Subject: hand piecing
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2009 06:38:46 -0700 (PDT)

Thanks Holice for telling everyone how OLD I am (grin). I once was one o
f two primary speakers at a large quilt conference (the other was Ricky Tim
ms) and was introduced as
"Don Beld, who has been quilting since 1900".

By the way, I have a four page handout that I give in my classes that detai
led both the supplies (scratch boards, anyone?) I use for hand piecing and
the techniques as well.
Anyone interested in seeing it--AND REVIEWING IT--can e-mail me privately a
nd I will send it to you. I've never gone the book publishing route beca
use I have always found it difficult to write "how to"--and because I can a
lways think of a quilt I would rather be making.

best, Don
--0-1685442252-1242481126:63799--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 15, 2009
From: annielbaol.com
Date: Sat, 16 May 2009 01:48:40 -0400

I am goning on an Alaskan cruise in July.? Any suggestions for fabric and sewing related shopping in Juneau, Skagway, Sitka, and Ketchikan?? Must see places and things to do?
Thanks for your suggstions.
Annie






----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: hand piecing
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2009 18:41:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3


Don and Hollice,
I've been reading the thread of hand piecing techniques and have to
chuckle. I too, learned to make quilts ala marking templates, pinning
one end (where the dots on the left end line up) inserting the needle
in the dot at the right end of the seam and "weave the fabric" on to
the needle. Actually, Chris Wolf Edmonds taught me this technique one
evening untold eons ago while sitting at the lobby bar at the
Shamrock Hilton while attending the SSWQA quilt show in Houston.
Hollis, I know that you will be able to decipher that code! LOL! When
I had my shop back in Dallas, back in the early 80's I went along
with rotary cutting and speed machine piecing, taking Mary Ellen's
classes and teaching the fine art of using a wizzy wacker....but have
remained a closet hand quilter and hand piecer for my own piece or
mind! (Yes pun intended!). I hope that hand piecing does make a come
back. Sitting at the sewing machine makes me anxious. I hand piece
& applique and quilt for relaxation. I wont have 300 quilts finished
in my life time, but the ones that I will have finished will be
pieces that I can love and treasure!

Laura Hobby Syler
Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles
Quilt restoration specialist
Judge, Teacher, Lecturer Specializing in Hand quilt making techniques
Richardson, TX


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: hand piecing & machine piecing
From: Mary Waller <mwallervyn.midco.net>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2009 21:46:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I remember talking about quilts and quilt tops with hand-pieced blocks,
which were then sewn to each other by machine, at one of the quilt
history and restoration conferences in Omaha in the mid-90s. Someone
said hand sewing was sometimes done instead of machine sewing
because hand sewing used less thread than machine sewing.

Mary Waller
Vermillion, South Dakota, USA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: hand piecing saves thread
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2009 14:42:29 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


Mary
That's something I don't think I've heard before but it certainly could
be a factor - by 1860 and after was thread still so dear, in general?

Jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Re: hand piecing saves thread
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2009 16:40:55 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2


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Here is some interesting information on the prices of spool cotton
for home sewing, taken from:

http://chestofbooks.com/reference/Dictionary-of-Dry-Goods/
Thread.html. This section is from the "A Complete Dictionary of Dry
Goods" book, by George S. Cole. Also available from Amazon: A
complete dictionary of dry goods and history of silk, cotton, linen,
wool and other fibrous substances,: Including a full explanation of
the modern processes ... together with various useful tables.

<While spool cotton is now made of a higher order and superior
quality than ever, it is a notable fact that it has been selling at
steadily declining prices since 1860.


Selling Price

1860..........................................................$1 40 to $1 75

1865............................................................80 to 1 10

1870....................................................72 to 80

1875............................................................55 to 72

1880...........................................................55

1885...........................................................55

1890.............................................45

... then three threads of two cords each are twisted together,
forming a six-cord thread. Each particular number of thread has its
own twist - that is, the number of turns it gets to the inch. The six-
cord thread, is at last taken from the bobbins, and reeled into a
skein, in which form it is bleached or dyed. From the skeins the
thread is wound back on little white birch spools, and is ready for
the market. The machine that regulates the last winding measures the
number of yards on each spool, and the paper labels which decorate
the ends are cut and pasted on by machinery with great rapidity. Not
many persons understand clearly why thread is numbered 8, 10, 12, 16,
etc., up to 200, although the reason is very simple : When cotton
yarn first began to be made 840 yards of it weighed one pound. This
was called No. 1, and if a pound contained twice this number of yards
it was called No. 2, and so on. This system of numbering, or
"sizing," has been continued by all cotton spinners down to the
present time.>

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: hand piecing
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2009 06:25:25 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1


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Hi everyone; just a follow up note to say that I have had about 30-35 quest
ions for my first attempt at a how to guilde for Hand Piecing. I was sup
rised by the response; because, like most hand piecers, I thought there wer
e only a few others out there. So maybe we are stronger than we think.
 best, Don


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: thread
From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2009 07:27:37 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Xenia -
you never cease to amaze me with your resources.

thanks for the thread info.

