Subject: RE: shipping
From: "Candace Perry" <candace'schwenkfelder.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2009 14:07:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

I second Laura on fedex. '
Candace Perry



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: oop - pants leg quilt continued
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts'yahoo.com>

keep touching a sensitive button I guess, and emails fly off before completion. As I was saying, I once had a 1940s rayon gabardine shirt collars log '
cabin quilt in every color of the rainbow; we would all crave to have a shirt or two like those in the quilt, you know the kind with the two front fla'
pped pockets you see Gary Cooper and other old movie in. But, I never had a pants leg. Please someone, have want you want the world to see!
'
thanks
'
Laura Fisher
--0-608734922-1246827996':8595--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fw: PANTS LEG QUILTS
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts'yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2009 14:17:37 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3


--0-145541843-1246828657':56853
Content-Type: text/plain; charset'utf-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

QHL - this got mis-sent, is PART I of the email I just added to, so please '
read them in sequence, this first, so you get what I was intending to say.'
'
'
Asking about PANTS LEG QUILTS and the authors of an article about them.....'
............








Maggie Williams from NEQM who is doing wonderful research for the menswear '
exhibition found a reference to PANTS LEG QUILTS, but is unable to locate t'
he authors of the little'quilt they created to emulate it.'

I have included the reference here.'
''
....a miniature quilt pattern I found in my files. I did a google search on'
Tomorrow'E2'80'99s Heirlooms, Joan Padgett and Lynette Chiles. It appears '
that the business is defunct and references for Joan and Lynette are for qu'
ilt publications from the 1980s. I was hoping to obtain contact information'
for these women to ask where they obtained information on "pants leg quilt'
s." A search on "pants leg quilts" also yielded nothing.'
''
LITTLE HEIRLOOMS~ 1880s Collection
'
Tomorrow'E2'80'99s Heirlooms 'A9 1986, Joan Padgett and Lynette Chiles
'
1880's Collection
'
-2-Pants Leg Quilt
'
Pants Leg Quilts, for lack of a better name, are actually scrap quilts made'
, probably, from the good portions of worn-out trousers, judging from the l'
ong narrow pieces. They were probably used as hired hand's quilts - usually'
tied or roughly quilted. Although they were meant to be useful and not orn'
amental, they do have a certain charm. And they have a definite place in a '
country setting,
'
Use scraps of wool, linen, denim, and suiting. A good source is the ends cu'
t off of men's trousers. Also look through remnant tables, and inquire at t'
ailor shops.
'
QHL'ers: This is the first time I have heard of such a quilt concept, but i'
t makes wonderful sense. A couple of questions: can anyone put me in touch '
with either of these women, for more information. And, does anyone have, or'
can anyone point me in the direction of, a pants leg quilt to include in t'
he exhibition?! Sounds droll.
'
I'once had'a quilt of all blue jeans back pockets, and another ti'
me a quilt of narrow strips of rayon gabardine men's shirting collars in ev'
ery color of the rainbo
--0-145541843-1246828657':56853--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: MassQuilts Exhibit at the New England Quilt Museum
From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayre'nesa.com>


Hello All,

'

On behalf of the New England Quilt Museum in Lowell, and the
Massachusetts Quilt Documentation Project (MassQuilts) we would like to
invite you to the wonderful new exhibit of quilts from the Massachusetts
Quilt Documentation book, Massachusetts Quilts Our: Common Wealth.
Opening July 17th at the New England Quilt Museum and running through
September 20th, the exhibit includes about thirty outstanding quilts
which have been uncovered in this historic state. The quilts encompass
the early eighteen hundreds up to 1950. Included are quilts which
contain imported fabrics from Europe when Massachusetts was still a
colony with a thriving seaport community, quilts which boast of fabrics
printed in Massachusetts and other New England states during the
Industrial Revolution and thematic quilts showing patriotism, funding
raising and inspirational efforts. These are just some of the wonderful
works being exhibited. If you live in or are coming to Massachusetts
this summer or are trying to decide where to take your vacation, make
the New England Quilt Museum your first stop. Our opening reception will
be held on Friday July 17th from 5-7 pm. Authors of the book will be
there to meet, talk with you and sign your book.

