Subject: quilt study in Va
From: bunjordaaol.com

Happy Memorial Day everyone.
I'm so sorry to have missed the first quilt study meeting at the Va Quilt Museum. Cinda mentioned the Brashears Album Quilt and I just wanted to add some information about it.? The soldier on horseback pictured on the quilt is indeed Zachary Taylor on his horse Whitey. Smithsonian has a larger piece of the same fabric, probably made for his campaign/ election in 1848, the same date that is on the quilt.? Family history is that the quilt was made in memory of Joseph Brashears, a ship's captain from Mayo, Maryland.? He was lost in a shipwreck off the West Indies and his friends and relatives had the quilt made as a memorial to him.? In the center block is an inked inscription that reads: "Joseph Brashears/ His quilt/ Made by his friends/ Presented to his cousin, Ella Knighton/ 1848"
Wishing all quilts came with detailed information.
Bunnie Jordan
(who missed the quilt study that weekend but got to spend a pleasant evening sipping wine and listening to jazz while sitting on the waterfront lawn of the first President's home at Mt Vernon. No quilts, but it was still cool.)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ABC Quilts Founder Passes
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>

The following is a link to the obituary of Ellen Quimby Ahlgren, 90, the
woman who organized the ABC Quilts program for children at risk of AIDS. The
program is no longer in existence, but meanwhile, inspired by Ellen's work,
more than one million baby quilts were made and distributed across the
globe. May she rest in peace.

*http://tinyurl.com/r28my8
*
--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: craftism
From: palamporeaol.com

I read an article yesterday/Sunday in the Raleigh News & Observer about a woman who coined the word --- craftism. It combines crafts and activism. I know many of you who fit into that. Should Don and the group who make quilts for soldiers?be "quiltervist"?
This lady has an interesting blog using her "new" word.
Lynn in New Bern, NC


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: craftism?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2009 13:57:21 +0100
X-Message-Number: 2

I'm not sure about this word. When I saw it my first reaction was
that it was like 'sexism', and signified a disdain for those who
craft.....

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: craftism
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>

Did this woman say when she coined the word? I've seen it used in
newsprint at least 8 years ago. A story about local craft shows
featuring the works of craft artists who called themselves craftists who
practiced the art of craftism.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: craftism/craftivism?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2009 14:12:30 +0100
X-Message-Number: 4

Oh....

Is this the blog? 'Craftivism' makes more sense to me...

http://craftivism.com/blog.html/

Sally Ward



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: craftism/craftivism?
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2009 9:32:14 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

NOnonononono!

Don't let this barbarism in!

It's a neologism and it means nothing, though I'm sure the user thought it elevated what the woman was doing. In fact, it obscures it.

"Ism" properly refers to a school of thought, a philosophical system, sometimes (not often) a doctrine.

So to what philosophical system (note that word "system") is this journalist referring.

The Arts and Crafts folks knew what they were saying. They made proper distinctions between the formulative artistic conception and its execution by a craftsman. They hoped the two roles would blend, but they recognized that because the central focus of their concern was the home and its objects of use that sometimes they would not. Their use of the term "craft" did not relegate the activity to a lower position. It is linked to "art" by a co-ordinating conjunction.

If a person designs and executes her designs, isn't she an artist? And even if she executes someone else's design, she might be an artist. In the various kinds of embroidery, for instance, the manner in which different stitches are used represents an artistic decision. The skill of the worker in understanding the perfect border design is an artistic skill.

This woman is using the Humpty Dumpty theory of language. In "Alice in Wonderland," Humpty Dumpty uses the word "glory" incorrectly. Alice says, "I don't know what you mean by 'glory."

HD replies, contemptuously, "Of course you don't---till I tell you. I meant, 'There's a nice knock-down argument for you!'"

"But 'glory' doesn't mean 'a nice knock-down argument," Alice objects.

"When I use a word," HD said in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I chose it to mean--neither more nor less."

"'The question is,' said Alice, 'whether you can make words mean so many different things.'"

"The question is,' said HD, 'which is to be master--that's all.'"

