Subject: Wholecloth, was hand piecing From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 13:06:16 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

As ever, thanks for the excellent and generous information from you all. I think the public and private answers confirm my 'all of the above' suspicion.

I feel like a rather demanding child at the moment, asking all these questions. I have another for you. And it also concerns definitions and absolutes.

When is a wholecloth not a wholecloth?

Would you reserve the exhibition tag 'Wholecloth' purely for quilts with one fabric across the whole of the top (even if necessarily seamed to achieve the size) or would you also apply it to a pieced top which had an intricate wholecloth-style pattern quilted across it (for example in the case of Amish squares, Welsh strippies, or the UK North Country 'Sanderson Star' ?

And for that matter, where does your term 'whitework' come into it?

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: garment manufacturers selling scraps, paper piecing From: "Rose Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 07:17:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Laura, Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Ward both sold fabrics for men's clothing, so you'd think that they might be a source of scraps and remnants. I looked through the catalogs I have (not many) and didn't see any scrap packages for these fabrics, even though there were many for cotton and rayon fabrics. If you have access to old catalogs, you might take a look there, since I didn't have enough to be comfortable making any conclusion. Rosie Werner

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Subject: garment manufacturers selling scraps, paper piecing From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com> Date: Thu, 07 May 2009 08:33:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

 

Laura -- I remember magazine ads well into the 1950s offering scrap bags of all types of fabrics including wool. Generally the company was a jobber or mill outlet agent rather than a specific mill or clothing manufacturer. Wool was popular because braided rug making was the trend at the time. I don't remember any specific names of these outlets and companies. I also remember early Ladies Home Journals in the latter 1890s offering wool and cotton scraps. Unfortunately I don't have those magazines anymore. Hope this information helps in some way.

Rose Werner wrote:Laura, Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Ward both sold fabrics for men's clothing, so you'd think that they might be a source of scraps and remnants. I looked through the catalogs I have (not many) and didn't see any scrap packages for these fabrics, even though there were many for cotton and rayon fabrics. If you have access to old catalogs, you might take a look there, since I didn't have enough to be comfortable making any conclusion.

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Subject: RE: Wholecloth, was hand piecing From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 08:27:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Wholecloth is ONLY for the quilts with one fabric (even if seamed).

Kim (midwest USA)

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Subject: RE: Wholecloth, was hand piecing From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Thu, 07 May 2009 10:18:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi Sally -

In the documentation work I've been involved with in my area (southeastern PA, DE, MD), there are words used to describe the assembly of the top, and a different set of words used to describe the quilting designs/motifs.

Wholecloth is a word we use to describe the top assembly -- meaning it's all one fabric (seamed for size).

You wrote - or would you also apply it to a pieced top which had an intricate wholecloth-style pattern quilted across it (for example in the case of Amish squares, Welsh strippies, or the UK North Country 'Sanderson Star' ?

We don't refer to "an intricate wholecloth-style pattern quilted across it". Rather, in the quilting section we refer to 1. Is there an overall quilting pattern 2. Or a medallion style quilting pattern -- and then state what the "parts" contain

The Welsh strippies (at least what I'm picturing) would be described -- 1. Top assembly -- strippie, or strips 2. Quilting pattern -- medallion style quilting pattern with star in center, surrounded by feathered wreath, grid background quilting, with cable border (that's a broad example)

I personally have not heard the phrase "Wholecloth-style quilting pattern" until reading your note. The whole cloth quilts I've seen can be as simply quilted as grids or clamshells, or have intricate medallion designs. Therefore, your phrase would not adequately describe the quilts I've documented, because there is such variety in the quilting design.

This note only reflects my personal experience with these words and phrases.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Wholecloth, was hand piecing From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 08:55:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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My understanding is that the term "wholecloth" refers to the fact that a quilt top has all the same fabric whether pieced or not. As far as I know, the term has nothing to do with the hand quilting pattern overlaid on top of the quilt's top.

The term "whitework" is a general term for embroideries, including, but not limited to, the techniques of cutwork, Hardanger, reticella, and other types.

Hope this information is helpful.

Pat

When is a wholecloth not a wholecloth? Would you reserve the exhibition tag > 'Wholecloth' purely for quilts with one fabric across the whole of the top > ... And for that matter, where does your term 'whitework' come into it? > > Sally Ward

-- Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

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Subject: new book From: "Robins-Morris, Laura A" <lrobinsscharp.org> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 08:23:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Have any of you seen the book "American Quilts in the Modern Age", catalog for the upcoming exhibit at the International Quilt Study Museum in Lincoln? http://www.quiltstudy.org/discover/exhibitions/upcoming.html?upcoming_it em=3D47158&db_item=3Dlistitem One description of the book lists the dimensions as 7.4" x 4.3" - quite a strange size. Is it really that size? It is listed at almost 500 pages and containing more than 500 quilt photos. Are they all thumbnail photos? Laura, in flowery but cool Seattle P.S. During all this talk of T quilts, all I could see in my mind was the cutout, which is an L. Just didn't get it. Finally my mind was able to step back and see the whole quilt and the T. It's all a matter of perspective. 

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Subject: RE: new book From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 10:33:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Laura-- This book is volume one in a series the IQSC is doing, carefully examining and photographing all their quilts. It is 9"x 12", and heavy! There are a lot of thumbnails, but there are larger photos, too. I would recommend it for public and university libraries, or for those fanatics like me who can't resist quilt scholarship.

It is FAR, FAR more than a show catalog.

Kim

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Subject: 4-post bed quilts, t-quilts, cut out quilts From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 09:59:03 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

many years ago in a quilt history group, there was mention made that the quilts with cut outs on the bottom were made to accomodate the 4-post beds and generally came from the new england area and would date to the late 1800s. since that time whenever i've seen this type of quilt that general rule has been followed, but i guess one can never say "never" or "always". add to that "why?" and i think we can cover all instances of being proven wrong.

this discussion did remind me tho of a quilt that is hanging in our local museum, the MAC in spokane, wa. it is an exhibit of several of the museum's collection of local quilts. i was lucky enough to help get the quilts ready for the exhibit and as i was working on one, saw that the back side had been pieces oddly. while talking outloud to the lady in charge, and coming to the conclusion that this had originally been a quilt designed to accomodate the posts, she smiled and said that i was correct. i can only assume that blocks from the bottom of the quilt were used to fill in the gaps because the backgrounds and pink and brown fabrics of this album quilt are certainly the same as well as the continuity of design on the front. here is the description from the catalog:

12. CROSBY ALBUM c. 1860

Maker: Julia Stevens Crosby

Museum Collection 3352.1

This is one of three known, nearly identical quilts that Julia Crosby, who lived in Stevens Mill, Vermont, made for her children in 1860. Her son John Quincy Adams Crosby carried this personalized quilt with him to Cedar Falls, Iowa. The inscriptions on each block form his family tree, including his siblings and cousins, and the family tree of his wife Julia Sawyer. The quilt was passed from generation to generation until Julia's great-great-granddaughter donated it to the Museum.

since i'm a west coast native and not well versed in geography, new england to me is vague and in general refers to all of those small states in the northeast part of the country down to about massachusettes -- so even using the term "new england" leaves alot to interpretation.

patti

--- On Wed, 5/6/09, Quilt History List digest <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> = wrote:

From: Quilt History List digest <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Subject: qhl digest: May 06, 2009 To: "qhl digest recipients" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Date: Wednesday, May 6, 2009, 9:01 PM

QHL Digest for Wednesday, May 06, 2009.

1. re "T" quilts 2. not all NE quilts 3. T Quilts revisited 4. Re: not all NE quilts 5. T Quilt Name 6. Re: T Quilts revisited 7. Re: 4 poster bed quilts 8. Re: hand piecing preferences 9. Re: hand piecing preferences 10. Re: 4 poster bed quilts 11. Hall of Fame Celebration Registration Form now on-line 12. Re: T Quilt Name 13. Re: T Quilt Name 14. hand piecing

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Subject: re "T" quilts From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 5 May 2009 23:00:49 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

re: "the term "T quilt" seems to be verbiage superimposed by people who are not native to New England and who may not be aware of regionalisms in terminology."

As a member from Texas noted earlier, Texas is working alive with "T" quilts that have nothing to do with Temperance movement and that are called "T" quilts.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: not all NE quilts From: Judy Roche <judyqrocheclan.com> Date: Wed, 06 May 2009 06:41:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Jeanette did do a study on cut out corner quilts, printed in Antiques magazine,maybe 4-5 years ago. Sorry I cannot be more specific, as I am=  in Maine ( where incidentally , a large portion of the NE cut out corner quilts came from) , the magazine in Pa .! I own one cut out corner quilt from a Moravian family ( religion , not=  country) in Bethlehem Pa , and another much later one ( lots of coppery prints) from the Delaware River Valley( PA/ NJ) . I have some=  from NE , too (one a very dear doll quilt) Judy Roche Stockton Springs Maine

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Subject: T Quilts revisited From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 6:43:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I was researching online newspapers and came across this January 25, 1884 reference to "T quilts." It was in a column called "Aunt Philura" in The Fort Wayne Gazette, Fort Wayne, Indiana. Some of the print could not be deciphered. Here is what I could read.     Aunt Philura As proud of her Bedquits as if They Were Brickybats. Miss Winters Makes up Her Mind to say Her Piece A Moral Lesson of General Application.