Neva Hart in Virginia
AQS Appraiser


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: hand piecing
From: "Karan Flanscha" <SadieRosecfu.net>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2009 08:41:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I think there are more hand piecers out there than you might
think... on the Dear Jane list, there are some of us who have
stitched the entire quilt by hand... and some who have used
every contemporary method possible. The Inklingo list has
over 1000 members, and although this technique can be used for
rotary cutting & machine piecing, quite a few are hand piecing.
Linda Franz has just released a new collection and has a new book
coming out on Lucy Boston's 'The Patchwork of the Crosses'.
If you are not familiar with Lucy Boston, her daughter-in-law, Diana
Boston, has a web site where you can see the patchwork and learn more
about this fascinating lady. http://www.greenknowe.co.uk/gallery.html
Diana's wonderful book about all of the quilts, The Patchworks of
Lucy Boston, is out of print, but she is in the process of ordering
a new soft cover edition, which will be available this summer.
Linda is adding to our quilt history, combining research on the
subject (Jane Austen, Lucy Boston) with computer aided marking to
make the quilt project faster and more accurate, whether you hand
or machine piece.
Karan





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: apology
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2009 10:14:08 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 4

Sorry everyone, while rearranging my address book, the brain disengaged while the fingers were flying and I guess I hit the send button by mistake.

Nancy


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 17, 2009
From: Beth Donaldson <thequiltdrgmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2009 11:52:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

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About 10 years ago my DH went to my aunt's house and brought home my
grandmother's treadle sewing machine for me for Christmas. The best
Christmas gift ever! I cleaned up the machine, bought a new leather belt and
took a few stitches. I found that if I didn't get the right momentum, the
treadle would stitch backwords. It then occurred to me that it was much
better to treadle long seams, than short seams. So now my theory about the
old tops in my collection is that it was easier to stitch the short
patchwork seams by hand and sew the longer seams of sashing and borders by
machine.

--
Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant
Michigan State University Museum
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/
http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadle machine work
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2009 16:25:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

How fascinating, Beth ! I buy your theory.
Only when you actually worked with the machine they were using did that
dawn on you! I think it makes perfect sense esp. as a new contraption -
a new skill in the first place. If you got going in rhythm it was great
but doing two inches - a hassle!
This conversation has been really fun !
jean



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: thread
From: Mary Waller <mwallervyn.midco.net>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2009 22:25:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

When I joined the South Dakota Quilters Guild about 15 - 20 years ago, I
remember several of the members commenting they had to drive 90 miles to
buy thread, and only cotton-covered poly was available at the "closest"
place. The nearest place for me to buy thread is 25 miles away, unless
I luck out at the local thrift store. I don't know what, if any, thread
the WalMart in my town carries since they closed the fabric department.
It may not have been price alone that determined thread use.

Mary Waller
Vermillion, South Dakota, USA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Treadle stitching
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2009 21:46:10 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

A big Wooo Hooo to you Beth Donaldson for your theory on treadle machines,
stitch length and hand piecing. I have seen a remarkable number of tops, and
own some, that fit your description. I wondered about it and never had an
answer, best guesses only. Thanks so much for sharing that theory. I'll look
at them with news eyes next time, adding that possibility into the mix and
see how it "fits."

Piece,

Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
Women On Quilts
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: qhl digest: May 18, 2009
From: Connie Chunn <conniesminishotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 08:11:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

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6. Re: Treadle machine work

Hi Everyone

Beth I have an additional theory to add to your treadle machine piecing
(or not) of short seams. While taking apart an old 4-patch quilt (1900s pri
nts with 1930s borders) I found the two sets of 4-patches (that make up the
block) were chain-pieced. This may have been another way to avoid sewing s
hort seams on the treadle machine.
Connie Chunn
Webster Groves MO



----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 17 2009
From: Beth Donaldson <thequiltdrgmail.com>
Date: Mon 18 May 2009 11:52:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

About 10 years ago my DH went to my aunt's house and brought home my
grandmother's treadle sewing machine for me for Christmas. The best
Christmas gift ever! I cleaned up the machine bought a new leather belt
and
took a few stitches. I found that if I didn't get the right momentum th
e
treadle would stitch backwords. It then occurred to me that it was much
better to treadle long seams than short seams. So now my theory about t
he
old tops in my collection is that it was easier to stitch the short
patchwork seams by hand and sew the longer seams of sashing and borders by
machine.

Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant
Michigan State University Museum
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/
http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/



_________________________________________________________________
HotmailAE has a new way to see what's up with your friends.
http://windowslive.com/Tutorial/Hotmail/WhatsNew?ocid3DTXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Tut
orial_WhatsNew1_052009

--_d0f8db27-7f1d-4a19-b0fc-cc3262a35bf2_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: treadle and hand stitching
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 06:38:31 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3


I wonder if there may be another subtlety in the handstitch/machine stitch combinations we see. I know that in a busy life, I have often found it useful to divide projects into "portable" and "not portable" sections. Or, to have projects suitable for various activities such as watching tv, riding in a car, or sitting in meetings. Is it possible that 19th century women did the same? Piecing smaller sections of a quilt top by hand might have meant conveniently moving it with her to a place where the light was good, or where she could visit, watch children, or take along to a friend's. No big lapfulls of fabric, just some nice pieces of handstitching to pick up and put down easily to sip tea, look in someone's face, or simply set down in the lap to give the illusion of being productive while taking a break. I often have a bit of something to work on at the kitchen table, so to catch a few stitches while waiting for the soup (big pots full at my house)
to heat up. Those stitches add up! Susan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Treadled seams
From: "Mark Freudenthal" <freudqwestoffice.net>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 07:27:13 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

For years, I did all my piecing on a treadle. With lots of practice, you
have very good control of the needle movement. I think there may have been
other reasons for doing hand piecing on smaller pieces. It may have been
habit and convenience. Like now, small pieces are very portable and easy to
pull out to do a few quick seams. It's more sociable to hand piece while
sitting with friends or family. They would have been very quick hand
piecers too.

Light may have been an issue also. Treadles, at least early ones, weren't
equipped with a light source. They were customarily placed in front of a
window for daylight sewing. It may not have been safe to put a candle or
kerosene lamp on one while sewing in the evening or on dark days, while a
lamp can be on a table next to your chair as now. I used to put my Ott light
on my treadle even in the daytime. Their eyes wouldn't have been any better
than ours and their glasses may not have been as good.

But it is undeniable that sewing a long seam on a treadle after only hand
piecing must have seemed like a miracle. Treadling can be done at a good
speed. I have read that the number of borders increased after treadles
became available.

Velma Freudenthal
Newport, OR




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadled seams
From: sadierosecfu.net
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 11:22:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Interesting ideas on this thread! I helped with the Iowa Quilts
Research Project, and we saw quite a few quilts made with hand pieced
blocks, that were then machine sewn together (with sashing, alternate
squares, etc). We wondered if some of the blocks were made by young
girls, (they looked like a beginner's work), then when there were
enough blocks for a top, they were put together by machine. If only
those old quilts could talk :)
Karan from sunny Iowa



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Treadled seams
From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 11:21:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

In second grade I mastered the coordination required to use our treadle sew
ing machine (our only sewing machine) and used it until I graduated from hi
gh school in 1965. Yep, I could really rip along on that baby and wish I s
till had it. But I also stitched LOTS of short seams - Barbie clothes for
my little sister - yes, LOTS of them. So I know short seams are quite poss
ible to achieve accurately in tiny little spaces. So, for the most part, I
'm thinking the portability of the project was the main reason - but certai
nly not excluding all those others as there is ample room for them. And I'
d wager there are even more reasons out there...
Maretta


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadled seams
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 17:00:03 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 7

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C2 I remember my mother saying that in her family traditions,C2 Bow
ie, Texas, that certain things were always suppose to beC2 sewn by hand
.C2Specifically, a layette for a baby was to be hand sewn.C2C2
Quilts also fell into this catagory in my family and with another quilt mak
er that I met in the late 1960's.This second olderC2lady would make her
quilts all by hand, pieceing all winter thenC2quilting at a frame set
up on the porch or under a tree in the warmer months. Her "patterns" were a
stack ofC2blocks with different patterns. She had a whole basket of di
fferent individual blocks. She did not have paper patterns. I saw card boar
d templates. I suspect that is where alot of sampler quilts came from.C2
Somethings, likeC2making aC2quiltC2were considered to be bet
ter made if they were done by hand and by tradition should be made that way
. I hear quilters even today say that they feel like their quilt is superio
r because it isC2 "all hand done".