Please recall that HD had fallen off a wall and was cracked: communication depends on everyone using words in their proper meaning.

Sometimes situations cry aloud for a new word. Technological changes, for instance, always create new words, words that have agreed-upon meanings. Philosophical and religious systems do the same thing: what starts out as a technical term, acquires popular currency (NB Freudian psychology in the early 20th century).

But this is not one of those situations. This is the result of lazy thought.

Anyone who watches even 3 minutes of the late-night celebrity interview programs will hear "It's like...." or "I'm like." used many times. Instead of saying what something IS, the lazy and vocabulary deficient resort to what originated in the Valley Girl jargon: "I'm like here I am."

I read TIME magazines piece on Michelle Obama last night. She resorted to this device routinely. And this woman is an attorney.

Forgetting all the grammatical problems ("like" is either a verb or a preposition, and as a preposition, it demands an object because its very definition is "a word that shows the relationship between words or groups of words"), this jargon that once was reserved for young teenagers has stayed with them when they grew up, leading to more imprecision that further befuddles the Alices of the world.

Getting rid of that particular vulgar error was something I had to do with the students with whom I worked in prep school. It took about 4 months to cure, at best.

Let's not let some silly "craftism" get its foot in our doors.

I know there will be some who say, "Oh that's just the rantings of an English teacher." Not so. The most classic examination of the consequences carelessness in language and poverty in vocabulary produce. It is an essay called "Politics and the English Language."

One of the emerging trends in historical scholarship is the close examination of the way language is used in a given period. Elizabeth Varon, whose excellent book "We Mean To Be Counted" explores women's quasi political activities in the 1840's and 1850's, has a new book out that examines the way "disunion" and "disunionism" were used in the half century preceding the Civil War. The terms obscured the real issues, slavery and abolition movement, both of which threatened the fragile union of the American states. Lincoln used it in assuring voters the new Republican Party was opposed to anything that would lead states, north of south, to abrogate their original contract. Southern firebrands like Hammon, Rhett, and Calhoun from South Carolina used it to point out the dangers being created by the Abolitionists and Free Soil advocates. Northern firebrands like Seward used it to note the dangers slavery created to the union of the states. It obscured the debate.

I recall hearing John Dean say, "At that point in time" and I just knew the phrase would gain popular usage. It sounded so precise, so legal. And now the phrase is used routinely to say, "At that time" or "Then."

Show me a crafticist, and I'll show you a person who needs to spend some quality time with a dictionary.

In Wonderland,
Gaye


Sally Ward wrote
Craftivism' makes more sense to me...
http://craftivism.com/blog.html/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: craftism
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2009 11:00:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Interesting that we feel the need to define ourselves by "crafted"
<g> terms; I think it speaks to a defensive posture, as though
without labels, what we do has less importance. Or maybe I am just
feeling curmudgeonly at having to remember yet another term. We
already have contention over whether quiltmaking is a craft or an
art, and whether non-traditional quilts should be defined as "art
quilts" or "studio quilts" or some other designation and their makers
acknowledged as separate from other quiltmakers. If we now have to
further splinter our interests to indicate the intent of the product,
does it serve to enhance the greater definition?

Nope!

Xenia - just plain quiltmaker


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: craftism
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2009 15:02:43 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

What Xenia said.

Stephanie Whitson


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Desperately seeking...
From: "Lisa Evans" <kittencat3charter.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2009 20:19:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Is Patricia Crews on either of these lists? I need to get in touch with
her. It's not quite an emergency but it's close.

Thanks.

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Query: Opinions are free of charge
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2009 23:16:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I've been moving a thousand years of saved clippings about quilts from newspapers, magazines, notebooks, and cave walls to ring binders.

Among them is an article from our local newspaper titled "Quilt Nearly 200 Years Old." (This was probably in mid-late seventies) I seriously doubt it, but the thing that bothers me is that the owner was a woman with good sense and a history degree.

