Subject: Dr. Allen's poll and blog
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>

You can vote as to whether or not you "believe" in the secret quilt code, on
Dr. Allen's blog. Apparently, some detractors and true believers have
already chimed in, as seen in the 7 comments present to date.

http://2jazzy4u.wordpress.com/2009/06/02/7/#comments

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Live free and eat pie." Rebecca Rule

--0016364c74b7803ea2046bffc95a--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Dr. Allen's poll and blog
From: hknight453aol.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2009 15:46:00 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

I'd really like to see some primary source evidence, such as a
pre-1861 quilt, before I could consider believing in the alleged
Underground Railroad Quilt code. I enjoyed the first Elm Creek Quilts
novels by Jennifer Chiviarini, but the novels centered dealing with
Underground Railroad quilt codes annoy me. The whole subject seems to
be made up from whole cloth.

Heather


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 10, 2009
From: elpaninaroaol.com
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2009 01:11:52 -0400



I cast my vote, but it is difficult to want to reply. This guy is a real piece of work and invokes every unintelligent argument imaginable. You cannot?have a rational discussion with people this stupid.?

First, he bases all his replies on the idea that the book he read is fact, and then he also talks about hoping for a discussion for the "public" and not just "academia"- which opens the floodgates for just the kind of romantic wishful thinking that many of the posters on his blog in support of the idea espouse- even though they have no idea what they are talking about.

Those who avidly?promote the idea of the Quilt Code are doing so as a reflection of a legitimate human anger over the fact a segment of human society was living in a repressed state that did not allow them the education or access to document their history.

The irony is that those same people are trampling all over another segment of society- the American Woman of the 19th and early 20th Century- who were similarly denied that education/access (albeit to a lesser degree) and using their sole outlet of generationally-enduring personal expression to create fantasies.

I had this very conversation last week with a terrific quilt scholar who has been called a racist and everything else in the book for having the audacity to be intelligent. Realizing many people are stupid and believe what they want is the best antidote- as is realizing those who really care about quilts (who are the only ones I care about anyway) will be open minded and understand the case for the fact the Quilt Code never existed.

Tom.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: UGRR arguments
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2009 04:43:05 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2


I agree with Tom. His thesis is that this quilt was made by former slaves therefore all the symbols in it must have relevance to former slaves therefore all symbols in it must refer to the Underground Railroad. He moderates all comments, doesn't post the ones he doesn't like, says thank you to the people who agree with him and responds to all questions with "buy the book".

Waste of time.

Kris


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: UGRR arguments/fabrics used in quilt
From: Jccullencrewaol.com

What I don't understand is if this was made by slaves, where did they get

the fancy fabrics it looks like the quilt is made from? Looks like
velvets, silks, and taffetas from the photos. Another puzzlement.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: UGRR reasoning
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2009 09:34:19 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

There is a fallacy in this argument, Kris.

Quilt was made by former slaves (Tom has proof of that)

Symbols in it must have relevance to former slaves (almost correct--applies
only to these particular former slaves, and only if we agree that all of us
only use symbols in our quilts that have relevance to us)

All symbols in it must refer to the Underground RR (where did the UGRR come
from in this reasoning? Not all symbols that have relevance to former slaves
refer to the UGRR. This is a false syllogism.)

Kim


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Dr. Allen's poll and blog
From: "Robins-Morris, Laura A" <lrobinsscharp.org>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2009 09:19:05 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5


It's very interesting. He says the blog's purpose is to open
discussion, but then his own response is simply "read the book."
Where's the discussion? If I bought the book, I wonder if he would then
discuss specifics?? He doesn't really sound interested in that.
Laura in Seattle

http://2jazzy4u.wordpress.com/2009/06/02/7/#comments



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 10, 2009
From: pollymellocomcast.net


C2A0 I publish a comment on his blog. I think that the relevant part of h
is res ponce is "you should read the book". He is, of coarse,C2A0wanting
as many people as possible to buy his book. It does not matter if in the en
d you agree or disagree with him if you buy the book. He can increase his b
ook sales and lecture requests quit a lot by saying that his has a real "co
de quilt". Even if it was made post slavery albeit by documented slaves. Th
ere is still no quilt from the time of slavery with a prooven code. And you
can make the symbols on a crazy quilt say anything you say they mean. The
point is they were covered with pictures and meaningless forms. Never mind
how inaccurate most families memories are aboutC2A0 their quilts and even
when or who made them and most symbol interpretation is murky at best.C2
A0

