New England for 30 years so I'm still considered an
outsider. I have to disagree with Pat Cummings about T-Quilt being
reserved for the Temperance Block Quilt. Quilt Historians in NH and
Massachussetts do use the term T-Quilt to refer to a 4-poster bed quilt.
I've heard it used by many. How about other New Englanders and fellow
NH and MA quilt historians? Do you also use the term T-Quilt?

Yes, I'm way behing reading my emails...was in Paducah, then my local
quilt show.

Julie Crossland
Hudson, NH
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Subject: The Quilters Hall of Fame Auction Quilts E-mail Bidding
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2009 07:22:32 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2


Forwarding this info from Marylou McDonald to QHL members:

The Quilters Hall of Fame Auction Quilts E-mail Bidding

On July 16 -19, 2009, The Quilters Hall of Fame will be celebrating the 150
th birthday of Marie Webster, the 30th anniversary of the founding of The Q
uilters Hall of Fame, and the 5th anniversary of the opening of Marie Webs
terE28099s home in Marion, Indiana where she operated an early mail orde
r quilt pattern business. The Quilters Hall of Fame is a National Historic
Landmark that honors todayE28099s quilt makers.

Members of the Baltimore AppliquC3A9 Society have made over 50 one-block
quilts as a fund raiser for a silent auction during their Celebration in Ju
ly. Please go to the BAS website
www.baltimoreapplique.com/auction.html
to see the quilts and to find out how to bid. I will be taking bids prior t
o sending the quilts to TQHF on June 27, 2009. The quilts will continue to
be auctioned at their Celebration and will go to the highest bidder. The e-
mail auction will be from May 4th E28093 June 26th. Unless you plan to a
ttend the Celebration or are willing to pay $300 outright for a quilt, THIS
EMAIL AUCTION WILL BE YOUR ONLY OPPORTUNITY TO BID. As additional quilts a
re finished, they will be added to the auction and will appear on the BAS w
ebsite by the following Saturday. All the money from the sale of the quilts
will go to The Quilters Hall of Fame - This is a great way to support this
organization.

Thanks,
Marylou McDonald
mlumcdverizon.net


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: T-Quilts and New Englanders
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>


Dear Julie and others,

You bring up a very interesting point: what to call quilts that are made to
be used for 4 poster beds. Old time New Englanders call them "4 poster
quilts" or, alternatively, "cut corner quilts."

The term "T quilt" (meaning a quilt of that type) is a superimposed 20th
century term perhaps first written about by Jeannette Lasansky from
Pennsylvania who summered in Maine. I would have to hunt down the reference.
She would be the first to tell you that these kinds of quilts are not seen
outside of New England.

The shape of these quilts is not even proportionate to a "T." Some "drops"
at the end of the bed are deeper than others, depending on how high the bed.
As I have mentioned before, beds were often so high that a stepping stool
was needed to get into the bed. They were high because heat rises and the
higher up from the floor that one slept, the warmer one would be.

Not all quilts with cut corners are the same either. Some have key hole
openings, some are just slit diagonally. Personally, I don't find the term
"T quilt" to be a particularly useful one, as there are so many possible
exceptions to the word.

As far as "T quilt" meaning "Temperance Quilt," I would have to check Clues
in the Calico to see if that is where I originally saw the term. If not, I
have seen it in print in magazines, and certainly, some of the variations of
the block, like "Double T" could be where that shortened form originated.

Language is a fluid instrument of communication. We try the best we can to
get it right. In this case, I think it is interesting to consider the
history of both of these terms. Like Florence Peto, the great quilt
historian of the 1950s said ... it is best not to be too didactic when it
comes to naming quilt patterns. I would say the same for naming categories
of quilts.

Has anyone ever seen an 18th or 19th century diary that calls quilts for 4
poster beds, "T quilts?"

Patricia Cummings

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Piecing techniques
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2009 17:18:17 +0100
X-Message-Number: 4

I have recently read on a pubic forum that the historic 'American
Technique' for piecing is to draw a pencil line round templates and
then sew along the drawn lines. It was drawing the distinction
between that and English Paper piecing, 'always' (their words, not
mine) whip-stitched with the fabric tacked over templates.

Does anyone have an opinion on exactly how early Americans arranged
their piecing so that it was sewn accurately with a running stitch?
I have an orphan block from America of GFG hexagons which are hand
sewn, and accurate, but with no sign of a pencil line. Did they have
accurate templates including a seam allowance, and an incredibly
accurate eye so that it all fitted? Did they use templates made to
finished size and indeed draw round them?

