xSubject: Re: Summer Travel Plans . . .
From: "deb" <debquiltingposs.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 15:38:03 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

For those of you in the New Jersey area next weekend - www.njquilts.org.


Exhibit - Quiltmaking That Saw U.S. Through The War Years:1941-1945.-An
exhibit of World War II Quilts
-curator Sue Reich

FRIDAY, JUNE 12 3:00PM
SUE REICH-Quiltmaking that Saw the U.S. through the War
Years:1941-1945-($20)
Each year, more and more members of .The Greatest Generation. are leaving
us. Between
1941 and 1945, women were busy keeping the home fires burning, working in
the defense
industry, planting Victory gardens and quilting! So where are those quilts!
This presentation will
identify some of those quilts based on the patterns of the time, the fabrics
used, newspaper
articles and stories from the quiltmakers. Some WWII quilts are obvious with
patriotic color
schemes and military insignia. Others are not so obvious but all were made
at the most crucial
and pivotal time of the 20th century. Share the history of this important
time through quilts.
2009 is the 65th anniversary of D-Day and 2010 the 65th anniversary of the
end of WWII. This
exhibit connects the interests of both men and women. All of us have our own
personal story
from this era, come and hear about those of others.
Quilt historian Sue Reich shares her vast knowledge of quiltmaking during
WWII with an
insightful slide presentation. Then join Sue for a personal gallery tour of
.Quiltmaking that Saw
the U.S. through the War Years:1941-1945.. Gain insight into the .Greatest
Generation.
through this intriguing collection of quilts from WWII. Sue will guide you
on a journey into the
hearts and minds of quiltmakers from this important time in history.
Reception to follow with light refreshments.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New Story
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>

Hi!

I am wondering if anyone else has ever heard the same story I heard today -
that in Lancaster, PA, the Amish began using yellow in their quilts because
peddlars would slip in the color in the bundle of cloth, and the quilters
did not want to "waste fabric."

On the surface, this sounds more like a myth. Any thoughts?

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Signature Quilt Project Call for Participation
From: Mary Worrall <worrallmsu.edu>

Call for Participation:
Quilt Index Signature Quilt Pilot Project

Do you have a quilt with signatures and perhaps other writing on it
that you've been researching or that you would like to share with
other researchers?

The Quilt Index is conducting a pilot project for "signature" quilts
that will test a new system that will eventually allow public
submissions of quilts.

We have been working with a group of researchers all spring. See the
project description and update on the Quilt Index website:
http://www.quiltindex.org/signaturequiltproject.php.

We are now looking for contributors/researchers to participate in
this free pilot.

Quilts from any time period with more than one name on them that are
not simply the artist's "signed" mark qualify. We are purposefully
defining the scope of this pilot to include the broad traditions of
writing names on quilts, from fundraising-type "signature quilts", to
"friendship", "album", and "presentation" quilts.

We don't know what kind of response we'll get, but we've set a
minimum goal of 50 quilts for the pilot. These will include "tester"
quilts owned by the SQP team members, quilts documented by the SQP
already in an earlier phase, direct invitations to contributors and
researchers who have been working with us, and an open call for
participation to members of AQSG, QHL, BQHL and H-Quilts online
networks.


Here is the overall timeline for this pilot:

1. Sign up to participate <
http://survey.constantcontact.com/survey/a07e2iyamawfvgsn3kj/start>
by Friday, June 12.

2. Participate in one training session, either on Thursday, June
18 at 1pm (Eastern Daylight Time) OR Saturday, June 20 at 1pm EDT
(Note: You will need simultaneous access to a phone line and a
computer that is connected to the Internet.)

3. Enter your quilt this summer, by Wednesday, August 12. (We will
acknowledge your submission and communicate with you for further
clarification, if necessary.)

