Subject: Nice write up - Quilt Exhibit in Greenville TN
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Thu, 08 Oct 2009 21:24:24 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

http://www.greenevillesun.com/story/306040

The Museum is named for a Revolutionary War general under whom many Greene
Countians served, and for whom the town and county are named.
http://www.nathanaelgreenemuseum.com/

Karen Alexander in the Islands






----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: big ticket books
From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Oct 2009 08:58:05 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

At the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Study Day last week, I learned that the New
Jersey quilt book is now selling for big bucks.
Can any one tell me what other documentation books are in a similar league?

when i first became interested in antique quilts and the fabrics that help date them, my husband purchased (at my request) a book from the smithsonian -- calicos and chintz -- which i have seen well over the $100 price at amazon and other online stores. i printed out a page and stuck it in the book so that hopefully it will never be sold for $1 at a garage sale.
patti





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 08, 2009
From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net>
Date: Fri, 09 Oct 2009 06:09:59 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

--_2044390.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"; formatflowed

Hi Newbie - you can check prices on Amazon and other internet sites.
www.bookfinder.com will show you prices on a number of sites. Just
remember that what someone is asking for a book is not necessarily
what they are selling for. Some of these sellers are delusional! I
recently sold a rug hooking book, only a couple of years old, but out
of print . . . at the time there was one copy on Amazon, and someone
was asking $800+ for it! I sold mine for $70 within a few days of
putting it on Amazon. I was very happy with that, especially since I
knew the book was likely to be reprinted and I never thought the book
was that great anyway. It seems to me that these book prices
fluctuate a lot as well, so you really need to look to see how easy
it is to find a particular book at the time you want to sell it. - Judy



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 08, 2009
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Oct 2009 20:55:24 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Judy makes a good point. I've seen autographed copies of my out of print
novels at unbelievable prices on e-bay as a "buy it now" price. Pretty
amazing when the same book is available on my web site from my stash for
cover price. "What the market will bear". . . . and "buyer beware" truly
do apply.
Stephanie Whitson


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: big ticket books
From: Ady Hirsch <adamroninetvision.net.il>
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2009 09:26:28 +0200
X-Message-Number: 2

Yes, some of them are selling for rather insane prices, although most can be
bought used quite reasonably. As far as I know, the priciest are Down by the
Old Mill Stream (Rhode Island), A Maryland Album, First Flowerings Early
Virginia Quilts. I have no idea what makes a book so expensive, other than
the printing of a limited edition. The written content of the Rhode Island
book, for example, is excellent, yet the quilts selected for photography are
mediocre, disappointing even.
Most of the other state project books can be bought quite reasonably (used
or sometimes new) from Amazon, www.abebooks.com. www.alibris.com etc.
Ady in Israel


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts in Movies
From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com>
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2009 11:17:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi All,
Couldn't help but notice this quilt (in between the lovely Welsh Men's
traditional choral singing) in the movie, "How Green was my Valley", with
"master Roddy McDowall", seen last night. While he is in bed by the
window, he's covered in a barely visible Double Wedding Ring quilt. Of
course, the accessories and costumes were a bit vague for a specific date
as well, but it certainly seemed that the "flavor" of the set denoted
early 1900s......

Also -- did someone already mention "Annie Hall" as a quilt spotted movie?
There was a quilt on the bed of the place they stayed in on the island,
where they had the great scene of putting the "escaped" lobster into the
pot.....

Martha Spark
Roseburg, OR
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: I have to thank some people today.
From: "Maureen" <maureenbooksandoldlace.com>
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2009 11:02:05 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

I have to thank some people today.

When I moved to Oregon in 2001, I finished up the quilt in the frame, a
bear's claw for my parents, and that's the last quilting I did. My
quilting
space had morphed into a general purpose, shared workroom. I didn't have
a
table large enough for the rotary mat, a large clear wall to lay out the
blocks, space to leave colors and patterns in view to dream about.
Whenever
I felt an impulse to put colors and patterns together, I designed a new
website using those colors, or edited video that required a particularly
focused effort.

But quilting is about more than space. It's about peace of mind. It's
about
remembering.

Yesterday Ed and I pulled my Heritage Quilt Frame out of storage. I
finished
off the last block in a quilt that I started in a 1998 class with Mary
Waller in Vermillion, South Dakota. I pieced the backing from stash and
pulled batting from the closet. It took us week to position the quilt on
the
rails.

Thanks to Mary Waller who made me iron when I didn't want to, to the
quilting ladies at the Wayne Nebraska Senior Center, to Shelly Zegert
who
keeps asking me quilt history questions, to Kris who's kept me connected
through QHL, to my local friends in quilting Elaine, Max and Darlene, to
Martha Sparks, who's moved from Salem to Roseburg, Oregon bringing with
the
Columbia Willamette Quilt Study Group even closer and to Nell Mathern
whose
boundless energy keeps quilting and quilts everywhere here in Southern
Oregon.

This weekend, I'll have a quilt in the frame. This quilt will be for
Naima,
my niece of whom I am so proud, off to college today.

This weekend, I'll have a quilt in the frame.

Maureen.
In Ashland, Oregon.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: for Maureen who has a quilt in the frame
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 06:00:52 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

--0023545bdb806cc4330475a5e32c
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Welcome back. Maureen. I know the quiet joy of sitting down to work and
letting your fingers move across the quilt as the stitches accumulate. It is
soul satisfying. Some great music to listen to---ahhh. I am demonstrating
sashiko at Quilt Market today and see the busy shop owners tromping the
aisles. I am the lucky bunny who can sit-n-stitch-they stop and look and
say, "You're doing what I'd like to be doing right now."Handwork rocks (or
at least hums)
Pepper Cory



author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--0023545bdb806cc4330475a5e32c--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 10, 2009
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 08:01:41 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2


-------------------------------1255262501
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Subject: Regional Quilt Study Day CD - Last Call
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
I'd like to wind up my CD burning, labeling, packaging, and mailing this
week.

I am taking last call orders for the CD of all the images from the most
recent Regional Quilt Study Day of the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Study Group at the
Burlington County Historic Society in Burlington City NJ on September 26,
2009. The CD contains close to 400 digital images, many in close-up. And
while I'm at it, and have just recently learned how to create really snarky
labels, if you want the CD from last year's RQSD, with well over
400 images, you can order that too, for the same price. Cost is $15.00 and
includes postage. A check for $30.00 gets you both. Respond to me for my
address. _judy.growcomcast.net _ (mailto:judy.growcomcast.net A) A
testimonial from others who have received either or both wouldn't hurt here
-- how about it?

Lovers of antique quilts, may I have your attention, please? This CD
offers a rare opportunity to see amazing quilts and pillowcases-- yes, antique
pillowcases. more than a dozen PAIRS of pieced and appliqued antique
pillowcases! These CDs are wonderful. The quilts are beautiful. The photography
is clear. You'll see quilts here like you have seen nowhere else, because
they are mostly in private collections are shown rarely. If your pocketbook
allows, buy both CDs. The images are terrific. You'll laugh! You'll cry!
You may even drool (just a wee bit).
You'll be amazed!

Truly, these CDs are well worth the price and I think they are a bargain!
Many of my old quilt books have had to be rebound. I look through them and
read them often, and I love them to death! Well, if CDs were like books, I
would have worn out last year's CD already.

Many grey days last winter, I set the Burlington CD on my PC as a slide
show, and just let quilts glide past all day long as I went about my
business. The parade of antique quilts was a great way to lift my spirits and make
my heart sing.

Bright blessings!
~Donna Laing

_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_
(http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)









-------------------------------1255262501--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 10, 2009
From: zegrtquiltaol.com
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 12:41:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3


----------MB_8CC18A8D9EB23DA_38F8_1E81D_webmail-m081.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


Thanks to Maureen as well because she is always so gracious in answering my quilt history questions.. and I am sure there will be more.. My best and appreciation , Shelly Zegart







-----Original Message-----
From: Quilt History List digest <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
To: qhl digest recipients <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Sun, Oct 11, 2009 12:01 am
Subject: qhl digest: October 10, 2009










QHL Digest for Saturday, October 10, 2009.

1. Another great story about quilts helping those going blind
2. RE: big ticket books
3. Quilts in Movies
4. I have to thank some people today.
5. Regional Quilt Study Day CD - Last Call

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Another great story about quilts helping those going blind
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Fri, 09 Oct 2009 21:54:58 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

http://www.psfk.com/2009/10/pics-emily-fischers-tactile-quilted-maps.html

Karen Alexander in the Islands




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: big ticket books
From: Ady Hirsch <adamroninetvision.net.il>
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2009 09:26:28 +0200
X-Message-Number: 2

Yes, some of them are selling for rather insane prices, although most can be
bought used quite reasonably. As far as I know, the priciest are Down by the
Old Mill Stream (Rhode Island), A Maryland Album, First Flowerings Early
Virginia Quilts. I have no idea what makes a book so expensive, other than
the printing of a limited edition. The written content of the Rhode Island
book, for example, is excellent, yet the quilts selected for photography are
mediocre, disappointing even.
Most of the other state project books can be bought quite reasonably (used
or sometimes new) from Amazon, www.abebooks.com. www.alibris.com etc.
Ady in Israel

Subject: big ticket books
From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Oct 2009 08:58:05 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

At the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Study Day last week, I learned that the New
Jersey quilt book is now selling for big bucks.
Can any one tell me what other documentation books are in a similar league?

when i first became interested in antique quilts and the fabrics that help
date them, my husband purchased (at my request) a book from the smithsonian
-- calicos and chintz -- which i have seen well over the $100 price at
amazon and other online stores. i printed out a page and stuck it in the
book so that hopefully it will never be sold for $1 at a garage sale.
patti







----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts in Movies
From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com>
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2009 11:17:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi All,
Couldn't help but notice this quilt (in between the lovely Welsh Men's
traditional choral singing) in the movie, "How Green was my Valley", with
"master Roddy McDowall", seen last night. While he is in bed by the
window, he's covered in a barely visible Double Wedding Ring quilt. Of
course, the accessories and costumes were a bit vague for a specific date
as well, but it certainly seemed that the "flavor" of the set denoted
early 1900s......