First paragraph can't be read

Second paragraph:  She................ That woman is always piecin up bedquilts. Her house runneth over full of bed quilts. Rising star bedquilts setting sun bedquilts, ........... bedquilts basket bedquilts log-cabin bed quilts T quilts999 pieces no two- of em alike bedquilts, hit-or miss bed quilts, puzzle bedquilts-and! I don't know how many other kinds of bedquilts that wo- man has got in her house. And she always take her company clear through the house and makes 'em look at her bedquilts as proud of 'em as if they were foreign bricky- bats.Why, I've known that woman to let her men folks' shirts go till they wouldn't hang on to their backs (without bein tied on) so she could piece bedquilts."  It goes on to report the "Queen Victory" quilt made in Canada that is all t= he rage. The "Queen Victory" quilt is actually a quilt with hundreds or thousands of= pieces. The reason I am sharing this is the reference to "T quilt." Although it is not described, I would bet money it is a cutout quilt. sue reich  -- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

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Subject: Re: not all NE quilts From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 08:20:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

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That's good to know about the Antiques magazine article, but I don't believ= e that is where I read Jeanette's information.

I have a doll bed quilt, as well, but mine was "made to look like" it was originally intended for a 4 poster bed, when in actuality, the antiques seller admitted to me that she herself had fashioned it, in that manner, when she cut pieces of an old quilt and bound the edges. There are all kind= s of twists! I liked it, so I purchased it anyhow, knowing that its proportions are not true to a quilt of this kind.

I wonder, overall, how many quilts for 4 poster beds have shown up in all the various Pennsylvania documentation projects, how many were brought to P= A from New England, if any, and how this trend related to furniture sales of = 4 poster beds in the area of PA, or if those were all migratory birds.

Interesting input. Thanks.

I own one cut out corner quilt from a Moravian family ( religion , not > country) in Bethlehem Pa , and another much later one ( lots of coppery > prints) from the Delaware River Valley( PA/ NJ) . I have some from NE = , too > (one a very dear doll quilt) > Judy Roche > Stockton Springs Maine >

-- Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

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Subject: T Quilt Name From: Linda Hunter <hunterljroadrunner.com> Date: Tue, 05 May 2009 22:37:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

I am from the Buffalo, NY area, and I have often heard the "T block" referred to as the Temperance block in my area. Note that I live near Chautauqua Institution where the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) was very prominent.However, I traveled to Raleigh, NC in January and enjoyed a small show of quilts and a lunchtime lecture at the NC History Museum (name may be incorrect, but it was in downtown Raleigh). I was surprised to hear the speaker say the T in the Double T=  block was for Tobacco. She had never heard it used in reference to Temperance. Tobacco is, of course, prominent there. I imagine there are=  other names for this block in many areas of the country. Just thought I'd add my 2 cents.    Linda

-- Linda Hunter AQS Quilt Appraiser, Instructor and Lecturer lindahunters-stars.com www.hunters-stars.com

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Subject: Re: T Quilts revisited From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 08:31:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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That is an interesting thought. If we listen to B. Brackman, then we would believe that cut out quilts were made before 1860, so this "T quilt" seems to be at least a generation or more too late for a "trend." Since the poem was generated in Indiana, hmmm ... are there any of these so-called "T quilts," supposedly meaning cut out quilts, that have shown up in the Indiana state doc. project?

I suppose that if the beds for which these quilts were made, were still being used, then it is conceivable that new bedcoverings of the cut out corners variety, could have continued to be quilted.

There really is no way to prove what someone meant by what they said in the past, unless one believes in connections to the supernatural world via a seance.

I don't think this is a case of being "right" or being "wrong," but coming to terminology that means the same thing to all concerned, today.

Another thought is that the poet was not a quilter and was just throwing ou= t quilt-related words she had heard or encountered in writing. In considering history, we cannot assume too much.

I am loving all the thoughts on this topic!

Pat

On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 6:43 AM, <suereichcharter.net> wrote:

> I was researching online newspapers and came across this January 25, 1884 > reference to "T quilts." >

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

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Subject: Re: 4 poster bed quilts From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 06:01:32 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

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I purchased a cut out quilt a few months ago in upstate, NY.=3DA0 The consi= gn=3D or was from NJ.=3DA0 Not sure where the quilt originated from, though.=3DA0= It =3D is circa 1890s, later than Brackman's observation.=3DA0 Mine is a wholeclot= h =3D cheater print.=3DA0=3D20 https://material-pleasures.3dcartstores.com/assets/images/quilt273.JPG

When I describe the quilt, I have always called it a 4 poster bed quilt.=3D= A0=3D =3D20

My best, Dana

Material Pleasures, LLC =3DA0Antique and Vintage=3DA0Textiles - Wrap You= rself =3D in History www.materialpleasures.com

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Subject: Re: hand piecing preferences From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 09:06:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Great questions! I love hand piecing ... here are my answers:

> 1. What is your favorite needle to use? And why?

I prefer a size 9 or 10 sharps - small enough to glide through the fabric=  but long enough to get 5 or 6 stitches on easily.

> 2. Do you use a thimble?

Always! I can't thread a needle without having one on my finger. I li= ke a tailor's thimble for piecing (with an open end) - I use the side of my finger when piecing, and the tailor's thimble fits well no matter the seaso= n (small cold fingertips in winter through puffy warm fingertips in summer).=  I got this tip from Cindy Blackberg - thanks, Cindy, if you're out there!

> 3. Do you use a template actual size thus marking the sewing line and the= n > hand cut the estimated seam allowance OR as above ala Jinny Beyer.(or > other method?)

I use finished size templates, drawing the sewing lines on and eyeballing=  the seam allowances, and I teach this method because it gives newbies a sense of security to have the lines on both pieces. I appreciate Jinny's=  logic though, and I now have her cool template with the holes to mark corne= r dots, etc. I'll try it some time, because marking the sewing lines is tedious.

I made a small hexagon wall hanging recently (large hexagons, small wall hanging) using the "American" method ... I've done English paper piecing before, but all that paper cutting, basting, etc. drove me crazy. I don'= t teach it.

Dale Drake in central Indiana

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Subject: Re: hand piecing preferences From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 08:42:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

> 1. What is your favorite needle to use? And why?

I prefer a size 11 sharps - same needle I use for applique. Or sometimes a size 12 betweens - same needle I use for quilting.

> 2. Do you use a thimble?

I always wear my Tommie Lane thimble when quilting... sometimes when piecing or appliqueing.

> 3. Do you use a template actual size thus marking the sewing line and > then hand cut the estimated seam allowance OR as above ala Jinny Beyer. > (or other method?)

I have used 'regular' marking with a template... freezer paper templates (FP is actual size, iron it on the wrong side & then draw your sewing line along the edge of the FP); English paper piecing. Currently I am using a new method... Inklingo by Linda Franz (www.lindafranz.com) You iron a piece of fabric Wrong side up onto a piece of freezer paper, and print the cutting & sewing lines on the fabric with a regular inkjet printer! Linda has a free collection to make a 4 1/2" Le Moyne Star... and a variety of other shapes/collections which she is adding to all the time. This method is excellent... takes most of the work out of marking your fabric, and you have perfect results! There is a blog showing projects that have been made with this method: http://inklingoprojects.blogspot.com/ I replicated a doll quilt from "Childhood Treasures" by Merikay Waldvogel... it is shown on the April 1st blog entry. Although I use the rotary cutting/ machine piecing method for some projects, I really do enjoy hand piecing... and this new method makes it even easier to prepare your fabric. More 'quilt history' in the making... as we find new ways to use the technology of the day to apply to quilting :) Karan from rainy Iowa

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Subject: Re: 4 poster bed quilts From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 10:32:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

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A picture says 1,000 words, and you have just "nailed it," Dana. Look at th= e curved corners of the cutout. Have you ever seen a "T" that looks like that= ? I am not talking about cursive or fancy writing, just a "T" <- like this.

You are most correct in calling it a 4 poster bed quilt. Bravo for you! Someone is finally "getting" this!