A photo shows the owner and an art prof who also was a no-nonsense sort of person. looking at a very large "child's quilt" (not crib or modern baby bed size). The quilt is stripped (red, I assume) and motifs are embroidered on square "beige" blocks. Can't tell a thing about them in the photo. Narrow sawtooth border. Appears to be in good condition, not fragile.

Here is basic text: "....look over children's quilt which was made by Mrs. F's great-great grandmother, Lydia Fowler, in the late 1700's in Vermont. The quilt will be shown at the DAR Antique Show. Its colors are red and beige and the motifs were designed by Mrs. Fowler."

Opinions please?

Gaye Ingram


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Query: Opinions are free of charge
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2009 05:15:50 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2


Gaye,

From the description, it sounds late 1800's. Could it just be a typo? Creative math?

Kris

> Here is basic text: "....look over children's quilt which was made by Mrs. F's great-great grandmother, Lydia Fowler, in the late 1700's in Vermont. The quilt will be shown at the DAR Antique Show. Its colors are red and beige and the motifs were designed by Mrs. Fowler."



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt commemoration event
From: Joan Kiplinger <jkipncweb.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2009 09:19:42 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

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Thought you might all enjoy some good reading. Here are the results of
stories entered in a writing competition to honor three important March
events -- Women's History Month, National Craft Month National Quilting
Day. Initiated by Kim Wulfert, this e-book format includes a recap of
the competition plus all entries and comments from the judges, in this
case called tasters.

Enjoy a look back at women's fortitude between 1905-42 and relive those
times as memorably written by the authors.

http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/Changing_Times_Womens_Stories.pdf or
http://WomenOnQuilts.blogspot.com click on email book at left of screen.

--------------070200060504060604060303--


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Subject: Jennifer Regan and Jeanette Lasansky
From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2009 09:52:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

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Dear Friends,
I am seeking current contact information on the above two ladies. I
apologize at having to make an uniformed request, but my quilting materials
are packed away for another two weeks, including my AQSG directory, so I
can't look for myself. If any of you have this info, please contact me
privately, thanks!

Pam Weeks
AQS Certified Appraiser
Quilt Historian, Teacher, Lecturer
Durham, NH

--001636c5a537d052d9046ae528fe--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: clipping
From: schreurs_ssyahoo.com
Date: Wed, 27 May 2009 05:44:48 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

Gaye, what you have there is, IMHO, a genuine piece of folklore. An example of the state of quilt scholarship in the 1970's. An excellent sample of the human tendency to believe what your mother told you of family history over ALL evidence to the contrary. Or, heaven forbid, of gullibility (please forgive the sentence fragment).

It's also, I think, ancient history of the sort that shows that the more things change, the more they stay the same. Can you remember why you saved it???

Susan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: oops....craftivism
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Wed, 27 May 2009 12:01:11 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6


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http://craftivism.com/blog.html/II
This is the site. I guess it was ---- craftivism. Whatever........... I am glad I got y'all stirred up!!! Has been an interesting "exchange". I really don't care. I will continue to do crafts and sewing for a good cause and will just call it "a good deed".
giggling............
Lynn in New Bern


----------MB_8CBACFB7D48DAF6_1658_66BD_webmail-dh27.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: clipping
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2009 12:33:22 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

---- Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> wrote:
Gaye, what you have there is, IMHO, a genuine piece of folklore. An example of the state of quilt scholarship in the 1970's. An excellent sample of the human tendency to believe what your mother told you of family history over ALL evidence to the contrary. O
Can you remember why you saved it???
-----

I love the question "Do you remember why you saved it?"

Actually I do: in those days I saved everything about quilts. And I still save every quilt-related clippings from local paper.

I did not attend this particular exhibit, so I didn't get to lay eyes on it.

The thing that made me wonder at all was the owner's character. She was a journalist by training and previous practice, a cultivated and travelled person. She owned laces and other inherited textiles that were exquisite. I guess by then even I knew the redwork tradition was comparatively recent. But I also thought the condition of the quilt (it appears to be sturdy as a log) would have raised doubts in the owner's mind if such were justified.

What is the earliest date for extant example of these embroidered blocks?

Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 27, 2009
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Thu, 28 May 2009 07:23:29 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1


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I> The quilt is stripped (red, I assume) and motifs are embroidered on
> square "beige" blocks. Can't tell a thing about them in the photo. Narro
w
> sawtooth border. Appears to be in good condition, not fragile.
>
> Here is basic text: "....look over children's quilt which was made by Mr
s.
> F's great-great grandmother, Lydia Fowler, in the late 1700's in Vermont
.
> The quilt will be shown at the DAR Antique Show. Its colors are red and

> beige and the motifs were designed by Mrs. Fowler."
>
> Opinions please?
>
> Gaye Ingram

I read the digest as I linger here over my morning coffee. I nearly choked

this morning when I read the name of Lydia Fowler in Gaye's post.

Many of us have some eccentric inclination (or two). Mine happens to be

phrenology, the study of bumps, lumps, nooks and crannies on the head as
a
means to deternine the nature of one's character.

It was a rather common practice in the 19th century, and Orson Squire
Fowler and his brother Lorenzo were the leading proponents in America.

Dr. Lydia Folger Fowler was married to Lorenzo. She was an amazing woman,

one of the first women to be graduated with a nedical degree and practice

medicine in this country. I don't know whether she lived in Vermont, and
I
don't know whether she was a quilter. I do know that if that quilt was mad
e by
Lydia Fowler, it has additional value. She was rather remarkable and famou
s
in her time.

She was born in Nantucket, MA in 1822, and lived and worked all over New

York and New England. She addressed the Women's Convention in 1852, travel
ed
extensively lecturing on hygiene, temperance, women's and children's healt
h
issues, wrote numerous tracts and was published in books and magazines.


Lydia and Lorenzo Fowler had several children. At one point they lived in

an octagonal home in Fishkill NYdesigned by Orson Squire Fowler. Orson was
a
great proponent of the octagonal home as a healthful environment, using
less heat to warm the structure and allowing more natural light into the
home
and a greater flow of air, with porches all around so that windows could

remain open even during rainstorms. It sounds like his ideas would fit nic
ely
with the green movement today. Unfortunately the septic system in the
octagonal home was too close to the water source, and this resulted sever
al family
members developing typhoid fever.

Lydia and Lorenzo moved to London, and continued to write and practice
medicine and phrenology there until her death in 1879.

Bright blessings!

~Donna Laing
Bucks County PA
www.NorthStarQualityQuilting.com


**************
We found the real E28098Hotel
CaliforniaE28099 and the E28098SeinfeldE28099 diner. What will yo
u find? Explore
WhereItsAt.com. (http://www.whereitsat.com/?ncid3Demlwenew00000004)

--part1_c6b.56e48555.374fce31_boundary--


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Subject: RE: qhl digest: May 27, 2009
From: "Natalie Cadenhead" <>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2009 16:53:24 +1200
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi we have a quilt in our collections dated in very early 1800s which is
red/white (actually off white) strips with saw tooth border so it is
possible that it would fit the era. We also have one around the late
1700s - early 1800s with beige materials in it. From research done it
appears the fabric may have been dyed with walnut (it is a UK piece).
Can you tell if the quilt in question is quilted and what pattern the
quilting is as that can help date it.

Natalie

-----------------
Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 27, 2009
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2009 12:09:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Donna, thanks!

Such a heritage sounds right for the offspring, an independent woman who, with her husband, published the local newspaper, gave to all the right causes. Will check it out and let you know.

gaye
>
Dr. Lydia Folger Fowler was married to Lorenzo. She was an amazing woman,
one of the first women to be graduated with a nedical degree and practice
medicine in this country. I don't know whether she lived in Vermont, and I
don't know whether she was a quilter. I do know that if that quilt was made by
Lydia Fowler, it has additional value. She was rather remarkable and famous
in her time.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: embroidered blocks in quilt
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2009 12:00:05 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

"Can you tell if the quilt in question is quilted and what pattern the
quilting is as that can help date it. Natalie"

I cannot tell about quilting from photo or even the figures that were embroidered.

the dissonant part in my view is the embroidered blocks, which suggest a much later date.