Also -- did someone already mention "Annie Hall" as a quilt spotted movie?
There was a quilt on the bed of the place they stayed in on the island,
where they had the great scene of putting the "escaped" lobster into the
pot.....

Martha Spark
Roseburg, OR
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: I have to thank some people today.
From: "Maureen" <maureenbooksandoldlace.com>
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2009 11:02:05 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

I have to thank some people today.

When I moved to Oregon in 2001, I finished up the quilt in the frame, a
bear's claw for my parents, and that's the last quilting I did. My =
quilting
space had morphed into a general purpose, shared workroom. I didn't have =
a
table large enough for the rotary mat, a large clear wall to lay out the
blocks, space to leave colors and patterns in view to dream about. =
Whenever
I felt an impulse to put colors and patterns together, I designed a new
website using those colors, or edited video that required a particularly
focused effort.=20

But quilting is about more than space. It's about peace of mind. It's =
about
remembering.=20

Yesterday Ed and I pulled my Heritage Quilt Frame out of storage. I =
finished
off the last block in a quilt that I started in a 1998 class with Mary
Waller in Vermillion, South Dakota. I pieced the backing from stash and
pulled batting from the closet. It took us week to position the quilt on =
the
rails.

Thanks to Mary Waller who made me iron when I didn't want to, to the
quilting ladies at the Wayne Nebraska Senior Center, to Shelly Zegert =
who
keeps asking me quilt history questions, to Kris who's kept me connected
through QHL, to my local friends in quilting Elaine, Max and Darlene, to
Martha Sparks, who's moved from Salem to Roseburg, Oregon bringing with =
the
Columbia Willamette Quilt Study Group even closer and to Nell Mathern =
whose
boundless energy keeps quilting and quilts everywhere here in Southern
Oregon.

This weekend, I'll have a quilt in the frame. This quilt will be for =
Naima,
my niece of whom I am so proud, off to college today.=20

This weekend, I'll have a quilt in the frame.

Maureen.
In Ashland, Oregon.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Regional Quilt Study Day CD - Last Call
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2009 16:51:42 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0141_01CA49C9.F1E9DC90
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="Windows-1252"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I'd like to wind up my CD burning, labeling, packaging, and mailing this =
week.

I am taking last call orders for the CD of all the images from the most =
recent Regional Quilt Study Day of the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Study Group at =
the Burlington County Historic Society in Burlington City NJ on =
September 26, 2009.

The CD contains close to 400 digital images, many in close-up.

And while I'm at it, and have just recently learned how to create really =
snarky labels, if you want the CD from last year's RQSD, with well over =
400 images, you can order that too, for the same price.

Cost is $15.00 and includes postage

A check for $30.00 gets you both.

Respond to me for my address. judy.growcomcast.net

A testimonial from others who have received either or both wouldn't hurt =
here -- how about it?

Judy
------=_NextPart_000_0141_01CA49C9.F1E9DC90--




---

END OF DIGEST

---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: ZegrtQuiltaol.com
To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442851Alyris.quiltropolis.com
For more information, articles and archives, visit our home page at
http://QuiltHistory.com.






----------MB_8CC18A8D9EB23DA_38F8_1E81D_webmail-m081.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: turning prize irbbons into quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 11:04:38 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 4

--0-695763328-1255284278=:82236
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi all --I just had a question from a writer about quilts which feature awa=
rd or imprinted commemorative=A0ribbons sewn together into a quilt. Do any =
of you historians know of a published instruction or article in a periodica=
l=A0that instructed=A0how to do this?=A0 Most of the prize ribbon quilts I =
have seen, now that I think abiout it, include ones=A0that=A0date from the =
early 20th century, thec years indicated on the ribbons, so I wonder how th=
is=A0trend was spread then?=20
=A0
Thanks
=A0
=A0Laura Fisher
--0-695763328-1255284278=:82236--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Traveling the Silk Road
From: Gary Parrett <gparret1yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 11:26:00 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

We were in NYC recently and visited the American Museum of Natural History. An upcoming exhibit which opens November 14 is called, "Traveling the Silk Road". If you get on their website, look on upcoming exhibits to find out more. It sounds very interesting.

Karen Parrett





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: potholder type quilts
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 15:07:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6


----------MB_8CC18BD2B78DA80_B3B8_3897_webmail-m087.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


I want to know more about "potholder" type quilts. When were they first made? How are they made? When were they most popular? Are there any sites to see some of these on? Pam Weeks, aren't you the person who loves and adores these???

I think I want to make one out of reproduction fabric. What time period? Anyone have instructions?

Thanks!!!

Lynn in New Bern, NC----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: potholder type quilts
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 15:41:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

Quilt 1997.007.0569 on the International Quilt Study Center database is
a "potholder" type of quilt. Each individual nine patch block is bound with
muslin binding and I believe the blocks are whip-stitched together. That
actual
hand stitch that connects them might not exactly be a "whip stitch" but
that's what I remember. I "mapped" the signatures on the quilt and spent
quite a lot of time with it trying to solve the mystery and unanswered
questions, but it's been a while. I have educated guesses about the whys and
wherefores of this quilt's construction but no proof so I'll let it stop
with that.

At any rate, it's one you can look at online and a lovely one IMHO.

Stephanie Whitson

-----Original Message-----
From: palamporeaol.com [mailto:palamporeaol.com]
Sent: Sunday, October 11, 2009 2:07 PM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] potholder type quilts


I want to know more about "potholder" type quilts. When were they first
made? How are they made? When were they most popular? Are there any sites to
see some of these on? Pam Weeks, aren't you the person who loves and adores
these???

I think I want to make one out of reproduction fabric. What time period?
Anyone have instructions?

Thanks!!!

Lynn in New Bern, NC


---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: stephaniestephaniewhitson.com.
To unsubscribe send a blank email to
leave-qhl-1813299Dlyris.quiltropolis.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ***SPAM*** turning prize irbbons into quilts
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 15:31:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Most of the ribbons I've seen are part of Crazy Quilts. I think the
International
Quilt Study Center has one made entirely of "chicken ribbons", meaning
ribbons
that were won for showing chickens. I don't know if you can tell how it was
constructed on the IQSC site, though. . . .
Stephanie Whitson




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: potholder type quilts
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 14:35:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Lynn, would you mind sharing what you learn with the rest of us, or at least
ME!!!

Thanks!
Sharron.......................
.......in cold (haha 61 deg) and rainy Spring, TX........................


-----Original Message-----
From: palamporeaol.com [mailto:palamporeaol.com]
Sent: Sunday, October 11, 2009 2:07 PM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] potholder type quilts



I want to know more about "potholder" type quilts. When were they first
made? How are they made? When were they most popular? Are there any sites to
see some of these on? Pam Weeks, aren't you the person who loves and adores
these???

I think I want to make one out of reproduction fabric. What time period?
Anyone have instructions?

Thanks!!!

Lynn in New Bern, NC


---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: quiltnsharroncharter.net.
To unsubscribe send a blank email to
leave-qhl-1812780Flyris.quiltropolis.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: HIPV -
From: Senoperaaol.com
Date: Sun, 11 Oct 2009 20:22:16 EDT
X-Message-Number: 11


-------------------------------1255306936
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

It will be interesting to know his clarifications...

Dobard will be at the Calvert Library Prince Frederick (MD) on Tuesday,
Oct. 27 at 7 p.m. to talk about their story and answer questions. He has new
material to share since his book was published in 1999 and will offer
clarifications to questions about the accuracy of the book that have arisen
since publication.

_Click here: Quilts Played an Important Role for Escaped Slaves - Southern
Maryland News, Charles County, Calvert County and St_
(http://www.thebaynet.com/news/index.cfm/fa/viewstory/story_ID/15120)

Sue
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ribbons quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 04:57:35 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 1

OK I am trying this in rich text, despite warnings, since plain text still prints my messages with  glitches!

I am interested in knowing if instructions were ever published to use ONLY ribbons as the quilt top. It seems logical to regard quantities of ribbon as available fabric like any other, and put them together into a top. A quilt made of striped ribbons used for military commendations, another of hatband ribbons, and yet another of clothing label ribbons woven with manufacturers and merchants names are all on display right now at the the New England Quilt Museum in my menswear exhibition; one made of first, second and third place ribbons in red, white and blue with a monogram and dates is on diplay at the Houston Quilt Festival this week.

All of these quilts are completely ribbons, not just a ribbon or two or six inserted into a crazy quilt. Given my weakness about and impatience for library research, I have not (yet) discovered the published instruction that might have led to this trend. Hoping someone on the list knows! If it's not been written about from the late 19th-early 20th century era, then it may have been spontaneous generation of ideas, simple, intuitive, women's logic.

p.s. I think Pam Weeks is writing a book and doing an exhibition at NEQM of her potholder quilts. She knows all...........

Laura Fisher



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: potholders
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 07:23:28 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

--0-1836264369-1255357408:98275
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Pam Weeks is the expert on potholders; but basically there are two types--f
inished blocks and unfinished blocks. Today, potholders are known as "qu
ilt as you go". I know they were very popular during the Civil War as it
is an easy way to make a community project--i.e., the Sanitary Commission
Quilts. The finished blocks are layered, quilted and have binding; the u
nfinished blocks are layered, quilted, and no binding--someone then adds na
rrow sashing between the blocks. Half of the surviving SCQ are potholder
s as are two located prominent museums, the NEQM and the Smithsonian. Th
ey are not "SC" quilts; but are soldiers quilts. The Smithsonian's is kn
ow as the Susaanah Pullen Civil War quilt and has a very cute story with it
; the NEQM's is known as the Andersonville Quilt. Both are available to
be seen through their websites.