Or, all of the above?<G>

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Piecing techniques
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2009 13:27:08 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

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I can't believe you pose this question today, Sally, as just last night
I lay sleepless and was thinking of posting about the various methods of
hand piecing. I know Jinny Beyer uses templates that include the seam
allowance and claims one can 'eye-ball' very accurately in no time at
all. (She talks about the added difficulty of continually checking the
back marked line to be sure you have them even when doing it the other
way) which I have done and must agree with her.
I wanted something to work on while sitting in front of the Tv and my
hand quilting project is to the point of needing marking of a border
which sounded like too much work - so I picked up some cut squares and
began to hand stitch seams. I do think she is right - we who have sewn
for so long can eyeball everything! We need to trust ourselves! It's one
less step so I'll go with this for awhile but wanted to poll you....

Hand piecers:

1. What is your favorite needle to use? And why?

2. Do you use a thimble?

3. Do you use a template actual size thus marking the sewing line and
then hand cut the estimated seam allowance OR as above ala Jinny Beyer.
(or other method?)

I know you asked about the English paper method and I remember when I
first learned that it was used not only for hexagons....amazing shapes
all around paper. Are any you using this method for piecing still - and
for what template shapes?

As for your question about American piecing - I am guessing that 'all of
the above' is most likely as there are countless 'patterns' and methods
of construction of all sorts. If the hexagons for some GFG's were 'die
cut' I assume they were sewn by eyeballing the seam allowance.

jean

Does anyone have an opinion on exactly how early Americans arranged
their piecing so that it was sewn accurately with a running stitch?
I have an orphan block from America of GFG hexagons which are hand
sewn, and accurate, but with no sign of a pencil line. Did they have
accurate templates including a seam allowance, and an incredibly
accurate eye so that it all fitted? Did they use templates made to
finished size and indeed draw round them?

Or, all of the above?<G>

Sally Ward



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Subject: Re: Piecing techniques
From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au>
Date: Tue, 5 May 2009 08:51:26 +1000
X-Message-Number: 6

I have a small collection of hexagon quilts and tops sourced from both the
US and the UK. All of the UK items were pieced over paper. A small
proportion of the US items (19thC) must have been pieced over paper as the
seams are oversewn. Certainly all the 20thC US hexagon items that I have
were pieced using templates. The seams are only 3/16 inch and there are no
pencil markings anywhere that I can find. I wonder if there was a shortage
of paper in the US during and after the time of the Civil War and this had
some influence on the method used. Women will always find a way around a
problem ;-).

Personally I use both methods - if I am restoring/completing an item then I
use the method used by the original maker. On looking through my Japanese
quilt books (Japanese quilters appear to love hexagons and make some
beautiful items using them), both methods are shown with very clear
diagrams.

I use straw needles and always sew with a thimble. I usually mark the sewing
line and eyeball the cutting line when using templates. I quickly get to the
stage when sewing where I shortcut the process anyway.

I recently saw clamshells pieced over paper, but only the upper arc was
folded over the paper.

Janet O'Dell
Melbourne Australia



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: You can go home again
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2009 21:58:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Thomas Wolfe eat your heart out! My friend Julie and I had a two day
"Quilt Nirvana" in PA. We went to the Mennonite Heritage Center in
Harleysville to see "Bits & Pieces:Quilts from Scraps" curated by Nancy Roan
and Joel Alderfer. PA German scrap quilts are "my thing" so I knew I'd like
it. What fun to see three Perkiomen Valleys in one gallery! Now if I could
just find one to take home.
What I didn't expect was the many quilts that did unusual thing. There
is a cotton Crazy Patch from the early 20th century that incorporates bits
of pieced blocks for an especially dynamic effect. Squares and Diamonds is
an all wool quilt make from leftover suit fabric by a Brethren woman around
1930. Using a palette of grays, black and browns and 9-Patch, 4-Patch and
Square in Square variations she created a stunning and sophisticated piece
of graphic art. Elizabeth Bauer made a Log Cabin (4th quarter 19th cen.) in
jewel-tone wools. The magenta center squares combined with plaids, stripes
and paisleys takes your breath away. Another slightly later Log Cabin
(cotton) made by Annie Overdorf is a medallion with fabulous color
manipulation.
The exhibit of 33 quilts will be up until August 22. The permanent
collection which includes decorated hand towels and fraktur is the icing on
the cake.
Just a few miles up the road is the Schwenkfelder Museum in Pennsburg
where Candace Perry has again put some delicious needlework on display.
This time she's featuring Berlin work of which Schwenkfelder women created
some fabulous examples. I always learn a lot from Candace's labels and she
doesn't disappoint this time. There are finished examples, patterns, three
of the amazing Schwenkfelder townscapes and the delicious watercolors of
Sarah Kriebel whose paintings resemble the Berlin work motifs. You'll also
see a small exhibit of clothes worn by 19th century women in SEPA.
The Kutztown Area Historical Society is showing quilts from the
collection of Pat and Arlen Christ. There are about 40 quilts--all from PA
and just about everything you can imagine including a Rolling Stone
inscribed in fraktur by William Gross. The hours are very limited because
it's an all volunteer organization. I think it's only open on Sundays
during May; but if you can go you'll be delighted. Check the website.
We stayed over night with friends in Old Forge (Pizza Capital of
America) and ate great Italian food. On Sunday we went to the Pennsylvania
Quilts to show near Wilkes-Barre (my guild before I was hijacked to the
Eastern Shore). These women are incredibly talented. The quality of the
work was outstanding. The food was like a summer church picnic: haluski,
wimpies, sausage and peppers and seeing so many old friends was the best.
Cinda back on the Eastern Shore