4. Signature Quilts section of Quilt Index website will launch by
October 15.

For this pilot, the QI staff first and SQP team as a whole will
review actual submissions for completeness and either approve them or
communicate with the owners to clarify or enrich the submission. We
will be evaluating this process for development of a future vetting
process for public individual submissions.

Even if you do NOT have a signature quilt to enter, you can still
help the Quilt Index plan for other types of public quilt
submissions. Please fill out this Quilt Index sustainability survey <
http://survey.constantcontact.com/survey/a07e2iy2v55fvfkfm5i/start>
and let us know what you think.

Thanks very much to the Institute of Museum and Library Services,
which is supporting the development of public object submissions to
the Quilt Index, and to the Salser Foundation, for supporting a
specific focus on Signature Quilts.

Sincerely,

Quilt Index staff team and Signature Quilt Project
Marsha MacDowell macdowelmsu.edu
Mary Worrall worrallmsu.edu
Justine Richardson justine.richardsonmatrix.msu.edu,
Amy Milne amy.milnequiltalliance.org
Nancy Hornback nancy9636sbcglobal.net
Karen Alexander karenquiltrockisland.com
and Lynn Gorges palamporeaol.com


--
--_-968051024_ma--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: For your enjoyment and join us please
From: "Kimberly Wulfert, PhD" <quiltdatingjetlink.net>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 18:08:20 -0700

There is no charge for any of the opportunities described in this email.
They are provided for your enjoyment and the enjoyment of all involved in
making the three things mentioned available.

"Changing Times: Women's Stories 1902-1942." It is only compiled by me, 14
women, including some on QHL (like Teddy Pruett, Joan Kiplinger and Sharon
Pinka and others) are the real writers. Delaine Gately on this list did the
beautiful collage, by special request, of needlework items for the book's
cover and wrote 2 stories. And 3 judges gave their time and expertise, Sue
Wildemuth, Tracy Jamar and Karen Porter. The creative writing challenge
raised funds for The Quilters Hall of Fame.

The eBook is free, written by women for women. It is historical fiction in
16 short stories with period photos in 53 pages. Have Kleenex handy and be
ready to laugh as well.

Please send these links to your friends and groups. Its purpose now is to
share with women everywhere in honoring women. The years, to set the stories
with in 1902-1942, were chosen on behalf of Marie Webster's life and
business in the now Quilters Hall of Fame museum house.

You can access the eBook at either address below. They will send quickly,
sending the eBook PDF would take more time for the download.

http://womenonquilts.blogspot.com or

http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/Changing_Times_Womens_Stories.pdf

You might also be interested in my interview/open discussion with Julie
Silber on June 15, join us! Tomorrow's interview is with Joanna Penn for
authors. (All are free)

Piece,
Kim

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD
Women On Quilts
www.womenonquilts.blogspot.com
www.quiltersspirit.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Free talk NYC thru June 10 - Options for Damaged Quilts; see www.quiltcare.ning.com - jean gonzalez
From: richmondseamstressyahoo.com
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 16:25:11 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 15

Hi. I posted recently that I have written a Quilt Care Resource List available free onlline at www.quiltcare.ning.com.

I have a home based business in Richmond, Virginia & repair old quilts. The list is a compilation of inquiries from the public over the years for things I don't offer that I have found ressources for - mostly appraisal, conservation & do it yourself support.

I offer a Free talk in the NYC area to any group while I'm here,through Wed June 10. The talk is a summary of the info on the list quoted above.Your group, your location. No charge for the presentation.

Anyone anywhere who cares about old quilts can offer the talk free in your area using the list as a jumping off point & then including sources in your area. Everyone on my list has been contacted & agreed to the wording so it makes sense to ask people before you include them in a public talk & make sure they want to be contacted by the public.

This info will help people who inherit an old quilt & don't know what to do with it as well people who don't have an old quilt but who might consider it if they knew their options.