I am making several as part of my project to reproduce the Civil War soldie
rs quilts.
Best,
--0-1836264369-1255357408:98275--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ***SPAM*** ribbons quilts
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 10:00:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I don't know that anyone has ever found published instruction that led to
many (most) of the trends that we see in quiltmaking in the 19th century.
It's one of the great mysteries quiltlovers want to solve. At least that's
my understanding of things in general. I think we all are on a constant
search for that kind of documentation hoping to find "the source" for many
of the trends we see.

I hope someone can supply just the thing about ribbon quilts. It would be a
huge finding!

Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ribbons quilts
From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 11:11:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

I have seen 20th century quilt tops made of horse show ribbons and
county/state fair ribbons, usually in one or two related categories,
from times when ribbons used to be made of more hospitable fabrics
than acetate. Expanding on the thought, I am aware of a tradition of
making quilt tops from the ribbons gathered from funeral baskets and
floral displays. My memory is that this was a southern tradition,
perhaps discussed some years ago on this list. Again, the ribbons
were silk or satin.

The award ribbon tops I have seen were attractively arranged in
circles, blocks, and sashing strips, sewed together strip to strip by
machine. Is is possible that instructions for these were available
through home demonstration clubs or 4-H?

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Potholder Quilts
From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 16:37:20 -0400


Hi Lynn!
I have my website nearly designed, and one part will be a blog called the
"Potholder Chronicles". As you correctly remembered, I've been studying
these rare things for nearly 8 years now, and will be posting regularly to
the blog as I share my collection, my research and the things I've learned
in the last few months making them with the help of my "Potholder Posse".
These wonderful folks share information when a potholder quilt (PHQ) is
sited (my data base has nearly 70 now!) Special thanks to Lori Stubbs for
the most recent sitings! And to Don Beld for the Civil War PHQ.

when I asked for blocks for a friendship quilt, 37 of you wonderful list
members responded, and I'm learning even more as I assemble them. I could
use more blocks, and if anyone wants to make one, please e-mail me off-list
and I will provide directions.

So, in a nutshell, with lots more information to follow someday soon, here
you are:

I define a potholder quilt as one that is comprised of completely finished
blocks that are sewn together to make a quilt. Each block could stand alone
as a small finished quilt with 3 layers, top, back and some kind of filling,
but 2 that I own have no batting. They are either bound, or finished knife
edge. In all but one case, the blocks were overcast, or whipstitched
together on the back, and i use those terms interchangeably. The overcast
stitching is TiNY, with 20-30 stitches to the inch.

The earliest extant dated PHQ is 1842, but one collector had one pass
through her hands that was silk and dated 1837. We are looking for this one!
the earliest in my collection is also silk and dated 1847. They are mostly
cotton, but the Mass. Quilt Doc book has a wool one, a CW one, and a cotton
signature quilt, if you are looking for good photos.

As to patterns, use any mid-nineteenth century block and you're there. Very
common is "Economy Patch" or square in a square, Album, and un-even
ninepatch. My silk one is Lemoyne Star, and Historic Deerfield has a silk
one that is all half-square triangles.

Have fun! Watch for my website, as I will either post directions, or try to
get a book published. With Kris's permission, I'll put an announcement here
when the site is up. I've seen some very early Quilt-as-you-go techniques,
and I'll be writing about those soon, too. Georgia Bonesteel did not invent
QAYG!

Best to all from sunny NH, where the forecast holds snow for the north
country! Time to head West!

--
Pam Weeks
603-661-2245
Quilt Historian, Teacher
AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles
PO Box 123
Durham, NH USA

--0015174bdcc874ab460475c2e57e--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Potholder Quilts
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>

Pam - I cannot even think of 25-30 to the inch!!!!! Keep me posted on your doings with the PHQ.
Mitzi Oakes - from beautiful colorful Vermont (always have to say we are better than NH you know when it comes to trees turning.
Cold here with frost.....



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: mystery Civil War block
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 14:48:54 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7


Hi everyone, I have posted on the picture website a front and back photo of
potholder block I have made the old fashioned way. YES, A POTHOLDER BLOCK.
 It is a block found in one of the Sanitary Commission Quilts; but I can
not find a 19th Century name for it.

Brackman says Finley called Ice Cream Cone--but that would the be 1920's or
30's.

Any ideas out there? Best, Don


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Oxblood fabric in quilts?
From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 16:44:28 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8

Hi all,
Was oxblood colored fabric used widely, or regionally? I have had 3 antique quilts with oxblood, all from PA...coincidence? Or was the color available and used outside PA?
Thanks,
Dana

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Please do not reply with the whole digest attached
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jatt.net>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 17:06:31 -0700

It's' really confusing for those of us who are on digest. We can't tell
what was from today and what is from earlier digests.

Thanks :)

Judy B




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Oxblood fabric in quilts?
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 22:12:17 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

Absolutely! In fact, it's my impression it is used more in NC than anywhere else. Texas would be next. Usually in combination with that "tealish" double-dye blue-green and cheddar. Look at the NC book. Also Kentucky book.

Right now there is a beauty in that color combination featured on Julie Silber and Jean Demeter's website at The Quilt Complex. The late dealer-collector Sandra Mitchell handled lots of these quilts. Usually considered southern.

Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: HIPV -
From: Kittencat3aol.com
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 23:45:56 EDT
X-Message-Number: 12


-------------------------------1255405556
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

An interesting note:

I am currently taking a women's history class at the University of
Massachusetts. We had a guest speaker last week, Manisha Sinha
(_http://www.umass.edu/history/faculty/sinha.html_
(http://www.umass.edu/history/faculty/sinha.html) ), who has sterling credentials in her field. According to her, not
*one* Civil War historian gives any credence to HIPV, for the same reasons
that quilt historians do not find it credible. She asked me to explain the
controversy to the class, and of course it turns out that one of the other
students had read Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt and was shocked to
find out that it was only a story....

Lisa Evans


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ribbon quilts thanks, movie quilt
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 22:38:44 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

Thanks to all for the input about ribbon quilts. I have seen horse show ribbons framed up a shadow boxes to preserve them, and I now know farm families can accumulate plenty of ribbons from well raised livestock, so I presume the concept of prize ribbon quilts might continue on among quilters. And Xenia, now that more ribbons are made from lessest quality material, maybe it will wind up in landfill rather than quilts, so these too will have an historic niche. Remember when there was all that grosgrain at the 5 & 10?!

And just to amuse you all before bedtime, in the papers today was a color drawing from Disney's revamped, HD or something technologically improved SNOW WHITE, and she appears to be in bed, confronting a gaggle of dwarfs, while covered with .... a crazy quilt. It looks to be solid color,random shaped, probably wool scraps.Now top that, QHL!

Laura Fisher


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: HIPV
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 22:56:04 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

<<Dobard will be at the Calvert Library Prince Frederick (MD) on Tuesday,
Oct. 27 at 7 p.m. >>

Anyone living in the area planning to go and report back to the List?

Karen A.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Oxblood fabric in quilts?
From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com>
 

Thanks Gaye...this most recent quilt has some of that teal blue, too!
I'll check the books and Julie's site.
My best,
Dana






________________________________
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Cc: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com>
Sent: Mon, October 12, 2009 11:12:17 PM
Subject: [qhl] Re: Oxblood fabric in quilts?

Absolutely! In fact, it's my impression it is used more in NC than anywhere else. Texas would be next. Usually in combination with that "tealish" double-dye blue-green and cheddar. Look at the NC book. Also Kentucky book.

Right now there is a beauty in that color combination featured on Julie Silber and Jean Demeter's website at The Quilt Complex. The late dealer-collector Sandra Mitchell handled lots of these quilts. Usually considered southern.

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 12, 2009
From: LinusDonnaaol.com


Subject: mystery Civil War block
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 14:48:54 -0700 (PDT)

Hi everyone, I have posted on the picture website a front and back photo
of potholder Block I have made the old fashioned way. YES, A POTHOLDER
BLOCK. It is a block found in one of the Sanitary Commission Quilts; but I can
not find a 19th Century name for it


Don, thank you for posting that block's photograph. I don't know whether
that block had a name during that time period, but I think it's interesting
that the symbol is one of the corps badges for the Army of the Potomac.
That shape cross is the 5th Corps badge. It was displayed on hats and banners
so that soldiers could identify others from their corps, especially in the
heat of battle.

That cross is prominently displayed on monuments also, including the
Twentieth Maine monument on Little Round Top at Gettysburg. The Twentieth Maine
was led by Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. After the war, he designed a
bracelet for his wife. It features a red enameled Fifth Corps badge cross
surrounded by diamonds in yellow gold. Tiffany crafted the bracelet for him, and
he gave it to Fannie on their tenth anniversary.

Point being, those corps badge shapes were powerful symbols and had
meaning and resonance for the people in that time. The symbols show up postwar,
in advertising and business logos, as buttons, embellishments sewn on
garments, in jewelry, in home decor.

A Corps Badge quilt was displayed at Show and Tell at the recent Mid
Atlantic Quilt Study Day at Burlington NJ. I went a little nuts when I saw it.
I don't think I was breathing at all. I didn't catch the owner's name and I
had wanted to talk to her about it. If you're on this list, please write to
me! I'm sort of a Civil War buff. Well, actually, I probably passed
"buff" and moved on to "Civil War nut."