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 04, 2009
From: Jane Hall <jqhallearthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 05 May 2009 08:06:54 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Sally...it's my understanding that it was "all of the above". I have seen
old pieced blocks with pencil lines, but I have also seen a lot without. And
I know people boasted of having an 'eye' for the 1/4" seam allowance. Lucky
them!

I used to teach hand piecing, and we always made finished-size templates to
draw the lines for piecing. It gave us all a sense of security! Jane Hall




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: hand piecing preferences
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 05 May 2009 03:48:03 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

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This is a delightful series of questions to contemplate as a hand quilter occasionally overwhelmed by the interest in machine work...although I do piece as much by machine as by hand...

Hand piecers:

1. What is your favorite needle to use? And why? I was taught to use longer needles, such as straws, but am so comfortable with a 12 between, used for hand quilting, that it's what I usually pick up for piecing. Either will do.

2. Do you use a thimble? Not unless I'm sewing for such a long stretch that my middle finger gets sore. I love using a thimble (I know many don't), but I have more speed without one.

3. Do you use a template actual size thus marking the sewing line and then hand cut the estimated seam allowance OR as above ala Jinny Beyer.(or other method?) I draw the sewing line and try to follow it, especially for starting and stopping at corners or half-seams. I notice that eyeballing usually achieves the same result, but I like the assurance of the accuracy of that line, especially if I'm sewing in the car.

I know you asked about the English paper method and I remember when I first learned that it was used not only for hexagons....amazing shapes all around paper. Are any you using this method for piecing still - and for what template shapes? I have never sewn over templates. It's just never come up as the best method for anything I've sewn in 20-plus years. I agree that some Japanese hexagon designs are fabulous, but that particular shape does nothing for me, so it's never been something to try.

Andi in Paducah, KY, working (occasionally) on a hand-pieced Drunkard's Path project


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Subject: Quilt Care Resource List at www.quiltcare.ning.com written by Jean Gonzalez
From: "Jean Gonzalez" <richmondseamstressyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2009 20:49:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

May I re-introduce myself ? I was a member a few years ago & posted about
the Virginia Historical Society exhibit of Quilts Before 1900. I dropped
off the list for a while & am re connecting. I've been repairing old
quilts for several years & was surprised at how many people have come for
repair appointments & really don't want repair. They are asking questions
for an appraiser or conservator but they don't seem to follow up & hire a
professional when referred. I've been sending out a QUILT CARE RESOURCE
LIST via email since fall 2007 - I don't have a website - I just posted it
online at www.quiltcare.ning.com. It lists appraisal, conservation,
machine quilting of quilt tops & even places to donate an old quilt they
don't want to have repaired.

I had hoped getting the info to the public would get people to the source
that is best for them but although leading with appraisal & consevator
questions most have not followed up when given sources. My public library
just tried to buy the appraisal dvd but they can't buy materials online
with paypal. I'm in Richmond, Virginia & I'd like at least one retailer in
my area to carry it. Maybe you can buy 2 & library can purchase one from
you ? If you are a retailer in Richmond please consider this esp museum
gift shops.

I don't think the public has ever been told that old quilts are not
necessarily priceless antiques. I'm not an appraiser or a textile
conservator. I do hand sewing & I started out about ten years ago with a
clothes mending service & clothing clients brought old quilts & that
became something of a specialty for me. I guess I got so known for that
locally that I got inquiries for lots of things I don't offer & it took
years to find sources but I did find some of those services available
elsewhere & I guess I hoped when I finally had the info the public wanted
it would solve the problem.

From what I've seen last few years, typically the person who inherits an
old quilt doesn't sew, isn't connected to a quilting community, isn't sure
who made it or if they plan to keep it til they know more about it, mostly
how much it's worth & how much care it needs.

I've been surprised at how many old quilts people have. Some people have
several in different stages of completion & can't seem to make decisions
about how to proceed. Of all the people who've come for repair appts over
the years I'd say there are more who leave with their head spinning & do
nothing than people who can make decisions from a range of options &
proceed on having their item finished or repaired.