'

You can find additional information about the exhibit plus directions to
the Museum and hours at www.nequiltmuseum.org.'

'

Hope to see you there,

Vivien Lee Sayre, Carolyn Millard and Laura Lane, Guest Curators.

'




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: coffin quilt
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts'yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2009 14:41:20 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5



Hi - someone remarked of a long narrow quilt I showed them that it looked l'
ike it was made'for a coffin! Hmmmph. Then it got me thinking, were there'
quilts made specifically to drape (or gasp, line?) coffins, use on wake ta'
bles, and the like. I bet there were, and someone on the list knows all abo'
ut them. If there were coffin drape quilts, were they re-used as the need a'
rose?! And, if there were, did they follow a formatted look, or could they '
be anything? Were there published instructions for making something like th'
is?'
'
You can tell I don't want to go down and do the laundry tonight, not after '
yesterday's high of being in the thick of the NYC July 4 celebration and fi'
reworks watch. We were on 34th Street at the entrance to the West Side High'
way, any closer and we would have been on a barge in the Hudson! Fantastic '
experience, albeit veeeeeery crowded. People from every nation, so many dif'
ferent languages around us'ooooohing and aaaahing and applauding in glee;'
ladies dressed in saris, burkhas, head shawls, contrasting with the locals'
in the tighest tights with'abundant flesh exposed! What a country. It wa'
s great. Fireworks very simple and elegant, no corporate logos, no spinning'
cartoon characters, just great looking. So close we could here the sizzle '
and smell the gunpowder. Hope many of you saw them on TV. A great night.
'
Laura Fisher
'
'
--0-306774314-1246830080':41229--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: coffin quilt
From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo'yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2009 15:18:23 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6


--0-1868322867-1246832303':67046
Content-Type: text/plain; charset'us-ascii

Hi Laura,

We were at the Marquis and could see the fireworks from our room...5 of the 6 barges at least...with the kids that was perfect! Sorry I didn't think to let you know we were in town. (also took them to see Wicked in the afternoon...awesome!) Weather was perfect.

Penny McMorris's book, "Crazy Quilts" refers to a mourning quilt with a coffin shaped center. I have also seen a crazy quilt long and narrow, at auction several years ago, said to be a coffin quilt, but no provenance. I have also seen other patchwork quilts, long and narrow, said to be work hand's quilt to go on a work hand's cot...those were usually depression era.

My best,
Dana


________________________________
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts'yahoo.com>
To: Quilt History List <qhl'lyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Sunday, July 5, 2009 5:41:20 PM
Subject: [qhl] coffin quilt

Hi - someone remarked of a long narrow quilt I showed them that it looked like it was made for a coffin! Hmmmph. Then it got me thinking, were there quilts made specifically to drape (or gasp, line?) coffins, use on wake tables, and the like. I bet there were, and someone on the list knows all about them. If there were coffin drape quilts, were they re-used as the need arose?! And, if there were, did they follow a formatted look, or could they be anything? Were there published instructions for making something like this?

You can tell I don't want to go down and do the laundry tonight, not after yesterday's high of being in the thick of the NYC July 4 celebration and fireworks watch. We were on 34th Street at the entrance to the West Side Highway, any closer and we would have been on a barge in the Hudson! Fantastic experience, albeit veeeeeery crowded. People from every nation, so many different languages around us ooooohing and aaaahing and applauding in glee; ladies dressed in saris, burkhas, head shawls, contrasting with the locals in the tighest tights with abundant flesh exposed! What a country. It was great. Fireworks very simple and elegant, no corporate logos, no spinning cartoon characters, just great looking. So close we could here the sizzle and smell the gunpowder. Hope many of you saw them on TV. A great night.