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Block Identification
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2009 15:21:54 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

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Has anyone in the Maine area ever heard of, or seen, a quilt block called
"Lobster Claw?"

I am trying to determine if this is an original design, named this by the
family, or if it is a known pattern that has shown up in other Maine quilts,
or was a published design. The quilt I am looking at is from circa 1850s,
and was red and fugitive green, on a muslin-color background/ red binding.

I found a "Lobster" design in print, but that motif does not look anything
like this.

I thought maybe something might have shown up in the Maine state
documentation project. The quiltmaker was from Harmony.

Please contact me directly at: patquiltersmuse.com, so as not to clog up
the list. Thanks.

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Folger Fowler quilt
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2009 21:47:46 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1


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Can't speak to the age of the quilt, but the Folgers (maiden name of Lydia
Fowler) are aA0prominent Nantucket founding family, with a museum named fo
r them. I bet they would love that quilt if it were proved to be hers.
A0
Laura Fisher
--0-587337184-1243572466:35667--


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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 28, 2009
From: "Bobbi Finley" <bobbi_finleymsn.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2009 09:30:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

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This isn't quilt related, but Donna's post about the octagonal house
suggests that Orson may have been influenced by our 3rd president,
Thomas Jefferson, who also was a proponent of the octagonal home as
evidenced by rooms at Monticello and his retreat, Poplar Forest, where
even the privies are octagonal shaped.
Bobbi Finley
Williamsburg, VA

"At one point they lived in an octagonal home in Fishkill NYdesigned by
Orson Squire Fowler. Orson was
a great proponent of the octagonal home as a healthful environment,
using
less heat to warm the structure and allowing more natural light into the
home and a greater flow of air, with porches all around so that windows
could
remain open even during rainstorms.
~Donna Laing
Bucks County PA
www.NorthStarQualityQuilting.com<http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com/
>



------_NextPart_000_0011_01C9E040.23439450--


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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 28, 2009
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2009 9:59:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Bobbie and Laura,

The national headquarters of the American Architects Assn is housed in a D.C. octagon house, the one the Madisons stayed in after the President's home was destroyed in the War of 1812. I've seen an inventory of octagon houses constructed in America and it seems that there were more than 1,000. Their virtues were ease of construction and efficient use of materials, the octagon offering the most efficient enclosure of space besides the circle. There is a famous octagon house in Natchez, Ms, called "Nutt's Folly." It was under construction when the CW broke out, and workman, imported from the North, simply lay down their tools and removed their aprons and left. Everything in the section of the house where they were working remains as it was that day.

Poplar Forest is wonderful, isn't it? I wonder if Jefferson is responsible for this essentially gothic, Victorian development. Will check.

Laura and all, I had not associated the local quilt's owner with this Fowler/Folger, and I will check the connection. It would have descended in the husband's family. Our newspaper is not too careful with facts. The owner celebrated his 100th birthday recently. He was one of the founders of Delta Airlines way back when that was a hot venture. He has children, and sale would not likely be a consideration. Identification and registration would, however.

Will check. Meanwhile, what's the earliest such quilt anyone has identified?

gaye



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lobster Claw pattern
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sat, 30 May 2009 10:06:45 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Pat, see Gwen MarstonB9s book Mary Schaffer: American Quiltmaker page 65.
Does it look anything like this?

Karen in the Islands




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lobster Claw pattern
From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com
Date: Sat, 30 May 2009 13:47:38 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2


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Another one is on pg. 57, no 6.7 of Barbara Brackman's "Encyclopedia of
Applique".

Hope this helps.

Alma Moates
AQS Certified Appraiser-Quilted Textiles
6295 Frank Reeder Road
Pensacola, Fl 32526

_quiltsappraisedaol.com_ (mailto:quiltsappraisedaol.com)

(850) 944-3334 Home
(850) 324-1510 Cell
**************A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in just 2 easy
steps!
(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100126575x1221322950x1201367186/aol?redirhttp://www.freecreditreport.com/pm/default.aspx?sc668072&hmpgID62&bcd
MaystepsfooterNO62)

-------------------------------1243705658--


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Subject: change of email address
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <phahnerols.com>
Date: Sat, 30 May 2009 15:19:13 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

I am changing my email address to:

pnhahn01comcast.net

Nancy Hahn, Bowie, Maryland


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lobster Claw pattern
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 May 2009 15:25:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

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No, it's not at all like that, but thanks for checking.