Pat

It is circa 1890s, later than Brackman's observation. Mine is a wholeclo= th > cheater print. > https://material-pleasures.3dcartstores.com/assets/images/quilt273.JPG > When I describe the quilt, I have always called it a 4 poster bed quilt. > > Material Pleasures, LLCAntique and Vintage Textiles - Wrap Yours= elf in > History www.materialpleasures.com >

-- Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

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Subject: Hall of Fame Celebration Registration Form now on-line From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Wed, 06 May 2009 10:03:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

The Quilters Hall of Fame Celebration Registration Form is now on-line.

http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

Then you'll see

2009 CELEBRATION REGISTRATION FORM NOW AVAILABLE! CLICK HERE just under the photo of the Marie Webster House.

Don't have time for the blog? Go straight to the registration form here.

http://www.quiltershalloffame.net/files/celebration_2009_shedule_WEBSITE_VE= R SION.pdf

Let me know if this direct link doesn't work.

Do come help us celebrate Merikay Waldvogel's induction! Hope to see some o= f you there!

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Re: T Quilt Name From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 13:25:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Is this all sort of like the vagaries of block names?=3D20 There are so many examples and usages. Nothing can be proven to be the =3D RIGHT one and doesn't need to be IMHO. I have two bed covers I call "T" quilts. I've posted photos on E board =3D under T quilt. The vintage one I've often seen called Double T - the =3D newer one I made for my son - Todd! Tobacco, temperance, shape of the quilt - I think to be clear the 'cut =3D out corner' with mention of a 4 poster bed leaves no doubt. In Sue's =3D reference we actually have no idea what she was calling a T quilt. The joys of quilt study discussion. Another terminology thing is with Chintz Cut-Out vs. Broderie Perse. I = =3D have seen a 'Peony' quilt named (pronounced) "Piney" in the south. You say tomato... jean

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Subject: Re: T Quilt Name From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 15:01:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

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I have been told that the term "Laid-on Work," is an even older one than *Broderie Perse* (which means Persian embroidery, by the way, versus *Broderie anglaise*, English embroidery).

On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 2:25 PM, Jean Carlton <jeancarltoncomcast.net>wrote= :

> > Another terminology thing is with Chintz Cut-Out vs. Broderie Perse. > You say tomato... > jean >

-- Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

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Subject: hand piecing From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 16:56:18 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

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Hand piecers:

1. What is your favorite needle to use? And why?

i recently took a class by pepper cory on gentle curve hand piecing.=3DA0 she recommended that i try the straw needles that i had brought and i did, but i will go back to my standard shorter needle.=3DA0 it doesn't matter to me how many stitches i can get on at one time, my hands are uncomfortable with the longer needles -- perhaps because my hands are on the small side.

2. Do you use a thimble?

again, pepper recommended using a thimble.=3DA0 i've never used one for hand sewing and it seemed akward to me.=3DA0 it took me quite awhile to get used a thimble when quilting even!=3DA0 i don't do alot of hand piecing, so unless my fingers begin to feel pain i will not try a thimble.

3. Do you use a template actual size thus marking the sewing line and then hand cut the estimated seam allowance OR as above ala Jinny Beyer.(or other method?)=3DA0=3D20

because i've been doing a quarter inch seam by eye for so long, i feel confident in my seam allowance without marking.=3DA0 i do dot the corners for starting and stopping tho.=3DA0 pepper had us mark center seams and suggested that if we weren't confident with 1/4" by eye we could use additional dots.=3DA0 i can see where this would be a helpful reference, especially on longer seams.

i made a dutch rose (carpenter's wheel variation) quilt using the english paper piecing method and was quite happy with the results as far as fitting the pieces together.=3DA0 the basting threads were made thru the paper and fabric, but the premade papers were the weight of index cards and could easily be reused many times.=3DA0 however, the teacher said only to make our stitches "small" and not to pick up too many threads of the pieces as we sewed our parts together.=3DA0 she also had us leave those seam allowances open. regrettably, my quilt began to come apart as i quilted in the hoop.=3DA0 my less than 1/8" spaces between stitches was too much and the stress of the hoop pulled the on the seam allowances and popped some of the seams.=3DA0 i was repairing the quilt top using a ladder stitch as i was quilting it.=3DA0 alot of extra work and i always warn people to take a nice bite of the fabric and make sure those stitches are SUPER close.

patti

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Subject: Re: 4-post bed quilts, cut out quilts From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 10:21:12 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

On Thu, 5/7/09, ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> wrote: ...as i was working on one, saw that the back side had been pieced oddly...and coming to the conclusion that this had originally been a quilt designed to accomodate the posts...blocks from the bottom of the quilt were used to fill in the gaps...

I have a quilt from Maine (c.1800-1850) that has a square, bound inset on one back corner to fill in, I believe, a cut away for the bedpost. The other side is straight so I believe it was altered at some point and the side fabric reused, quite nicely, to match the pieced square-in-a-square blocks on the front. The change is not evident unless you turn it over to the back or notice the difference in the binding on the one side.

Mary Anne

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Subject: Re: 4-post bed quilts, cut out quilts From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Thu, 07 May 2009 12:50:56 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

I believe the opposite occurred as well. During the Centennial and later Colonial Revival, people started pulling their Colonial period furniture out of storage and buying antiques. There were some lovely bench made pieces done during the Centennial period. Can we then assume that quilts, like Dana's cheater, were made for the 4-poster 'revival' of that period? And, to take it further, that some earlier quilts had corners cut out to accommodate the later repro and antique 4-posters. I think this could also apply to doll beds and quilts. Miniature 4-posters were repro-ed and antique ones passed down through generations. I have also seen at least two, full size, late 19th century canopied iron bed on which a cut-corner quilt would have fit perfectly. I have an 1850 that has some pretty strange sewing and edging on the key-holed corners. I haven't figured it out yet but I shall make a pronouncement before I die. On a side note, do we know the earliest date that dust ruffles were attached to quilts? Jan

> On Thu, 5/7/09, ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> wrote: > ...as i was working on one, saw that the back side had been pieced oddly...and coming to the conclusion that this had originally been a quilt designed to accomodate the posts...blocks from the bottom of the quilt were used to fill in the gaps... > > I have a quilt from Maine (c.1800-1850) that has a square, bound inset on one back corner to fill in, I believe, a cut away for the bedpost. > Mary Anne >

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Subject: Re: 4-post bed quilts, cut out quilts From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 14:36:32 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 12

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Hi Jan, Very possible the corners were cut out later. On my quilt there is a qua= rter inch binding on the top edge, and the other edges are finished by bringing the top to the back, applied by hand.  My best, Dana

Material Pleasures, LLC Antique and VintageTextiles - Wrap Yourself = in History www.materialpleasures.com

--- On Thu, 5/7/09, Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> wrote: From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Subject: [qhl] Re: 4-post bed quilts, cut out quilts To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Date: Thursday, May 7, 2009, 2:50 PM

I believe the opposite occurred as well. During the Centennial and later Colonial Revival, people started pulling their Colonial period furniture ou= t of storage and buying antiques. There were some lovely bench made pieces done during the Centennial period. Can we then assume that quilts, like Dana's cheater, were made for the 4-poster 'revival' of that period? And, to take it further, that some earlier quilts had corners cut out to accommodat= e the later repro and antique 4-posters. I think this could also apply to doll b= eds and quilts. Miniature 4-posters were repro-ed and antique ones passed down through generations. I have also seen at least two, full size, late 19th century canopied iron bed on which a cut-corner quilt would have fit perfec= tly. I have an 1850 that has some pretty strange sewing and edging on the key-ho= led corners. I haven't figured it out yet but I shall make a pronouncement before I die. On a side note, do we know the earliest date that dust ruffles were attache= d to quilts? Jan

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: May 07, 2009 From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Fri, 8 May 2009 09:12:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

When is a wholecloth not a wholecloth? And for that matter, where does your term 'whitework' come into it? Sally Ward

Sally,

I agree with what Barb Garrett said about how quilts are documented.

However, in 'Glorious American Quilts: The Quilt Collection of the Museum of American Folk Art' two early quilts made of large pieces are combined in the first chapter entitled "Whole-Cloth Quilts." A reasoning given reads, "They are considered part of the whole-cloth tradition, however, because of their large size, early date and the fact that they have been made of sizable pieces of wool in a center-medallion format. These factors all indicate a closer affinity to eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century whole-cloth quilts than to the pieced-block tradition that developed later in the nineteenth century."

That same chapter also includes, a whole-cloth quilt with pieced border, printed whole-cloth quilts in addition to those made with the early solid wools, a stenciled quilt and 'Whitework Bedcovers' including candlewick spreads.

Bear in mind the book was published in 1996 but it is a good example of how often terminology varies within a relatively short period of time and/or for various purposes.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

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Subject: Noting the date From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Fri, 8 May 2009 14:10:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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I'm sitting here polishing speeches and making sure my samples are in order for the Pittsburgh Quilt Market. But today was the day to post on my personal blog and I couldn't resist a nostalgic look at Mother's Day. http://peppercory.blogspot.com Because both my folks are gone, I didn't want to get too sentimental. But to all on this list, be you mother, aunt, step-mom etc--happy Mother's Day. Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--00504502b194cd162a04696a8bfa--

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Subject: New England From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Fri, 8 May 2009 14:02:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

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Patti,

Just so you know, the New England states are New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont and Maine. Six states.