Laura Fisher



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Re: coffin quilt
From: xenia cord <xenia'legacyquilts.net>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2009 18:57:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

I have 2 "casket" quilts - one is a long rectangle in crazy quilt
style, said to have been draped over the casket when the deceased
were waked in the parlor. The other, with better provenance, came
from a funeral home in Quincy, Illinois, and came in a heavy
pasteboard presentation box with attached tissue lining. It is white
cotton sateen, child sized, nicely quilted in a diamond grid, and has
pinned (with silk pins) to the center a ruched wreath of pink
ribbon. One assumes this was used when children or infants were
viewed, and that a similar blue ribbon wreath could be attached if
the deceased was a boy.

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Fw: PANTS LEG QUILTS
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltco'airmail.net>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2009 18:19:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8


Laura,
Joan Padgett and Lynette Chiles both worked for me at the retail
version of Texas
Quilt Co. in Dallas back in the 80's. Lynette and I are both charter
members of the Quilters Guild of Dallas. They met while working and
teaching for me and when I closed the store to be a stay at home mom,
they opened their shop in Lewisville. Sadly, Joan passed away some
years ago from breast
cancer. She started quilting during her first bout, and came it to
take a class. She had such great color sense...just needed a little
help with technique. I have lost touch with Lynette. You might tell
Maggie to do a search for Lynette in either Lewisville or Argyle,
TX. I checked the Dallas Guild directory, but she is no longer a
member. Not sure that she is even still quilting.Feel free to pass my
email address along to Maggie if she has any questions.

Laura Syler
AQS Certified Appraiser '98
Quilt judge, teacher, lecturer
Richardson,TX
texasquiltco'airmail.net




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: MassQuilts Exhibit at the New England Quilt Museum
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmuse'gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2009 19:17:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

--001485f6cd06fc1f2d046dfd96fa
Content-Type: text/plain; charset'ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

*The Quilter* magazine <http://www.thequiltermag.com>, published by
All-American Crafts, Inc., has a nice 5 page spread in the September 2009
issue where the editor has graciously provided space for information about
"Our Common Wealth Quilts." Nice photos!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: let me vent
From: <bonniedwyer'roadrunner.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2009 21:11:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

Hi Lynn and other authors on the list,

One way to get librarians to purchase books is to find a way to get reviews published. You would need to provide preview copies of your book to publishers who do this, for example Library Journal and Booklist magazines. These are two of the most likely review journals public libraries rely on for purchasing decisions.

I honestly don't know the likelihood of a book getting reviewed, and then the review actually getting published. In my library career I was on the "review reading" end of the process. Perhaps someone else on the list knows more about the review process.

BTW, I believe these review journals sometimes feature special topics in each issue -- I recall sewing has sometimes been featured. It would be worth asking.

--
Bonnie Dwyer
in (finally) sunny Maine!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Coffin Quilts
From: Edwaquilt'aol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 07:43:19 EDT
 

About 8 years ago there was an exhibit of primarily wholecloth quilts at
the Vermont Quilt Festival. in the exhibit there was a coffin size quilt
draped over what appeared to be a basket type coffin. It had (as I recall)
Masonic type designs embroidered in the patches.

I just finished marking a wholecloth casket quilt for a church in Cold
Spring Mn. They plan on using it whenever there is a funeral at the church.
**************Summer concert season is here! Find your favorite artists on
tour at TourTracker.com.

-------------------------------1246880599--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: pants leg quilts
From: Mary Waller <mwaller'vyn.midco.net>
Date: Mon, 06 Jul 2009 07:45:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I don't have any information about antique/vintage quilts, but I made a
quilt from "retired" jeans. I cut long rectangles from the legs, using
a rotary cutter and sewed the long pieces together into strips, then sew
the strips into the quilt top. I machine quilted it, placing the motifs
on the long rectangles so I didn't have to stitch across any seams. I
used the thinnest Quilter's Dream cotton batting, "wonder fabric"
(yardage I wondered why I bought in the first place) for the backing,
and the leftover pieces of binding from other projects.

Pants leg quilts do make a lot of sense. I've made "rag quilts" from
single layers of denim, too.

Mary Waller
Vermillion, South Dakota, USA





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: coffin quilt
From: Sally Ward <sallytatters'ntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 14:31:58 +0100
X-Message-Number: 3

A friend who lives in the Yorkshire Dales and has quietly researched
quilts from her little area for years has told me in the past of
seeing long, thin, white wholecloth quilts. Some old Daleswomen have
told her these were used for laying-out at home, either on the coffin
or just over the deceased. Few people recognise them for what they
are, many think they were table, shelf, or piano-toppers. I think my
friend sometimes chooses not to tell owners what she suspects their
treasures may have been used for.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: pants leg quilts
From: Sally Ward <sallytatters'ntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 14:29:14 +0100
X-Message-Number: 4

Aren't quite a lot of the Gees Bend quilts made from the 'negative
space' (arty term )left in fabric when you've cut out a leg? I.e.
long, thin, strips with one edge at an angle. Its a while since I
read the book, but weren't they orange corduroy, and from a local
factory?

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Coffin quilt
From: "Munsey" <sgmunsey'comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 09:50:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Laura:

I remember seeing a coffin quilt at a Vermont Quilt Festival years ago. It
was in the elaborate crazy quilt style and the correct size to drape over
the coffin. My recollection is that it had been made to be used when
members of a particular fraternal organization passed away. Unfortunately,
I don't remember which group.

Sandra on Cape Cod



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: coffin quilt
From: pollymello'comcast.net
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 14:03:16 +0000 (UTC)

I have two quilts that may fit into this category, but unless they come wit'
h a note saying that they were a coffin drape it is impossible to really kn'
ow. The first quilt is from the Civil War era. It is long and thin and two '
sided with no batting. It was sold to me with a tag that'asks the ques'
tion'"Coffin Drape?" Was it really used for that purpose? Who knows. b'
ut it is the right shape and size for a coffin drape.'The other was'
'is a small'red work piece. With a group of angels and the words "Ma'
y Angels Sing Thee to Thy Rest". I have the original paper pricking with a '
watermark of 1896. There was a discussion about a similar piece on this lis'
t a year or two back. It appears to be a coffin drape for a child.'

'Finally, one of my friends told me about a family that she knew in No'
rth Carolina that had a quilt that they always place on family coffins at t'
he funerals. The quilt is lost but she is remaking a copy of it for me. She'
is making it look as much like the original as possible with purple fabric'
s and shirting fabrics.'

Polly Mello'

"Quilts That Go Bump in the Night"'

------'_Part_31389_1319244703.1246888996308--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pant legs quilt
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravo'sjloken.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 08:37:29 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Laura and all,
I just realized that the quilt I posted about isn't men's wear but kids
wear. I forgot about the subject of the exhibit and only focused on the term
pant leg.
Jean



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pant legs quilts
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravo'sjloken.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 08:35:33 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

Laura,
I made such a quilt back in maybe the 80s. I'd be surprised if I actually
put a label on it, but it's still alive to my knowledge. It was our family
picnic quilt, but our daughter kind of took it over as a teen. She used it
as a beach quilt and I believe it's still alive in the back of her Subaru.
It was made of the legs of all the jeans I turned into cut-offs for my kids.
I couldn't stand to toss jeans they outgrew and they did that at a record
pace. So they had shorts and I had a quilt. I had a red pair that became the
centers and the rest is a normal log cabin quilt. It's tied and I'd say sort
of a longish lap quilt size. The condition is questionable. I'll see if I
can post a photo. She's about 15 minutes away but digitally seconds away.
Jean Loken in MN



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Coffin quilts
From: <suereich'charter.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 14:19:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

In Connecticut, we documented quilts that came with the provenance of being coffin quilts. I remember one was a long and narrow Crazy quilt of black wools. It had embroidery but only enough to cover the seams. sue reich
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: another addition to the highly amusing typos collection
From: "Candace Perry" <candace'schwenkfelder.com>


This just came through freecycle about 5 minutes ago. I just had to share.
Candace Perry



I am re-newing my vowels next week in Jamaica and I need a strapless white
gown size 14-16. I ordered one on ebay and it hasn't even shipped yet and
it's coming from China. I can't afford to buy a new one.I can even borrow
the dress if anyone has one and return it. Thank you!




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: another addition to the highly amusing typos collection
From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63'yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 11:59:32 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 11


Perhaps her spouse will take the consonants.

Mary Anne

-


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: utility/pants leg quilt
From: mopalka <mopalka'alaska.net>
Date: Mon, 06 Jul 2009 09:37:37 -0800
X-Message-Number: 12

Laura,

I have a "utility" quilt from my Grandmother, Mattie Shuler
Miller(1885-1983). I remember sleeping under it when I stayed with
her in Oklahoma. It has a flannel backing, is tied with bright red
yarn and the top is pieced from used wool clothing. I think the
pieces are rectangular but, not long rectangles as you described as
"pants leg". It is so heavy! I know we cousins could not move once
the quilt was put on us. Maybe there was a reason, we certainly
didn't get up and down all night, we settled right down and went to sleep!

Susan(in Alaska with an all time high of 80 degrees on July 4th! It
didn't get dark enough to see the fireworks but, we sure heard them.)



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Coffin quilts
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603'yahoo.com>
 


There is a supposed coffin quilt at the International Quilt Study Center:
http://www.quiltstudy.org/discover/search.html?search_type'3Dadvanced&searc'
h_action'3Dadvanced&totalresults'3D75&offset'3D0&maxresults'3D10&detailresu'
lt'3D9&sortby'3DPatternPrimary
'
Judy Schwender'''
--0-365763974-1246911943':50106--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QNM
From: Pat Kyser <patkyser'hiwaay.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 17:15:56 -0500
X-Message-Number: 14

I have Quilters' Newsletter Magazines from 1973-1991.
Does anyone want them? Or are they like National Geographic: too
numerous to bother.
Pat
(who is getting weary of the downsizing effort but at least it is
inside work, in the air conditioning.)



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilters' Journal
From: Pat Kyser <patkyser'hiwaay.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 17:52:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 15

I have vol. 1, no. 1 through issue #30.
Pat


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Coffin quilts
From: <pcrews'neb.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 21:09:09 +0000
X-Message-Number: 16

Yes, the International Quilt Study Center & Museum has a piece that is believed to be a coffin cover. Like so many other coffin quilts recently mentioned on QHL, it too is built in the Crazy quilt format with rich silk fabrics including velvets and satins. It is part of the Ardis and Robert James Collection, IQSC object number 1997.007.0360. You can view it at www.quiltstudy.org then click on Collections Database and enter the Object Number under Advanced Search. We simply list it as a Crazy in our Collections Database. However, it is one of the highlighted quilts in our recently released collections catalogue--"American Quilts in the Modern Age, 1870-1940: The International Quilt Study Center Collections." Coffin quilts are discussed on p. 138 in that volume.

The IQSC coffin cover will be on display in an upcoming exhibition at the museum entitled:
"A Fairyland of Fabrics: The Victorian Crazy Quilt," on view July 24-October 25, 2009. So please come visit and see this unusual quilt in the cloth!


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: coffin quilts
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmuse'gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 16:48:34 -0400
X-Message-Number: 17

--0016364c794d326a8f046e0fa133
Content-Type: text/plain; charset'ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Coffin quilts have been around since at least the 19th century because we
have seen photos of them, especially covering children. These last images of
the dead were important to the culture, especially those who had their photo
taken infrequently, during their lifetime.

Recently, I saw this notice, copied verbatim, on a website that purports to
sell (art) "coffin quilts."

*PLEASE NOTE: ALL DESIGNS AND TATTOO/COFFIN QUILT CONCEPTS HAVE BEEN
COPYRIGHTED!!! By recreating my concepts YOU ARE BREAKING THE LAW!

*I wrote to politely say that a concept cannot be copyrighted. Only tangible
objects fall into the category of something that can be copyrighted or
patented.

First, I was told that the person who owns the website is unable to make
changes; then, that the nephew who makes changes would be told about my
letter and perhaps make the change.

What followed was a litany of e-mails that used exceedingly foul language,
and even told me "to get over myself."

I must be a brazen hussy to have even brought up this subject, so there is
little chance I will do what is suggested*, *i.e. "get over myself."*

*I bring this up only because we were on the subject!* A case in point, it
takes all kinds!
*
--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: more about coffin quilts
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmuse'gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 17:43:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 18

--0016e6de016ccf5c32046e106413
Content-Type: text/plain; charset'ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Coffin quilts have been around since at least the 19th century because we
have seen photos of them, especially covering children. These last images of
the dead were important to the culture, especially those who had their photo
taken infrequently, during their lifetime.

Recently, I saw this notice, copied verbatim, on a website that purports to
sell (art) "coffin quilts."

*PLEASE NOTE: ALL DESIGNS AND TATTOO/COFFIN QUILT CONCEPTS HAVE BEEN
COPYRIGHTED!!! By recreating my concepts YOU ARE BREAKING THE LAW!

*I wrote to politely say that a concept cannot be copyrighted. Only tangible
objects fall into the category of something that can be copyrighted or
patented.

First, I was told that the person who owns the website is unable to make
changes; then, that the nephew who makes changes would be told about my
letter and perhaps make the change.

What followed was a litany of e-mails that used exceedingly foul language to
me, and even told me "to get over myself."

I must be a brazen hussy to have even brought up this subject, so there is
little chance I will do what is suggested*, *i.e. "get over myself."*

*I bring this up only because we were on the subject!

A case in point, it takes all kinds!*
*

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: QNM
From: Gaye Ingram <gingram'suddenlink.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 20:22:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 19

Pat Kyser <patkyser'hiwaay.net> wrote:
> I have Quilters' Newsletter Magazines from 1973-1991.
> Does anyone want them? Or are they like National Geographic: too
> numerous to bother.

Pat, are these something that might be offered for auction at guild or similar organization? Perhaps a group of younger quilters (not that we here are not mighty young enough)?

When I started out with quilts, I would have felt blessed with this set.

gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: coffin quilts
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton'comcast.net>

This is slightly different and maybe your area does this also but many '
quilt guilds do charity quilts for vets, unwed mothers, kids etc. There '
is something done here by a few groups called Dignity quilts. They are '
also long and narrow - designed to be used in a care facility or '
whenever a death has occured. Carrying the person out in dignity with '
this quilt over them is so much nicer (especially in a public facility '
where the trip is down the hall past many rooms and other residents ) I '
wish it had been done for my Dad. I happened to look out of the family '
room at the wrong time. If you are in a group who would like new ideas '
for charity projects these can be made quickly and donated to local '
nursing homes/care facilities.
jean
Minnesota
oh - I've also appraised an amazing crazy quilt - newly made - which the '
owner said she made for her own coffin cover. Her kids were somewhat '
uncomfortable but it was beautiful and made her very happy!'

------'_NextPart_000_0022_01C9FE7F.5F2C24C0--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Coffin Quilts
From: "Maureen" <maureen'booksandoldlace.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 19:47:52 -0700
X-Message-Number: 21

In Alabama I found several quilts that were longer and narrower than '
usual,
that were described as being for hands -- narrow cots in the barn. Mine '
were
large block patterns, rough homespun, carded cotton batting and quilted '
5 or
6 stitches to the inch.

Maureen in Ashland, Oregon

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: This I Accomplish: Harriet Powers' Bible Quilt and Other Pieces
From: kyra hicks <kyra262'yahoo.com>
 



''''Wanted to share with you news of my new book!' "This I Acc'
omplish: Harriet Powers''Bible Quilt and Other Pieces."' During'th'
e last two years, I've had such an adventure challenging what we think we'
'know about Harriet Powers (1837 'E2'80'93 1910) and her two known quilts'
(The Bible'Quilt at the Smithsonian - and the Pictorial Quilt at the Mus'
eum'of Fine Arts, Boston). You know that Mrs. Powers offered to'sale he'
r Bible Quilt to Jennie Smith for $10. Miss Smith, though, only had'$5.'
' But, did you know that there was'ANOTHER woman who also wanted to '
buy the Bible Quilt?
''''This I Accomplish highlights nearly a dozen SIGNIFICANT new'p'
ieces of information about Mrs. Powers and her quilts.... including the los'
t'1882 Lord's Supper Quilt!' Or, how IOWA plays an important'part '
of Mrs. Powers' story.' Yes, IOWA! The'book illustrates proof that M'
rs. Powers was a literate, award-winning quilter,'who stitched at least F'
IVE quilts and stood up for herself as an artist!' Did you know that w'
e might not know about'Mrs. Powers' Pictorial Quilt at the MFA if the out'
come of a 14 year adulterous'affair and three year legal battle had gone '
the other way?!?'''''The'book is 180 pages and includes abou'
t 20 pictures. There's an extensive'annotative bibliography, fun timeline'
, and more! I hope the clues in the book'can help us find the Lord'E2'80'
'99s Supper Quilt 'E2'80'93 or one of the other lost Powers'quilts! '
'This I Accomplish is available'on online or by special order at your l'
ocal bookstore. You might also ask'your local library to order it.

Hope you enjoy this new historical work!' Best,' Kyra E. Hicks'
''

--0-1699257043-1246939931':4907--


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Subject: RE: Coffin Quilts
From: "Maureen" <maureen'booksandoldlace.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2009 20:22:17 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

And in Nebraska and Iowa I collected several quilts which were clearly '
cut
down the middle, so these were longer and narrower than usual as well. '
These
quilts, I'm told, were cut because of family arguments, distribution
obligations and family sharing between descendants. These quilts have '
split
blocks, no border and different binding on the one side. Maureen in '
Ashland,
Oregon

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: coffin quilt
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts'yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2009 14:41:20 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5
---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: maureen'booksandoldlace.com To
unsubscribe send a blank email to '
leave-qhl-1442973G'lyris.quiltropolis.com
For more information, articles and archives, visit our home page at
http://QuiltHistory.com.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts, curved seams, myth
From: Gaye Ingram <gingram'suddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2009 9:44:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

While reshelving books yesterday, I came across a statement in Rose Wilder Lane's "Woman's Day Book of American Needlework" that I've always wondered about. In reading through Lane's introduction to patchwork, I was surprised at just how wrong she was about some things. Nevertheless, her book was inspiring at the time it came out, and I often turn to it still, for old times' sake.

This is what she says (p.79): "The seams [of patchwork] are almost always straight, for only th Dutch women of Manhattan and Long Island and the German women in Pennsylvania and Ohio had the superb skill to sew a perfectly curving bias seam."

Clearly by the time to which she referred, a lot of English women had managed bias in applique and in early pieced patterns that gave the effect of applique.

But is there anything to her statement?

And if so, why would these women have acquired that skill that others had missed?

In reviewing this section of the book, I recognized Lane seemed not to meet an unverified, romantic legend she didn't like. But what she got right was important, too---that an interest in quiltmaking can take one through libraries and museums into "the living culture of our country" and that through it "women..who are preserving and still enriching this heritage [are] culture bearers." And as a child of the Plains, she had a real feel for the meaning of quiltmaking. In a desert, her book was an oasis.

Inquiring mind in steamy Louisiana,
Gaye Ingram


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Correction! Quick!
From: Gaye Ingram <gingram'suddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2009 10:24:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I just reread my post to QHL and realized that it included this statement: "...in a dessert, it was an oasis"

Apologies for haste and decidedly mixed metaphors! (watery puddings?)

Besides, working with gardening editing and writing, I've come to loathe the "oasis" metaphor. If you read garden publications---even high-end ones like "Horticulture" or "Fine Gardening" or "Garden Design"---you will drown in the number of oases that appear in gardens or gardens that are oases.

Stop laughing, Mary Ann and Candace.