Jean Gonzalez 804 304 3345

richmondseamstressyahoo.com

i'm on the upper west side near 88th & broadway but am open to other locations & a group can be a few people at starbucks. i offer this a few times a year in nyc & it's hard to believe no one here cares about old quilts ?
Jean's Hand Sewing - using needle & thread to re purpose sewing supplies, repair quilts - see www.quiltcare.ning.com - and make personalized custom wall hangings, any theme or message. Richmond, VA near Carytown. Appts twice yearly in NYC. ( 804 ) 304 3345. Free talk to groups.





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Index Signature Quilt Project Update
From: Mary Worrall <worrallmsu.edu>
 

Dear list members:

We are writing to update the quilt
research community about work going on this spring at the Quilt Index
with signature quilts.

Working closely with several members of the Signature Quilt Project
team (primarily Karen Alexander, Nancy Hornback, and Lynn Gorges with
additional support from Cinda Cawley), we are developing a pilot for
public quilt submissions. Thanks to everyone from AQSG and elsewhere
who shared their signature quilt research interests and methods --
even example excel spreadsheets and access databases people set up to
work with information on their quilts.

We've been meeting weekly on the phone and working through a lot of
general discussions about protocols and issues involving individual
submissions (such as: how, by whom and through what technical
mechanisms to vet submissions; update submitted records; communicate
with the submitter if necessary; what kinds of costs would be
associated with a full public submission process; imaging standards,
etc., how to invite participants to the pilot in a way that also
encourages both inclusion and quality submissions). Three SQP
members tested out the Quilt Index "Comprehensive Fields" and "Core
Fields" with one quilt each, to review the fields and determine
modifications for signature quilts. We have also reviewed comments
and feedback we have received on the fields from a broad range of
users, including many of you.

Based on this review, we have developed a new shorter form for data
entry, with particular focus on inscriptions for this pilot. We're
framing some training materials, and we are now looking for
contributors/researchers to participate in this free pilot.

To capture more of the remarkable stories that draw so many to study
signature quilts, we are defining the scope of this pilot to include
the broad traditions of writing names on quilts, from
fundraising-type "signature quilts", to "friendship", "album", and
"presentation" quilts. A quilt with more than one name inscribed on
it, that is not only the artist's "signed" mark qualifies. Text on
the quilt often will include text in addition to signatures, as well.
Quilts from any time period are eligible.

In an attempt to be open and fair, we have set a minimum target goal
of 50 submissions for the pilot. These will include "tester" quilts
owned by the SQP team members, quilts documented by the SQP already
in an earlier phase, direct invitations to contributors and
researchers who have been working with us, and an open call for
participation to members of AQSG, QHL, BQHL and H-Quilts online
networks. The training and quilt entry will take place over the
summer and the pilot section will be launched October 15.

Watch for the Call to Participate to follow shortly in a second email/post.

For this pilot, the QI staff first and SQP team as a whole will
review actual submissions for completeness and either approve them or
communicate with the owners for more information to clarify or enrich
the submission. Vetting quilts from a completely public process will
be important in the future. So we will work with the QI Task Force
and Editorial Board to evaluate how long this takes, what kinds of
questions people tend to get stuck on, and revise the form and the
training materials accordingly through the process.

Thanks very much to the Institute of Museum and Library Services
(which is supporting the development of public object submissions to
the Quilt Index), to the Salser Foundation for supporting a specific
focus on Signature Quilts, to Lynn Gorges for collaring Nancy
Hornback in 2004 to jointly begin the Signature Quilt Project, and to
the AQSG list members for sparking the conversation that led to the
present convergence this spring.

Sincerely,

Quilt Index staff team and Signature Quilt Project
Marsha MacDowell macdowelmsu.edu
Mary Worrall worrallmsu.edu
Justine Richardson justine.richardsonmatrix.msu.edu,
Amy Milne amy.milnequiltalliance.org
Nancy Hornback nancy9636sbcglobal.net
Karen Alexander karenquiltrockisland.com
and Lynn Gorges palamporeaol.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 1887 Crazy Quilt
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>


Some people look at an 1887 Crazy Quilt and think of silks, satins, and
embellishments of thread and paint. Others, like John E. Allen, D.D.S., sees
150 years worth of family history, as well as the slave history of his
ancestors. For a photo of the quilt and more information about his new book,
visit my blog (link below).