Don't feel bad. I didn't know they had roadrunners in the high desert in California until I lived there, and this week I learned from a fellow list member that there are armadillos in Texas. Who knew? I've led a terribly sheltered life!

-- Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

--0015174c42bac7640a04696a6e8d--

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Subject: Re: 4-post bed quilts, t-quilts, cut out quilts From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 2009 19:03:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

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Patti,

Just so you know, the New England states are New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont and Maine. Six states.

Don't feel bad. I didn't know they had roadrunners in the high desert in California until I lived there, and this week I learned from a fellow list member that there are armadillos in Texas. Who knew? I've led a terribly sheltered life!

Pat

-- Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

--0015174beeb8938ebb04695a843a--

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Subject: RE: New England From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 8 May 2009 12:39:59 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Patti, there are some folk who are not clear about what states comprise = New England. Those states are Massachusetts and its "daughter", Maine, N= ew Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut and Rhode Island. New York is NOT in New England, despite some newcomers' misperception. The New England that I grew up in had as much distinctive character and pride as Texas, Louisiana, or California, and as much variety in geography, character, and speech. This regionalism was so pronounced that as a true "Yankee" (which means born and bred, and has nothing to do with a certain mid-nineteenth century internecine conflict), it did not occur to me until I was in college, nearer to the MA/NY border, that the trees just across the border in New York turn color in October exactly as the trees in Massachusetts do. Since New England was famous for autumn color, I had not thought about it occurring across that boundary.

My delight in upending that notion, and many others having to do with preconceived or misconceived ideas, has, I hope, earned forgiveness for youthful provincialism by those less lucky to be Yankee.

Looking forward to checking out the Northwest one day...Susan Schreurs  who makes a "wicked good" apple pie, and eats it with sharp white Ve= rmont cheddar

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Subject: Just an oberservation From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Fri, 8 May 2009 17:41:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I've noticed recently the use of the abbreviation "NE" in referring to quilts from the Northeast, at least that's what I think the abbreviations mean. But being a current resident of the state of Nebraska (post office designation = NE) I've found myself frequently confused about the content of the information I was reading.

Maybe it's time to reconsider--or at least give a second thought to--the use of such abbreviations. Many of us do not "text" very much and are not facile users of the abbreviated forms currently in vogue by texters (and maybe sexters?).

Consider this a plea for taking the time to make yourselves clear when typing your posts...please!

Thanking you in advance,

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: American Quilts in the Modern Age post From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Fri, 8 May 2009 17:31:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I whole-heartedly second Kim Baird's post regarding the IQSC's new book, "American Quilts in the Modern Age." I would also make the same recommendations for Annette Gero's recently published book on Australian quilts.

I count myself lucky to have both.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: more info on the new book From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Fri, 8 May 2009 17:58:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Here's what the University of Nebraska's in-house publication for faculty and staff has to say about the new book, American Quilts in the Modern Age. I just received my copy of the issues and thought you'd all like to know more about the book. Here's the quote:

"American Quilts in the Modern Age" is part of the multi-volume series of the IQSC collections. The book examines the period's quilts from both an artistic and a historical perspective. The contributing authors provide critical information regarding the modern and anti-modern tensions that persisted throughout this era of America's coming of age, from the Civil War to World War II. They also address the textile technology and cultural context of the times in which the quilts were created, with an eye to the role that industrialization and modernization played in the evolution of techniques, materials and designs. "American Quilts in the Modern Age" includes full-color photos of more than 587 quilts. Some of the quilts are featured in the IQSC exhibition "American Quilts in the Modern Age, 1870-1940." The exhibition is on display from May 23 to Nov. 15 at the museum.

Hope this new information helps.

Kathy Moore

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Subject: Re: American Quilts in the Modern Age post From: ag32040 <ag32040aol.com> Date: Sat, 09 May 2009 18:48:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

On May 8, 2009, at 6:31:09 PM, "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> wrote= :

From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Subject: [qhl] American Quilts in the Modern Age post Date: May 8, 2009 6:31:09 PM EDT To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> I whole-heartedly second Kim Baird's post regarding the IQSC's new book,=  "American Quilts in the Modern Age." I would also make the same recommendations for Annette Gero's recently published book on Australian=  quilts.

I count myself lucky to have both.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: words on quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 2009 15:56:54 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks for all the info and photos for the menswear exhibit.  Now I am on to discovering more wonderful examples of Text on Textiles: Wor= ds as Design in Antique Quilts. Not only are weincluding signature/tithi= ng quilts, but also words/phrases/poems/sentiments/memorials religious and = not; political'/patriotic/ commemorativeexpressions, 'cause' quilts; adv= ertising; letters.  Aside from the Ladies Art Quilt company, did any other concern issue patter= ns for letters?  Any knowwhat companymade the Jack and Jillquilts pairwith the p= ieced lettering of the rhyme?  Has anyone discovered why there have beensome alphabet quilts with the l= etters backwards, or running vertical from the right, rather than horizonta= l from the left? I have owned three, and have another now...most curious--d= yslexia perhaps?!  I have had several advertising quilts with embroidered names, locations of = businesses, often in star patterns.Where was this written, anyone know -- t= here are too many similar to be coincidental.  And, why so many signatures quiltsin redwork embroidery? How was this= concept passed on around the country?  Thanks for your input, and also for photos of great examples you know of th= at you might be willing to loan for exhibit, article, book.  Thanks  Laura Fisher

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Subject: making my text legible From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 2009 21:27:19 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

--0-287106306-1241929639=:75606 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

No matter which computer I work from, I guess when I email from this addres= s, the printed text has AO and other interruptions in the flow of the langu= age. Anyone know how I can end this strange phenomenon?  thanks  Laura Fisher --0-287106306-1241929639=:75606--

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Subject: Re: words on quilts From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sun, 10 May 2009 09:39:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Laura, You mention advertising quilts. There were several quilts which may fit your definition in the exhibit "Going West: Quilts and Community" which I saw a couple of years ago at the Renwick in DC. The quilts were made in or brought to Nebraska. Checkout the book by Roderick Kiracofe and Sandi Fox: the Pawnee City Newspaper Quilt (p. 74), the Omaha Commerce Quilt (p. 76), the Trans-Mississippi Exposition Quilt (84). Cinda on the Eastern Shore

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Subject: Appraiser Needed From: Edwaquiltaol.com Date: Sun, 10 May 2009 10:03:27 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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Is there anyone on the list or do you know an appraiser who is knowledgeable/expert in Quaker quilts. I have an acquaintance down in the edge of WV who a Quaker quilt passed down through her family. Provenance apparently very good as it came up through her family. There is a possibility she will donate to an appropriate museum and needs a good appraisal. I will pass on any info to her.

Holice Turnbow

**************The Average US Credit Score is 692. See Yours in Just 2 Easy Steps! (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100126575x1222376999x1201454299/aol?redir=http://www.freecreditreport.com/pm/default.aspx?sc=668072&hmpgID=62&bcd=M ay51009AvgfooterNO62)

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Subject: Text Quilts From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com> Date: Sun, 10 May 2009 11:47:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Laura,

I'm remembering a certain unique and distinctive "writings" quilt that was auctioned at the 2005 AQSG in Denver, Colorado. OK -- Jan Thomas and Lorie Stubbs -- help me out here -- what were those wonderful sayings/verses that completely filled the top? It was embroidered in that lovely Sailor Boy Blue cotton floss on a muslin ground, with a Sailor Boy Blue colored fabric ruffle all the way around. And is the fortunate winning bidder perhaps still on this list?

Also, the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum has an unusual mourning quilt in its collection. The quilt is called "Cora Lee's quilt" and has a sentence embroidered in broken lines across the middle third of the quilt. It's quite folksy and rustic with the letters all unevenly spaced and somewhat distorted. The quiltermaker certainly could have come from humble origins. The Inscription reads, 鼎oralee Walters was born in 1885 and died in 1894". Nevertheless, it remains a heartfelt, tangible outpouring of grief over the death of a child, memorialized in cloth.

Martha Spark Salem, OR

> Thanks for all the info and photos for the menswear exhibit. > Now I am on to discovering more wonderful examples of Text on Textiles: Words as Design in Antique Quilts. Not only are we including signature/tithing quilts, but also words/phrases/poems/sentiments/memorials religious and not; political'/patriotic/ commemorative expressions, 'cause' quilts;advertising; letters. Thanks Laura Fisher

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Subject: Literature and sewing From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Sun, 10 May 2009 11:35:15 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

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Hi all -

Have a quick question and think this group may be able to help...

I'm looking for some literature for or about children that has references to sewing - particularly older literature. I have a couple of old Godeys from the 1850-60s as well as Harpers, and Lady's Home Magazine. They have lots of literature, but I'm really looking for more specific stories that talk about children sewing.