A community response would be ideal. I'm suggesting local groups host
FAMILY QUILT SHOW & TELL events inviting the public to bring their quilts,
tell their stories & see what other people have. That way they can see how
many old quilts there are & how similar & damaged they tend to be. This
could be a stand alone event or done in conjunction with another event a
group is planning - say, a church or school etc.

I've wondered if the quilt history list should be included on the QUILT
CARE RESOURCE LIST. I emailed the contact person. So many people are
looking to sell I'm not sure how that would work but everyone on my list
is there by consent & agreed to be listed & confirmed the wording.

I had hoped that if people who care about old quilts all had the same info
to pass on that we could get the public to the best source for them
without all the fishing for how much its's worth. I'm sorry to say I've
had a fair amount of people come for repair consultation & then fish for
how much the quilt is worth. I guess people have seen Antiques Roadshow.

It might make more sense for people who don't have an old quilt to offer a
good home & I guess Freecycle & craigslist are the best places for that.
I'm not sure. Anyway, I have a hand sewing business & I repair damaged
textiles & make personalized wall hangings. I never expected to hear from
so many people who don't know what to do with their old quilts & in the
beginning I really didn't know. Some of the people on my list I found on
the quilt history list.

I'm open to suggestions about this. People are welcome to make suggestions
on additions to the list, use it any way you see fit. From what I can see,
Vintage Textile Care workshops are needed & that could be a source of
income for a group or individual. That's another thing people ask for that
I don't offer. My business story is online at www.quiltrescue.ning.com. At
one time I got so many inquiries from the public for things I don't do &
don't offer that I wondered if I should stop what I'm doing & start a
quilt rescue & I don't think I want to do that but now that I've seen how
many old quilts there are that people don't know what to do with I'd like
to help bring clarity to this situation & I welcome support & community on
this issue.

My business has been in the newspaper several times & they will print that
I'm not an appraiser but it hasn't gone into detail about the fact that
old quilts are mostly not valuable & the way to find out how much it's
worth is appraisal & the way to find out care info is from conservators &
I don't think everybody is going to hire a professional conservator &
appraiser anyway. I'm starting a series of FREE talks in my area on
OPTIONS FOR DAMAGED QUILTS where I basically suggest a family quilt show &
tell event, then I outline the resources available on my list & then
invite people to talk about their quilts. I hope this will bring clarity
to the issue & help clarify what I actually do which is hand sewing. It's
ironic that my business got in the middle of this since I'm not really a
quilter at all. I re purpose vintage & designer samples & remnants & I
repair textiles & make wall hangings. I do some things that look like
traditional quilts but I'm not a traditional quilter at all. For a long
time I just didn't know what to make of all this. Now that I have a QUILT
CARE RESOURCE LIST & it's available free online at www.quiltcare.ning.com
I'm hoping this can work for everybody.

Thanks for caring about old quilts, Jean Gonzalez Richmond, Virginia
richmondseamstressyahoo.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: T Quilts
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2009 21:23:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

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I googled "T quilts." Guess what came up? Quilts made of tee-shirts!!!!!

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

--0015174c3ef0f4235704692020e7--


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Subject: T Quilts--Not all New England
From: Trishherraol.com
Date: Tue, 5 May 2009 09:20:16 EDT
X-Message-Number: 5


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Subject: Re: T-Quilts and New Englanders
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2009 10:26:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

The term "T quilt" (meaning a quilt of that type) is a superimposed 20th
century term perhaps first written about by Jeannette Lasansky from
Pennsylvania who summered in Maine. I would have to hunt down the
reference.
She would be the first to tell you that these kinds of quilts are not seen
outside of New England.

Just a comment about where we see those quilts with cut out corners. We
have documented them here in Pa. particularly early examples with Quaker
history in the southeastern part of the Commonwealth around Philadelphia. So
they are not limited to New England. My supposition is that where ever there
were early poster beds with hangings and such needleworkers may have adapted
their bedcovers to that form. Just a thought. Trish Herr



**************A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in just 2 easy
steps!
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May5509AvgfooterNO115)

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Subject: hand piecing
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Tue, 5 May 2009 09:09:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Here's my methods:
1. I use a # 10 needle, any smaller and I can't thread it and it bends too
much. I like it small so it's thin and short, which leads to #2
2. I use a thimble, so the distance from the end to the point is shorter
with a small needle. That makes "aiming" the point easier.
3. I pencil the actual sewing line, but cut 1/4" outside, so I don't have to
always check the back if the edges line up. My stencil is an open sandpaper
template - the sewing line is inside; easier to draw without contorting your
pencil or template-holding hand. With luck, the cutting is done by rotary
cutter to the actual size+1/4". Most shapes lend themselves to that
arrangement. But I think I could eye-ball 1/4".
I have also used the "English method" on hexagons and diamonds, for a baby
block quilt.
Jean Loken in MN



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Subject: Re: T Quilts--Not all New England
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Tue, 5 May 2009 09:43:45 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

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Interesting info.