Bright blessings!
~Donna Laing
_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_
(http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)


-------------------------------1255435369--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: HIPV
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 08:25:41 -0400

I would love to hear the results of this meeting. Having volunteered at the Shelburne Museum (VT) this season, HIPV was always around......I was hoping all the myths had had its day in court.
Mitzi from snowy VT



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ribbons, potholders, and oxblood
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 08:31:28 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

--001517478f98b1b16b0475d039be
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8

Hello all-Thanks for interesting topics! In South Carolina, amongst Black
churches, making a quilt out of funerary ribbons (those that came on floral
arrangements and wreaths) was a custom at least into the 1970s. My dad was
an Episcopal minister and was given two of them. The pattern used almost the
whole ribbons and was something like a haphazard Brick Road. Unfortunately
at about the same time, funerary ribbons started being made less of fiber
and more of some plastic/paper substance. In even two years' time (between
quilt #1 and 2) the quality and durability of ribbons fell and the second
quilt, while quite pretty and bright, went to pieces in no time.Potholder
technique: I think it came with the poor and practical emigres to the US at
about the time of the potato famine, particularly those who came from the
Isle of Man. The classic folded Log Cabin pattern is celled Roof Tile on the
Isle of Man still today and is made, one block at a time, and whip-stitched
together. A time-saving portable method of constructing a quilt would have
been popular in their new homeland and other folks might have seen and
applied it to other patterns, particularly if they were making a quilt as a
group.Besides, it's still true today: quilters cannot resist sharing and
teaching!
Oxblood: the default neutral color of both the PA Dutch, North Carolinians,
and Texans. Maybe it came down from PA with the Moravian settlers of the
interior of NC. These guys scouted the Winston-Salem area and started the
first cotton mill in the state with the express purpose of getting closer to
the cotton fields in the 1820s. While there was never a print plant in NC,
there were spinning mills, dye mills, and checked fabric/striped fabric, and
even string mills. Oxblood brown fills the bill artistically: a rich brown
with deep red undertones, it contrasts beautifully with Cheddar
(golden-orange) and that home-dyed Indigo look shade of blue (like Marine
dress pants). Not one crack about how I know the color of Marines' pants
please.
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--001517478f98b1b16b0475d039be--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Not in Houston but my Crazy Quilt is there
From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 13:29:35 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 7

Howdy
I won't be in Houston but the Crazy Quilt I made for the Alliance for American Quilts CQ contest will be part of the special exhibits. It brightly colored (black, white and hot pink) with Crazy Quilt spelled out in paper pieced letters, I took the challenge quite literally. I was one of the honorable mention viewers choice award winners and thank all those who voted for me.
Hope you can take a minute to look at it and the rest of the great donated quilts. They will be auctioned off to raise funds for the Alliance on eBay at the end of the month.

And if you are part of the stay at home group, you can view all the quilts
http://www.allianceforamericanquilts.org/projects/galleries/Crazy%20for%20Quilts/gallery/

And here's a link to my quilt and a bit of my process:
http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com/search/label/crazy%20quilt


Thanks for looking in cloth and/or pixels.

Sandra Starley
AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser
Moab, Utah
my antique and vintage quilts
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts
http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ribbon Quilts
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 11:04:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Stephanie said: "I don't know that anyone has ever found published
instruction that led to many (most) of the trends that we see in quilt
making in the 19th century. It's one of the great mysteries quilt lovers
want to solve."

When considering the effort to put ribbons together what comes to my mind is
the sewing of ribbons, entredeux and laces side by side to make fabric for
garments. Such skills are considered 'heirloom' sewing techniques today but
looking at clothing styles of the 19th century the practice of sewing would
have been more common.

Sewing references that are not quilt specific might provide a clue. The
original instructions that came with my 19th century sewing machines include
instruction for using accessories for hemming, braiding, gathering, felling,
quilting, etc.

I see no reason why ideas for garment sewing wouldn't inspire a quilt maker.
Proving that is another story. <g>

Just a thought!

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

Enjoying autumn's early chills. . .




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Not in Houston but my Crazy Quilt is there
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 10:24:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Congratulations Sandra! I'll look for it!
Best regards,
Sharron


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: t-shirt thanks
From: Tracy Jamar <tjamaroptonline.net>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 11:36:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

Thanks to all who responded to my request for makers of t-shirt
quilts. I have passed the information on, as it wasn't for me.

Thanks again, Tracy Jamar


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: potholders
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 10:33:09 -0700 (PDT)
 

Well, Pam Weeks IS the expert. I noted on her message that she said all
Civil War era potholders were made with FINISHED blocks. I thought I had
photos of one that showed that sashing was added; but after zooming in
on it, I can see that it was, indeed, all finished blocks.

So my earlier statement about there being two ways of doing potholders duri
ng this period was incorrect. Live and learn; but now I have to take an
entire row of sashing potholders apart and do them right! Serves me righ
t. best, Don
--0-1726478594-1255455189:86397--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ribbon Quilts
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 11:32:53 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12

Cross-over techniques were used in other needlework mediums too, such as
ruching to trim embroidered
samplers. So I think Greta's statement below is no stretch at all. A
few of us were discussing this topic in
Marion, IN, this past summer and I thought at the time someone needs to
do a paper on this topic.

Jan

Greta VanDenBerg wrote:
> I see no reason why ideas for garment sewing wouldn't inspire a quilt maker.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: potholders
From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net>
Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 18:21:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

Not sure if this is what you are looking for but in 1836 Godeys Lady's mag.
published the first ever printed quilt pattern. It was a hexagon block and
the articles says it is a good little project to teach your daughter how to
sew. And they could make it into a potholder for a gift for a grandmother
or aunt. I am not sure if I have it in my files right now but I can get an
e copy of the original page and send it to you if you email me at my email
address under my sig.
Debbie Hill-Russell
russhillbeecreek.net
http://russellhillranch.blogspot.com/



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ribbon quilts thanks, movie quilt
From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 14:28:11 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14

Hi Laura,

Well, I don't know if this tops Snow White, but there is an interesting
quilt made from Wool Pennant Flags circa 19-teens (1915-1918) in the colln
of the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum Golden, CO. Its quite fascinating and
quite heavy! Pictured in Sandra Dallas's Book, The Quilt That Walked To
Golden, p. 80.

Martha Spark
Roseburg, OR
(former Colln. Manager, RMQM)



>...covered with .... a crazy quilt. It looks to be solid color,random
shaped, probably wool scraps.Now top that, QHL!
>
> Laura Fisher
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Oxblood fabric in quilts?
From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 14:33:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15

Gaye, Dana and All,

There is another PA album quilt that I just viewed with this same fabric
combination in our study group meeting back in June. It belongs to a
collector here in Portland, OR, named William Volckening. Here is the
link to his image:

http://billvolckening.com/Bill_Volckening/The_Volckening_Collection.html#2

I also wondered about the prevalence of this color combination being a
regional thing or not. I believe Bill mentioned that his album quilt was
purchased from Shelly Ziegart, so possibly a southern connection there.
Shelly Z., if you are reading this, could you please shed a bit more
light
on this color combination and/or regionality aspect?

Bobbie Aug had a wonderful example album quilt in this same fabric
combination that she brought to her Fabric Dating class in Colorado a
fewyears ago. The color combination is so very distinct, something one
never forgets!

Does anyone know if any in-depth research has been done on this type of
color combination, like actually comparing the fabric prints in detail,
places that might have sold these fabrics, dessemination of quilts found
with this fabric combination overlain on a state grid?? Hum-m-m....
Curious minds would like to know....

Martha Spark
facilitator,
Columbia Willamette Quilt Study Group
covering Oregon and SW Washington
(living in Roseburg, OR)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: modern ribbon quilts
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 05:14:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Not that this will add to the body of quilt history knowledge, but...as
a brand new quilter 20 years ago, one who used to make her own clothes
and did embroidery and needlepoint, flunked knitting and disliked
crochet, I came across a big bundle of ribbons my parents had won for
showing prize-winning roses. My immediate, and to me spontaneous,
ingenious, and brand-new-under-the-sun thought was, "I'll make them a
quilt of these!"

Obediently, my mom has been sending me bundles of ribbons every so often
ever since. The inclination has passed, but the concept discussed in
this thread of the idea to use ribbons in this way just sort of coming
to people certainly happened to me.

I'd been feeling sort of vaguely guilty about not following through, but
the paper-like quality of the ribbons and this discussion about the
futility of expecting a long-lasting tribute from them suggests there
may be a better way to display them --- and there are hundreds, if not
thousands.

Andi in Paducah, KY


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Don's potholder block
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 06:50:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Don:
I looked on the eboard at the photo of your potholder block.

http://www3.eboard.com/eboard/servlet/AttachmentShowServlet?ATT_ID2918874&SESSION_IDkql5shkesil99m9366&NOTE_ID3899356&BOARD_NAMEVintagePictures&SITE_NAMEDestination
You had posted as unknown pattern and asked if anyone knew the name of it.
Just wanted you to know that I looked it up in my Blockbase program and it
is listed as "unnamed", but the block is there. I am not an expert in
working this _____ Blockbase program so I cannot import a photo of it.
However, I find it very similar to a Maltese Cross. When I looked up the
Maltese Cross on line, it is the symbol for a "Christian Warrior" and that
would make a great deal of sense if it were used on a Civil War soldier's
quilt.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltese_cross
The actual Maltese Cross doesn't have that center square that this quilt
block has, but I wonder if an inexperienced quilter might have had trouble
with the meeting of these V shaped cross-like shapes and put an appliqued
square in the center to hide a multitude of sins?
When I did my first swag border on a quilt, I had such trouble where the two
points of the swags meet and I remember thinking it would look great if I
appliqued a small flower and two leaves on the quilt where those swags met.
No one was the wise (except now all of you!) and I was a very new quilter at
the time. So, perhaps this quilter did a similar thing to what I did, hence
she created her own Maltese Cross variation?
Linda Heminway
Plaistow NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re Oxblood/Teal/Cheddar colors
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 8:41:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Martha Spark wrote

"......[has]research has been done on this type of
color combination, like actually comparing the fabric prints in detail,
places that might have sold these fabrics, dessemination of quilts found
with this fabric combination overlain on a state grid??"
-----------
Martha,

My own study, very tentative yet, shows many of the quilts that have ended up
elsewhere may be traced back to the Ulster Scots/Scots-Irish counties in
NC---especially Mecklenberg County (Charlotte area). This is interesting because
Mecklenberg County along with Iredell and Carrabus Counties were settled
predominately by Scots-Irish, and this color combination seems more typical of
Germanic tastes.