I've had about as much controversy as I can handle lately, in trying to
correct the endless amount of revised quilt history that people must be
staying awake nights to fabricate!

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings

ubject: Blogs and quilt history
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcw@geneseo.net>
Date: Fri, 5 Jun 2009 07:20:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Blogs.

Here is the url for my blog, (new as of last weekend):

http://sew-eyeoftheneedlequilthistory.blogspot.com/

A Word About Blogs

Many of you are doing this already, but for those of you who aren't, if this
is something you'd be interested in, it is easy to do -- I promise.

Perfect for regional quilt study groups.
Perfect for quilt and quilt history people.
Perfect for quilt teachers or lecturers.
Perfect for organizations.

Remember diary or journal style entries -- then you have an idea of what it
is.

Free -- if you use blogger (Google).

Get a Google e-mail address.

Go to http://www.blogger.com
Look at the tutorial (It is short.) or jump in with both feet and start a
blog.

Easy to create and easy to maintain.

****
Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com







----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Newspaper Tribute to Ellen Ahlgren, Founder of ABC Quilts
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmuse@gmail.com>

http://www.concordmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090605/NEWS01/906050301

Concord Monitor, Concord, NH

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: blogs & quilt history
From: carylschuetz@comcast.net
Date: Sat, 6 Jun 2009 16:52:33 +0000 (UTC)


Another free blog source is wordpress; its address is: http://wordpress.org/
I find that it is very easy to use.
These are my two wordpress blogs: aboutquilts.wordpress.com
woodhavenstudio.wordpress.com
Caryl Schuetz



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ohio documentation
From: TOTOCO@aol.com
Date: Sat, 6 Jun 2009 14:36:51 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2



I replied to Jan Thomas off-line about her request -- I'm on digest and
the question has probably already been answered here. If not, the last that
I heard, the Ohio documentation records are at the Ohio Historical
Society... which has just announced that Ohio is slashing the OHS budget by more
than $2 million. A volunteer was busy last year trying to organize the
documentation records - pre-computer, pre-digital photography - so it is boxes
and boxes of records.

janet white


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: If you are in Philadelphia in June
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com>



Here's an underground railroad connection that is actually true!!--in Phila=
delphia, the Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church on South Sixth Street was a stop o=
n the underground railroad, and -- =A0through the end of June is host to an=
art show that includes one dozen quilts, mostly African-American, from my =
gallery.=20
=A0
Artist Sanford Biggers is using some in his own artwork to express a contin=
uum of artistic expression, (at least that's what they told me!) so don't f=
aint if you go, he's "adding on" to some=A0he bought!
=A0
I haven't=A0seen the show yet; am awaiting the press release from the organ=
izing art consultant firm so I can post news on my website, but if you are =
in=A0Philadelphia (fun town, lots to do, easy to navigate) do try to see th=
e exhibition. Church has remarkable history, second oldest black congregati=
on in US. If you go, tell me how everything looks!
=A0
Laura Fisher
--0-1253690201-1244324107=:24927--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Philadelphia exhibition
From: laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com
Date: Sat, 6 Jun 2009 19:58:11 -0700 (PDT)