On Sat, May 30, 2009 at 1:06 PM, Karen Alexander
<karenquiltrockisland.com>wrote:

> Pat, see Gwen MarstonB9s book Mary Schaffer: American Quiltmaker page 65
.
> Does it look anything like this?
>
> Karen in the Islands


--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilted clothing - long
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sun, 31 May 2009 10:15:10 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

This may not be directly quilt-related in the usual sense of the word that
we discuss it on QHL --- except this couple designed and created many
different pieces of gorgeous quilted clothing!

Jeanne and Marc are a wonderful couple. I believe they met and began their
artistic careers in Great Britain or Holland but wound up back in the San
Francisco area, creating their own clothing and fabric line in the 70s, 80s
and 90s. They closed shop about 10 years ago.

I found two of their pieces in the past two years which I bought "used" as
collector's items to possibly hang on the wall and a 3rd was recently given
to me by a friend here on the island. It is always such an inspiration to
tour an artists' home! Their home was on a Fund Raising House Tour for the
island's historical society a couple of years ago.

Now they have decided to sell their archival collection of clothing and the
fabrics they designed. Their fabric is fabulously colorful! Someone is
going to wind up a lucky-duck if they live within an hour or two drive of
Mill Valley! If you just google Jeanne-Marc, you may find all kinds of
links. Meanwhile, here is the link to their own website and blog:

http://www.jeanne-marc.com/archives/Home_and_Contact.html

Here is a paragraph from their blog:


<<Earlier this year, in March, we made our first exploration to the Pleasan
t
Hill storage unit that has housed the Jeanne-Marc archives since 1997.
Here, Heidi Johnson and other members of the Jeanne-Marc staff had stored
the companyB9s design history and twelve years later, we werenB9t sure what t
o
expect.

For us, the experience was like walking into our own pyramid. The room was
cool and dry with scarcely a speck of dust anywhere. On rolling racks,
meticulously double-bagged and documented in a book of fading Polaroid
photos, were over 200 uncirculated outfits representing every Jeanne-Marc
collection for 30 years. Hanging along the walls were patterns--hard paper
silhouettes from the early Bird Jacket days and computerized patterns from
the techno 90B9s. Towers of clear plastic bins filled with 5 yard cuts of
every fabric we had ever designed and all the antique textiles from Europe
and Japan we had collected for their inspiration, were piled to the ceiling
.
There were more bins of buttons, trims, shoulder pads, quilting and bias
binding. A line-up of Italian linen and maple mannequins with hand carved,
articulating limbs, patiently waited to be sprung from their tomb. In fact
,
everything we would need to revive Jeanne-Marc was there at the ready.....>
>

Can't post the colorful pdf flyer as an attachment, but here are the words
from it. Hope some of you in the area can take advantage of this!

Karen in the Islands


Jeanne and Marc invite you
to the one & only sale of the
Jeanne-Marc Archives

WHAT?
80 Outfits and key pieces from the
70B9s, 80B9s And 90B9s, most in
uncirculated condition.
80 3-6 yard cuts of Jeanne-Marc
textiles
80 Vintage fabrics and scarves
from Europe

WHERE?
Acqua Hotel in Mill Valley
555 Redwood Hwy
Mill Valley, CA 94941

WHEN?
June 13-14
12:00 to 6:00

To learn more check Our website :
jeanne-marc.com
Or contact
510-872-9457




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Subject: embroidered swastika design
From: Laurel Horton <laurelkalmiaresearch.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2009 21:45:55 -0400
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Here's a question for those of you who have been exploring
early-twentieth-century patterns: Has anyone identified a published design
or kit for an embroidered swastika block with floral motifs? Or for that
matter, a commercial or published patchwork pattern for the same?