Possible influences in southern PA and/or in Germanic settlements in the state
must be examined. It must also be remembered that Mecklenberg County was an
important early stop along the Great Wagon Road and a place from which many
moved into the Tennessee and Sweetwater Valleys of Tennessee and into Middle Tennessee and the Ohio River Valley en route westward. Many of the TX examples can be traced back to the NC, via Middle Tennessee-Nashville area.

The tradition was strong in Texas, brought by Tennessee in 1830's and 1840's and possibly
reinforced by the number of German settlements in Texas.

I've traced quilt patterns that spread across the South back to Old Mecklenberg. The town and region was settled early and grew prosperous and outward-looking
early. Many prominent families like the Knoxes (as in Fort Knox and Knoxville
and the first U.S. Secretary of Treasury) and the Polks (President James K.
Polk, Bishop and Generals Leonidas Polk, Lucius Quintus Lamar Polk) came from
Mecklenberg County families. Sons and daughters of prosperous families moved into the Old Southwest to make their own fortunes when Indian problems were resolved, territorial land records were settled, and cotton was made extremely profitable crop by the cotton gin and other technology. The town's importance in the ante-bellum South can hardly be overstated.

Examples of these tri-colors are found along the Ohio River, especially the part
that is bordered by Kentucky. I have records of examples from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Kansas that I've traced back to NC.

These muddy solid colors replaced the bright, clear yellow, red, and green prints used by
earlier quiltmakers. I've traced the shift in colorways in Whig's Defeat, peonies and lilies.
Patterns once rendered in the bright prints begin appearing in these muddy
colors just before the CW (1850's). Most surviving examples seem to come later.

One possible explanation---the bright prints looked out of place in the
Victorian decorating schemes, even in Second Empire styles.

These three colors, especially the teal and oxblood, became very popular in home decoration fabrics and wallpapers at this time. They appeared in clearer, brighter renditions in the late 18th centuries. But the muddier hues characterize Victorian decoration, especially in popular
wallpapers and even in paints. They show up as accent colors in exterior
decorations, and they are used in stencil wall and ceiling decorations.

I've collected quilts in these colors and lusted after others. In some, it is
clear from faded spots or at seams that the blue-green is a two-stage dye
process. In others that is not clear, though it is probably true. All are not identical. Some are
brighter than others and some are close to a navy blue. Clearly the production of the fabric was not limited to a specific factory. I've seen some quilts in which I believe the blue-green was home dyed.

I believe the use of these colors along with specific patterns is one of the
better defined aspects of the history of Southern quilt history.

I also wonder what it tells about pattern and color dissemination in general, the way trends and preferences were spread informally through family and community groups in the rural South. For what is particularly interesting about the group is its regionality.

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ribbons quilts
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 9:21:25 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

The current issue (I think) of "Country Living" has a small framed arrangement such as you describe.

The "covers" I've seen made from funeral flowers looked woven. I don't recall a backing. I'm sure they were tacked. They certainly were tacky. At first I thought the one I saw was idiosyncratic. Then I heard of others. I think they were part of a crafts trend. Lugubrious and ugly at best, made by a friend of the bereaved, who then, I guess, had to spread the thing at the foot of the bed. The one that appeared in my family when I was a child was promptly picked up and returned to the maker by a caring sister-in-law. The maker was big into crafts.

Seeing that framed piece in the magazine, which was quite attractive, made me realize how many of these fads probably spring up in the too fervid imagination of some magazine staff member. Home magazine staffs are flooded with products by companies who also pay people to develop ideas for "beautifying" the home. Like the "antiquing" of perfectly good and attractive mahogany furniture and decoupaging anything that didn't move, they are often product-driven.

Now that I think of it, the same aunt-in-law who made the funerary coverlid also "antiqued" a beautiful Prudent Mallard armoire white and moved it into the bathroom. The armoire had been in my paternal grandmother's family for a century. The victim of a "crafts" fad.

Yesterday I filed some magazine materials from twenties and thirties Teddy P. had passed along---quilt patterns mainly. All the "crafty" hints were directed toward practical needs. The quilts were the "beautifiers."

My own experience in 4-H (brief) and with the extension service is that both focused more on things like home sewing, quilting and food preparation (canning, e.g.) and gardening. They were driven by real needs. They didn't descend to odd and useless crafts. The agents were smart people who took real interest in assuring a better quality of life for people in their districts.

In the South, Summer Bible Schools did and, I suspect, still do put time into the latter. The only time I taught in one, my group of 3rd graders were studying the 10 commandments. The assigned project was a 10 Commandment mobile, just what every home needs. We pasted the commandments on craft sticks and then finally rigged them up in a mobile. No 4-H leader would waste her or students' time on such a project.

Gaye

-


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mystery Civil War quilt block pattern
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 07:40:19 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

I've had two suggstions about my mystery block: the 5th Corps Cross Badg
e and a later, Brackman pattern identified from LAC, as Greek Cross.

Neither of them is quite correct--the Corps Badge has a flat top, rather th
an a curve; and the Greek Cross is made with two fabrics, while the Civil W
ar block is made with three.

But it could be a local idiosyncracy.

Any other ideas?

Best, Don


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ribbons quilts
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 11:14:43 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Gaye wrote. . . In the South, Summer Bible Schools did and, I suspect,
still do put time into the latter. The only time I taught in one, my group
of 3rd graders were studying the 10 commandments. The assigned project was a
10 Commandment mobile, just what every home needs. We pasted the
commandments on craft sticks and then finally rigged them up in a mobile.

As a child of those Bible schools I am ROFLOL. I do treasure the mousetrap
we spray painted red, adorned with butterfly sticker, and sprinkled with
silver glitter, though. I was four. My mother hung that thing on a cupboard
door handle and used it for a recipe holder for the rest of her life. I
brought it home after she passed away. . . . it was much more useful than
the mobile, I really must say :-).

Cheers and thanks for the walk down memory lane.
Wordless book, anyone?????
Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ribbons quilts
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 14:13:46 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

I have to chime in...one of my most favorite projects, ever, was the balloon
wrapped in string then coated with flour-and-water paste. You let dry, then
popped the balloon and voila, you had something...I don't remember what it
was supposed to be exactly. I can still conjure up the smell... paste mixed
with church basement and my most favorite bible school teacher, our HS drum
major, a 6'8" fellow who later became a UCC pastor.
I want to make one!
Candace Perry


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ribbons quilts
From: "Mary Persyn" <Mary.Persynvalpo.edu>


Form for a Halloween mask? I remember doing that one year.

Mary

<candaceschwenkfelder.com> wrote:

I have to chime in...one of my most favorite projects, ever, was the
balloon
wrapped in string then coated with flour-and-water paste.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: AQSG Seminar
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 15:56:11 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

San Jose was wonderful! Penny Tucker, Helen Hodak and their
committee organized a weekend filled with quilts, friends, good food at
a
great location.
First things first. The paper presentations were fascinating. The
mission of AQSG is to promote the highest standards of quilt related
studies. The topics ranged from a subject I knew absolutely nothing
about,
Norwegian silk quilts, to the "inside story" of the Stearns and Foster
Company, a discussion of geometric, pictorial patchwork and the history
of
the Rainbow Quilt Block Company. The paper on the Battered Women's
Prison
Project was powerful and disturbing. Read all this exciting research in
Uncoverings 2009.
If I could only have one quilt-related adventure each year (horrible
thought) I'd choose the AQSG Seminar. If you've never been to one you
simply cannot imagine how rewarding it is to spend four days in a place
where extremely competent women have worked for a couple of years to
insure
that you can see and talk quilts with a couple of hundred kindred
spirits.
The fact that Seminar moves around the country makes it even better.
See
the USA and the quilts to be found in the different parts of this huge
country.
The Welcome Event on Thursday evening was at the San Jose Museum of
Quilts and Textiles where we saw the Joyce Gross Collection. A grant
from
the East Bay Quilters Guild (I apologize if I have the name wrong)
provided
the most amazing selection of goodies made from food grown within 30
miles
of San Jose--outstanding. You didn't need to worry about dinner after
grazing that table.
Joyce Gross joined us for the celebration. I'd heard about her
collection, but had no idea of its depth and richness. Joyce commented
"I've had so much fun with this stuff" which seemed to sum up the joy we
were all feeling. The very first quilt in the gallery was Pine
Eisfeller's
The Garden(one of the 100 best American quilts of the 20th century).
Eisfeller's Tree of Life (also among the 100 best 20th century quilts)
shared space with several quilts by Bertha Stenge and Dr. Jeanette
Throckmorton. Joyce acquired quilts from the Florence Peto collection
many
of which are part of this exhibit. Emma Andres Lady at the Spinning
Wheel
is an icon of 20th century quiltmaking. What an opportunity to see 31
quilts from this fabulous collection which now belongs to the University
of
Texas at Austin.
Friday was study centers and tours. I took advantage of the lunch
break to go back to the Quilt Museum to spend more time with the Gross
collection. The formal Seminar begins with dinner on Friday and the
Keynote
Address. "What's So Funny" by Jean Ray Laury set the tone. Reflecting
on
the early days of the quilt revival Jean said "I remember how much we
laughed." After dinner and show and tell the vendors gave us more eye
candy
than can be absorbed in one visit. You just keep going back to the AQSG
vendors whenever they are open.
The paper presentations took place on Sat. and Sunday mornings.
Saturday afternoon Sandi Fox reprised her landmark series of antique
quilt
exhibits.
I hope that after leaving San Jose Julie Silber headed for a luxury
spa. She was in constant motion throughout the weekend. Not only did
she
do her usual job as super auctioneer (ably assisted by the Juliettes,
Dawn
Heefer, Trish Herr, Lisa Portwood, Marcia Kaylackie and Pam Weeks, a
group
of would-be Vanna Whites) she organized an exhibit of quilts from
California
collections at the hotel. Mary Brown's MD album was the star of the
show
(see p. 130 of A Maryland Album). It's a quilt we all know but to see
it in
the cloth looking as if it just came out of the frame is heart-stopping.
Star Burst (New Jersey, 1878) is made of solid color wool strips with
18"
exploding starbursts appliquE9d with blanket stitch. A 9-block
pictorial
appliquE9 (3rd quarter 19th century) of houses and people reminded me
of
scenes found on samplers. A Delectable Mountains friendship quilt from
NJ
dated 1839-43 included many wonderful fabrics and amazing inked drawings
(a
steam lathe, a bee skep a full rigged sailing ship) and lovely
sentiments,
e.g. "Give me a sense, a taste refined, Candor with honor blended, A
feeling
heart, a virtuous mind with charity attended." Julie also hung quilts
in
the ballroom (different ones Sat. and Sun.!). My very favorite of all
was
hanging on Sunday. It was a cotton Crazy made of denim, chambray and
shirtings with the message GLAD DAY NOV. 11, 1918 machine appliquE9d.
Talk
about a quilt that speaks directly from the heart!
Start making plans for next year in Minnesota!
For those of you who heard me worrying about John making the plans
for our California vacation (the reason this report was delayed) let me
go
on record that not being in charge worked out very well. I got my two
top
priorities, Alcatraz and horseback riding in the Sierras, and lots of
other
great stuff. I must tell you that in spite of all she had on her plate
as
co-chair of the Seminar Penny Tucker took time to help us plan the trip
and
her suggestions were wonderful (John has designated her as his official
travel advisor).
Cinda back on the Eastern Shore