C2A0My daughter is a teacher.C2A0 SchoolsC2A0 and libraries, are alwa
ys looking for interesting books about every culture and they buy books and
I am sure that many might pay him to come and speak where he could also se
ll more books. He seemsC2A0to have a good business strategy, even if it m
akes quilt historians crazy, that may work for him financially.C2A0The pr
oblem is that mostC2A0 people know or careC2A0so little about quilt his
tory that they never question the original premise. And we are in the unpop
ular position of attacking this unstoppable story. This story is beguiling
and many people want it to be true. If you haven't read his book you can no
t argue it's merits or lack of them and if you buy it to read it you have a
ccomplished his mission to sell you a book. If you request it from your lib
rary, they buy it and you accomplish is goal anyway. Facts never seem to ge
t in the way of this juggernaut.



Polly Mello


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: UGRR reasoning
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2009 17:43:50 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 9


Sorry, I should not have used the pronoun "he". I was referring to the author, not Tom.

I was trying that make same point as Polly. This is just a gimmick to sell books. I suspect the author knows the quilt has no UGRR relevance, but since he can document the fact it was made by former slaves, he plans on using the UGRR controversy as a method of getting publicity.

Kris

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 10, 2009
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2009 11:47:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Whoa. Very eloquent, Tom! Maybe you can set this guy straight.

Best regards,
Sharron........
education or acce

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts and proverbs
From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2009 20:05:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

My friend Dr. Wolfgang Mieder, a specialist in the study of proverbs,
and I are working on a paper on quilts and proverbs. We would deeply
appreciate any references to specific uses of proverbs in the
traditions of making and using quilts, the incorporation of proverbs
on quilts, and any exhibitions of quilts with proverbs.

With gratitude in advance for your assistance,

Marsha

Marsha MacDowell, Ph.D.
Curator, Michigan State University Museum
Professor, Department of Art and Art History, MSU
Editor, H-Quilt
Co-PI, The Quilt Index (www.quiltindex.org)

PS: I have already put in a call to Laura Fisher re. her project on
text on quilts.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: let me vent
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 07:22:24 -0400

I just need to vent one second. I wrote a book on sewing for walkers and wheelchairs.(I think this is a good cause.)?I am having a difficult time getting libraries to buy it. I bet there are many legitimate HISTORICAL quilt books that aren't being bought for libraries as well. Then this totally "out of the blue" myth?book is getting all sorts of publicity and being bought by libraries.
What are the mysterious symbols, anyway? Shouldn't have asked that. Someone has to buy the book to find that out, unless it is in a book store.
It is all in the controversy. Our country is consumed by controversy. Who is sleeping with whom. Scandal, scandal, scandal...........?Do I have to figure out how to make my book controversial for it to sell gang busters? Do we have to put quilters sewing in the nude on the covers? Wheelchairs with grannies topless sitting in them?
OK, off to get my first cup of coffee. I will be mulling over my "crazy" marketing plan. Hmmmm, a wheelchair race on the front? A walker diva parade? One of those nude calendar things with quilts covering just the right spots?might be good for an historic quilt book? Hey, I like that!
As I said, no coffee yet. Maybe you should ignore me this morning.
Lynn in New Bern, NC

----------MB_8CBB96731EFDB10_A6C_5425_webmail-da19.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: let me vent
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 08:15:18 -0400

Hey Lynn- I like the idea of a nude on your book! (). Seriously, I feel your frustration - if it isn't sexy or controversial these days people ignore you (and your book). I for one am not going to buy 'that' book as I have had it with the UGRR myth (I have to set people straight each week when I volunteer at the quilt building at the Shelbrurne Museum in VT - at least once a day some visitor comes looking for the slave quilts that the UGRR used to show 'safe houses'.
Mitzi from VT
NOW, go get that coffee, I have had mine already