I would love to see a study done to determine just how many quilts of this
type, for four poster beds, are found in New England, and how many migrated
from New England elsewhere. It would be fun to know who made the quilts, and
how the insertion point to accommodate the bed post was created: two cut
out corners; a keyhole type opening; or a slit; or other treatment.

This could be a good project for a graduate student, or an ambitious
American Quilt Study Group member. I can deal with facts, but not sweeping
generalizations, and that, I suppose, is my main point.

Fun that Quaker quilts of this type, now in PA, have shown up in
documentation projects.

Pat

... particularly early examples with Quaker
> history in the southeastern part of the Commonwealth around Philadelphia.
> So
> they are not limited to New England. My supposition is that where ever
> there
> were early poster beds with hangings and such needleworkers may have
> adapted
> their bedcovers to that form. Just a thought. Trish Herr
>

--0015174beee4bc3ed504692a7715--


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Subject: Cutouts for Poster Bed Quilts in Connecticut
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Tue, 5 May 2009 10:03:45 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

I very quick check of the Connecticut data base shows about 20 out of a little over 3,000 quilts documented had cutouts for the poster bed. I would wager the further north you go into New England the larger the percentage would be.
sue reich


--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com


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Subject: Re: T Quilts--Not all New England
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Tue, 5 May 2009 15:08:25 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9


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Shelbunre Musem has quite a few of the cut-out quilts (always have questions each year about them) Mitzi from VT



In a message dated 05/05/09 10:53:30 Eastern Daylight Time, quiltersmusegmail.com writes:
Interesting info.

I would love to see a study done to determine just how many quilts of this
type, for four poster beds, are found in New England, and how many migrated
from New England elsewhere. It would be fun to know who made the quilts, and
how the insertion point to accommodate the bed post was created: two cut
out corners; a keyhole type opening; or a slit; or other treatment.

This could be a good project for a graduate student, or an ambitious
American Quilt Study Group member. I can deal with facts, but not sweeping
generalizations, and that, I suppose, is my main point.

Fun that Quaker quilts of this type, now in PA, have shown up in
documentation projects.

Pat


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: National Register of Historic Places features Marie Webster
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Tue, 05 May 2009 16:12:07 -0700
X-Message-Number: 10

Dear QHL members,

The National Register of Historic Places is featuring Marie Webster in May.
You can find the link to the story on the TQHF blog
http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/. There are a few errors in the
article we are trying to get corrected. For example in the 1st paragraph it
reads..... She also wrote the path breaking book Quilts: Their Story and How
to Make Them, which was the first book to demonstrate how to make a
quilt.....

However, this book did NOT give quilt instructions -- despite its title. It
was strictly about the HISTORY of the quilt, going back to its earliest
roots in Asia. Of course there have been corrections made even to Marie's
rendering of quilt history since her book first came out in 1915, as is
often true in historical research of any kind as later generations add to
the body of knowledge.

The sentence should read..... She also wrote the path breaking book Quilts:
Their Story and How to Make Them, which was the first book solely dedicated
to the history of the quilt.

Thank you, National Register of Historic Places, for your coverage of Marie
Webster and The Quilters Hall of Fame!

Karen Alexander




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Subject: Re: Piecing techniques
From: maggmaloneaol.com
 

Way back when I became interested in quilting, 1950's through the 1970's, paper piecing was always referred to an the English paper method.? Instructions for American quilts said to trace around a template.? If a pencil was used, the lines may have simply disappeared over time.


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Subject: Quilts for 4 poster beds - Update
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>


In Clues in the Calico, Barbara Brackman states:

*Most quilts are rectangles or squares; some older quilts and spreads are
T-shaped with cutouts in the corners to allow the coverlet to fit around the
foot posts of a four poster bed. Cut-out corners are generally found in
quilts attributed to the years before 1860.* p. 120-121

I could not find the writings of J. Lasansky on this subject, so do not know
if her use of the same terminology "T shaped," or "T quilt," pre-dates
Brackman's statement.

Nonetheless, as I stated previously, the term "T quilt" seems to be verbiage
superimposed by people who are not native to New England and who may not be
aware of regionalisms in terminology. The same is true of the use of the
word "coverlet." We say "woven coverlet" when we are talking about something
that was woven on a loom; and "summer coverlet" for a one or two layer
cotton coverlet, embroidered or not. In Pennsylvania, however, the term
"summer spread" is used for a one or two layer cotton coverlet: a regional
language difference.