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bible School Art
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 16:46:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

The 10 Commandments Mobile was from the seventies. Now be honest: where wou
ld YOU hang a 10 Commandments Mobile? It's not like Stephanie's painted mou
setrap recipe holder.

That one class cured me of agreeing to teach in Bible School ever again. I
would have dug latrines at Girl Scout wilderness camp first. There were aro
und 15-18 kids in that class and only 3 girls. And---surprise?---third-grad
e boys were manifestly uninterested in the 10 Commandments.

In my own days as a Bible School student, I made my first sampler as well a
s a perfectly lovely tray made from plywood and decoupaged butterflies, whi
ch I mother displayed in the kitchen since it had no sides and after all th
at spray painting, things slipped off it easily. We generally made things t
hat were potentially useful if not entirely tasteful. No tongue-depressor m
obiles.

I like crafty things, and when I went to teach at a prep school where prize
s were awarded for the best-decoreated door for homecoming, I found my year
s at Bible School served me well. We always won first or second place. I ha
d an art instructor's child in my class most years, of course. Our all-time
best, however, came when the class consisted mostly of boys. The opposing
team at homecoming were hornets and our school mascot was the cougar. One
of my feistiest and most devious students ever was in that group. The plan
was to have a 3-D (well 2.5 D) cougar bug exterminator spraying hornets. Th
e idea was to use dried ice to simulate the bug spray. They had constructed
hornets, which we hung from the walkway cover and glued to the sidewalk. W
e had colored lights and music ("Another one bites the dust"). One of the a
rt teachers helped the girls with the painting and cougar construction, so
that was admirable. The boys were on their own, and they had arranged to ha
ve the dry ice there and had rigged a way it could be "sprayed" at regular
intervals for up to 30 minutes. Then it had to be reset. Unfortunately the
dry ice idea did not work. Did not give off enough fog. The leader and his
buddy said not to worry, they had the problem solved. I was so enthralled b
y the extravagance of the whole thing, I trusted a kid whose email name was
"communistirishjew." The judges came at 3 PM, and the music played and the
cougar's sprayer sprayed on time. Only thing was it sprayed real bug spray
. They had borrowed the real Mc Coy from the custodian. Still, we won first
place. Not even the sour gym teacher who really didn't care for kids, let
alone gifted kids, could deny the perfection of design and execution.

No mousetrap, but a lot of fun.

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: potholders
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
e

Hi all,
Last week, a woman brought in a 1940s-1950s Cathedral Window quilt that was
sort of made potholder style. On the back you could see all the seams f
or the individual blocks, but they were sewn block-to-block, not with any b
inding or bias tape over the seam allowances.I didn't take a good loo
k at it as we were rushed, but now that I think about it, I don't know how
the heck she put it together. The individual backing squares had no stit
ches in them, so they weren't the foundations foreach Catherdral Windows
construction.

And, I apologize if this has already been answered (I am swamped still tryi
ng to catch up from being in San Jose and have not read all the posts) but
were Cathedral Windows quiltstypically constructed this way?

Judy Schwender
Paducah, KY0A0A0A
--0-2099193412-1255557088:66038--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re:Bible School Art - NQR
From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 17:56:52 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12

While one hates to blame Bible schools for useless instruction, I am
reminded of a faith-based group in my town who decided to make toys
for the poor children of migrants who came annually to pick tomatoes.
Accordingly, they created farm scenes involving, among other objects,
trees made from large green sponges. They were shocked and
disappointed when, upon re-visiting the scene of their largess, they
discovered the trees had reverted to very useful kitchen sponges.
It's a lesson I have never forgotten.

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Someone got it right
From: "Rose Marie Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 19:01:41 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

In the October 21, 2009 issue of ANTIQUE TRADER there's a front page article
entitled, "Understanding the Underground Railroad". It is a report on the
National Parks Service Network to Freedom's 3rd National Underground
Railroad Summit in Indianapolis on Sept. 16-19. One of the speakers was
Susan Cooke Soderberg, a Maryland researcher, who debunked 3 myths of the
Underground Railroad's use of quilts - sign of a safe house, map to freedom,
coded message.

Another URR myth that was debunked was that of the lawn jockey being used
for a signal. I hadn't heard that one before. Research has shown that the
lawn jockey (black boy holding lantern) wasn't manufactured until after
1865. This myth was also begun as oral tradition and wound up in books.
So, someone is getting it right.
Rosie Werner



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re:Bible School Art - NQR
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 22:29:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 14

---- Xenia Cord <
> While one hates to blame Bible schools for useless instruction, ......

Xenia, blame away with freedom of conscience. I've never found anything in the Christian Bible that instructs man or woman to "suffer the little children to come unto you and make useless things."

In fact, underpinning all in the Bible is a real economy based on usefulness.

From as early as I can remember, I've respected, cherished, the things people made with their hands to satisfy their needs. I felt distinguished because my great-grandfather had made white oak baskets. Few things are more beautiful in my eyes than the well-wrought double egg baskets that passed down in his family. I grew up in a tradition where no matter what people did for a living, they also did something with their hands, something useful, whether it was sewing a fine seam, grafting fruit trees or camellias, or playing a fiddle or piano. Function begets form and being guided by potential use generally precludes the tacky gee-gaws that can be turned out quickly and that serve no purpose. I think of all those painted wooden things that made up "craft fairs" of the 80's. Signs of folks with too much time on their hands, too much money in their pockets, and too little appreciation for the needs that exist in our world.

It's not just Bible schools, it's schools in general that operate on the theory that busy hands are well-employed hands. Despite all the claims that the school day is too short to work in all the classes needed for students today, anyone can walk into any school in the nation and check off the wasted hours---the classes in "self-esteem" and socialization, "instruction" in the value of community service, the "advanced" sociology courses taught by coaches that have neither rhyme nor reason nor discipline, etc. I've often thought that an hour daily spent creating something useful---even if it's a carved whistle for calling the dog or a good potholder--would be so much more productive and would generate the self-esteem that talk-about courses can never generate.

In the prep school where I taught, the plane geometry course became one of the most popular courses when a teacher incorporated the production of a quilt, which was raffled and the funds used for specific charities of the students' choice. Kids took such pride in their individual blocks as well as the completed project. And they learned to appreciate the beauty of geometry in the process.

In his "Valediction: Forbidding Mourning," John Donne wrote "as well a well-wrought urn/ becomes the greatest ashes /as half-acre tombs." Better, usually, because their creation was driven by function.

I loved Bible School because of the crafts classes, where we could talk and learn new things and make things that were beautiful. My sampler hangs on my wall today and reminds me who I am. The over-lacquered tray held houseplants on my mother's screened sun room until it finally went the way of all plywood. I became an embroiderer thanks to the sampler, and I built on the basics of decoupage to produce some objects that were both useful and attractive, that gave pleasure, both in the making and the using.

A 10-Commandments mobile did nothing like that for the poor children in that Bible School class I taught. Hooray for the women who saw straight to the real function of the green sponge "trees" ! Beautiful irony in that, isn't there?

Gaye

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mystery Civil War Block
From: "Elaine Kelly" <elainekelly63verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 18:24:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15


Don, the block is in Jinny Beyer's new book, "A Quilter's Album of Patchwork
Patterns". She cites it as "Greek Cross" as published by Ladies Art Company
in 1897 (also Maltese Cross, Nancy Cabot in Chicago Tribune June 11, 1938.)
A post-war name but a 19th C published one!

Full disclosure: I work for Jinny Beyer, but if you don't yet have your
copy of this book, you NEED one. More than 4000 blocks from published
sources, cross-referenced with all the published names she could find. All
the blocks are provided in line drawings and colored with fabric, and there
are transparencies with corresponding grids that you overlay on the line
drawings so you can easily draft the blocks in whatever size you like.
Plus, it weighs almost five pounds so you can use it as an upper-body
workout! It's a beauty and one that is just an amazing resource for quilt
historians.