Thanks!
Laurel Horton

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Subject: Summer Travel Plans . . .
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Jun 2009 14:52:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

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If anyone has plans for a vacation (or even a 'staycation') in the vicinity
of Duluth, Minnesota next week I hope you'll consider stopping by the
'Minnesota Quilter's Inc. 31st Annual Show and Conference' to see the AQSG
2008 Red & Green Quilt Study quilts. The Study Quilts are scheduled to be
on exhibit there June 11-13, 2009.



The 2008 Quilt Study theme of Mid-19th Century Red & Green quilts was the
inspiration for approximately 50 quilts that resulted from the study
challenge. Of those, 25 wonderful quilts were selected for the touring
exhibit by a panel of three jurors. If you haven't had a chance to see
these quilts yet, or even if you have, and you will be in the Duluth area I
would encourage you to go.



The show is located at the Duluth Convention Center, 350 Harbor Drive,
Duluth, MN. For show information about the show please see their
informative website at http://www.mnquilt.org/mq2009/index.html. For more
information about the Quilt Study project please see the AQSG website
http://americanquiltstudygroup.org/QS%20Exhibit%20Schedule.asp or contact
me.



Greta VanDenBerg

Quilt Study Chair






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Subject: Detergent Blocks Quilt
From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Jun 2009 22:19:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi all! I've just posted a picture on qhl Vintage Pictures of a quilt
that my friend just inherited from her Grandmother. I've put the picture
under "Feedsacks" because there wasn't room in "Quilts". The quilt has no
feedsacks in it.

My friend's Grandmother lived in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Grandmother
got fabric blocks from inside the laundry detergent box that she
purchased. This is the quilt she made with the blocks. I was wondering
if anyone could shed any more light on this free quilt blocks in the
laundry detergent.

Thanks and best regards,
Sharron......................

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Subject: Re: Summer Travel Plans . . .
From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533frontiernet.net>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 08:01:11 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Good Morning,
Another great quilt show for people in western New York is this weekend:
Genesee Valley Quilt Club Festival June 5-7, 2009 at the RIT Gordon Field
House in Rochester. You can read all about it at:
http://www.geneseequiltfest.com/

The hours it is open are: Friday 5-8 / Saturday 10-8 / Sunday 10-5

There are over 650 quilts: Contemporary, Art, Antique, with several
special exhibits and challenge quilts. And vendors galore.

Regards,
Beth Davis
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Subject: regarding embroidered swastika design
From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533frontiernet.net>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 08:14:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Laurel,
I do not have an answer regarding embroidered swastika, but I have
recently had a strange observation. I was shown a copy of the book:
Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America, which belonged to a quiltmaker
who passed away in the 70's. The quiltmaker had written in her book (on
the front and back cover)- she had listed the quilts that she had made (34
were listed, but we know that she made over 70). One of the quilts listed
was the Swastika. I was taken aback that she named it such (rather than
Fly-Foot or another less offensive name). I think that she wrote this in
late 1940's.

RE: Here's a question for those of you who have been exploring
early-twentieth-century patterns: Has anyone identified a published design
or kit for an embroidered swastika block with floral motifs? Or for that
matter, a commercial or published patchwork pattern for the same?

Regards,
Beth Davis
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Subject: Interesting quilt reference
From: "Lisa Evans" <kittencat3charter.net>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 00:06:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

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From my friend Jadwiga. Note the reference to bed rugs as well!

Found in Warm and Snug: The History of the Bed by Lawrence Wright:
"There were two Long Galleries at Cowdray, one on each side of the
court, and in the Book of Household Rules drawn up by Lord Montague in
1595 the "Yeoman of the Wardroppe" is to "see the galleryes and all
lodgings reserved for st[r]angers cleanly and sweetly kepte, with
herbes, flowers, and bowes in their seasons and the beddes of such as
shall hither resorte att their first cominge to be mayde and the better
sortes of quiltes of beddes at any tyme to be used at nightes taken off,
and Yrish Rugges layd in their places." P. 64


This is the same arrangement I found in Henry VIII's death inventory,
which had numerous references to several quilts and a heavy counterpane
being used on the same bed as a sort of set. Early Tudor bed-in-a-bag,
anyone? :)

Lisa Evans
Easthampton, MA



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Subject: a note about the IA/IL study group
From: "Catherine Litwinow" <litwinow62msn.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 08:40:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi,
Thought I'd share some thoughts about the IA/IL Quilt Study Group.