C2My great grandmother had a treadle sewing machine and she and my grea
t aunt would make dresses for my cousins on it. They prefered to make rathe
r than buy these dresses because "store bought' dresses had skimpy skirts.
C2 Several of these dresses were pasted on to my older sister and then
finally to me.C2 They were wonderful. They were all ruffles and ric rac
and beautiful full skirts for lots of pettycoats.

C2 Some of these local or general prejudicies may have had a bearing on
whetherC2women pieced or used a machine. I am sure that just as many f
elt that their machine work was superior because they were using the latest
technology.

C2C2 Polly Mello

Finally sunny in Elkridge, Maryland



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Subject: Re: Treadled seams
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 18:14:14 +0100
X-Message-Number: 8

I recall hearing that Singer cleverly donated sewing machines to
Important People (usually a Minister's Wife) in a community to give
them status and desirability. Might it not also have been that when
not every household had a sewing machine you might take your hand
pieced blocks to another house to whizz them together on the machine?

The first machine I ever used, aged 5, was a treadle. I can still
conjure the feel of the flywheel under my right hand as I spun to
start, and braked to stop a seam under Grandma's guidance.

Sally ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re hand- and treadle-stitching
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 12:36:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

We have had almost a blackberry winter here, perfect gardening weather, and I'm headed back into the garden.

But not before I add my 2 cents to the machine-hand stitching discussion. I think we might be stretching a point and making more than really exists of the choice of handsewing over machine sewing when piecing quilt blocks.

I learned to sew on a treadle machine, and I don't recall stitch lengths varying so significantly with speed. Maybe I just had one speed.

But that was not the point with "handwork," a term that included crochet, embroidery, rug-making, tatting, knitting, hemstitching, quilt piecing, dress hemming, and probably lots more.

"Handwork" was done while relaxing, sitting down for a minute between tasks, or after lunch and before it was time to begin supper. This time was the one time I recall my mother simply sitting down for any length of time during the week day. In my memory, she is always washing, ironing, cooking, cleaning, gardening, or otherwise occupied in the daylight hours, except for a morning coffee break with our next-door neighbor and for the longer afternoon time. I imagine the heat had a lot to do with it where I grew up. In the days before central air-conditioning, one rose early and got the work done before the hottest part of the day. Children were put to bed in darkened bedrooms where oscillating fans helped the attic fan create a cooling breeze. That was the time my mother did "handwork." She was a reader and her evenings were probably equally divided between needlework and books. But afternoons were for hand sewing, which she clearly relished.

Her mother had 9 children and a farm and large pine woods to manage, but when I knew her, after her children had grown up, she too either read or did handwork in that afternoon hiatus and then again in the evening.

"Smart" women did not sit around "empty-handed" in our area. The word "smart" was linked not to intelligence, but to industriousness and pride in homemaking. It was a compliment to say of a woman, "Her hands were always busy." I know that in all those Ya-Ya books, written by a writer from Rapides Parish, LA, where I grew up, women sat around with cool alcoholic beverages in the afternoon. But in real life, most women I knew had some sort of needle in their hands. Certainly all Protestant women. Cocktails were what people in New York City and Hollywood had---in movies and magazine short stories.

My point is not merely anecdotal. It is that this work was pleasurable in the middle of a day of work. I've seen women hold up pieces of fabric and admire them before they sewed them together. Such a pleasurable look. You could see their minds working, admiring fabrics and combinations.

In the South, where large families were the norm, a lot of visiting went on between family members in the evenings and weekends. I had aunts who routinely brought knitting or crochet (afghans) with them to supper for the time after supper when the group retired to the living room and the conversation began. I never noticed that they missed a conversational beat either. My mother never did that, and her sisters did not, but she admired her sisters-in-law who stitched away at family reunions or evening visits.

Moreover, "handwork" was just valued more by most people. I think it still is.

I grew into that tradition first with embroidery, then with quilt pieces and later with smocking and French hand-sewing. It was easy to pick up, pleasurable to work, and you got a surprising amount accomplished over time.