Elaine Kelly
Reston, VA


------------------------
Hi everyone, I have posted on the picture website a front and back photo of
potholder block I have made the old fashioned way. YES, A POTHOLDER BLOCK.
 It is a block found in one of the Sanitary Commission Quilts; but I can
not find a 19th Century name for it.

Brackman says Finley called Ice Cream Cone--but that would the be 1920's or
30's.

Any ideas out there? Best, Don
--0-1658751062-1255384134:70284--


-




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Franklin County quilt book, oxblood/teal/cheddar
From: "Debby Cooney" <resmarcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 20:43:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 16

The answer to a recent query about a publication of the Chambersburg
Quilt
Guild is that its new book on Franklin County, Pa., quilts, based on its
multi-year documentation project, is now available from the Web site,
chambersburgquiltguild.org. The book, 93Quilt Treasures of
Yesteryear94
covers a county that is not well known for great quilts97except to the
dealers who have bought wonderful examples there for years. The late
Sandy
Mitchell was a frequent customer; she bought many of her
oxblood/teal/cheddar quilts from local dealers. A terrific quilt from
her
estate and several others in those colors are included in the book. In
fact
that color combo is seen often in the late 19th century from Lancaster
west
through York, Adams, Franklin, and Fulton Counties; it was a favorite
among
quiltmakers of the Plain sects. While Franklin produced some classic
red &
green appliquE9s, the giant Broken Star pattern, often made by
Mennonites and
River Brethren, is almost a signature design in Franklin. The book
features
several of those, along with the more typical Pennsylvania Log Cabins
and
other patterns. Yours truly has an interview in the book and would be
interested to hear reactions.

Debby Cooney
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sandra Mitchel and cheddar quilts
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 05:50:52 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

--0015173fe65018d92c0475f637f4
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8

Hello all,Am tucked up in bed on my netbook and find it wonderful that even
while at the Houston bun fight I can connect with QHL online. And, as
enmeshed as I am in all things quilty here, do feel some envy for those that
made it to the gathering. The Gathering. That's what it ought to be called,
as in a Highlands gathering. Fun, games, history, fellowship.
As a young woman, I dealt in antique quilts. I was on the front lines. Went
to the farm auctions, dealt with estates etc. Sandra often bought from me.
She was a terror to do business with> Here she'd come, at god 'o early ( 5
AM, not light yet) barrelling into your "booth" ( a swept-out horse stall)
at the Ann Arbor Antiques Market, and start pawing through your bags before
you'd even opened them officially. I threw her out of my booth on more than
one occasion but she never held it against me. She'd just wait 15 minutes
and charge in again.
I liked to make tags for my quilts that had as much info as I could gather.
If Sandra bought a quilt from me, she'd rip the tag off even as she was
stepping out of my booth. I'd ask, "Why are you throwing away all that
information someone might like to know?" and she'd growl, "I just sell the
things..." She was perversely proud of her hard as nails reputation although
I suspect she was not as tough as she acted. And she had exquisite taste in
quilts. And she loved cheddar when no one else did, thus saving and
elevating this superior color in quilts.
From an orange-gold lover
Pepper Cory

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--0015173fe65018d92c0475f637f4--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 14, 2009
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 07:30:15 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2


-------------------------------1255606214
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Subject: Mystery Civil War quilt block pattern
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 07:40:19 -0700 (PDT)

I've had two suggstions about my mystery block: the 5th Corps Cross Badge
and a later, Brackman pattern identified from LAC, as Greek Cross. Neither
of them is quite correct--the Corps Badge has a flat top, rather than a
curve; and the Greek Cross is made with two fabrics, while the Civil War block
is made with three.
But it could be a local idiosyncracy. Any other ideas?
Best, Don


Don, I'm sorry I didn't notice the arcs rather than straight edges. That
changes everything! The block is closer to the Union Army's 16th Corps
badge-- XVI Corps, MIlitary Division of West Mississippi. It was a late war
addition. I have very little information, but that cross with arced edges was
their corps badge.

Bright blessings!
~Donna Laing
Bucks County PA
_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_
(http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: useless things
From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 06:37:05 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

The Bible School stories remind me that adults sometimes are forced
into making useless things. My friend's mother, in her eighties,
went to a senior adult club at her church. One day she came home with
a high heeled shoe which she had covered by glueing on elbow macaroni
and then sprayed the whole thing with gold paint. It then was filled
with plastic flowers. The daughter called me and said, "HELP! Will you
please teach my mother to make quilts? This club is an insane use of
her intelligence."

I did teach Bridget to quilt and before her death over a decade later,
she made a beautiful quilt for every one of her many grand children.
And I was enriched by her beautiful brogue, her stories of her
childhood in Ireland, and her deep and treasured friendship.

Pat in Alabama, where it has rained daily for weeks.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: useless things - NQR
From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 08:23:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

What is it about macaroni? Beyond the idiocy of turning food into
useless decoration (remember shellacking bread for wall decorations?),
there's the demeaning use of craft. I have an adult handicapped son
who once came home from "school" wearing a string of badly painted
macaroni. It took me about 30 seconds to call the school and complain
about that sort of "craft" (which he didn't make, in any case)!

Xenia



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Those "NC colors" & Sandra Mitchell
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 8:08:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

When I posted to the list in response to Martha S. re the oxblood, teal, and cheddar colors, my post came back to me because I had not erased Martha's statement. More than 3 lines quoted from preceding post. So I had to copy my remarks and resend. The copy that went to Martha contained full text. One to QHL omitted first paragraph

In it, I noted that the gorgeous Lynn Gorges and I had been conspiring about these colors for at least 4 years and that Pepper Cory is especially devoted to cheddar and seems always to have been. (She takes some pride in North Carolina's now producing more sweet potatoes than Louisiana, that "cheddar" color being the same color as sweet potatoes, so she has double ownership). Kathlyn Sullivan also is interested by these colors and has generously shared her thoughts with me. I know there must be many who are interested in this combination, but these are the ones with whom I've had serious conversations.

I just read Pepper's post re cheddar and Sandra Mitchell---happily, with great interest. This woman is a compelling figure to me. I wish I had every quilt she owned because she owned a lot of these tri-color quilts. I've begged stories of her from people like Shelly Zegart and Julie Silber, and she seems to have been a not altogether pleasant person. I have encouraged Shelly to put together a biography of her, since the few materials remaining from her estate seem to be archived at U. of Louisville. I would help with editing, proofing, and all sorts of drudge work just to be able to know more about her. She intrigues me. Her taste for these quilts seems to have preserved a sizable number of them. That is an important contribution to the study of Southern quilts, making her an important figure in the region's quilt history.

Pepper, I find that story so interesting ----that she would not consider the information you had provided as something that would enhance the sale value of the quilts. How odd. And I really appreciated your description of Mitchell's mannerisms. Others have described that, but not so concretely or vividly. I "got the picture."

I once told a friend who knew Mitchell that I thought I was a spiritual relative of her, because I'd never seen a quilt from her collection I'd not loved. My friend said, "Never even THINK that!" She too admired the collection, but found the person difficult.

Anybody else willing to share Sandra Mitchell stories, either on or off list? Pepper's story made my morning.

We are just now reaching the point in studying American quilts that we can begin to see the valorous effects of individual collectors. Too bad Mitchell's collection could not have been preserved---at least a part of it.

Reading Cinda's remarks on the recent seminar also reminded me of the importance of collectors. Thanks for those reflections too, Cinda.

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Someone got it right
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 10:00:42 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Oh yes -- the lawn jockey was my personal crusade for many years when I
worked at the KY Derby Museum and afterward. It was absolutely a mass
produced late 19th century phenomenon. There have been some prominent
historians, sadly, who pushed that myth, and I'm not sure why. I think it
was viewed as uplifting in some way, but is even less credible (if you can
believe it) than the HIPV.
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Macaroni---oh yes!
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 9:09:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Pat and Xenia,

I have laughed until there are still tears running down my face at your macaroni stories. I cannot explain why X's sentence, "My son came home with a string of macaroni around his neck" strikes me as so funny, but it does. Its literalness makes so clear the idiocy of the thing.

And I spewed a.m. coffee when I hit the part about a high-heeled shoe covered in macaroni and then used as a planter. That seems like triple-play stupidity. If you were going to commit such an atrocity, why would you gild the lily, so to speak, by gluing macaroni on the shoe?

When my children were in grade school, our family took off for the big flea market at Canton, Texas, which was big affair then. Silver sets sold for next to nothing. Quilts. Dogs. Stolen house plants. You name it. Plus "crafts." We were meandering along, me looking for textiles and my husband looking for antique woodworking tools and our son looking for food, when we realized we had lost Kathryn, our daughter. I quickly retraced our path, scared out of my wits. I found her standing silent beside a table, totally absorbed. Not saying a word. Entranced.

"Mama," she asked, "where is the rest of the man?"

The base of the table was a boot and jeans stuffed to look like a leg. Put that baby next to a camelback sofa, and you'd have a real conversation starter.

Macaroni: that's another thing to be grateful for---growing up at a time before it became a decorative item.

gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: OT--19th century "decorative arts"
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>


All of this got me in the mind to remember how clocks were
displayed--usually in the stomach of a nude! Venus de Milo with no arms
and a clocks with arms, there has to be something to that! sorry, it's
just me this AM
Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: invitation to the Eastern Shore
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 11:00:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

On Wednesday, Oct. 28 the Eastern Shore Quilt Study Group is
sponsoring an "Afternoon of Crib Quilts" with Debby Cooney and Polly
Mello
to benefit AQSG. We will meet at the Caroline County (MD) Public
Library in
Denton from 1 to 4 p.m. All are welcome. If you'd like more
information
please contact me privately.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Crafts 1960s and 1970s
From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com>

LeeWardsof Elgin, Illinois employed designers - several in fact.They
had a head in-house needleart designer from almost the beginning.They
had an in-house"ecology" designer (late 1960s - 1970s) -- all of her
things were made and sold as kits from things you could find "from nature"
such as seashells etc. Ecology Art - Very Groovy.