In a message dated 06/12/09 07:28:41 Eastern Daylight Time, palampore writes:
I just need to vent one second. I wrote a book on sewing for walkers and wheelchairs.(I think this is a good cause.)?I am having a difficult time getting libraries to buy it. I bet there are many legitimate HISTORICAL quilt books that aren't being bought for libraries as well. Then this totally "out of the blue" myth?book is getting all sorts of publicity and being bought by libraries.
What are the mysterious symbols, anyway? Shouldn't have asked that. Someone has to buy the book to find that out, unless it is in a book store.
It is all in the controversy. Our country is consumed by controversy. Who is sleeping with whom. Scandal, scandal, scandal...........?Do I have to figure out how to make my book controversial for it to sell gang busters? Do we have to put quilters sewing in the nude on the covers? Wheelchairs with grannies topless sitting in them?
OK, off to get my first cup of coffee. I will be mulling over my "crazy" marketing plan. Hmmmm, a wheelchair race on the front? A walker diva parade? One of those nude calendar things with quilts covering just the right spots?might be good for an historic quilt book? Hey, I like that!
As I said, no coffee yet. Maybe you should ignore me this morning.
Lynn in New Bern, NC


---

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: let me vent
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 11:20:57 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Well, and we don't know how many libraries bought his book. I would expect
libraries aren't buying much of anything at the moment that's not terribly
significant...i.e. whatever Dan Brown might churn out...the latest oprah
book...
I do think it's sad though, Lynn, that libraries won't buy your book.
Having had a wheelchair bound mom and spending a lot of time in nursing
facilities makes me realize the importance of what you've done.
Have you ever thought about marketing to those types of places? Activity
directors and the gift shops in those facilities? I'm sure you did -- but
that just occurred to me!
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: let me vent
From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 10:38:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

FWIW - As of this morning "Content of their Character" is not listed in
the Worldcat database under author, title or ISBN.

http://www.worldcat.org for those of you who don't know it, is a
database of materials cataloged by about10,000 libraries worldwide.

Mary


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QHL: Let Me Vent
From: "Susan Wildemuth" <ksandbcwgeneseo.net>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 12:18:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

I bet you've tried this -- but let me share anyway -- Have you also tried
Amazon Marketplace to market your book?

I would also think Disabled Vets organizations - American Legion Magazine.

Hope this helps.

Sue Wildemuth

****
Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: QHL: Let Me Vent
From: Senoperaaol.com
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 13:44:04 EDT

Another possibility is _Click here: American Association of Homes and
Services for the Aging_ (http://www.aahsa.org/)

Sue


In a message dated 6/12/2009 1:23:06 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
ksandbcwgeneseo.net writes:

I bet you've tried this -- but let me share anyway -- Have you also tried

Amazon Marketplace to market your book?

I would also think Disabled Vets organizations - American Legion Magazine.

Hope this helps.

Sue Wildemuth

****
Susan Wildemuth
www.illinoisquilthistory.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: let me vent
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 08:23:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

--0016364c758ec2e3bc046c25c7ce
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Are libraries buying that book? If so, I'll try to borrow it, just out of
curiosity.

Your book is terrific, Lynn. I featured a whole article about it on my
website, with photos, on my website. It is a book anyone with aging or
disabled parents or relatives, who also like to sew, should have! Wonderful
projects to make life easier for those who are struggling. Would I like to
see a nude granny on the cover? Spare me.

As far as this other book, probably I will never see it, if I have to
purchase it.

Historical writings by people who have had something to say, even if they
were a bit misguided in their remarks due to the age in which they lived,
will always be in vogue. Sincere assessments, even when slightly
misinformed, but which demonstrate an intent to tell the truth, and not some
trumped up baloney, will always be in style. They reflect the times in which
the writer lived.

That is why we still read Marie Webster's first book, as well as that of
Ruth Finley. Even Mrs. Ellen Emeline Hardy Webster, New Hampshire's own
quilt historian, about whom I've written at length, was guilty of some
assumptions that in the long run, did not prove to have been true. However,
these ladies, in pre-Internet days, were working in an isolated bubble, and
did not have the benefit of interacting with others of the same interests,
worldwide, and in an immediate manner.

We all know that researchers have relied steadily on previously written
information, rather than doing their own first-hand assessments, and many
have just given new voice to old mistakes because of that method.

Those who hype history will come and go. They are but a blip on the radar.
When statements of truth outweighs those of fantasy, the historical account
is bound to be around for a long time. However, it is a fact that
controversy sells, and in this society, is a great national pastime.

I believe that I was the first to mention this book, online, to a broader
audience. Not that I am looking for a gold star on my forehead. As I said in
my blog post, I merely try to keep people informed. Since the Dobard/Tobin
book received so much attention, I wanted to let those, who are interested,
know about the current information being sold, at a price.