If you have any suggestions or can point me toward some book titles, it would be helpful -

I'm thinking of helping out some home school moms by giving their kids a little class on hand sewing and I wanted to share some stories from history that talk about kids sewing or learning to sew, etc.

Really appreciate any advice you can offer.

Happy Mother's Day to all you wonderful Moms.

Leah Zieber Temecula, CA

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Subject: Re: Literature and sewing From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Sun, 10 May 2009 16:59:33 EDT X-Message-Number: 6

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Leah,

I remember reading the "Little House" books to my daughter in the 1970's and believe there was an entry of "Little Laura and Mary" making 9-patch quilt squares. Check the books out. This would be something the children can relate to also since the shows are being shown still today.

Hope this helps, Alma Moates AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser-Quilted Textiles Pensacola, Fl. **************The Average US Credit Score is 692. See Yours in Just 2 Easy Steps! (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100126575x1222376999x1201454299/aol?redir=http://www.freecreditreport.com/pm/default.aspx?sc=668072&hmpgID=62&bcd=M ay51009AvgfooterNO62)

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Subject: Re: making my text legible From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 10 May 2009 16:36:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Laura - It comes thru fine for me. jean ----- Original Message ----- From: Laura Fisher To: Quilt History List Sent: Saturday, May 09, 2009 11:27 PM Subject: [qhl] making my text legible

No matter which computer I work from, I guess when I email from this = address, the printed text has AO and other interruptions in the flow of = the language. Anyone know how I can end this strange phenomenon?

thanks

Laura Fisher

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Subject: Re: words on quilts From: "Rose Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com> Date: Sun, 10 May 2009 20:41:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Laura, The Jack and Jill quilt pair with the pieced lettering of the rhyme are Mountain Mist patterns. There are a number of ABC quilts for kids that were sold as kits, including one from the Boag Company and one from Mary McElwain. The James C. Michael (Mickey) company sold a kit called The Calico Twins, which featured twin girls in the center (along with some stylized pots of flowers) and the alphabet letters in a frame around them. Mrs. Danner also sold a pattern for a quilt with large alphabet squares. 26 letters didn't fit well for making a quilt, so X and Y were often together - also I and J - or X,Y, and Z were together on one block. There are also many transfer patterns and stamped blocks featuring the alphabet. Rosie Werner

----- Original Message ----- From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, May 09, 2009 5:56 PM Subject: [qhl] words on quilts

Thanks for all the info and photos for the menswear exhibit.

Now I am on to discovering more wonderful examples of Text on Textiles: Words as Design in Antique Quilts. Not only are we including signature/tithing quilts, but also words/phrases/poems/sentiments/memorials religious and not; political'/patriotic/ commemorative expressions, 'cause' quilts; advertising; letters.

Aside from the Ladies Art Quilt company, did any other concern issue patterns for letters?

Any know what company made the Jack and Jill quilts pair with the pieced lettering of the rhyme?

Has anyone discovered why there have been some alphabet quilts with the letters backwards, or running vertical from the right, rather than horizontal from the left? I have owned three, and have another now...most curious--dyslexia perhaps?!

I have had several advertising quilts with embroidered names, locations of businesses, often in star patterns.Where was this written, anyone know -- there are too many similar to be coincidental.

And, why so many signatures quilts in redwork embroidery? How was this concept passed on around the country?

Thanks for your input, and also for photos of great examples you know of that you might be willing to loan for exhibit, article, book.

Thanks

Laura Fisher

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Subject: quilts in art From: "Deborah Kratovil" <kratovilhis.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 04:01:29 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

I picked up an interesting book at a sale yesterday, hard back "coffee table" type book titled "the Art of Food" by Claire Clifton. I only like to read about food; I don't like to cook. Filled with beautiful pictures, many by the masters, with food as the theme. "Feast in the House of Levy" by Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) surprised me - I was horrified to see all o= f these people standing on a quilt! It's a 9 Patch and Snowball pattern. Then a second later I smacked my head when I realized that the reverse is true - quilters got their ideas for patterns from mosaics, floor tiles, etc. I just hadn't seen (or observed) any in artwork. I'm glancing at it now and I still can't get the thought of these people standing on a quilt out of my head! It's done in cream, light and dark blue and is a lovely pattern! Now I guess I'm on a mission to see what else comes up in works of art, especially from centuries ago. Debby Kratovil, still learning after all these (many) years

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Subject: making my text legible From: Sarah Hough <dougandsarah1gmail.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 07:15:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Laura, your message comes through fine for me. I use explorer and gmail, if that helps figure out your problem.

Sarah

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 10, 2009 From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 07:12:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

--Apple-Mail-51--403721391 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed; delsp=yes Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

> > Re: Sewing and literature Leah, google The Mary Frances Sewing Book by Jane Fryer. You can get old ones (printed 1913) or a reprint through Lacis for $28. Stories of "the thimble people," as well as projects. I loved it with my grand daughters. Pat Kyser >

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Subject: Jack and Jill Mountain Mist Pattern From: Cook Family <dmcooknetvision.net.il> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 16:01:20 +0300 X-Message-Number: 4

The Mountain Mist Jack and Jill pattern is still available and can be ordered from the Fabric Shack http://www.fabricshack.com/cgi-bin/Store/store.cgi?cart_id=8852909.32057&lastmenu=&product=mountainmist will take you right to the page with the patterns. You can no longer get the patterns directly from Mountain Mist.

I recently ordered this pattern and another: the other came as the original batting wrapper but the Jack and Jill came as a reprint. BTW these cost all of $3.50.

Miri Cook www.milkandhoneyquilts.blogspot.com

<<The Jack and Jill quilt pair with the pieced lettering of the rhyme are Mountain Mist patterns. >>

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Subject: Advertising Quilts From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilteralltel.net> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 09:56:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

While this is not historical (but it will be eventaully), I have noted an advertising quilt in a current ad on tv. Just catching a glimpse, and have not had a good look, but in the new Snapple ad that is about "new, better stuff" as ingredients for their beverages, there's a quilt. The opening scene shows a manager at his desk on the phone talking about "stuff". On the wall behind him is what appears to be a star quilt wallhanging with some words in the center of it. I keep watching for the ad to ascertain just what I'm seeing, but it's a fleeting image. Have you seen it? Nancy Roberts

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Subject: RE: Advertising Quilts From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 09:25:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Yes, it's definitely there. I forget what it says, though. Kim

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Subject: Re: Advertising Quilts From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 08:04:28 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

The quilt says: "Made from the best stuff on earth."

Mary Anne

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Subject: Re: 4-post bed quilts, cut out quilts From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 10:36:19 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

Dana, Excuse me, I didn't mean to suggest 'your' quilt had the corners cut out after it was made. I just think that it was made about the Centennial for a repro or antique 4-poster. With the change in some bed styles came the need/desire to change some earlier quilts or to make new ones, like yours, to fit the change in beds. Does anyone know the date of the cheater on Dana's quilt? I believe late nineteenth century, as she dated it, but can anyone be more specific? jt

> I believe the opposite occurred as well. During the Centennial and later > Colonial Revival, people started pulling their Colonial period furniture out of > storage and buying antiques. There were some lovely bench made pieces done > during the Centennial period. Can we then assume that quilts, like Dana's > cheater, were made for the 4-poster 'revival' of that period?

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Subject: Re: Text Quilts From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 11:23:44 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

Yes, Martha. The AQSG auction quilt was embroidered with all kinds of 'isms'. Loved it. I think, just afterward, Cinda wrote a nice mention of it on the list.

As to 'Cora Lee's Quilt', it is on the Quilt Index under RMQM. I did some basic research on it and I believe, when I am finished, we will find it was from Kentucky. jt

Martha Spark wrote: > I'm remembering a certain unique and distinctive "writings" quilt that was > auctioned at the 2005 AQSG in Denver, Colorado. > > The Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum has an unusual mourning quilt in its > collection. The quilt is called "Cora Lee's quilt"

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Subject: Text Quilts From: lstubbs726comcast.net Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 11:19:46 -0600 X-Message-Number: 10

Martha,

Regarding your reference to the quilt purchased at the Denver AQSG auction in 2005, I believe the lucky winner, subsequent to the very entertaining bidding war between Charlotte Enfield and Joanie Pigford, was Charlotte Enfield. I think Penny Tucker may have arranged the donation of the quilt to AQSG. This particular quilt was like none I have ever seen with all manner of sayings, poems, etc. on it. It provided endless fascination to all who came into the auction room. My favorite had to do with buying or trying on a bathing suit and I wish I had written it down because I do not have Cinda's memory about these things. Charlotte, if you're out there, I'll bet many would get a laugh out of that particular message.

Lorie Stubbs Lakewood, CO

-----Original Message----- From: Quilt History List digest [mailto:qhllyris.quiltropolis.com] Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2009 10:01 PM To: qhl digest recipients Subject: qhl digest: May 10, 2009

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Subject: Re: quilts in art From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 14:40:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

The floors of every cathedral or museum I've ever been in in Europe say QUILT to me. . . . Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: More than 2,000 Iowa Quilts Added to Quilt Index From: MegMaxCaol.com Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 14:31:27 EDT X-Message-Number: 12

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Dear QHL List Members: As you may know, the Quilt Index is expanding rapidly, adding new museum collections and quilts from state documentation projects. I'm pleased to announce that we've just added the 8th state or regional project to the Index, and it's one of the biggest thus far. More than 2,300 quilts from the Iowa Quilt Research Project are now available in the Index archive, bringing the total number of quilt records to more than 21,000. The Iowa quilts just added include many treasures from the collection of Mary Barton, one of the leaders in quilt documentation. An inductee into the Quilters Hall of Fame, Mary Barton of Ames, Iowa is recognized as one of the first to document not only finished quilts, but also the methods and mores of mid-19th century quiltmakers. The first 200 records in the Iowa archive online come from her personal quilt collection and include her own Heritage Quilt, recognized as one of the best quilts of the 20th century. This is a spectacular collection including many quilt styles, reflecting the waves of diverse immigrants to Iowa over the years. The 500 volunteers in the Iowa Quilt Research Project began their work in 1987, seeking out Iowa quilts made prior to 1925. To browse these quilts, go to www.quiltindex.org, or www.allianceforamericanquilts.org. The Quilt Index is a partner project of the Alliance for American Quilts and Michigan State University. Also, please note that the Quilt Index is now accepting applications from institutions and quilt documentation projects interested in being part of the Index. The deadline is May 31 and application materials are available at www.quiltindex.org. Enjoy! Meg Cox, vice president Alliance for American Quilts

************** Recession-proof vacation ideas. Find free things to do in the U.S. (http://travel.aol.com/travel-ideas/domestic/national-tourism-week?ncid=emlcntustrav00000002)

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Subject: Re: Question about a Paragon Kit Quilt From: ARabara15aol.com Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 21:12:02 EDT X-Message-Number: 13

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I just purchased an unused Paragon kit quilt. It is # 01147.It is an all cotton Central Eagle applique quilt with a buatiful vining border of flowers and vines.The eagle has 13 appliqued stars on his wings and breast.The applique printed fabrics look like 50's/60's calico's and red solids.The woman who made it is 92 years old and said that it is over 50 yrs old. I have seen this pattern for sale on eBay before. Can anyone help me date it? The batting is cotton and the backing is cotton muslin.Though it is a kit quilt, the execution and quilting are superb. Thanks

Donald Brokate **************An Excellent Credit Score is 750. See Yours in Just 2 Easy Steps! (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100126575x1222585010x1201462743/aol?redir=http://www.freecreditreport.com/pm/default.aspx?sc=668072&hmpgID=62&bcd=May Excfooter51109NO62)

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Subject: Question about a Paragon Kit Quilt From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 22:16:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

This eagle quilt is a Paragon No. 01147 quilt called American Glory Quilt. It appeared in Good Housekeeping Magazine - September 1961. Special Note: It is described as "A truly beautiful early American Design inspired by an antique quilt in the Philadelphia Museum. Stamped for appliquéing and quilting on eggshell colored percale background. The color fast appliqués are calico green and yellow prints and reds. Double and single bed size." Hope this helps -- Sue in Illinois

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Subject: wool samples for braided rugs From: mopalka <mopalkaalaska.net> Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 21:43:13 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello,

A few messages back someone mentioned "samples" of fabric and then said something about using it for wool in braided rugs. I remember a lady who would buy wool which had been used as a type of conveyer belt in paper making. When too much of the nap was gone the manufacturer would sell the wool. The lady would wash and dye the wool, cut it on some type of measured cutter, and then use it for making braided rugs. Does anyone else remember this being done in the late 50's and early 60's? Gosh! I am telling my age! This was in the north eastern Oklahoma area.

I still have one of her smaller rugs.

Susan(in Alaska where we have our first scillia and crocus blooming!)

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Subject: Re: wool samples for braided rugs From: "deb" <debquiltingposs.com> Date: Tue, 12 May 2009 06:12:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Back in the late 70s and early 80s, I used to braid rugs. I went to Rowley, Mass from my home in Gloucester to buy wool pieces by the pound. There was a woman there who bought the cutaways from left over suits, coats, etc and had a small business out of her home reselling them. I can't remember where she got them from but you went into an addition built onto her house expressly for that purpose & sifted through huge boxes of wool scraps separated by colors.

My braided rugs are still on my floors almost 30 years later & I would bet if I dug in the attic, I still have some of the wool cutaways left.

Debbie Bayville, NJ

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Subject: Re: wool samples for braided rugs From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 May 2009 05:28:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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I went to a quilters sale this spring and she had tons of shirting samples = that were about 6"x7", I bought all of them, some still on the card, she al= so had alot of wool stripped for rugs, I think she had done this from cloth= ing tho, cut apart the pants, jacket, what have you and then cut it all int= o strips to hook or braid with. I bought all that too, but GUESS WHAT, I Do= n't know how to do it. LOL. so I would love to find someone who knew how to= either teach, explain or do it for me. Anyone know of such a person? I am = in Wisconsin.

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Subject: Re: Question about a Paragon Kit Quilt From: ARabara15aol.com Date: Tue, 12 May 2009 09:39:53 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks Sue, This is the quilt and the time period is right on the mark. It fits in with the "Colonial" furniture very popular during that period of time.There is more grid quilting than clam shell but there is a lot of quilting for a kit quilt and the quilter was very skilled 10-12 SPI. Donald Brokate

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Subject: updating my information on quilthistory.com From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lzbassettcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 12 May 2009 15:39:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Dear Friends,

Perhaps you can help me with this problem. I have tried repeatedly to get my new contact information onto the quilt history teachers website. Am I wrong that list mom Kris handles that? Anyway, I've gotten no response despite no fewer than four tries. What am I doing wrong? I am now getting complaints from the person who has my old phone number and I really need to get that information changed! Please, if anyone has an "in" with the quilt history teachers website, I would greatly appreciate your help.

I apologize that I have to bring this to the attention of the QHL and appreciate your understanding.

Thank you, Lynne Bassett

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Subject: Books-3rd attempt From: blackeyedsewsanyahoo.com Date: Tue, 12 May 2009 05:22:53 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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Hello to all-hopefully this attempt will go through; 2 were returned to me = last week. As I continue to unpack my retirement bags, I am finding many= goodies. There wasone new andone older quilt book that Ihad not p= ut on the bibliography and just found another title todaythat has never = appeared on any quilt list also.Two will go under Non-fiction ( 1-811.6 = poetry & 1-398.2 folktale) & 1 easy. I sent out 29 bibliographies to the li= st and almost everyone sent a 2nd reply of thanks which was wonderful! It w= as fun 'conversing' with everyone. Non-fiction Additions Hurst, Margaret M. Grannie & the Jumbie, A Caribbean Tale Wassenhove, Sue Van The Seldom-Ever-Shady Glades Poems & Quilts E:

Lester, Alison Ruby Book Discovery #2: Just finished reading Sandra Dallas' new novel: Prayers for Sale. In her ac= knowledgments, she thanks 'nationally known quilter Teddy Pruit conveyed he= r love of Southern quilts.' I always read these things and never 'know' anyone; what fun to find a name= I recognized. Susan Riley, Hingham MA

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Subject: re: Backwards alphabet From: Lenna DeMarco <lenna.demarcogcmail.maricopa.edu> Date: Wed, 13 May 2009 10:19:59 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I've been catching up on my QHL emails and was intrigued by Laura Fisher's query about the backwards alphabets. I have some quilts with a few backwards letters - Ss and Ns - but no full alphabets. What I do have is an 1804 American sampler with an entire row of alphabet written backwards, right to left. In every other regard it is a traditional sampler, including two other rows of the alphabet written correctly. I've always been curious about this choice and wondered about its significance. I've not seen it in any other sampler but since it apparently does exist in some quilts, maybe there is a connection. Looks like a research paper to me!

Lenna DeMarco

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Subject: Quilt on magazine cover From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net> Date: Wed, 13 May 2009 16:38:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

In cleaning, I found a JAMA from 1999 with a quilt on the cover. The only ID is "Bedcover, 1842, American". It is a friendship/signature sampler quilt (or top). I could not figure out how to post on eBoard and assume that I can't because I am working from a Mac. Does anybody have a clue what I'm talking about? ;-) Curiosity is my only motive.

Jean

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Subject: re: Backwards alphabet From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Wed, 13 May 2009 21:01:27 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 3

=C2Some one said/wrote somewhere, when I was studing samplers that in 17= 95 only about 5% of women could write and that was if you counted the ones = that could only write their name. They suggested this as a reason for backw= ords le tters and mispelled words. Many never advanced past thier first alp= habet sampler if they even got that much instruction. Even sending them to = a "Dame School" was expensive and beyond many families. Buying linen and th= read was expensive . It was suggested that m any may not have been able to = read the samplers the stitched. They learned to stitch their letters to mar= k their household clothes and linens, which were nece ssary and othen very = labor intensive to produce. M any beginners write letters backwords and the= n there is dyslecsia (I p robably just mispelled that). Look at many early = samplers and they are missing the letter "J". I have forgotten why it wasn'= t included.

Polly Mello

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Subject: Re: Quilt on magazine cover From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Wed, 13 May 2009 17:19:46 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

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Jean,

I haven't seen a JAMA magazine in about 7 yrs.. You do mean Journal of the American Medical Association, right? I don't think I have any issues still at home, I'll check. If you can seed a picture. I can always have a librarian the local hospital pull a copy for me if you can't.

Is it a Medallion? Pieced? Appliqued? You have me curious.

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Subject: Re: Quilt on magazine cover From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Wed, 13 May 2009 17:20:43 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

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Jean,

What month????

Alma

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Subject: Re: Quilt on magazine cover From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Wed, 13 May 2009 17:30:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 6

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Jean,

I did a quick search and got a picture and information printed out. It's a beautiful sampler! It was provided by the Arts Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.. A gift of Mrs. Betsey Leeds Tait Puth;

Thanks for bringing this to our attention.

Everyone interested can Google- Jama Bedcover Cover and it comes right up.

Thanks again, Alma Moates AQS Certified Appraiser-Quilted Textiles Pensacola, Fl.

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Subject: Auction open for Marie Webster Anniversary Quilt Blocks From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Wed, 13 May 2009 17:10:49 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

The Baltimore Applique Society has made some 50 small quilts based on Marie Webster patterns to help raise funds for The Quilters Hall of Fame and to celebrate the 150th birthday of Marie Webster and the 30 anniversary of the founding of The Quilters Hall of Fame. You can begin bidding any time! Just go to http://www.baltimoreapplique.com/auction.html

These are going to be stunning keepsakes. The members of the BAS are known for the exacting needlework standards. They will continue to put up more <quitlets> as they are completed.

Thanks for supporting TQHF! Funds raised keep our doors open and programs and exhibits possible!

Karen Alexander Public Relations The Quilters Hall of Fame http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/ http://quiltershalloffame.net/

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Subject: Exciting New Information From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com> Date: Wed, 13 May 2009 19:52:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Yesterday, we drove to Vermont and traipsed around cemeteries, looking for Eunice Cook's gravestone. After careful research, I believe we have found our lady who made the silk piece called "The Gossips." There are new photos on my website from our trip, and some of the additional information I have found. Research is ongoing, and some questions remain unanswered. The link is accessible from the front page of the site. Enjoy!

-- Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings http://www.quiltersmuse.com http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

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Subject: qhl re: Backwards Alphabet From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Wed, 13 May 2009 18:50:24 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

/The letters J and V were not part of the early (Latin) alphabet: the same letters were used for I/J and U/V until about the 19th century. You will quite often see, for example, Jesus spelled as IESVS. So presumably the missing I is a variant of this. Most early samplers had the abbreviated alphabet on them; more recently (say in the 19th century) some might have one short 24-letter alphabet and one long (26-letter) one.

In the more than 500 samplers we documented for the OH Sampler Project, we saw frequent examples of a backwards letter or two and sometimes an entire word whose letters were in the right order but backward. My favorites were the embroiderers who ran out of room on a line and scrunched in letters, words or symbols just below or around something else.

An intentional row written backwards, with other rows embroidered correctly, says something different to me.

Lenna, Is your sampler a Maryland piece and has it been documented?

Jan

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Subject: making templates/ hand piecing From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Thu, 14 May 2009 07:54:00 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Hi everyone, I have been in Europe, so I am a little late in responding to = these questions; but I have a different method of making templates: I wa= s taught to use a 1/16 inch hole punch (they can be bought at Joanne's very= cheaply--mine cost over $20.00 in 1992).  You then trace the unfinished edge on your template plastic; make dots at a= ll the corners of the finished edge on your template; and then punch out th= e dots with the hole punch.  There are many advantages to this method: 1. sharp corners; 2. quicker c= utting of the pieces (I usually cut four layers at a time); 3. forgiveness = on inaccurate seam allowances; and very accurate finished blocks.  Try it; you'll like it! For the other questions: I use # 10 betweens = (John James) to piece and #11 betweens to quilt. No thimble for piecing;= thimble for quilting.  I use these exact same procedures for all of my work and have made many, ve= ry intricate quilts with very Small (as little as 1/4") pieces. Currentl= y working on a self designed mosaic that has one border with three inch blo= cks of 1" squares and 1/2" triangles)  best, Don Beld --0-1070018084-1242312840=:49198--

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Subject: Re: making templates/ hand piecing update From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 14 May 2009 11:17:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I'm glad the subject came up again, Don, as I have been working on these = 4 patches and using some of the suggestions I got - esp. about the = needle. I do like the shorter one - betweens - but after sitting one = evening and making quite a few I woke up with wrist pain on the top of = the wrist which made it impossible to squeeze a wash cloth or hold a = cup! I figured it was using new muscles - waited a few days and picked = it up again - so far so good. Anyone else recall that happening? Is my = technique at fault? I try to 'gather' those stitches on the needle ala = J. Beyer. If you haven't seen her video of doing this I think it's worth = seeing. And thanks for the reminder about the hole punch. I read about = that trick some time ago and even bought a punch but had forgotten about = it. I am thrilled with how much progress one can make with 'found' time - my = little doll quilt is almost done and it was done at times I wouldn't = normally be sewing. Many old quilts are a combination of hand and machine piecing. Do any of = you construct the blocks by hand but use your machine for assembly ie. = sashing, borders etc.? On thimbles - I use the little 'dot' Thimble Pad for quilting and have = for years - I LOVE IT. Never could manage the bulky ones; they got in my = way. But for piecing I put on the pad and seem to not use it much - = sometimes need to use it to push. My index finger of the left hand is = poked but don't feel the need to use anything there. I've decided to always have something going by hand - next will be a = baby block doll quilt - so will cut those pieces and have them ready - = I'll get out my punch. I did these 4 patches by cutting the piece WITH seam allowance and = eyeballing it - it's a doll quilt so why not experiment? I found it = worked fine for these simple shapes even as a beginner- some are not = perfect but all pressed nicely and the top goes together and lies flat. = So what the heck. Saves a step. And another question to throw out - do you 'backstitch' along that seam = - how often? I have examined lots of old hand-pieced quilts and found = that most take a back stitch at least every couple of inches! jean

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Subject: RE: Templates From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 14 May 2009 08:34:26 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Don, do I understand you correctly? You make a template of the shape which includes a seam allowance, mark the "meeting places" through a punched hole in the template, and then sew using those marks, point-to-point, to guide your seam. Do you rotary cut along the template? Or trace, then cut? Cut by hand through several layers? If you cut several layers, do you then have to go back and mark through the little holes?

It sounds like an efficient method for you - just trying to clarify. Thanks very much, Susan Schreurs

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Subject: RE: making templates/ hand piecing From: ad <adamroninetvision.net.il> Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 08:09:07 +0300 X-Message-Number: 1

-----Original Message-----

I try to 'gather' those stitches on the needle ala = J. Beyer. If you haven't seen her video of doing this I think it's worth = seeing.

Many old quilts are a combination of hand and machine piecing. Do any of = you construct the blocks by hand but use your machine for assembly ie. = sashing, borders etc.?