Then there is tramp art....remember that?

Sue

0A0A0A
--0-1806798866-1255618685:83790--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Macaroni---oh yes!
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 10:16:40 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11


First of all, I would like to begin a concern group to protest the abuse of
perfectly good high heeled shoes. Honestly!!!!

Next, may I suggest that a book on the many uses of macaroni belongs on the
rack at Barnes & Noble next to the Duct Tape book. If it hasn't been done,
it should be. I remember macaroni angels from Bible school. To hang as
Christmas tree ornaments.

Thank you all for the smiles this week. Now to begin my crusade on behalf of
stilettos. . . .. :-)
Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Weird stuff
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
 


This is a postscript to my previous post. While mentally processing i
mages of macaroni covered shoes, etc, a term popped into my consciousness t
hat used to be used to describe such finds at yard sales and flea markets.

"Gormy". As in, that is "really gormy". Ugly, useless, and not a litt
le disturbing. Anyone else remember that word? Susan

--0-1901078069-1255620216:5007--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Weird crafts
From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>
 


Sort of an aside, but it is getting close to Halloween. I always thought
that the elaborate 19th c. ornaments and jewelry made out of hair of a bel
oved deceased was truly creepy. I can get my head around a lock of hair
in a vellum envelope, or something similar - but the labor and obsession re
quired to make these strikes my late 20th c. sensibilities as just weird.

Now I want to know - what other really weird, useless items have we witness
ed, or been coerced into making? The macaroni strings and shoe are a new
low. But funny!

I did have to get rid of the macaroni decorated Christmas tree shape that o
ne of my boys made in nursery school. It wasn't SO bad- the mice liked i
t!

I also agree that opportunities to make something useful are important elem
ents of education. Time spent seeing and doing and getting a tangible pr
oduct of use to someone is an important way of "getting" the intangible and
distant lesson that education, practice, persistence and skill are tools w
hich result in someONE worthwhile - a better person.

Susan




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re:gormy
From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 11:35:08 -0400


There's a perfectly useful English word: gormless -

Pronunciation: \CB88gC8AFrm-lC999s\
Function: adjective
Etymology: alteration of English dial. gaumless, from gaum attention,

understanding (from Middle English gome, from Old Norse gaum, gaumr) +

-less
Date: 1883
chiefly British : lacking intelligence : stupid

E28094 gormC2B7lessC2B7ness noun chiefly British



It clearly defines sticking macaroni where it does no good. Form
follows function.



And now...back to oxblood, teal, and gold as widely regional colors?

Xenia

--Apple-Mail-1-288318078--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Macaroni---oh yes!
From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 12:10:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15

speaking of duct tape - last year just as we were ready to leave on a
cruise, my breast prothesis cracked open. You should have heard my husband
howl as I duct taped it back together.
Shari in NC
----- >
> Next, may I suggest that a book on the many uses of macaroni belongs on
> the
> rack at Barnes & Noble next to the Duct Tape book. If it hasn't been done,
> it should be. I remember macaroni angels from Bible school. To hang as
> Christmas tree ornaments.
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Macaroni---oh yes!
From: hknight453aol.com
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 12:51:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 16

My father used three minute epoxy to glue teeth back into his plate.
I think duct tape is a legitmate tool. It makes a great mender for
cracked vinyl seats and such.
Ha anyone ever seen pre-1950 quilts made with scraps in only one or
two colors? I would like to do a Broken Dishes quilt in blue and pink
feedsack flower prints,and wondered if this would be too odd.

Heather in RI


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Crafts 1960s and 1970s
From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 11:49:14 -0500
X-Message-Number: 17

Well I don't remember it since I am not old enough to remember it but I do
know about it. In fact I was thinking about that when you all were talking
about macaroni art. Its funny how what we thought was so cool at one time
and now we think "What were they thinking?"
Debbie Hill-Russell
russhillbeecreek.net
http://russellhillranch.blogspot.com/


Then there is tramp art....remember that?

Sue





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bible School Projects
From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net>
 



Couldn't resist adding my two most remembered Bible School projects to the list. We painted the 6 oz. Coke bottles and decorated them with decals and put sprinkler tops on to sprinkle the clothes for ironing! come on, I'm not that old, but doubt that many people seeing that today would know what it is for. Our fabric finishes have become very good. We also wove a mat/pillow out of strips of newspaper and covered them with fabric. Supoosed to make easier sitting at baseball and football games. It was fun and my mother still had her sprinkler when she was moving and we cleaned out her house. It was relegated to the barn for storage, but still in working order!
Thanks, Gaye, for the walk down memory lane!
Judy Knorr

--Boundary_(ID_QWeyy/AgKOVttydbHgdQ4Q)--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Regarding duct tape and quilts
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 10:54:17 -0700
X-Message-Number: 19

Someday, I expect that we may see duct tape in quilts dating from the last part of the twentieth century. Before my sewing days, I used it to hem skirts and pants all of the time. One of the best uses was devised by my own husband.
He incurred a large U-shaped laceration on the back of his hand a few years ago. Did he tell his ER nurse/wife about it? No. He waited until it was too late to be sutured. Then, he applied duct tape for about a week. He had to soak off the tape and the cut had healed beautifully. No infection was getting through that barrier.
From Connecticut, where it is snowing. sue reich
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Macaroni
From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1san.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 08:43:15 -0700
X-Message-Number: 20

As I read these posts on crafts, a tune keeps up a refrain in my mind.
"Stuck a feather in his cap...and called it macaroni"
Apt to our discussion.
Regards to all on a fallish feeling morning in Poway CA,
Julia Zgliniec



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Shows in Hawaii
From: Loretta Woodard <lwoodardhawaii.edu>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 10:05:57 -1000
X-Message-Number: 21

There are not one but TWO quilt shows opening this month in Honolulu.

At the Mission Houses Museum, the exhibition is called: Hawaiian Flag

Quilts: Legacy of Patriotism
Exhibition dates: October 16, 2009 96 January 2, 2010
http://www.missionhouses.org/mhm/?q3Dnode/13
In celebration of Hawai91i92s 50th anniversary of statehood, the
museum
honors the concept of patriotism that is such an innate part of
American heritage. Nowhere is this more apparent than within
Hawai91i92s Flag Quilt traditions that have become so popular in the

islands. Created in the later part of the 19th century as a form of
political protest, Hawaiian Flag Quilts are still being made today.
Mission Houses Museum will feature its own historic collection of
Hawaiian Flag Quilts along with modern and contemporary works on
special loan for the exhibition.

At the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the exhibition opening in the Textile

Gallery is called In Honor of Grandmother.
Exhibition dates: October 22, 2009-January 31, 2010
http://www.honoluluacademy.org/cmshaa/academy/index.aspx?id3D4872
The Honolulu Academy of Arts often receives gifts from people who
donate cherished items in honor of their grandmothers. The loving act

spurred Sara Oka, Textiles Collections Manager, to curate the upcoming

exhibition In Honor of Grandmother.

93The inspiration behind the exhibition came from a Hawaiian quilt that

was donated to the Academy in 2007, by Thane Pratt,94 says Oka. 93This

quilt belonged to his mother, Brenda Cooke Pratt, who inherited it
from her grandmother97Anna Rice Cooke, the founder of the Academy.94

The beautiful quilt, Ka ohu o Halemano (The Mists of Halemano), made
by Mrs. Ella Victor, is just one of 40 works that has a rich island
family history behind it. Also on view will be a crazy quilt that
belonged to two-time Republican senator for Hawai91i92s Territorial

Legislature Joseph Farrington97his grandmother made it during the Civil

War while awaiting her husband92s return.

It is fascinating to trace the histories of the objects. Also on view

will be two feather lei that the British naturalist, R.C. Perkins gave

the Academy in 1951. They belonged to King Lunalilo92s grandmother,
Princess Miriam Kalakua Kaheiheimaile. They then came into the
possession of H.G. Crabbe, who was postmaster of Hawai91i and was later

appointed court chamberlain to Lunalilo. Crabbe gave the lei to
Perkins92 wife, Zoe.

93Many of the gifts in the exhibition were inherited from a
grandmother, or were made or collected by a grandmother,94 says Oka.

93Grandmothers are voices of the past, role models of the present and

they open the doors to the future. Her words are the golden threads
that bind families.94

Oka conducted hours of research in preparation for the show, finding
out the artistic and personal details of each piece. For example,
Academy Film Curator Gina Caruso is lending as a promised gift, a
quilt her great grandmother made in Arkansas. Oka92s research revealed

that the pattern Caruso92s grandmother used is called the Fly Foot,
which is an adaption of the architectural design element known as
Greek fret or fylfot, which was commonly used in early America as trim

for porticoes, eaves, mantelpieces and staircases.

Through items as diverse as an 91ahu91ula (Hawaiian feather cape), an

intricately embroidered Korean satin case, christening gowns, and a
lace wedding gown, the exhibition illustrates how the making of cloth

is often a result of the division of labor, marking relationships
within a family, honoring reciprocal ties and forming familial
alliances. Textiles are also offerings from loans and exchanges across

bloodlines resulting in ancestral gifts handed down through generations.

The garments, accessories and furnishing items in In Honor of
Grandmother are testimony to how we use them to celebrate life cycles

and how they are an intimate connection to the lives of people and
integrated family traditions.

Special programming

December is for Grandmothers: Throughout the month of December, people

can bring their grandmother to see the exhibition and get in for free.

A $20 savings. Applies to the grandmother and grandchild only97not
whole families.