I think the term "quilt with cut-out corners" is more descriptive and
precise. With language, we like people to understand what we are saying, if
the actual object or photo of the object is not present. To me, personally,
"T" quilt always makes me think of Temperance Quilts, as stated.

Many thanks to sue reich for her input about the CT documentation project.
Interesting that there were relatively so few quilts for 4 poster beds.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings

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Subject: re "T" quilts
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 5 May 2009 23:00:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

re:
"the term "T quilt" seems to be verbiage superimposed by people who are not native to New England and who may not be aware of regionalisms in terminology."

As a member from Texas noted earlier, Texas is working alive with "T" quilts that have nothing to do with Temperance movement and that are called "T" quilts.

Gaye Ingram


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Subject: not all NE quilts
From: Judy Roche <judyqrocheclan.com>
Date: Wed, 06 May 2009 06:41:26 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Jeanette did do a study on cut out corner quilts, printed in Antiques
magazine,maybe 4-5 years ago. Sorry I cannot be more specific, as I am
in Maine ( where incidentally , a large portion of the NE cut out
corner quilts came from) , the magazine in Pa .!
I own one cut out corner quilt from a Moravian family ( religion , not
country) in Bethlehem Pa , and another much later one ( lots of
coppery prints) from the Delaware River Valley( PA/ NJ) . I have some
from NE , too (one a very dear doll quilt)
Judy Roche
Stockton Springs Maine


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Subject: T Quilts revisited
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 6:43:40 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

I was researching online newspapers and came across this January 25, 1884 reference to "T quilts." It was in a column called "Aunt Philura" in The Fort Wayne Gazette, Fort Wayne, Indiana. Some of the print could not be deciphered. Here is what I could read.
Aunt Philura
As proud of her Bedquits as if
They Were Brickybats.
Miss Winters Makes up Her Mind to
say Her Piece A Moral
Lesson of General Application.

First paragraph can't be read

Second paragraph:
She................ That woman is
always piecin up bedquilts. Her house
runneth over full of bed quilts. Rising star
bedquilts setting sun bedquilts, ...........
bedquilts basket bedquilts log-cabin bed
quilts T quilts 999 pieces no two-
of em alike bedquilts, hit-or miss bed
quilts, puzzle bedquilts-and! I don't know
how many other kinds of bedquilts that wo-
man has got in her house. And she always
take her company clear through the house
and makes 'em look at her bedquilts as
proud of 'em as if they were foreign bricky-
bats. Why, I've known that woman to let
her men folks' shirts go till they wouldn't
hang on to their backs (without bein tied on)
so she could piece bedquilts."

It goes on to report the "Queen Victory" quilt made in Canada that is all the rage.
The "Queen Victory" quilt is actually a quilt with hundreds or thousands of pieces.
The reason I am sharing this is the reference to "T quilt." Although it is not described, I would bet money it is a cutout quilt. sue reich

--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com


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Subject: Re: not all NE quilts
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>

That's good to know about the Antiques magazine article, but I don't believe
that is where I read Jeanette's information.

I have a doll bed quilt, as well, but mine was "made to look like" it was
originally intended for a 4 poster bed, when in actuality, the antiques
seller admitted to me that she herself had fashioned it, in that manner,
when she cut pieces of an old quilt and bound the edges. There are all kinds
of twists! I liked it, so I purchased it anyhow, knowing that its
proportions are not true to a quilt of this kind.

I wonder, overall, how many quilts for 4 poster beds have shown up in all
the various Pennsylvania documentation projects, how many were brought to PA
from New England, if any, and how this trend related to furniture sales of 4
poster beds in the area of PA, or if those were all migratory birds.

Interesting input. Thanks.


I own one cut out corner quilt from a Moravian family ( religion , not
> country) in Bethlehem Pa , and another much later one ( lots of coppery
> prints) from the Delaware River Valley( PA/ NJ) . I have some from NE , too
> (one a very dear doll quilt)
> Judy Roche
> Stockton Springs Maine
>



--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

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Subject: T Quilt Name
From: Linda Hunter <hunterljroadrunner.com>
Date: Tue, 05 May 2009 22:37:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

I am from the Buffalo, NY area, and I have often heard the "T block"
referred to as the Temperance block in my area. Note that I live near
Chautauqua Institution where the Women's Christian Temperance Union
(WCTU) was very prominent. However, I traveled to Raleigh, NC in
January and enjoyed a small show of quilts and a lunchtime lecture at
the NC History Museum (name may be incorrect, but it was in downtown
Raleigh). I was surprised to hear the speaker say the T in the Double T
block was for Tobacco. She had never heard it used in reference to
Temperance. Tobacco is, of course, prominent there. I imagine there are
other names for this block in many areas of the country. Just thought
I'd add my 2 cents. Linda

--
Linda Hunter
AQS Quilt Appraiser, Instructor and Lecturer
lindahunters-stars.com
www.hunters-stars.com





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Subject: Re: T Quilts revisited
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 08:31:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

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That is an interesting thought. If we listen to B. Brackman, then we would
believe that cut out quilts were made before 1860, so this "T quilt" seems
to be at least a generation or more too late for a "trend." Since the poem
was generated in Indiana, hmmm ... are there any of these so-called "T
quilts," supposedly meaning cut out quilts, that have shown up in the
Indiana state doc. project?