Like Velma, I believe that portability and light also mattered in an era before electricity. Archives are filled with photographs of sewing machines outside of sod houses or on porches of houses in the Midwest and Plains states, where long dry periods could be predicted. One reads in the journals and diaries of Southern women phrases like "worked as long as the light held," In parts of rural America---large parts---electricity was not commonplace until the WW II or post WWII eras, and I've heard my grandmothers talk about sewing by lamplight, how much less efficient it was than sewing by daylight.

The fiction, memoirs, and journals I've read support the notion that the choice of handsewing had little to do with long or short stitches and much to do with portability, sociability, and pleasure. The American penchant for busy hands added virtue to the list, almost surely. Until its latest revival, quiltmaking was almost completely a traditional craft (or art), passed through personal instruction from one person to another. It was a "leisure art." Women who sewed clothing either by choice or necessity must have welcomed a time away from the machine. The physical pleasure must still exist for many: remember all the concern about having to be on a two-hour flight without a needle in the wake of 9/11/2001?

Gaye Ingram


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Treadle Machine Work
From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 12:09:39 -0600
X-Message-Number: 10

Beth Donaldson wrote:

>.... I cleaned up the machine, bought a new leather belt and
>took a few stitches. I found that if I didn't get the right momentum, the
>treadle would stitch backwords. It then occurred to me that it was much
better to treadle long seams, than short seams.

Well, as one who considers herself a quite proficient treadler, I
would say that short seams are no more difficult to sew with a
machine so powered than with an electric sewing machine, of any
vintage. However, back in the "bad old days" before rotary cutters
and speed piecing, when one's quilt patches were cut with scissors,
often from templates, it may have been simpler to hand piece at one's
work table where the prep was done, rather than organize and
transport a stack of quilt pieces to the machine for assembly. Also,
in any era, hand work can be a much more social and enjoyable pastime
when other people are present.

Jennifer Hill
--
'Winds of inspiration. . .'
Quilt Canada 2010
Telus Convention Centre, Calgary, AB
April 26 - May 1 2010


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Index of American Design - Search
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 17:20:39 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11


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_The Index of American Design_, 1950, has a 1/4 picture of a quilt about
which I need more information. It is not pictured
at the online site. The description lists it as from the New York City
Project, who the maker was and that it was owned
privately. Since this was part of a WPA project, the records and/or
pictures probably are out there somewhere. Can anyone
advise where I might look? Although I would like to locate the quilt,
the picture will suit my purpose if that is all I can find.

Thanks for your help.

Jan Thomas

--------------010303020906030802030301--


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Subject: Interesting quilt in an unusual context
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 20:47:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I wanted to post a photo on the board but can't seem to make it work.
So. . . . if you're interested e-mail me and I'll forward the photo.
It's from a book book titled
Dressing up Debutantes, Pageantry and glitz in Texas by Michaele
Thurgood Haynes.

Plate 11 in color shows a debutante's stunning many-yards-long train
that appears to be in the style of a red and green a Baltimore
Album Quilt.

The photo is credited this way: Courtesy: Institute of Texan Cultures,
Zintgraff Collection.
There is no date, although most of the other color plates are from the
1980's.

It appears that the debutante ball happened in San Antonio.

At any rate, intriguing. If you want to see the photo, I'll be happy to
attach to an e-mail but the e-board rejected my password.
Stephanie Whitson
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Subject: Re: Interesting quilt in an unusual context
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 21:34:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

Hi All, I know Michaele Haynes very well as she is (or has just recently
retired) from the Witte Museum in San Antonio. If you have not ever seen
these dresses in person, they are just fabulous!!! The applique work is
usually stunning and the beading is unbelievable!! Have a look!! Marcia
Kaylakie

Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Not again!
From: "Anne Datko" <datkoaverizon.net>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 23:05:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14

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I just looked at the Textile Museum (Washington, DC) website as they are
sponsoring a special tour of the current exhibition of Amish quilts plus
lunch at Nora's (the first organic restaurant). Just below that announcement
is. I could not believe this. a lecture by Raymond Dobard on the use of
quilts as signals for the Underground Railway!!!



I am too shocked (and also woefully unprepared) to present a coherent
argument to the Museum powers-that-be as to why this should not have been
scheduled. Can those of you who fight this good fight so communicate? And
possibly a local historian could attend the lecture to, if not heckle, at
least ask appropriate questions?



Anne Datko


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Subject: RE: The Index of American Design
From: "Maureen" <maureenbooksandoldlace.com>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 21:51:03 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Jan,

I have the printed Index of American Design compiled by Christensen,
published by Macmillan and the National Gallery of Art in 1950 and
introduced by the amazing Holger Cahill. There are several photos of
quilts
and if you can give me a little more information on the characteristics
of
the quilt you are looking for, I might be able to match your description
and
the photo. I'm sure the Index is also available at your local public or
academic library, and it can be purchased used on ABE for a dollar.

I love the index, and the idea of public works projects designated to
document and preserve popular and folk cultures. I collect photographs
and
histories of postal service murals created during this period of
history,
and love depression-era quilts and quilt histories (Waldvogel's, Soft
Covers
and also her Patchwork Souveniers, Nephew's Quilt Designs from the
Thirties,
to name a few).

Cahill introduces the work, "The Index of American Design is a record
made
by artists of a chapter in American history which is largely anonymous.
Is
it the story, told in pictures, of articles of daily use and adornment
in
this country from early colonial times to the close of the nineteenth
century." There were public works preservation projects for art, crafts,
architecture, music, language and writing that provide an invaluable
record
and incredible insight into our collective history. Of course everyone
knows
about the building projects (there was a great article in the NYT a
couple
of years ago on WPA swimming pools in the boroughs of NYC), but Cahill
advocated for the creative and decorative arts.

The archives from the New Deal Arts and WPA projects are found in
various
places and are difficult to access. There are five or six regional
archival
depository centers, a national archives and printed inventory lists, but
you
have to know quite a bit about your topic and the agency that worked
with it
before figuring out which of the archives and boxes will have
information
about your topic. Two good places to start (which I'm sure you've
already
considered) are the Smithsonian and the National Archives.

Subject: Index of American Design - Search
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2009 17:20:39 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11


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_The Index of American Design_, 1950, has a 1/4 picture of a quilt about

which I need more information. It is not pictured
at the online site. The description lists it as from the New York City
Project, who the maker was and that it was owned
privately. Since this was part of a WPA project, the records and/or
pictures probably are out there somewhere. Can anyone
advise where I might look? Although I would like to locate the quilt,
the picture will suit my purpose if that is all I can find.

Thanks for your help.

Jan Thomas




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Subject: Treadled seams
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2009 07:20:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

I think the ease or difficulty sewing with treadles depended a great deal
upon the machine. Each of the four treadle machines I use on a regular
basis has a 'personality' of its very own, as do my electric machines. Two
of the treadles have wonderful control; stops and starts on long or short
seams are not a problem - and one of them is a chain-stitch machine. One of
the other machines is less willing to stop until it is truly convinced
that's what I want it to do. The fourth is so loud my DH brought in
earplugs for me to wear while sewing; it sews beautifully but grudgingly all
the while singing it's very mechanical tune.

Sewing machine manufacturers have always been competitive, each doing their
best to trump the others in making their machines easier to use and offering
features the others didn't. Based on advertising pieces I have for 19th
century sewing technology, silence and ease of use were recurrently used
incentives to get customers to buy.

I've hand sewn blocks for the portability that makes it doable while
visiting friends, waiting for appointments, etc. And I've sewn those blocks
together into a quilt twice by hand, but every other time by machine. I
have the technology to do both - and I do both. 'Done' is one of the good
four letter words. <g>

Just my two cents . . .

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle
In a wonderfully sunny PA - finally!




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Subject: Lasansky article -cut corner quilts
From: "Cyndi Black" <bsythmblfairpoint.net>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2009 09:47:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

I found Jeannette Lasansky's article (T-shaped quilts: A New England
Phenomenon) in my files recently. These are the cut-corner figures from her
1997 article:
Maine: 1504 quilts and tops; 116 (nearly 8 %) (total quilts is now 2900+)
New Hampshire: 950 quilts and tops; 43 (4.5%)
Vermont: 4596 quilts and tops; 164 (3.6%)
Rhode Island: 873 quilts and tops; 25 (2.9%)
Connecticut: 3042 quilts and tops; 42 (1.4%)
Massachusetts: Statistics not available in 1997, but a quick glance through
the wonderful recently-published book, of the approximately 100 photos, 17
had cut corners. (approximately 6000 quilts documented).

In addition, NE museums that have holdings of regional quilts report that
between 22.8% and 9.7% of their quilts have this distinctive corner
treatment. Only one cut-corner quilt had been published as by a specific
maker in Philadelphia and two or three examples each had been attributed in
print to NY, NJ, VA, and MD, as of 1997.

Cyndi in Maine
Maine Quilt Heritage



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Subject: quilt study in VA
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2009 11:11:00 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Timing is everything. The first meeting of the Virginia Quilt Study
Group took place at the Virginia Quilt Museum on Saturday when I happened to
be in Richmond. Since Harrisonburg is only two and a half hours from
Richmond (albeit in the opposite direction from the Eastern Shore) obviously
I was meant to go.
We saw a collection of chatelaines, most from the early 20th century.
The most unusual was a leather example from Scotland as different from the
pretty ribbon variety as you could imagine.
We had a tour of the Museum's current exhibit of appliqué by the Old
Dominion Appliqué Society. Those ladies are amazing.
Quilts from the Museum's collection were the highlight of the afternoon.
If you have the VQM book you can see some of what we saw. The Barley
Medallion quilt (p. 17) sparked a spirited discussion. It was made in
Winchester, VA by Margaret Barnhart Barley in the 1840s. It is amazingly
similar to Amelia Lauch's Delectable Mountains medallions also made in
Winchester. Is there a connection? Seems likely.
The Chintz Medallion (p. 4) appears to have been made much later than
the date assigned by family history (1830 not 1810). The quilt, which was
made in Baltimore has a chintz appliqué center framed by pieced triangles, a
strip of chintz, a strip pieced of squares and triangles with a chintz outer
border. The fabrics are in great condition with the glaze still on them.
The Brashears Album quilt (p. 20) dated 1848 was made as a memorial for
a ship's captain from the Annapolis area who was lost at sea. Two blocks
contain images we think are of Zachary Taylor as well as the typical
Baltimore-style blocks.
A Whig Rose (p. 52) from the 1920s was said by the donor to have been
made by a young man in Rockingham Co., VA. Two quits are not pictured in
the book. One was a 4-block blue Prince's Feather . Each block has only
four plumes with a star in the center which gives the quilt an airy look.
The wide border contains single plumes joined by stars (very pretty). The
quilt was made in Carnegie, PA (just sw of Pittsburgh) around 1900. The
second was a New York Beauty in chrome orange, green and a red evenly faded
to dun. It has interesting vine and leaf borders and sashing with Sunbursts
as cornerstones--very impressive.
Show and Tell was great. A 7 Sisters/7 Stars (circa 1840) in turkey
reds was found in Oklahoma. Wouldn't you love to know how it got there.
There are 25 blocks and the stars are appliquéd. We saw a lovely Whig Rose
summer spread. The 4-blocks have running vine sashes and borders with a
floral block in each corner of the border. Bobbi Finley brought two of her
contemporary Tile quilts. Her book with co-author Carol Jones will be
published by C&T in December.
I was thrilled to see a quilt with a tree border (that's at the top of
my wish list in case anybody has an extra one hanging around the house).
It's an Oak Leaf in a single blue polka dot fabric with a very narrow piping
in the binding. We had a spirited discussion about the date and compromised
on 3rd quarter 19th century.
Neva Hart organized this great event and already has plans for future
meetings. Think of all the fabulous quilts there are to see in VA!
Cinda on the Eastern Shore



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Subject: RE: The Index of American Design
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2009 11:01:44 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

Thank you Maureen. I have the book which I love and re-read every few
years. And thanks to all who wrote
that the Index originals are alive and well WITH their records. Those
forms would be really interesting to read
to find out what was important to ask at the time the pieces were
documented.

The Index can be searched:
http://www.nga.gov/collection/index.shtm but the images are not all
there.
It goes without saying that the one I want isn't pictured.

Jan




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Subject: Thank you, Joan Kiplinger!
From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2009 12:15:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Joan's article "Fiber Savvy: The Backbone of your Quilt" in the April 2009
Pieces of Time: A Quilt and Textile History Magazine of the Iowa Illinois Q
uilt Study Group is informative, easily read, and motivational! Thank you,
Joan!

Maretta


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Subject: Sewing Machine Patent History
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2009 12:41:15 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

FYI - The following article is about patent law but is filled with 19th
century sewing machine history.

"A Stitch In Time: The Rise And Fall of The Sewing Machine Patent
Thicket" by Adam Mossoff of George Mason
University School of Law. Thank you to the Social Science Research Network.

This link is for the abstract and you then need to click on one of the 5
school icons at the top for the article pdf.
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id1354849

The referenced "Song of the Shirt" by Thomas Hood is at this link:
http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/hood/shirt.html

Jan - enjoy




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Subject: Re: quilt study in VA
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2009 14:00:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

Cinda's use of the term "the typical
Baltimore-style blocks" made me smile. Just think how far quilt scholarship
has come in our lifetime. . . that we can use the word "typical" attached to
Baltimore-style quilt blocks. Very cool.

STephanie Whitson




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Subject: Re: quilt study in VA
From: Crm793aol.com
Date: Wed, 20 May 2009 15:37:27 EDT
X-Message-Number: 9


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Cinda,

Once again, you have made me wish I lived among the old quilts where you
can just drive a short while and see amazing stuff. About your 'tree
border' wish, are you talking about the type of border that was on Anita
Shackelford's quilt at AQSG last year? I have one in red and white but NOT an
extra one.

Carolyn in North Texas

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Subject: Re: quilt study in VA
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2009 10:04:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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HI Carolyn,
I don't remember Anita's quilt (one of the very few criticisms I have of
the Columbus event was that Anita's quilts didn't get the attention they
deserved since they were squeezed in with the Study Quilts). Attached is an
example of my heart's desire. I think of the tree border as
quintessentially central to western New York (Finger Lakes to Buffalo). The
look of the trees is all over the place, but I like the "weeping trees"
best. The blue and white ones are my favorites, but if you ever tire of
yours I'll give it a good home.
Cinda

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Subject: Re: quilt study in VA
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2009 10:29:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Sorry meant to send that privately.
Cinda


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Subject: on the road antiquing, meals on wheels
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2009 10:40:11 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3


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Hi all , I am taking a break from showing and rolling dozens of hooked rugs
, Thought I should let all of you knowof the newest restaurant about to
open in NYC, called DBGB, on the Bowery at Houston for those of you who mig
ht be visiting NYC and liketo go to the hot eateries. Renownedchef Da
niel Bouloud (of Daniel)is the proprietor, and my dear friend Joan Ratne
r's son Jim Leiken is the head chef!!! Supposedly informal, modestly priced
, imaginative cookery -- including Joan's chicken soup recipe just praised
in the newspapers--asinterpreted by these two great chefs.

There is a benefit therefor Meals on Wheels NYC next week, which brings
to mind the very first quilt I ever bought. (whew- that's roundabout to qui
lts, but bear with me!)

I was doing social science research for a small organizationthat got an
Administration on Aging grant to site-visit Meals on Wheelsoperations
across the country and create a directory and guidebook so communities coul
d start their own programs based on the then- fledging concept. The boss an
d his wife somehow managed to 'randomly' site select a great westerntrip
including the Grand Tetons, Hawaii, California, New Mexico. Another seni
or researcher got the northeast and New England. My friend Marcia and I (pr
actically our first jobs)got to visit the midwest--Kansas, Iowa, Missour
i, etc.

Off we went, andyes I confess now, A on A, we stopped by everyantique
s shop whose sign we saw on the backroads of all those places, in addition
to site visiting wonderful local programs.. My firstantique quilt -- a r
ed, white and blue six-point stars pieced quilt I bought for $5 off the por
ch railing and I have it still. Imagine what else there was that I had no i
dea about then!!! Was even in Kalona Iowa (hi Marilyn) and admired Amish
farms but did nothave thesmartstocarry home any of that beauty.
Antiques were not yet part of my life, and certainly not quilts specifical
ly. I like to think though that seeing miles of midwest creativity spurred
something and left visual memories that inform today.

Laura Fisher

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Subject: photo of PA quilt colors
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2009 03:06:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

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OK you QHLers!
I am in a bind for a lecture this evening and need a photo of a quilt
with PA colors in it. Does anyone have one that they can and would be
willing to share with me right away? My lecture is at 5 PM! Many
Thanks!!
Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com
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Subject: RE: photo of PA quilt colors
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2009 09:28:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Marcia -- Did you get a reply? I can help.
Candace Perry

-----Original Message-----
From: Marcia Kaylakie [mailto:marciarkearthlink.net]
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2009 4:07 AM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] photo of PA quilt colors

OK you QHLers!
I am in a bind for a lecture this evening and need a photo of a quilt with
PA colors in it. Does anyone have one that they can and would be willing to
share with me right away? My lecture is at 5 PM! Many Thanks!!
Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com

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Subject: Re: quilt study in VA
From: Crm793aol.com
Date: Thu, 21 May 2009 15:15:40 EDT
X-Message-Number: 3


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Alas, the border I have is a much smaller tree but still the same as
Anita's. Sara Dillow had one also and I think it was among those acquired by
University of Nebraska. I'll go down and search the history books and let
you know if I find a picture. When I have the time and remember how I'll
email you a picture of mine.

Carolyn