Oy, don't hate me because I love=A0being invited to=A0display my quilts pub=
licly, instead of seeing them stacked on shelves in my warehouse gallery. S=
o I finally was sent some press material (google www.hiddencityphila.com, t=
hen go to the star on S. 6th St. for=A0 Mother Bethel AME Church)=A0which s=
ays (gasp!) the=A0artist was inspired=A0to create=A0a project that would=A0=
fuse together the elements of language in slaves' quest for freedom--quilts=
and celestial bodies! I have never met the artist, but=A0might at=A0some p=
oint share=A0him/them that there is controversy over the idea of quilt code=
s, and in fact no hard evidence to support its existance, but how mortifyin=
g at this point=A0for him/them/the programmmers, and me! What's the best st=
uff written I=A0might refer them to, after the fact of their doing a whole =
program with this as part of the foundation for his work?! Oy, oy.........
=A0
Laura Fisher
--0-290085492-1244343491=:36989--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: History of quilts in NC
From: Susan Seater <seater@mindspring.com>
Date: Sat, 06 Jun 2009 23:45:28 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Dear List,
Good news for those near or traveling through NC in the next few months!

Kathlyn Sullivan is curating a show from NCSU's permanent quilt
collection at the Gregg Museum of Art & Design in the Talley Student
Center, Cates Ave, on the second floor next to the Stewart Theatre.

She has a history of NC quilting and photos at:
http://www.ncsu.edu/gregg/ Click on Learn More.

"Graphic Quilts at the Gregg" is open June 11, 2009, through October 4.
Kathy is leading a walk-through Wed June 24 at 1:30pm. The reception is
Thurs Aug 20, 6-8pm.

The Gregg Museum of Art & Design hours for the summer until August 19:
10am-5pm Mon-Fri. Closed Saturday and Sunday. Free admission but no
free parking on campus at those hours. Look at the website for pay
parking locations next to the Coliseum.

Once fall semester starts in late August there are usually evening and
weekend hours (who knows with the staffing cuts). You can park free
almost anywhere on campus after 5pm and on weekends.
------------------------------
Graphic Quilts at the Gregg

June 11 - October 4, 2009

Reception: Thursday, August 20, 2009 | 6-8pm

Gregg Museum of Art & Design, NC State University, Raleigh NC


Curator Kathlyn Sullivan, and Textile Consultant Janine LeBlanc have
made a selection of over forty quilts from the Gregg Museum of Art &
Design’s permanent collection. Many of these quilts are recent
acquisitions and focus on graphic design elements in quiltmaking. The
exhibit includes quilts with patriotic themes, exquisite silk and crazy
quilts, antique North Carolina quilts, and two Sas Colby art quilts, one
of which will particularly knock your socks off! See what happens when
quilts go from the bed to the wall. Be prepared for a visual and
heartfelt treat.
-------------------------------

I met Kathy during the 1986 NC Quilt Project and she wrote a chapter of
NC's book
Roberson, Ruth Haislip, ed. "North Carolina Quilts." Chapel Hill,
NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1988. ISBN 0-8078-4234-6
(pbk) [authors Eanes, Kirkpatrick, McCarter, Newman, Roberson, &
Sullivan] Color photography by Mark Weinkle and Greg Plachta.

You also may know Kathy as a quiltmaker, from AQSG as an editor of
Uncoverings, as an appraiser, and as a dealer.

Susan Seater
Raleigh NC




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: piping in 20th century quilt?
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex@hughes.net>
Date: Sun, 7 Jun 2009 09:12:02 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello Friends,

I have a Tulips quilt made circa 1940. It features a thin, rolled red
piping defining the center section.

I do not remember seeing this wonderful detail in anything but very early
19th century quilts. Comments?

I have posted it on the e-Board (www.quilthistory.com -- GALLERY -- QUILTS
-- password: vintage).

THANKS!




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: calling anyone near Beloit, Wisc. NQR
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcrafts@verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 07 Jun 2009 15:26:39 -0400

Dear Wisconsin or Northern Illinois list members,
I am making the wedding dress for my daughter's best friend, Anna Schmidt.
I am in the Washington DC area. She is moving to Beloit (her fiance teaches
at the college) next week from Appleton. The wedding is in Maine in July. I
am hoping to save her the cost of a trip to DC.