I must be a fool. Every day I write and share information at no cost to the
general public, on both my website and blog. Others just think of gouging
the public for every little tidbit of sometimes non-essential or incorrect
information they provide. Go figure.

That's my rant for this rainy morning. Now, off to have my coffee,
decaffeinated, please.

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/


Do I have to figure out how to make my book controversial for it to sell
> gang busters? Do we have to put quilters sewing in the nude on the covers?
> Wheelchairs with grannies topless sitting in them?
> As I said, no coffee yet. Maybe you should ignore me this morning.
> Lynn in New Bern, NC
>

--0016364c758ec2e3bc046c25c7ce--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: UGRR reasoning
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>

Hello, all,

There is one mistake that the author of said book made. He infers that this
is a hot debate right now, among historians. I don't believe any true
historian would agree with that statement. Based on logic, reasoning and
existing quilt history, it is easy to see that there can be no real and
sustained argument for the validity of Ozella's code.

As for the tag-a-long books, all of these new writings (and it becoming a
genre of its own) seem to be driven solely by a wish for monetary
remuneration. They are founded on nothing more than vivid imaginations,
fueled by hot air. Throw in a few credentials, whether relevant or not to
the subject being discussed, and there you have it: a reinvention of
"History."

Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

---


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: let me vent
From: "Laurie Magee & Tom Blajeski" <woodmanvbe.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 19:19:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9




>I just need to vent one second. I wrote a book on sewing for walkers and
>wheelchairs.(I think this is a good cause.)?I am having a difficult time
>getting libraries to buy it.

I buy for a public library and I would buy your book. I simply am not aware
of it. I buy in both special needs and "crafts" which includes quilting. I
will say that most of the quilting books that go out are "flavor of the
months" rather than quilt history. My quilt guild frustrates me because
most of the member are only interested in the hot new trends.

Many librarians buy from reviews in Library Journal, Booklist and Kirkus.
If your title hasn't appeared in one of those, the problem may be ignorance
on the part of selectors.

Laurie in Wisconsin


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: let me vent
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 21:34:13 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1


--0-1673286044-1244867653:41790
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii

Lynn I read about your book on this list, I think, and I have communicated with you about it. We bought 3 copies. http://catalog.multcolib.org/search/t?SEARCHwalk+and+roll&searchscope1&submitSearch

Laurie is correct....it needs to be reviewed in at least LJ and/or it needs to be picked up by a vendor/jobber and books need to have an ISBN. I have to work harder to order books which are not carried by a big jobber; Ingram is our jobber. http://www.ingramlibrary.com/ipage.aspx

The book is very unique......regards, arden


(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR




________________________________
From: Laurie Magee & Tom Blajeski <woodmanvbe.com>
To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Cc: palamporeaol.com
Sent: Friday, June 12, 2009 5:19:39 PM
Subject: [qhl] Re: let me vent




> I just need to vent one second. I wrote a book on sewing for walkers and wheelchairs.(I think this is a good cause.)?I am having a difficult time getting libraries to buy it.

I buy for a public library and I would buy your book. I simply am not aware of it. I buy in both special needs and "crafts" which includes quilting. I will say that most of the quilting books that go out are "flavor of the months" rather than quilt history. My quilt guild frustrates me because most of the member are only interested in the hot new trends.

Many librarians buy from reviews in Library Journal, Booklist and Kirkus. If your title hasn't appeared in one of those, the problem may be ignorance on the part of selectors.

Laurie in Wisconsin


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: book trends
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2009 04:20:25 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Laurie in Wisconsin wrote:

I will say that most of the quilting books that go out are "flavor of the
months" rather than quilt history. My quilt guild frustrates me because
most of the member are only interested in the hot new trends.


She hit the nail on the head where book publishers are concerned. What
people buy drives what we publish. We live in a duality of "what's next"
and "what's worked." We also survive by carving out niches, which is why
most publishers are known for certain types of books. I'm very happy
that AQS has some quilt history titles among their works, and I advocate
constantly that there be more. So long as what most quilters buy
dictates what we acquire, well, you do the math. There's a reason we're
described as a "how-to quilt" publisher. And that niche informs how and
to whom our books are marketed. Authors like Lynn whose books cross
genres have their marketing work cut out for them, but so many
opportunities, as opposed to the usual, single label "it goes HERE" on
the Barnes and Noble shelf. And, our best selling books are those by
authors who do a LOT of public speaking, teaching, interviews and
self-promotion via these avenues and websites. Regardless of subject
matter, cover art or trendiness. We're right back to the public, and
what they buy. Wise words, Laurie.