I suppose that if the beds for which these quilts were made, were still
being used, then it is conceivable that new bedcoverings of the cut out
corners variety, could have continued to be quilted.

There really is no way to prove what someone meant by what they said in the
past, unless one believes in connections to the supernatural world via a
seance.

I don't think this is a case of being "right" or being "wrong," but coming
to terminology that means the same thing to all concerned, today.

Another thought is that the poet was not a quilter and was just throwing out
quilt-related words she had heard or encountered in writing. In considering
history, we cannot assume too much.

I am loving all the thoughts on this topic!

Pat

On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 6:43 AM, <suereichcharter.net> wrote:

> I was researching online newspapers and came across this January 25, 1884
> reference to "T quilts."
>

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

--0015174c142285e10104693d9167--


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Subject: Re: 4 poster bed quilts
From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 06:01:32 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7


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I purchased a cut out quilt a few months ago in upstate, NY. The consign
or was from NJ. Not sure where the quilt originated from, though. It
is circa 1890s, later than Brackman's observation. Mine is a wholecloth
cheater print.
https://material-pleasures.3dcartstores.com/assets/images/quilt273.JPG

When I describe the quilt, I have always called it a 4 poster bed quilt.


My best,
Dana

Material Pleasures, LLC Antique and VintageTextiles - Wrap Yourself
in History www.materialpleasures.com


--0-1888706102-1241614892:76595--


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Subject: Re: hand piecing preferences
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 09:06:50 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Great questions! I love hand piecing ... here are my answers:

> 1. What is your favorite needle to use? And why?

I prefer a size 9 or 10 sharps - small enough to glide through the fabric
but long enough to get 5 or 6 stitches on easily.

> 2. Do you use a thimble?

Always! I can't thread a needle without having one on my finger. I like a
tailor's thimble for piecing (with an open end) - I use the side of my
finger when piecing, and the tailor's thimble fits well no matter the season
(small cold fingertips in winter through puffy warm fingertips in summer).
I got this tip from Cindy Blackberg - thanks, Cindy, if you're out there!

> 3. Do you use a template actual size thus marking the sewing line and then
> hand cut the estimated seam allowance OR as above ala Jinny Beyer.(or
> other method?)

I use finished size templates, drawing the sewing lines on and eyeballing
the seam allowances, and I teach this method because it gives newbies a
sense of security to have the lines on both pieces. I appreciate Jinny's
logic though, and I now have her cool template with the holes to mark corner
dots, etc. I'll try it some time, because marking the sewing lines is
tedious.

I made a small hexagon wall hanging recently (large hexagons, small wall
hanging) using the "American" method ... I've done English paper piecing
before, but all that paper cutting, basting, etc. drove me crazy. I don't
teach it.

Dale Drake in central Indiana



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: hand piecing preferences
From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 08:42:56 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

> 1. What is your favorite needle to use? And why?

I prefer a size 11 sharps - same needle I use for applique.
Or sometimes a size 12 betweens - same needle I use for quilting.

> 2. Do you use a thimble?

I always wear my Tommie Lane thimble when quilting... sometimes
when piecing or appliqueing.

> 3. Do you use a template actual size thus marking the sewing line and
> then hand cut the estimated seam allowance OR as above ala Jinny Beyer.
> (or other method?)

I have used 'regular' marking with a template... freezer paper templates
(FP is actual size, iron it on the wrong side & then draw your sewing
line along the edge of the FP); English paper piecing. Currently I am
using a new method... Inklingo by Linda Franz (www.lindafranz.com)
You iron a piece of fabric Wrong side up onto a piece of freezer paper,
and print the cutting & sewing lines on the fabric with a regular inkjet
printer! Linda has a free collection to make a 4 1/2" Le Moyne Star...
and a variety of other shapes/collections which she is adding to all
the time. This method is excellent... takes most of the work out of
marking your fabric, and you have perfect results! There is a blog
showing projects that have been made with this method:
http://inklingoprojects.blogspot.com/
I replicated a doll quilt from "Childhood Treasures" by Merikay
Waldvogel... it is shown on the April 1st blog entry. Although I use
the rotary cutting/ machine piecing method for some projects, I really
do enjoy hand piecing... and this new method makes it even easier to
prepare your fabric. More 'quilt history' in the making... as we
find new ways to use the technology of the day to apply to quilting :)
Karan from rainy Iowa




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: 4 poster bed quilts
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 10:32:37 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

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A picture says 1,000 words, and you have just "nailed it," Dana. Look at the
curved corners of the cutout. Have you ever seen a "T" that looks like that?
I am not talking about cursive or fancy writing, just a "T" <- like this.

You are most correct in calling it a 4 poster bed quilt. Bravo for you!
Someone is finally "getting" this!

Pat

It is circa 1890s, later than Brackman's observation. Mine is a wholecloth
> cheater print.
> https://material-pleasures.3dcartstores.com/assets/images/quilt273.JPG
> When I describe the quilt, I have always called it a 4 poster bed quilt.
>
> Material Pleasures, LLC Antique and Vintage Textiles - Wrap Yourself in
> History www.materialpleasures.com
>



--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

--0015174be9665c533104693f44db--


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Subject: Hall of Fame Celebration Registration Form now on-line
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 06 May 2009 10:03:41 -0700
X-Message-Number: 11

The Quilters Hall of Fame Celebration Registration Form is now on-line.

http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

Then you'll see

2009 CELEBRATION REGISTRATION FORM NOW AVAILABLE! CLICK HERE just under the
photo of the Marie Webster House.


Don't have time for the blog? Go straight to the registration form here.

http://www.quiltershalloffame.net/files/celebration_2009_shedule_WEBSITE_VER
SION.pdf

Let me know if this direct link doesn't work.

Do come help us celebrate Merikay Waldvogel's induction! Hope to see some of
you there!

Karen in the Islands




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Subject: Re: T Quilt Name
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 13:25:24 -0500
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Is this all sort of like the vagaries of block names?
There are so many examples and usages. Nothing can be proven to be the
RIGHT one and doesn't need to be IMHO.
I have two bed covers I call "T" quilts. I've posted photos on E board
under T quilt. The vintage one I've often seen called Double T - the
newer one I made for my son - Todd!
Tobacco, temperance, shape of the quilt - I think to be clear the 'cut
out corner' with mention of a 4 poster bed leaves no doubt. In Sue's
reference we actually have no idea what she was calling a T quilt.
The joys of quilt study discussion.
Another terminology thing is with Chintz Cut-Out vs. Broderie Perse. I
have seen a 'Peony' quilt named (pronounced) "Piney" in the south.
You say tomato...
jean

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Subject: Re: T Quilt Name
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 15:01:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

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I have been told that the term "Laid-on Work," is an even older one
than *Broderie
Perse* (which means Persian embroidery, by the way, versus *Broderie
anglaise*, English embroidery).


On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 2:25 PM, Jean Carlton <jeancarltoncomcast.net>wrote:

>
> Another terminology thing is with Chintz Cut-Out vs. Broderie Perse.
> You say tomato...
> jean
>



--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

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Subject: hand piecing
From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 16:56:18 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 14


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Hand piecers:



1.
What is your favorite needle to use? And why?

i recently took a class by pepper cory on gentle curve hand
piecing. she recommended that i try the straw needles that i had
brought and i did, but i will go back to my standard shorter
needle. it doesn't matter to me how many stitches i can get on at
one time, my hands are uncomfortable with the longer needles -- perhaps
because my hands are on the small side.



2. Do you use a thimble?

again, pepper recommended using a thimble. i've never used one
for hand sewing and it seemed akward to me. it took me quite
awhile to get used a thimble when quilting even! i don't do alot
of hand piecing, so unless my fingers begin to feel pain i will not try
a thimble.



3.
Do you use a template actual size thus marking the sewing line and then
hand cut the estimated seam allowance OR as above ala Jinny Beyer.(or
other method?)

because i've been doing a quarter inch seam by eye for so long, i feel
confident in my seam allowance without marking. i do dot the
corners for starting and stopping tho. pepper had us mark center
seams and suggested that if we weren't confident with 1/4" by eye we
could use additional dots. i can see where this would be a
helpful reference, especially on longer seams.



i made a dutch rose (carpenter's wheel variation) quilt using the
english paper piecing method and was quite happy with the results as
far as fitting the pieces together. the basting threads were made
thru the paper and fabric, but the premade papers were the weight of
index cards and could easily be reused many times. however, the
teacher said only to make our stitches "small" and not to pick up too
many threads of the pieces as we sewed our parts together. she
also had us leave those seam allowances open. regrettably, my quilt
began to come apart as i quilted in the hoop. my less than 1/8"
spaces between stitches was too much and the stress of the hoop pulled
the on the seam allowances and popped some of the seams. i was
repairing the quilt top using a ladder stitch as i was quilting
it. alot of extra work and i always warn people to take a nice
bite of the fabric and make sure those stitches are SUPER close.



patti