I am hoping that our network can help me find someone who can give the
dress a final "fitting". I am sure the fit is fine - I have already fit her.
But before I finalize the hem and the placement of the lace appliques, I
would really feel better if someone who know how to pin a dress could look
at it on her for me. I found a bridal shop that does alterations in Beloit -
"An Elegant Affair", but I have no idea what kind of shop it is. Does
anyone know if the shop has a competant fitter? I will do the work, I just
need someone to tweek the fit!

If anyone can provide any leads please email me off list.
Thanks
Newbie Richardson
The Costume and Textile Specialists

PS I smocked all of Anna's party clothes when she was growing up. After I
offered to make her bridal gown, she called my daughter to ask if I did
anything else besides smocking?! ( You know, us "Moms" don't seem to have a
life outside our roles as parents!) So as a joke, I have smocked her a night
gown!


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: calling anyone near Beloit, Wisc. NQR
From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507@yahoo.com>


Wish I was a tad bit closer, I am in Wisconsin but not close enough to know=
anything about Beloit. GOOD LUCK and I know what you mean about Mom's havi=
ng no life. :) That smocking a night gown is TOO FUNNY. :) Jeanne



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: piping in 20th century quilt?
From: "Marlene Royse" <marleneroyse@nc.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2009 20:47:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi, Julie,

I have a tulip quilt from about the same time period. It has twenty blocks
with tulips in a basket and borders with tulip flowers. There is pink piping
in every seam between blocks and between the blocks and borders. It is
finished with piping on outer edge with a facing on the back. It was used as
a spread even though the seams are visible on the wrong side.

This quilt was given to me, but I have no information as to its origin. I
have posted two very blurry pictures on e-Board gallery under quilts. I will
try to get better pictures to replace these, but will be out of town for
awhile. Sorry I didn't do a better job with the pictures. This was my first
attempt at posting on e-board.

Wonder if there are more out there?

Marlene Royse



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Index of American Design
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com>



Check out this link:
http://www.nga.gov/collection/gallery/iad.htm
 
Judy Schwender



--0-325598254-1244570347=:83786--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Not again! plus how did I miss this???
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com>
 

History of the African American Family That Made It
This book approaches the subject of Black history from a unique perspective=
. It will reveal American history from a totally new perspective with surpr=
ising new facts and a different focus from most historical studies. It focu=
ses on a120 year old quilt passed down thru several More...generations. The=
quilt was made by former slaves and there are indications that it may have=
been made as a demonstration quilt outlining the Underground Railroad meth=
od of communication via symbols. This book presents a method for translatin=
g the Underground Railroad code present on this quilt. It also uncovers the=
history of the African American family that made this quilt for 150 years.=
An analysis of potential escape routes for contraband slaves in presented.=
It follows American history as it affected this family from pre Civil war =
years thru the Reconstruction era on to the Harlem renaissance and beyond. =
This book follows the later generations of the same family as they
participated in the development of bebop jazz performing in New York and E=
urope with some of the most celebrated jazz musicians. This is a family wit=
h a very unique untold story in African American history.=0A=0A=0A
--0-1160807516-1244570206=:68573--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ***SPAM*** re: Not again! plus how did I miss this???
From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com>
Date: Tue, 9 Jun 2009 16:15:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

It was written by a dentist. That struck me as interesting.
Candace Perry
-----------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ***SPAM*** re: Not again! plus how did I miss this???
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciark@earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 9 Jun 2009 16:18:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5


*It was written by a dentist. That struck me as interesting.*

Too much time on his/her hands! I know, I'm married to one! Marcia Kaylakie




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Not again! plus how did I miss this???
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmuse@gmail.com>

The man who wrote the book contacted me last week and I put information on
my blog about it, including his photo with the Victorian Crazy Quilt that he
says was made by his slave ancestors. He is a retired dentist who is in his
own words, trying to stir things up - okay - his paraphrase of an e-mail
title.

Pat

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings