VSubject: Re: Doll Quilt Slize
From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 15:55:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I haven't had a chance to dig the bed out yet and measure it but it sounds
like it would.
Debbie Hill-Russell
russhillbeecreek.net
http://russellhillranch.blogspot.com/



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Stolen > Misplaced > ?
From: textiqueaol.com
D

I sent a link the other day reporting a stolen Red Skelton quilt.? The story has changed.
Not involved in any way but it just reminds us all about keeping good records.

Jan


http://onlineathens.com/stories/091809/cop_494286423.shtml

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: How to learn about African American quilting?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Sep 2009 10:33:28 +0100
X-Message-Number: 1

A friend has asked for advice on what books to pick as an introduction
to African American quilting, and I wondered what the list would
recommend. This is as a result of seeing Gees Bend quilts at a
current exhibition in France with what she felt to be inadequate
labelling, and witnessing the reaction of the European public to
'badly made quilts'.

My immediate thought was Cuesta Benberry's 'Always There', but that is
out of print. Google brought up quite a few suggestions, but it is
difficult to know where to start.

(And yes, she does know HIPV is only to be read with a health warning
and in the spirit of 'knowing thine enemy' <G>)

Sally Ward




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: How to learn about African American quilting?
From: Getfruitaol.com
Date: Sat, 19 Sep 2009 15:24:18 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2


-------------------------------1253388258
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Contact Kyra Hicks at _www.blackthreadsblogspot.com_
(http://www.blackthreadsblogspot.com) . She is a leading expert to get you and your friends
started. The book, The Quilts of Gees Bend is a good place to start with more
info in other books The Quilters (or Women) of Gees bend and another about
the architecture of the quilts of Gees Bend.Gees Bend type quilting
represents the style of quilting by this isolated group of people (like the
Amish-also considered isolated), but is by no means the only quilting form by
African American quilters.

See also A Communion of the Spirits, a compilation by by Roland Freeman.

Violet Vaughnes,
AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles
San Bernardino, CA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: How to learn about African American quilting?
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Sep 2009 16:16:51 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3


I know many people don't agree with Eli Leon, but if you want to understand
the esthetic of quilts such as Gee's Bend, you should read his book,
Accidentally on Purpose: The Aesthetic Management of Irregularitites in
African Textiles and African-American Quilts.

It was published by the Figge Art Museum in Davenport, IA. I got my copy at
the Shelburne Museum in Vermont

ISBN 0-9771491-2-9

It's well to keep in mind that these improvisational quilts are only one
type of quilt that has been (and is being) made by African Americans.

Personally, I LOVE THEM.

I went to Milwaukee to see the first Gee's Bend Show, and it was wonderful.
Many, many people were wandering through the show, most with big smiles on
their faces!

Kim in ND



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: How to learn about African American quilting?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Sep 2009 00:25:36 +0100
X-Message-Number: 4

Thank you very much everyone. I was pleased to hear Communion of the
Spirits recommended, because it was the one book on my own shelf for
many years until I indulged in the large Gees Bend book. I have not
seen the Gees Bend quilts in the flesh, which may make a big
difference - photography can certainly lend enchantment to the eye.
But I warm to them in the same way that I warm to Yorkshire haps,
Welsh wool tailors sample quilts, and indeed Australian waggas. I've
been wondering whether the French and German viewers who 'didn't get
then' are actually coming from a very different aesthetic. I know
that my friend is a questioning kind of person, and I'll be interested
to see how she gets on with her further research.

As always, advice from this list is invaluable.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Gee's Bend Exhibit Next Weekend
From: Libby Wallis <libquiltsgmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Sep 2009 23:52:33 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

The Country Patchwork Quilter's Guild of Marshall, MO will have an
exhibit of the Gee's Bend quilts at their show next weekend, 9/26-27.
Marshall is in central Missouri. You can link to their website from
the calendar page of my website (see below). I believe some of the
Gee's Bend quilters will be there because I was invited to attend a
"reception for the Gee's Bend Quilters" on Friday night, although
their website doesn't mention it.

Libby Wallis

The LibQuilts Collection
www.LibQuilts.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: African American Quilting
From: Edwaquiltaol.com


Check this web site

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~ug97/quilt/atrads.html


Title of the site is African American Quilting Traditions

-------------------------------1253425726--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 19, 2009
From: zegrtquiltaol.com

I would like to suggest
?your friend read the article I wrote titled "Myth and Methodology: Shelly Zegart Unpicks African-American Quilt Scholarship" It is available to download on my website www. shellyquilts.com.. Though it is not about about technique it does illuminatesome of? the many ways and some of the many people , through exhibitions they have mounted and books they have written since the 70's? , have pushed forward? their own opinions about the origins of African American quilts .. some? good and some not so good.We the students of the genre should look at all that has been written so far with an analytical eye and keep our minds and eyes open..? I would consider the article, along with the books already mentioned and some others as critical to understanding the world? of African-American quilts.

btw The KQP, INc, producer of the" Always There "exhibition and catalogue by Cuesta Benberry does have several slightly damaged copies that could be for sale.

Best Shelly Zegart


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: How to learn about African American quilting?
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Sep 2009 16:16:51 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3


I know many people don't agree with Eli Leon, but if you want to understand
the esthetic of quilts such as Gee's Bend, you should read his book,
Accidentally on Purpose: The Aesthetic Management of Irregularitites in
African Textiles and African-American Quilts
.

It was published by the Figge Art Museum in Davenport, IA. I got my copy at
the Shelburne Museum in Vermont

It's well to keep in mind that these improvisational quilts are only one
type of quilt that has been (and is being) made by African Americans.

Personally, I LOVE THEM.

I went to Milwaukee to see the first Gee's Bend Show, and it was wonderful.
Many, many people were wandering through the show, most with big smiles on
their faces!

Kim in ND



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: How to learn about African American quilting?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Sep 2009 00:25:36 +0100
X-Message-Number: 4

Thank you very much everyone. I was pleased to hear Communion of the
Spirits recommended, because it was the one book on my own shelf for
many years until I indulged in the large Gees Bend book. I have not
seen the Gees Bend quilts in the flesh, which may make a big
difference - photography can certainly lend enchantment to the eye.
But I warm to them in the same way that I warm to Yorkshire haps,
Welsh wool tailors sample quilts, and indeed Australian waggas. I've
been wondering whether the French and German viewers who 'didn't get
then' are actually coming from a very different aesthetic. I know
that my friend is a questioning kind of person, and I'll be interested
to see how she gets on with her further research.

As always, advice from this list is invaluable.

Sally Ward




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: African American quilt info
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jatt.net>


I've referenced quite a bit on the topic between
http://www.historyofquilts.com/african_american.html
and
http://www.womenfolk.com/quilt_history_websites/lafam.htm

Judy Breneman


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: African American Quilting Books
From: Linda Hunter <hunterljroadrunner.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Sep 2009 22:17:42 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Dear Sally,
Also look at Spirits of the Cloth by Carolyn Mazloomi. She supports
the Women of Color Network, which showcases and sells quilts by
contemporary African American Quilters. These are more sophisticated
examples of contemporary AA quilts. Her website is
carolynmazloomi.com. It gives a good picture of what African American
quilt artists are doing today. Linda Hunter

--
Linda Hunter
AQS Quilt Appraiser, Instructor and Lecturer
lindahunters-stars.com
www.hunters-stars.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Subject: How to learn about African American quilting?
From: Laurel Horton <laurelkalmiaresearch.net>
 


I highly recommend a new book by Dr. Patricia A. Turner, *Crafted Lives:
Stories and Studies of African American Quilters
*(University of Mississippi
Press, 2009). The author is a professor of African American Studies and a
quiltmaker. The first part of the book includes profiles of nine quiltmakers
of varied backgrounds and who follow a variety of styles and techniques. The
second part is a collection of related essays discussing the public
presentation and perception of African American quilts from the late 19th
century to the present. She addresses both the Gees Bend phenomena and the
Quilt Code legend. It's a fine, readable book--an excellent introduction as
well as an important addition to the scholarship.

Laurel Horton
Seneca, South Carolina, USA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: what people do for quilting
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Sep 2009 19:55:08 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I'd like to thank Kimberley Wulfert for having to deal with my parents
this evening in our attempt to conduct an online interview about my job
with AQS. Look in the dictionary for "imperious." Find my dad.
Kimberley showed amazing patience and a great sense of humor. I'm
certain no one in his lifetime has suggested therapy to my dad. She must
have been diplomatic because he stayed on the line.

It was truly funny and the quilt-related purpose of this email is not
for me to toot my own horn but to remind everyone that Kimberely has
been conducting quilt history one interview at a time. Like many of us,
she's working at this for passion, not a paycheck.

I'm honored to have been asked to be interviewed, and we plan to
re-schedule. I'm obviously vested, but Kimberley respects the QHL rules
and won't post to announce her interviews. You can find archives of
conversations with many more worthy others than me and keep up with
future events including an interview with Kyra Hicks on October 26, at
www.womenonquilts.com.

Andi in Paducah, KY



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Storing quilts
From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Sep 2009 10:48:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I have a question for our curatorial experts. We spend the winter in
AZ and the summer in KS. When we leave we turn off the heat in the KS
house. I have a lot of quilts, mostly new and 30s. The house is three
stories high. I've been stacking them flat on the upstairs beds but
there is not much circulation except for a ceiling fan. I can store
them flat on the main floor bed. I have watched the basement temp &
humidity and it stays at 70 degrees and 70% humidity. It also smells a
little musty but might be the most stable environment. The house is
over 100 years old and has no insulation except in the attic.

Where is the best place for them? If I stack them flat should I put a
sheet between each? How many can I flat stack on a bed?

Thanks for any advice you share.

Linda Laird
www.lindalairddesigns.com  (I'm so proud to be able to put this
website with my name because I did it myself. Please take a learning
look at the history of Mayan hand stamps that I use to create with.
These 3,000 year old stamps were used to add designs to Mayan fabric
as well as pottery and tattoos.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: on the road with Bunnie and Hazel
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Sep 2009 20:09:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

The Dating Club had a field trip last Thursday. We went to visit
Jinny Beyer and saw both her antique quilts and her groundbreaking
original
designs. What a day! Jinny was so gracious and welcoming and provided
an
endless stream of eye candy.
Being who we are we wanted the antique quilts first starting with a
beautifully quilted Compass (first quarter 19th cen.) in a single blue
and
buff print with a half square triangle inner border. A red and white
Sunflower had a print background and a floral trail chintz border with
fan
quilting.
Jinny seems to like stripy quilts. We saw a circa 1840 Flying Geese
stripy, another pieced of scrappy diamonds made from 1/2 square
triangles
using lots of stripes and chintzes. None of us had ever seen the turkey
red
printed lace on the border of a Mosaic Diamond.
A cotton Crazy dated 1883 included lots of cheater cloth and
commemoratives: Garfield, Pickwick, Asian scenes, a man and woman in bed
(shocking!)
I loved the Oak Leaf and Reel and various print backgrounds. The
appliquE9 was scrappy; the center of one reel was cheater cloth. But
if I
could have taken one piece home it would have been the 1850's top with
four
enormous roses and a floral vine border all pieced a la Anne Orr. We
agreed
that the design was enlarged from Berlin work patterns. You can see it
pictured on p. 62 of Jinny's 2004 Quilt Making by Hand.
Jinny has a marvelous collection of charm quilts. The huge Mosaic
Star will be in her new book.
Jinny's first quilt was made when she lived in India. The floral
Hexagons are on a blue background. We were stunned to see Ray of Light
in
person and Inner City and the other masterpieces that have made Jinny
one of
the most influential figures in the current quilt revival. I feel so
lucky
to be part of this world.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sad News
From: DDBSTUFFaol.com
Date: Wed, 23 Sep 2009 09:36:59 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1

Myr good friend and fellow antiques dealer, Carolyn A. Petrus, 59, died
Sunday, August 30, at her home.
Carolyn was active in the antiques business for more than 30 years and was
well known as an expert in textiles and Americana.
She was a 1967 summa cum laude graduate of Wyoming Area High School and a
1971 graduate of Wilkes College, earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in
mathematics. Carolyn then pursued a master of geology and environmental sciences
degree from Pennsylvania State University.
She was a licensed member of the Pennsylvania Professional Engineers, Land
Surveyors and Geologists and worked for 25 years as a geologist in
Pennsylvania.
In recent years, Carolyn enjoyed traveling to Eastern Europe to explore
her ancestry and to collect antique ethnic costumes and pagan symbolism in
fabrics.
Carolyn owned and operated a bed and breakfast in a historic Eighteenth
Century stone house, where she enjoyed displaying her diverse collections.
She loved good food, good wine and good conversation. She enjoyed the great
outdoors, spending winters skiing in upstate New York, and the rest of the
year at home in Port Matilda with her dog Summer and her cat Maggie.
Carolyn had a knack for finding treasures in unlikely places. She was a
regular dealer at the spring and fall Brimfield antique shows, and attended
other shows in and around Pennsylvania.
Carolyn was a beautiful person who was loved and deeply appreciated by
those who knew her. She will be greatly missed.
She is survived by her parents, Joseph and Katherine Petrus of Exeter,
Penn., and a brother Richard Petrus of Scottsdale Ariz.
Donations may be made in Carolyn's name to the Ovarian Cancer Society, 910
17th Street, N.W., Suite 1190, Washington D.C. 20006 or your local SPCA.

Regards,

Darwin

"To the world, you are nothing but to a rescued dog or cat, you ARE the
world"



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Date this fabric?
From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Sep 2009 20:31:03 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Dear friends, I am documenting these blocks found in the early 1990s at
a yard sale in an old house on Deer Isle ME. Kathy, the woman who
bought the blocks, had them put together at a local quilt shop. Kathy
then donated the tied quilt to the Historical Society.

When I examined the blocks and photographed them, I found that the pink
fabric with the abstract green flower has a burn hole in it with a
smooth clear bead on the edges. I did not do another burn test, but
presume that this means the fabric is a polyester, limiting it to after
1950 or perhaps a nylon.

The style of the flower looks modern to my eye, a Sputnik-era design,
no earlier than 1945. The style of the cotton fabrics suggests 1950-1965
utility fabrics, I think, from my memories -- like my father's pajamas.
I can't find anything like it in my quilt reference books where the
quilts seem to use florals or solids after 1910. I'm much better at pre
1915 styles. What do you think?

I have posted the photos to www.vintagepictures.eboard.com/
under Fabrics with a white note that says, "Help date this block?"

Thanks for any comments.

Susan Seater, Raleigh NC, just back from Deer Isle ME.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Date this fabric?
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Sep 2009 20:38:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Susan,
have you seen eileen Trestain's book on fabrics from 1950-2000? It might be
very helpful to you in this matter. Marcia Kaylakie
Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Date this fabric?
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Sep 2009 20:56:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Susan--

They sure look like mid-20th century to me. I ought to know--I'm mid-20th
century myself!

Kim

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: desparately seeking George
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Sep 2009 07:24:39 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

--0-2096631524-1253802279:68624
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi everyone, to all the stashers out there, I am desperately looking for a
fabric that was out a number of years ago that had small pictures of the Gi
lbert Stuart portrait of George Washington on it.

I need a small piece to finish a look alike of one of the Sanitary Commissi
on quilts that has a block with George's picture in it.

If you have some, please contact me off-line. thanks, best, Don


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Enquiring Mind wants to know
From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Sep 2009 09:37:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I was looking at the latest Connecting Threads catalog last night and
they say that their latest fabric is made from "cotton grown in the USA
and woven and printed in North America."

Does anyone know where it is woven and printed? Mexico?

Thanks,

Mary


--
Mary G. Persyn mary.persynvalpo.edu
Associate Dean for Library Services
School of Law Library
Valparaiso University
656 S. Greenwich St.
Valparaiso, IN 46383
219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Looking for a quilt judge
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Sep 2009 12:47:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

--001517475b544d7f0474559689
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8

Hello all,
My quilt guild hosts an annual judged show here in Morehead City, North
Carolina and they're looking for a judge for next year (2010). The date is
Thursday May 13. Interested? They would like to hire someone from NC, VA, or
SC so the person can drive. If you judge and would like to talk to our
show's co-chair, call Nancy Smith at (252) 728-2672. Or you can contact
Nancy at dolphinrunec.rr.com . Tell her I told you to call!

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: block dating for Susan
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Sep 2009 12:48:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

--0015173ff3e4c1a6d60474559835
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8

Hi Susan and other friends,
I totally agree with your assessment. Looks mid-20th century to me. The
colors and spacing on the prints are wrong for an earlier date. Thank you
for posting a link directly to the Eboards image so we could quickly view
the block. I never remember how to get on Eboards and the link was handy.
Hope this is helpful
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: cotton printing
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

According to Kim Wulfert in one of her research comments on her blog, Crans
ton Mills has recently terminated its cottonprinting in the US, making i
t the very last of the companies who do so. every aspect of textile product
ion used to be done in the U.S., now it seems there is none. After producin
g the fabric in the U.S., Cranston at least printed here; and now-- nuthin'
. So it's ironic to see the term "north America" isn't it? Sort ofsneaky
.

You can see a quilt or two or three made with cotton printed in the old U.S
. A. at the New England Quilt Museum show MASTER PIECES: Haberdashery Te
xtiles in Antique Quilts.Sorry for the unabashedplug but --itopens
right about now! There's a reception and talk on Saturday at 1:00 at the M
useum, 18 Shattuck Street, Lowell, Massachusetts.

If any QHL people come by,please do say hello.