Andi in Paducah, Kentucky



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Books
From: Edwaquiltaol.com
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2009 07:16:31 EDT
X-Message-Number: 3


-------------------------------1244891791
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

This is for Lynn in NC. Remember the movie about the old broads in
England who needed $$ for their charity so did a calendar? You just might have
something there. Instead of covering themselves with food and pastries,
cover stregistic body parts with your wheelchair quilts. Or maybe the
firemen etc etc etc
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: calendar
From: Polly Greene <pjgreeneeastlink.ca>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2009 10:13:38 -0300
X-Message-Number: 4

I can't wait to see the calendar of nude quilters covering their
strategic parts with "firemen."
Polly Greene



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilted Gardens
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2009 11:31:52 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

--_9225e248-e36b-4c06-a953-6016db2d8684_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"Windows-1252"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable



Those of you who are looking for quilts in news headlines may want to peek
at this.



http://elkhartproject.newsvine.com/




Teddy Pruett
www.teddypruett.com

I want to die with a needle in my hand.
Not stuck in the meat and bleeding2C you understand2C
just held between my thumb and finger.




_________________________________________________________________
Lauren found her dream laptop. Find the PC that92s right for you.
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/choosepc/?ocid3Dftp_val_wl_290

--_9225e248-e36b-4c06-a953-6016db2d8684_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Amazon.com to sell your book
From: carylschuetzcomcast.net
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2009 21:08:31 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 6

------_Part_179289_1777880956.1244927311090
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetutf-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


I would recommend using Amazon.com to sell your book. They and quilt shops are the only places that carry my book.

--
Caryl Schuetz
Woodhaven Studio
Professional Association of Appraisers -
Quilted Textiles
Certified by The American Quilter's Society
www.quiltvalues.com
Blog http://woodhavenstudio.wordpress.com
Blog http://aboutquilts.wordpress.com
http://indyfiber.com/artists/schuetz.html
Author of "Fabulous Tee Shirt Quilts"

From: "Susan Wildemuth" < ksandbcwgeneseo.net >
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2009 12:18:44 -0500

I bet you've tried this -- but let me share anyway -- Have you also tried
Amazon Marketplace to market your book?



------_Part_179289_1777880956.1244927311090--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts mentioned in non-quilt books
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2009 16:28:01 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

B3In My FatherB9s CourtB2 by Isaac Bashevis Singer. Written in Yiddish and
translated into English. Signet Books (1962). From the bookB9s back cover:
Isaac Bashevis Singer re-creates his fatherB9s rabbinate in a ghetto of Old
Warsaw8A.The boy who eavesdropped on them all has forgotten nothing, 8A.

From page 125

<< Late that night Asher had to drive to the railroad station to pick up
milk. He passed our house and noticed that it was unusually bright. This wa
s
not the glow of candles, or of a lamp, but rather the glare of a great
fire8Ahe raced up the stairs8Aknocked on our door8Ahurled his broad shoulder
against the door8A.found the entire family asleep while all around, benches,
prayer stands, prayer books, and holiday prayer books were aflame8Afinally
aroused us8Atore off our QUILTS and set to smothering the conflagration.>>




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Want to go on a scavenger hunt?
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2009 23:17:40 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

--001636c5a57b609b15046c466204
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello all-An important quilt from the second revival of 20th century
quiltmaking (1970s on) is MIA. Maybe you can help. Go to my blog
Pepper at the Quilt Studio and read all about it.
http://peppercory.blogspot.com . Thanks for any hints or help you might give
to martha Opdahl, the quilt artist.
Cheers from the incredibly muggy NC coast.
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--001636c5a57b609b15046c466204--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: jane hall
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2009 23:59:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9


----------MB_8CBBABBAFFAEEAC_10DC_3029_WEBMAIL-DY33.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"

There was a wonderful piece on Jane Hall of North Carolina recently. Thought many of you would like to read it. She is a very talented woman.
http://www.newsobserver.com/105/story/1544746.html

My daughter, Nora, graduated from high school today. She is the youngest of my 3. What a big day!

Lynn Lancaster Gorges?in HOT New Bern, NC