The Iowa/Illinois Quilt Study Group has the quilt owners sign a release
if their quilt can be pictured. We have one gal who takes them + many of
the members take their own pictures.
A CD is available for purchase at the next meeting. CD's are $5 at the
meeting, $6 if mailed. So the April pictures will be ready this August.

Everyone with a quilt fills out a report form which helps me write the
minutes. I use first names. The exceptions would be the quilts that are
printed in "Pieces of Time." Pieces" it is our Quilt and Textile History
Magazine. "Pieces of Time" are $15/issue or $30/annual subscription. The
advertising rate is $25 for a 2.25" x 4.25" spot (these are approximate
sizes).

Civil War was the April topic. We will be paying the Bennington, VT
museum to have the Jane Stickle quilt pictured, (in "Pieces of Time")
one of the members brought her "Dear Jane." The owner has also written
an article about the project.

Minutes are sent to the members who have e-mail. None of the others have
asked for them.
Next meeting is "Red and Green." I want to thank this group for the
fabulous Color by Victoria Finlay. I love the unusual tidbits she throws
in.

We meet the first Saturday in April and August. Easter has changed that
April date. We are an Educational Auxiliary of the Kalona Quilt and
Textile Museum in the Kalona Historical Village, Kalona, IA. The largest
Amish community west of the Mississippi. Marilyn Woodin, curator, hangs
4 or 5 shows in both the English and Amish galleries.

In April, we were shown the Lone Star and the square corners and side
triangles are a printed calico. We helped purchase the quilt for the
English gallery
I also want to thank Judy Anne Breneman publicly. She has willingly let
us use two of her articles from www.womenfolk.com/quilting_history/ for
handouts.

Catherine Noll Litwinow
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Subject: Myrtle beach quilt shops?
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 07:43:31 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5


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Hi all,
Are there any quilt shops in the area of Myrtle Beach?
Thanks!
Judy Schwender



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Subject: Men's suiting quilts
From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 10:00:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

I'm now in KS where my quilts reside and would be happy to sent a
photo to the person who was looking for examples of this type quilt
but can't remember who wanted them. It's great to have more quilts
than memory! Linda Laird


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Subject: Re: Myrtle beach quilt shops?
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 08:26:48 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7


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Hi again-
I should also have asked if there are any antique shops and good places to see antique quilts in the Myrtle Beach area.
Judy Schwender



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Subject: WW 2 quilts
From: Njquiltappraisraol.com
Date: Wed, 03 Jun 2009 10:54:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

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I wanted to let everyone know that?one of the SpecialExhibits at the NJ Quilt Convention wil be the Collection of Sue Reich's WW2 quilts.?The Convention will be on June 11, 12 and 13 from 10-5.

It is being held at the Raritan?Center in Edison, NJ. (Exit 10 of the turnpike)

If you would like more details, contact me off list.

K


Karen Dever
Moorestown, NJ

AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser
856-816-6628
www.karendever.com

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Subject: Re: Detergent Blocks Quilt
From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 11:32:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Sharron,
We used to get wash cloths, hand towels, etc. and glassware in detergent but
I never heard of quilt blocks!!
Lonnie Schlough
www.fixquilts.com



I was wondering
> if anyone could shed any more light on this free quilt blocks in the
> laundry detergent.



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Subject: Re: Detergent Blocks Quilt
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
 

I remember getting a lot of things in detergent boxes (most of the boxes were soap, not detergents in my day tho) but never quilt blocks.....I still have some of the glasses that my Mom collected over the many years she washed clothes.
Mitzi from warmer Vermont finally (it snowed on Sunday).