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: QNM
From: carylschuetz'comcast.net
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2009 17:03:11 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 5


Pat,
Perhaps you could run a small classified ad in the QNM to either sell them or send them to one who would pay for shipping.
There are collectors who might want the "complete collection" that you have.
Caryl

--
Caryl Schuetz
Woodhaven Studio
Professional Association of Appraisers -
Quilted Textiles
Certified by The American Quilter's Society
www.quiltvalues.com
Blog http://woodhavenstudio.wordpress.com
Blog http://aboutquilts.wordpress.com
http://indyfiber.com/artists/schuetz.html
Author of "Fabulous Tee Shirt Quilts"




------'_Part_26537_1084961214.1246986191394--


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Subject: pants leg quilts, cofffin quilts, learning more every minute
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts'yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2009 13:23:55 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6


--0-799825818-1246998235':36806
Content-Type: text/plain; charset'iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Whooo-eey. this is way more fun than folding and straightening and re-taggi'
ng and re-shelving Thanks everyone for all the interesting information. Thi'
s sheds lisoght on pieces I have owned in the past, and even some in the sh'
op now. About 'coffin quilts' it explains why some silk crazy quilts have u'
nusual proportion, long and narrow, I thought they were for sideboards, or '
to span the area of a bed, more than likely, they were made for the viewing'
of the dearly departed. (Michael Jackson should have had one of those Sara'
h Mary Taylor southern ones appliqued with hands, but I digress...) And it '
may explain why some crazy quilts are so long with simple embroidery, a qui'
ck but tasteful decorative element for the situation.'
'
About pants legs, those that still have traces of being inhabited (worn poc'
kets, mends, patches, weathered color) are so interesting to me, I don't kn'
ow about anyone else. I would LOVE'l to find one made just of pants cuffs'
that were removed to shorten the trousers for the next (shorter) guy. Just'
cuffs, not cut offs! I knew someone who collected quilts in which the orgi'
nal garment had to stil be visible in the quilt construction, like Polly Me'
llo's football jersey quilt.
'
About mis-spells, thanks for all these whimsical asides. A daily dose of th'
is stuff is really good. (the size 16 bride might want to re-think straples'
s!)
'
thanks all
'
Laura Fisher
--0-799825818-1246998235':36806--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilts, curved seams, myth
From: Sally Ward <sallytatters'ntlworld.com>
 



>
> "The seams [of patchwork] are almost always straight, for only th
> Dutch women of Manhattan and Long Island and the German women in
> Pennsylvania and Ohio had the superb skill to sew a perfectly
> curving bias seam."


I am baffled by this statement. Are we to assume then that nobody had
the skill to construct and decorate complicated clothing, headwear,
underwear, etc. etc. etc. using anything other than straight seams???

Sally Ward
--Apple-Mail-15-258110438--


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Subject: Re: Quilts, curved seams, myth
From: Gaye Ingram <gingram'suddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2009 17:33:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

Sally, this book is filled with historic errors, especially about quiltmaking.

But most are of a general or interpretative nature, often tied to an unrealistic view of who we were as a people.

This one, however, was a little more specific. and I wondered if there were something reasonable from which the author leapt to it.

i wondered if she were referring to decorative stitching or even folk art forms.

Or nothing at all.

A question, not a suggestion.

But the logical extension to your question is, I would presume, yes, she does suggest that German and Dutch women were more skilled in joining curved bias seems that British women in America.

gaye

gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: This I Accomplish: Harriet Powers' Bible Quilt and Other Pieces
From: Arden Shelton <junkorama'comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2009 16:26:41 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 9


Kyra: I have just ordered it for my large Central public library. I can't '
wait to see it. Many years ago, i received a small kit to embroider the '
bible quilt in the Smithsonian, (probably from the gift shop). As I was a '
quilter, I was not much interested in doing it, so I gave it away, and have'
regretted it since! ''The figures in the quilts remind me of the Ben'
in banners made in Africa. ...arden'' '(Ms) Arden Shelton 'Portl'
and, OR''''_