And another question to throw out - do you 'backstitch' along that seam = - how often? I have examined lots of old hand-pieced quilts and found = that most take a back stitch at least every couple of inches! jean

Hi Jean Re technique, if I understood you correctly I too may be using the same stitching method - I put in a pin at the end of the sewing line (if short - if longer I space a few pins at regular interval along my marked sewing line). I gently stretch both patches between the starting point and the pin, and actually move the fabric, not the needle, until I have a few stitches on the needle. It's a Japanese hand sewing method, and has the advantages of keeping both patches in perfect alignment (my stitches always remain on the sewing line on both patches, front and back), making for really tiny stitches, and enabling you to make 5-6 stitches at a time. It's also easy on the hands - I've never had any problems. I backstitch after each needlefull - If I have to unpick, I see how useful back-stitching is for keeping the stitching line from unraveling. Marking-wise, I always use finished-size templates, mark the sewing line and eye-ball the cutting line (erring on the generous size). Years ago I went to the clearance sale of the Sophie Campbell's shop in Paris (the woman who, almost single-handedly, started the quilt revival in France) and met there a few of her former students. They told me that she insisted that all her students mark only the cutting line and eyeball the seam allowances, and only hand-piece, for "historical accuracy". Personally, I think that's ridiculous. I hand-piece because I'm cursed with a perfectionist nature and my machine piecing sucks, by any standards. And also because I have three kids and hand-sewing has always enabled me to use up "lost" chunks of time, such as waiting for one of the kids to finish swim class or whatever. (I'm always the Mom who's sewing in PTA meetings :-)) Ady in Israel

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Subject: hole punch templates From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 07:01:46 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

thanks everyone for the responses and questions.  I may not have made it clear in the first note (it's hell getting old and s= enile!) that you punch out the dots of the corners of the finished sewing l= ines on the template; using the template you then can put it on the fabric = and rough cut 1 to 4 pieces with a rotary cutter (although I was taught wit= h scissors) and do it by eye--no marking, as the seam allowance size isn't = as critical in hand piecing; and then, using the template, make pencil dots= (that's why you use a 1/16" hole punch) on the reverse side of the fabric = pieces. Then you draw lines between the dots that act as your sewing lin= es. It gives you a perfect finished block and sharp corners.  Regarding unused muscle pain--my method of sewing on the fabric is the exac= t reverse of quilting: rather than rocking the needle through the fabric= with the right hand, I hold the needle steady in myright hand and rock = the fabric onto the needle with my left hand--usually four or five stitches= . I do not back stick except at seams or about every four or five inches= on long borders, etc. I use an anchoring method at seams of makin= g a back stitch and small loop knot; then going through the seam, I make a = straight down and back stitch to anchor that size as well--it pulls the cor= ners together  I once had a student who back stitch every other stitch. I asked her how= many quilts she had finished and she said none. I find that frequent ba= ck stitching is unnecessary if you are quilting in the ditch or even using = quarter inch quilting. Machine quilting will also make it unneccesary.=   Although I never use a machine (don't have one or know how to use one), I d= o have two c1880 quilt tops where the blocks have been hand pieces; but the= sashing has been done by machine.  I like hand piecing as it is mobile and social--I just got back from Europe= and while on the trip (its 11 hours by plane) I finished the top of a Seve= n Sisters; hand work also allows me to hear television, listen at meetin= gs, and gives me something to do when bored with the speaker (grin).  Also, in the 19th Century tradition; I believe there are no rules to hand w= ork--it's nice to know what most are doing; but whatever works for you is j= ust fine.  best, Don   --0-1086108372-1242396106=:85946--

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Subject: Re: Apology for Apology From: jocelynmdelphiforums.com Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 14:29:42 +0000 X-Message-Number: 3

> >I would not have apologized had it not been for my telling Lynn in that = note that I had "pulled Jackson into bed" with me. Lynn knows Jackson, bu= t those who do not, I feared, might think I had become a hussy, and an ag= gressive, brazen one at that. After all, lots of people name their dog Sp= ot or Rowdy or Fluffy, not after some Confederate general. Gaye, (reading late, as usual) It could be worse. Years ago, I had a cat who was just the shade of a nic= ely-baked egg custard, sprinkled with nutmeg. However, after naming him, = I realized Custard was sufficiently difficult to enunciate that he ended = up with the 'd' dropped from his name. (Oddly enough, it was only my sist= er who has a speech impediment who went on calling him Custard!) Of course, before long, people who didn't remember his Custard days were = assuming that he was named for Yellow Hair, Gen. George Custer. A person = with whom I have 'ish-shoes', as our departmental administrative assistan= t (aka 'secretary')would say, and certainly no one after whom I would nam= e a pet. Now, I would have to apologize to the list for hauling Benedict, Griffin = or Earl Grey into bed. <G> And, if I am ever able to catch his fuzzy behi= nd, the neighborhood stray Gentleman Caller. <G>

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Subject: RE: Handpiecing, hand work From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 07:27:28 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Don, thank you for your clarification. I now have a better picture. I have recently taken a workshop on hand piecing, and found that I did enjoy it and am looking forward to more. As it is, I do a great deal of handwork of various kinds and have been using the machine for speed, but one gets tired of that, sometimes, as well.

I seem always to have multiple projects going; knitting suits me better for the car, in front of the tv, and in meetings where I need to pay attention, as I do not have to look at it very much. In nursing staff meetings I would usually knit...my boss told me once that it really bugged her at first, until one day, she noticed that of everyone in the room, mine were the eyes that were open and looking in her direction!!! It was then that she understood that for some of us, having handwork helped settle the "monkey brain" that distracts, and allows our attention to focus. In the car, I seem not to be able to sew without stabbing myself, so the knitting is better. Also, my husband likes it cool in the car - the knitting can help me stay warm! Again, I don't always have to look at it - I have been known to knit in the dark, holding my work up to check it by streetlights or passing headlights! I used also to keep a simple project on the passenger seat, too - available to whip out in the case of long stop lights!

But I do still love to quilt by hand, and my favorite afternoons are either out on my deck, stitching and enjoying the birds singing and some good music, or comfortable in my studio with a good audio book. I think some practice with piecing by hand is in my future - somehow that could get worked in to the project list, too! Best wishes, Susan

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Subject: backwards alphabet, new quilt book From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 08:48:18 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Wow--what fascionating information and conjecture about the backwards alpha= bet in several quilts I found. Thanks to all for sharing your wonderful inf= ormation.  When folks haveconsidered the quilts,they thought the backward letter= sresulted simplybecause the quiltmakerplaced the stencilsincorr= ectly on the fabric,tracing them on the 'wrong' orreverse side, not r= ealizing that once the letters were flipped they wouldread backwards. Is= that what would happen? --I have not tried it. Doquiltmakers cut out= pieces on the reverse side of the fabric? I am wondering if some of you= might have done the same thing with a directional motif.  Ihave a "welcome' demilune hooked rug madeon a pre-stamped burlapt= hat themaker hooked on the reverse, probably thinkingit would read co= rrectly when laid at the door. Insteadthe welcome mat reads backwards. I= brought it theTV show when I dida Martha Stewart segmenton hooked= rugs. Laidat the door of the studio, my goodness it attracted attention= aspeople on the setjust couldn't figure out whatand why they we= re seeing it like that.  I also had an antiqueAmerican flag pieced quilt that was bought and h= ad tobe mounted and framed in lucite for a client. When hung thusly, the= star canton was simply in the wrong place in comparison toif you were t= o hang a real American flag. It was endlessly distracting and even disturbi= ng tothe formerMarine officer. He asked to me have it removed and fra= med with the reverse side showing so the flag would 'read' correctly, but i= t was a quilt, not a real flag, so not amount offlipping or turningwo= uld make it read right. He just couldn't live with it with the stars in the= wrong place, so.,,,,he had to return it to me.  Ah, the sweet mysteries of quiltmaking.  Laura Fisher --0-371566498-1242402498=:65745--

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Subject: thread From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 09:01:51 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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By the way, we didn't discuss brand and types of thread for hand piecing.=  I use Gutermann hand quilting thread for both my piecing and quilting. I find = it stronger than other brands and it lacks "fuzz" and makes it easier to th= read onto small needles.  Best, Don --0-997151094-1242403311=:92613--

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Subject: Making Templates From: Edwaquiltaol.com Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 13:21:09 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

Don: You just discovered how to make templates as we did in the "olden" days when we first learned to quilt. Amazing how the old ways work.

Holice

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Subject: potholders and hand piecing From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com> Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 15:25:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Hi all, Have landed back in New Hampshire, and am chasing potholder quilts as fast as I can get to the New England museums I saved for last. Thanks to all of you for your potholder blocks. If anyone would like to make a second (or a first potholder block) please contact me off line. I saw the most incredible quilt yet, and there were 70 full blocks, so I could use some more in order to replicate it.

As to hand piecing, I've done more in the last 3 years than ever, finding that I can hand piece while my partner drives the RV. The projects are so portable! But to answer the question, yes, I hand piece blocks, and use the machine to set them together. I've found this on many antique tops and finished quilts.

Enjoying my third spring this year--it's gorgeous today in NH, and the lilacs are in full bloom.

-- Pam Weeks AQS Certified Appraiser Quilt Historian, Teacher, Lecturer Durham, NH USA(for the summer and fall)

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Subject: Re: ***SPAM*** backwards alphabet, new quilt book From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 14:37:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

As someone who is "spacial relationship" challenged. . . and who used to do paste-up the "old fashioned way" for a print department, I can tell you I could easily be a woman who would have gotten confused about reversing things so they would come out "right." Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: New articles on TQS and on the TQHF Blog From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 17:51:31 -0700 X-Message-Number: 10

TQS is running an article on 2005 TQHF Honoree Bets Ramsey here http://www.thequiltshow.com/os/articles.php and The Quilters Hall of Fame is running a new article on Merikay Waldvogel, the 2009 Honoree, here http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/.

Enjoy!

Karen Alexander Public Relations The Quilters Hall of Fame