Lauira Fisher


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: research on womens sewing circles
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>


Hello all,
I received the email below from a woman doing research on women's sewing ci
rcles. I alerted her to Uncoverings and related articles in the journ
al. If any of you know of any quilt groups that fit what she is looki
ng for, please forward this information to them.
Thank you.
Judy Schwender
Paducah, KY

Hello Judy,
I was so lovely speaking with you this afternoon. Per our conversation my n
ame is Meribah Knight and I am a journalist based out of Chicago doing an o
ral history archiving project on women's sewing circles in the U.S. with a
grant I was awarded from Harvard University. The project is entitled: Will
the Circle Be Unbroken: An Oral History of WomenE28099s Sewing Circles i
n America. And I am now applying for additional funding from the National E
ndowment for the Humanities. I do write a fair bit about sewing and the res
urgence in contemporary crafts. I have two articles being published this wi
nter about it. The first is for December issue of O Magazine. It is a first
person narrative about sewing through three generations of women in my fam
ily and the second is for American Craft Magazine and is a much more trend-
oriented piece about the resurgence of hand crafts in America.
The premise of my oral history project is to preserve the stories and exper
iences that existed among the women within these circles. To find and speak
with these women, I will be crisscrossing the U.S. interviewing, archiving
and writing about various sewing circles. I am trying to find the most div
erse grouping possible: African American, Caucasian, Native American, Inuit
, Mexican American, South Asian, and many more. Because they all hold tradi
tions in hand crafts sewing groups exist among all of them. And It is my mi
ssion to find them! After the interviews have been completed and edited the
y will be archived in the Schlesinger Library at Harvard University.
I knew the National Quilt Museum would be a wonderful contact and I cannot
thank you enough for taking the time to speak with me and advise me. I woul
d be grateful if you might be able to pass my information on the anyone you
think could be a valuable contact as well as those who might like to parti
cipate.Thank you again and I am happy to provide any additional information
you might need, so just let me know.
Sincerely,
--
Meribah Knight
312-532-0502
www.meribahknight.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: enquiring minds want to know
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Sep 2009 11:25:25 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I'd guess that it's Honduras or another Central American country. I think
they're part of NA, not SA, no? They make lots of our clothes down there,
why not the fabric?
Jean Loken in MN



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Symbol in Crazy Quilt
From: "Jennifer Perkins" <qltrstoreharlannet.com>


I was just reading the Fons and Porter email showing a crazy quilt a man
brought in for them to see. It has a symbol I have never seen before, and
it is used a number of times through the quilt. It reminds me of the Breast
Cancer ribbon in shape, but has a very unique look. Has anyone see this
before? Know what it is?

Jennifer Perkins

NQACJ


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt about Beverly Sills
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Sep 2009 11:08:09 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5

The estate auction of Beverly Sills is taking place early October in New
York. There is one quilt in the lot made by members of the San Diego Opera
Guild depicting Sills in her various opera roles.

http://www.doylenewyork.com/default.htm

Karen Alexander


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Symbol in quilt
From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com>
 

Jennifer,

It looks like a religious symbol. Christian faiths often used fish as sy
mbols - I am not sure if others did too. I am catholic and am coming fro
m the range of reference.

To me the symbol looks like a fish with an eye.

This isn't much help, but it is a direction to look.

Sue


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Calling quilt pattern historians
From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com>
 

Hello to the block name enthusiasts on this list. Am finishing a little
essay on the Cracker quilt pattern and wonder if anyone has anything else to
add. So far, the folks from Ocracoke Island NC claim it as their special
quilt block. A native islander is called an 'Ococker' so maybe onomatopoeia
is at play.
Some people trace its name from the shape of Christmas crackers (English
pop-open party favors). There might be a connection there.
The Cracker pattern listed in Brackman's Encyclopedia is listed as being
published in Women's Day in 1931--not exactly an ancient pattern. But island
quilters claim it's ancient. The Ocracoke version however does not have
three rectangles but rather four and one must always be red. From another
islander: "One strip has got to be red (that's the sauce on the seafood) and
the two on either side are white for the light roll bread (or
crackers)--doesn't matter what the #4 strip is." Other trivia: On an island
where most things had to be imported from "off", red cloth was prized and
used carefully throughout a quilt. Sailors (about the only job besides
fishing on Ocracoke) would bring home red fabric from Jamaica or Bermuda as
gifts for their womenfolk.
if you have anything to add to this discussion, have at. Here's a link to
two blog entries I did earlier this year on the subject so you can see the
block: http://peppercory.blogspot.com/2009_01_01_archive.html . Thanks for
any tidbits!
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117